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Is Glucose Intolerance The Same As Gluten Intolerance

Lactose, Glucose, Gluten: Words That Sound Similar Can Leave Patients Confused

Lactose, Glucose, Gluten: Words That Sound Similar Can Leave Patients Confused

Lactose, Glucose, Gluten: Words That Sound Similar Can Leave Patients Confused Lots of words in the English language sound alike. You probably hear people confuse words all the time. But nowhere can that confusion cause more harm than in the medical field. My 78-year-old mother, who lives in another state, recently called me to let me know her diagnosis after shed been having some long bouts of diarrhea. (Sorry, I know we dont usually get that graphic on this blog.) She said, My doctor told me I have a glucose intolerance. Hmm, Mom, replied, I dont think thats quite right. If you had a glucose intolerance, youd be diabetic. And diarrhea isnt typically a sign of a diabetes. Are you sure the doctor didnt say you have a gluten intolerance? Oh, yes, a gluten intolerance. Thats it. I cant eat any dairy products. Hold on, Mom. If the doctor said you cant eat dairy products, then you have a lactose intolerance. After much back and forth and a phone call to her doctor, I confirmed that my mom does indeed have a lactose intolerance. But can you see how words like lactose, glucose, and gluten could easily be confused with each other? After all, lactose and glucose both end in -ose, while glucose and gluten both start with glu-. The Difference Between Lactose, Glucose, and Gluten Lactose and glucose are both sugars, but lactose is found in milk and milk products, while glucose is not. Most people can digest lactose without any problems, but a few people lack the enzyme that breaks this sugar down in our digestive systems. In some people, lactose intolerance is genetic; in others, its a condition that develops later in life, as in my mothers case. When you cant digest lactose, you experience cramping, bloating, gas, and diarrhea. Avoiding the intake of milk and milk products will Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance

Glucose Intolerance

Tweet Glucose intolerance is term for metabolic conditions which result in high blood glucose levels. Pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance are all conditions which fall under the term glucose intolerant. Glucose intolerance is defined by the World Health Organisation as: A blood sugar level of 6.0 mmol/l or above whilst fasting A blood glucose level of over 7.8 mmol/l 2 hours after consuming 75g of glucose The figures above are based on the assumption that people are not taking blood glucose lowering medication. The symptoms of glucose intolerance may not be so easy to spot. The symptoms may include: Feeling thirsty Being tired or lethargic Needing to urinate more than usual Itchiness around the genitals People with impaired glucose tolerance are more likely to notice symptoms after meals. Whereas people with impaired fasting glucose will notice the symptoms through other parts of the day including during the night. Glucose intolerance will often be diagnosed by a fasting plasma glucose test or by a glucose tolerance test. A plasma glucose test is when a blood sample is taken, usually from your arm, and the blood glucose levels measured. A glucose tolerance test involves taking a set amount of glucose orally, usually 75g of glucose, and then taking your blood glucose levels over regular periods of time over the next few hours. Glucose intolerance can be treated through diet and lifestyle changes or with assistance from anti-diabetic medication, such as tablets and/or insulin. Your doctor will measure your long term blood glucose control via an HbA1c test. Your doctor may also prescribe you with blood glucose testing supplies to allow you to make diet choices and to indentify and prevent high or low blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Whats The Difference Between Celiac Disease And Gluten Sensitivity?

Whats The Difference Between Celiac Disease And Gluten Sensitivity?

The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. The question: I thought I had celiac disease but my doctor told me that I may have gluten sensitivity instead. What's the difference? The answer: Both gluten sensitivity and celiac disease share similar symptoms that are triggered by exposure to gluten, but the potential implications of each condition are different. Gluten is a protein that is found in foods such as wheat, barley and rye. Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition where the body attacks itself at the site of gluten absorption the small intestine. This response causes inflammation and damage to the intestinal wall, making it leaky and unable to absorb nutrients, which can lead to symptoms of pain, diarrhea and bloating. Celiac disease can be diagnosed through a blood test, but it is often confirmed through a biopsy of the small bowel. It can also be associated with other autoimmune conditions such as thyroid disease and diabetes. Treatment for celiac disease involves the complete removal of gluten-containing foods from the diet. If gluten continues to be consumed, people experience significant negative effects on their health that are related to the malabsorption of essential nutrients and vitamins in their diet. Over time, the loss of these nutrients can lead to conditions such as anemia, lowered bone density and in children, growth delay. If untreated, the chronic inflammation in the lining of the intestine can also increase the risk of cancer. If gluten is avoided however, the inflammatory response stops, the intestinal lining will heal and the complications can be avoided. Those who experience the symptoms of celiac disease yet have negative celiac testing may suffer from something known as no Continue reading >>

