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Is Gluten Free Bread Good For Type 2 Diabetes

Maintaining Blood Sugar | The Gluten Connection

Maintaining Blood Sugar | The Gluten Connection

[twitter-follow screen_name=’kgalliett’ link_color=’00ccff’] That is a giant gummy bear in the picture. Consuming that would be 1 very bad way to regulate your blood sugar. Let’s talk about another… You probably know that if you eat foods that spike your blood sugar, that’s not good. You may not totally “get” why, but you get the idea…high blood sugar means you ate something that was sugary, and at some level, you know that is not good for you. Right? ok. So did you know this?…. Whole wheat bread raises your blood sugar MORE than 2 Tablespoons of sugar. It doesn’t matter if it’s fancy 9-grain or the weird wheat bread that is white (gotta trick those kiddies who only want white bread!) Whole wheat bread is a high glycemic index food, and was the main food cardiologist, Dr. William Davis, removed from his patients’ diets when he was trying to help them avoid obesity & its’ related diseases (namely, diabetes and heart disease). The curious side effect of doing this? His patients reported back in the following months with not just normalized blood sugars (diabetics became NON-diabetics, no sign of the disease at all & no more need for medication!) but they also reported back with: *major weight losses *skin rashes they’d had for decades were suddenly gone *acid reflux clearing up entirely, rheumatoid arthritis pain improved & disappeared *asthma symptoms were eliminated *deeper sleep & greater focus was reported *athletes reported more consistent performance *and even irritable bowel syndrome so severe a patient was looking at a colon removal – healed within 1 year Many of his patients were NOT intolerant to gluten based on a blood or saliva test – yet they STILL improved their overall health by removing wheat/gluten from their diet. Have Continue reading >>

Ask The Experts: Eat Gluten-free For Type 2 Diabetes?

Ask The Experts: Eat Gluten-free For Type 2 Diabetes?

Q: “I was wondering if gluten-free products would be a healthier option for my husband, who has type 2 diabetes?” Narelle, via email A: HFG dietitian Zoe Wilson says: “Being diagnosed with diabetes may mean that you need to change the type of carbohydrate foods you are eating, particularly when it comes to grain-based foods. Unless you are diagnosed with coeliac disease at the same time, however, there is no need to choose gluten-free bread, cereal, pasta or other products. The most important thing is to choose whole grain foods that are low-GI, such as multigrain bread, pasta, muesli or high-fibre cereal. Low-GI carbohydrates are more slowly absorbed into the blood, making it easier to control blood sugar levels and also keep you more satisfied with a smaller amount of food if you need to lose some weight. Unfortunately, gluten-free products can actually be lower in fibre and higher-GI than regular products, so they may make controlling blood sugar levels more difficult.“ Continue reading >>

Could A Gluten-free Diet Help Blood Sugar?

Could A Gluten-free Diet Help Blood Sugar?

Controlling blood sugar is of utmost importance to people with diabetes. This can be a frustrating task. Some people, like this writer, find it exceedingly difficult to bring blood glucose into a healthy range. What can they do to help blood sugar? Wrestling with Recalcitrant Blood Sugar: Q. I am diabetic. I am on an insulin pump and take two medications to control blood sugar. About a year ago, I could not get my blood sugar down below 225 no matter what I did. When I started getting diarrhea all the time, I thought I might have a gluten allergy so I went gluten free. That took care of the diarrhea, but here is the surprising part: it dropped my blood sugars over 100 points! My insulin dose is now lower and I’m getting consistently good blood sugar readings. Has anyone else reported that a gluten-free diet can help blood sugar? Avoiding Gluten to Help Blood Sugar: A. Several years ago we interviewed Richard Bernstein, MD, on our radio show. He is a type 1 diabetic who specializes in treating diabetes. He insists that a very low-carbohydrate diet, which might be achieved by going gluten free, can help control blood sugar. You can learn more about his perspective from his book, Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. If you think about the foods that are rich in gluten, you have bread, pasta, crackers, cookies, pretzels and beer. Simply substituting gluten-free versions for these high-carb foods might not help blood sugar, but avoiding them completely might be quite useful. Continue reading >>