How To Differentiate Between A Gluten Allergy And Lactose Intolerance

How To Differentiate Between A Gluten Allergy And Lactose Intolerance

How to Differentiate Between a Gluten Allergy and Lactose Intolerance Two Parts: Determining if You Have Food Sensitivities Following a Healthy and Balanced Diet with Food Sensitivities Community Q&A A gluten sensitivity and lactose intolerance have very similar symptoms and can be hard to distinguish from one another. They both may cause gas, bloating, stomach pain, nausea and diarrhea after the consumption of a food containing them. Lactose intolerance affects many people, around 65% of the population, and is not an actual allergy. [1] It's the inability of your body to digest lactose, the sugar found in dairy products. A gluten sensitivity, not to be confused with celiac disease, causes very similar symptoms to lactose intolerance. Side effects of either are uncomfortable and can be frustrating to live with. Changing your diet and modifying your food choices long term can help minimize or prevent symptoms from returning. Determining if You Have Food Sensitivities Talk to your doctor. It's crucial to talk to your doctor (possibly an allergist) if you suspect you have a food allergy. They will be able to guide you on what's appropriate as far as diet, diagnostic tests and treatment. Tell your doctor about your symptoms. While a food allergy can cause some of the same symptoms an intolerance or sensitivity, other symptoms include: rash, hives, itchy skin, shortness of breath, chest pain, or even a sudden drop in blood pressure. A food allergy usually comes on suddenly after exposure and can be life-threatening. [2] Never start a restrictive or elimination diet prior to talking to your doctor or a allergy certified registered dietitian. Do not eat any foods that you think could cause life threatening allergic responses unless under the care of a physician. If symptoms d Continue reading >>

Gluten Sensitivity Vs Gluten Intolerance: Whats The Difference?

Gluten Sensitivity Vs Gluten Intolerance: Whats The Difference?

Share with Facebook Share with Twitter Share with Google+ Share with Pinterest Share with LinkedIn Share with WhatsApp Have you ever wondered whats the difference between gluten sensitivity vs gluten intolerance? The terms are used interchangeably even by functional practitioners which would make you think that a sensitivity and an intolerance are the same thing. The problem is that they arent. Each term speaks to very different mechanisms at play in your body. Now I admit that until about a month of so, I was also under the impression that gluten sensitivity and gluten intolerance were the same exact thing. Just about every website youll read (especially the big sites intended for the layperson like you) will interchange them. Doctors will also do the same thing even if theyve been schooled in functional medicine. I dont know if its that thought leaders in health and wellness got lazy or honestly didnt know the difference, but either way its time to start being accurate with how you (and I) talk about how gluten affects you. Its important to be accurate with how you talk about your health or a condition you have. Using the wrong terms to describe something ultimately undermines the trust ofthose who know better. Its like when people claim they are allergic to gluten because they are gluten insensitive (yes, I did just write the word insensitive on purpose). First of all, you cant be allergic to gluten (though you can be allergic to wheat). And second, theres no such thing as gluten insensitivity. Im not trying to poke fun here, but to point out that it becomes hard for others to take us seriously when we use terminology incorrectly. So lets take a moment to get in the know so that we can all start using the correct terms from here on out, okay? To kick off this discus Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease, Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity Or Wheat Allergy: What Is The Difference?

Celiac Disease, Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity Or Wheat Allergy: What Is The Difference?

The Gluten Intolerance Group of North America Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity or Wheat Allergy: What is the Difference? Celiac disease (CD), non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and wheat allergy are all conditions whose primary treatment is avoidance of specific dietary components. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity have many symptoms in common, whereas those of wheat allergy are usually distinct. Possible symptoms of CD and NCGS include gastrointestinal symptoms such as cramping, diarrhea and constipation, as well as symptoms in other parts of the body such as bone or joint pain, headaches, or fatigue, to name a few. Symptoms of an allergy to wheat can include itching, hives, or anaphylaxis, a life-threatening reaction. Treatment for CD and NCGS is to remove gluten from the diet. Gluten is a protein naturally found in wheat, rye and barley, as well as in hybrids and products made from these grains. Treatment for wheat allergy is removal of all forms of wheat from the diet. People with CD, NCGS, or wheat allergy are fortunate because they dont need complicated medical treatments to get well, but they must avoid the food or foods that are problematic. Lets take a closer look at each of these types of reactions to food. Celiac disease (CD)is a genetic, autoimmune disorder that occurs in reaction to the ingestion of gluten. To develop celiac disease a person must inherit the genetic predisposition, be consuming gluten, and have the disease activated. Activation triggers may include stress, trauma (surgeries, etc.) and possibly viral infections. The reaction to gluten causes villous atrophy or flattening of the cells lining the small intestine, which can lead to malabsorption of nutrients and related health issues. There are over 200 identified Continue reading >>

Whats The Difference Between Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance, And Wheat Allergy?

Whats The Difference Between Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance, And Wheat Allergy?