Chasing The Perfect Bread For A Diabetic Diet

Chasing The Perfect Bread For A Diabetic Diet

Since the day I learned that carbohydrates were the culprit for raising blood sugar, I have been trying to find a way to keep eating them. The reason? I love carbohydrates. There are diets that have little or no bread, fruits, or vegetables, and some people with diabetes use them. It would be simple to eliminate most carbs from your life and live on protein and fats. But I will not do it. Keeping carbohydrates in my eating plan is a challenge, but it is worth it to me. The thought of living without them makes the future seem gray and empty. Carbs add color to my life. Since I made this decision, I have been looking for the best carbs. There is plenty of advice for people with diabetes, as well as people who just want to lose weight, about which carbohydrates to eat. So why have I found this so difficult? One problem is that the glycemic index, which ranks foods according to their impact on blood sugar, is not absolute. What fuels the changes in advice? For one thing, research has uncovered the vital importance of fiber, its impact on carbohydrate digestion, and the amazing way it helps control blood sugar. The big news today is that vegetable fiber encourages the growth of good bacteria. Where do we find all of this wonderful fiber? It comes from carbohydrates. Hurrah! Another problem with deciding what to eat is conflicting information. The American Diabetes Association and American Heart Association often agree on what is best, targeting calories as an important area of focus. Needless to say, they both advise that we limit high-calorie carbohydrates like desserts. But they encourage including wheat in your diet. Whole wheat is best, they say. But trying to find a good whole wheat bread turns out to be tricky, since bread labels can be confusing. A dismaying number of Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. White Bread Refined starches — white bread, white rice, white pasta, and anything made with white flour — act a lot like sugar once the body starts to digest them. Therefore, just like sugar, refined starches interfere with glucose control and should be avoided by those with diabetes. Whole grains are a better choice because they’re richer in fiber and generally cause a slower, steadier rise in blood sugar. Instead of white bread or a bagel for breakfast, opt for a toasted whole grain English Muffin (topped with a slice of reduced-fat cheese or scrambled egg for protein). At lunch and dinner, replace white carbs with healthier whole grain options such as brown or wild rice, barley, quinoa, and whole-wheat bread to minimize the impact on your blood sugar. Even high-quality, whole grain starches elevate blood glucose to some degree, so it’s still important to limit portions — stick with ½ to ¾ cup cooked grains or just 1 slice of bread at meals. Continue reading >>

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Have you ever stood in the middle of a see-saw, right over the center with one foot on each side? Trying hard not to put more weight on one side to keep it stable? Unless you are incredibly focused, it can be very difficult to keep a proper balance without one side touching the ground. The struggle is similar when trying to balance two medical conditions, such as diabetes and celiac disease. While each one has specific needs, they both need to stay balanced which can be hard to achieve. This article explains celiac disease and its relationship with diabetes. What is celiac disease? It’s a condition where the body recognizes gluten, a protein found in some foods, as a poison. The body tries to attack it to prevent it from being digested and entering into the bloodstream. When someone with celiac eats gluten (which is found in foods that are made with rye, wheat, or barley), the small intestines react by changing the lining. Normally, there are long, fingerlike structures that line our intestines that absorb the nutrients in the food that we eat. With celiac disease, those finger-like structures become flat to protect the body from absorbing the gluten. Additionally, the gut stops making digestive enzymes, to also prevent from any absorption. The image below gives a good illustration of what happens in the small intestines when gluten is eaten. The problem with this is that over time, it permanently damages the small intestines and prevents nutrients and vitamins from being absorbed. Long-term malabsorption can cause issues such as: Osteoporosis Anemia Infertility Organ disorders Delayed puberty Stunted growth Inability to gain weight Weak tooth enamel Seizures Depression Currently, 1 in 133 healthy people have celiac disease, and that number seems to be increasing. Bec Continue reading >>

Gluten And Diabetes: The Headlines Get It Wrong Again

Gluten And Diabetes: The Headlines Get It Wrong Again

Another study was released recently that purports to “prove” that gluten-free diets are associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes. As with many studies of this type, the findings were misinterpreted but fed into the media’s continual need for titillating headlines. I thought this hubbub would pass by now, but reports about this study (such as this piece of tripe from The Washington Post) seem to be gaining more traction than usual, fueling the misunderstanding and misinformation that plagues nutritional thinking. While I thought this would just pass, it looks like it will not and I’m therefore posting my comments. First, a few words about epidemiological studies of the sort this group used, the Physicians’ Health Study population of health professionals. The participants were asked diet questions, then health status was tracked over several years. Putting aside the imprecision of such dietary recall questionnaires, we know that such studies simply cannot—no matter how large the study, no matter how meticulous the questions—establish cause-effect relationships; they can only suggest a potential association. The purported 13% difference in type 2 diabetes incidence is minor, given the dramatic imprecision of epidemiological studies; confident associations are typically much larger than this: 40% or 50%, for instance. This does not stop, of course, media people, who are journalists at best, paid marketing people for the grain industry at worst, to propagate their misinterpretations. To further illustrate the problems inherent in epidemiological studies, let’s pretend that we want to establish whether a Toyota Prius is a safer car to drive than a Corvette. We therefore identify 1000 Prius drivers and 1000 Corvette drivers. We then ask the drivers ev Continue reading >>

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

Should I Start Following A Gluten-free Diet?

Should I Start Following A Gluten-free Diet?

I have had type 1 diabetes for 20 years. In the past, none of my doctors have suggested that I follow a gluten-free diet. My new doctor and pharmacist have both proclaimed the advantages of this kind of diet. Is there any merit to going gluten free when you have diabetes? Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets Are Not Actually Linked To Diabetes

Gluten-free Diets Are Not Actually Linked To Diabetes

In the pantheon of fad diets, there is perhaps none more hated on than gluten-free. And despite how annoying fad dieters are (if I hear one more person order a salad because they’re ‘gluten-free’ and then ask for croutons…), it’s not unreasonable to want to avoid foods that might possibly be bad for you. But is gluten actually bad for people who don’t have a problem with it? There’s no real evidence that avoiding gluten leads to tangible health benefits, assuming that you don’t have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. But there also haven’t been many studies that actually asked that question—there’s just not much information out there. On Thursday we got some preliminary answers...kind of. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done People who eat low gluten diets are at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes, according to results presented on Thursday at the American Heart Association Meeting. It’s crucial to point out here that these researchers weren’t looking at people on gluten-free diets. The researchers were only studying associations between eating less gluten and getting diabetes. Their study size was massive—199,794 people—because they looked at data f Continue reading >>

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Managing diabetes means monitoring your carbohydrate intake to help prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. An additional diagnosis of celiac disease adds another layer of complexity to eating. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which people cannot tolerate gluten.1 Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye—it helps dough rise and keep its shape and texture. Treatment of celiac includes eating a gluten-free diet. Common foods that are made with gluten include:2 pasta; bread; cereal; beverages such as beer; couscous; tortillas; crackers; cookies, cakes, muffins, and pastries; dressings, sauces, and gravies; and wheat-based flours such as white flour, wheat flour, kamut, semolina, spelt, and wheat bran. This list might seem overwhelming, but there are a variety of gluten-free versions of popular foods such as bread, pasta, and crackers that can be found in your local grocery store. For people with celiac and diabetes, however, it is important to consider the carb count—especially because many gluten-free foods are made with flours that contain less fiber and have a higher glycemic index. The golden rule? Get in the habit of checking the labels of anything you put in your mouth or on your skin (for both gluten and carbs). Hide-and-Seek with Gluten Labels can sometimes be deceiving. Just because something is labeled as “wheat-free” does not mean it is gluten-free. Always examine labels for buzz words such as wheat, barley, or rye, and if you have any questions, contact the manufacturer directly before eating. Certain additives in packaged foods contain traces of gluten—ask your healthcare provider or a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who specializes in celiac disease for a complete list of unsafe ingredients and foods. It is also impo Continue reading >>

Coeliac Disease And Diabetes

Coeliac Disease And Diabetes

Coeliac disease is a lifelong condition where your immune system reacts to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. This immune reaction damages the lining of your gut, making it hard to absorb nutrients from food properly. Coeliac disease is more common in people with Type 1 diabetes because both are autoimmune conditions. Up to 10 per cent of people with coeliac disease also have Type 1 diabetes. If you have Type 2 diabetes you’re not at increased risk of coeliac disease as Type 2 diabetes isn’t an autoimmune condition. However, there are many people who have coeliac disease, but don’t know it. Here, we answer all your questions about the symptoms, treatment and management of coeliac disease and diabetes. What are the symptoms? They range from mild to severe and include: diarrhoea bloating nausea mouth ulcers tummy aches unexpected weight loss (but not in all cases) hair loss anaemia What is the treatment? Coeliac disease is not the same as having a food allergy or being sensitive to particular foods. The only treatment, once you have been diagnosed, is to cut gluten out of your diet completely for the rest of your life. How can I tell if a food contains gluten? New UK food labelling laws make it easier to choose gluten-free foods. By law, manufacturers must list the ingredients containing gluten in bold. These include wheat (including spelt, Kamut and seitan), triticale, barley and oats. Common foods and drinks that aren’t suitable for people with coeliac disease include: wheat barley (including products that contain malted barley, such as malted drinks, beers, ales, lagers and stouts) bulgar wheat couscous durum wheat einkorn emmer (also known as faro) khorasan wheat (commercially known as Kamut) pearl barley rye seitan semolina spelt triticale Can Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

You’ve probably noticed a lot of food packages on grocery store shelves with gluten-free labels. If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if gluten is something you should avoid. Gluten is a type of protein found in certain grains. These include wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten can cause inflammation of the small intestine in people with celiac disease. This can result in symptoms that include: It’s necessary to follow a gluten-free diet for the rest of your life if you have celiac disease. Some symptoms of celiac disease are experienced by people with a condition known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). These people don’t experience the same kind of injury and irritation to the small intestine as those with celiac disease, but gluten intolerance can still cause physical and mental problems. Intolerance to other components of gluten-containing foods — such as FODMAPs, a group of fermentable carbohydrates — may cause physical or mental problems. NCGS can sometimes lead to fuzzy thinking and depression. About 1 in 100 people have celiac disease, but about 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Research suggests that there may be a genetic link between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. Certain biomarkers in your blood that make you more likely to have celiac disease may increase your risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Both conditions have an inflammatory component, which causes the immune system to attack the body’s tissues or organs, such as the intestines or pancreas. There doesn’t appear to be a connection between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Gluten is found in many high-carb foods because they are often grain-based. High-carb foods can raise your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Low-gluten Or Gluten-free Diets Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

Low-gluten Or Gluten-free Diets Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

Does reduction in gluten consumption provide long-term health benefits? Gluten is a protein that is commonly found in wheat, rye and barley, which gives bread and other baked goods elasticity and a chewy texture. It is avoided in a small percentage of the population that cannot tolerate gluten due to Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Gluten-free foods often contain less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, such as, vitamins and minerals, thus making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more. However, recent popularity of gluten-free diets has been trending even among people without any health problems. A ‘Gluten-free’ diet has been interchangeably used to represent a ‘healthy diet.’ On the contrary, researchers have shown concern that it may actually lead to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) over a period of few decades. Although there is no scientific evidence that low-gluten will contribute to diabetes, the scientists are concerned about the long-term health benefits with the reduction in gluten consumption. An analysis of a large study of U.S. health professionals observed the effects of food on health in nearly 200,000 subjects. The study suggested that gluten intake might not exert significant adverse effects on the incidence of T2D or excess weight gain. Thus, limiting gluten from the diet is unlikely to facilitate T2D prevention and may lead to reduced consumption of cereal fiber or whole grains that help reduce diabetes risk. The purpose of the study was to determine if gluten consumption would affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten. A long-term observational study looked at the data from three big previously held studies that started 40 years ago with the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and continu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Friendly

Diabetic Friendly

Certified, Safe and Tasty! Whether you're diabetic or looking to lose weight, it doesn't mean you need to cut the carbs you love out of your diet. It just means that you need to be able to trust that the food you buy and the companies that make them have your best interest in mind. Food for Life specially makes an assortment of low-glycemic foods that have been awarded the Diabetic Friendly Seal by the International Government Accredited Organization, The Glycemic Research Institute. This means all our offerings can help you: Lower your blood sugar levels Reduce "highs" and "lows" Reduce weight Reduce risk of heart disease Control Type I and II Diabetes, hypoglycemia and hypertension Reduce the incidence of Type II diabetes Above and beyond the health benefits of a low-glycemic diet, and meeting the strict standards of the Seal, we take more precaution and all the extra care and steps to provide you with the best tasting and most nutritious low-glycemic products out there. The Food For Life Low Glycemic & Diabetic Friendly Product Difference We use only use freshly sprouted certified organic whole grains and seeds, which helps your body digest more nutrients naturally found in grains. Our products are all kosher. We use absolutely no flour. Studies have shown that grinding grains into flour increases the surface area upon which enzymes in the body can work to more quickly convert starch into glucose. We don't use any genetically modified organisms (GMO's) We don't use refined sugars. When sugar is refined and processed there are many harmful ingredients that are added to the sugar as a result. Instead, we use malted barley, a natural sweetener produced from sprouted barley, which is basically a carbohydrate comprised mostly of complex carbohydrates rather than the "suga Continue reading >>

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