Whats the difference between celiac disease, gluten intolerance, and wheat allergy? Whats the difference between celiac disease, gluten intolerance, and wheat allergy? Though nutritionists tout the benefits of whole grains in the diet, introduction of more modern and processed grains has led to an increasing number of reported sensitivities, giving gluten a bad rap. Gluten is a protein composite that is found mainly in wheat, barley, and rye but its also in many processed foods due to cross-contamination. Experts find that many people who think they have a wheat allergy actually have gluten intolerance. Find out how you can distinguish between celiac disease, gluten intolerance, and wheat allergy, so you could better manage your diet! Celiac disease is a rare and life-long autoimmune condition triggered by eating foods that contain gluten. Autoimmune responses occur when the bodys immune system mounts an attack against on its own tissues. Those diagnosed are genetically predisposed, and have reached a gluten threshold in their diet that stimulated the immune system to attack the lining of the small intestine which, over time, could lead to nutrient malabsorption. Symptoms include anemia, skin rash, abdominal bloating, and weight loss. The most effective way to manage celiac disease is to avoid gluten in your diet. Also known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity, gluten intolerance is when ingestion of gluten causes the body to have a stress response that does not involve the immune system. This often results in gastrointestinal symptoms, such as abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, and diarrhea, but does not lead to intestinal tissue damage. Often, people with gluten intolerance do not have sufficient enzymes in their bodies to digest the amount of gluten consumed, and thes Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance | Definition Of Glucose Intolerance By Medical Dictionary

Glucose Intolerance | Definition Of Glucose Intolerance By Medical Dictionary

Glucose intolerance | definition of glucose intolerance by Medical dictionary Related to glucose intolerance: Gluten intolerance , Impaired glucose tolerance inability to withstand or consume; inability to absorb or metabolize nutrients. activity intolerance a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which a person has insufficient physiological or psychological energy to endure or complete necessary or desired daily activities. Causes include generalized weakness, sedentary lifestyle, imbalance between oxygen supply and demand, and bed rest or immobility. Defining characteristics include verbal report of fatigue or weakness, abnormal heart rate or blood pressure response to activity, exertional discomfort, and dyspnea. carbohydrate intolerance inability to properly metabolize one or more carbohydrate(s) , such as glucose, fructose , or one of the disaccharides. disaccharide intolerance inability to properly metabolize one or more disaccharide (s), usually due to deficiency of the corresponding disaccharidase (s), although it may have other causes such as impaired absorption. After ingestion of the disaccharide there may be abdominal symptoms such as diarrhea, flatulence, borborygmus, distention, and pain. One common type is lactose intolerance . drug intolerance the state of reacting to the normal pharmacologic doses of a drug with the symptoms of overdosage. exercise intolerance limitation of ability to perform work or exercise at normally accepted levels, as measured in exercise testing . glucose intolerance inability to properly metabolize glucose, a type of carbohydrate intolerance ; see diabetes mellitus . lactose intolerance a disaccharide intolerance specific for lactose , usually due to an inherited Continue reading >>

9 Symptoms Of Glucose Intolerance You Should Be Aware Of

9 Symptoms Of Glucose Intolerance You Should Be Aware Of

Could you be glucose intolerant? You’ll be surprised at some people who are without even realizing it. They suffer the common symptoms without ever thinking about them, believing them to be normal parts of life. It’s only when they suffer a major health problem that they realize those symptoms have never been good. You need to put your health first. It’s essential that you look out for common symptoms that indicate there is a major problem. These symptoms can be minor at first, but they will get worse over time. When it comes to glucose intolerance, you want to be aware of the following nine symptoms. Seek medical attention if you do have them. Glucose Intolerance Is Known as Prediabetes Most people right now will wonder what glucose intolerance is. Your body naturally creates this, so how could you possibly be intolerant to it? The medical term is impaired glucose intolerance (IGT) or prediabetes. It’s a term given to individuals who are at a higher than normal risk of developing diabetes at some point, especially if they continue with the current lifestyle that they have. This isn’t just about your diet, though. It could be that your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or that the normal hepatic glucose output is higher than it should be. Some doctors have linked the intolerance to the poor disposal of blood sugar from the system. Doctors wanted to remove the social stigma of having diabetes. At the same time, they needed a way to note if someone was a higher risk, as well as note those who were at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Now that you know more about what glucose intolerance is, it’s time to note the main symptoms. This will help you get an official diagnosis and help to avoid this issue turning into full-blown diabetes. Feeli Continue reading >>

Possibly Gluten Intolerance? Or Just Glucose?

Possibly Gluten Intolerance? Or Just Glucose?

Possibly Gluten Intolerance? Or Just Glucose? Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease 09/30/2015 This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc. Subscribe to Celiac.com'sFREE weekly eNewsletter What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes I am sure you've heard it all before..but well..i would like your enlightement on this. i am 27 girl with PCOS (an hormonal imbalance caused by insuline resistance), though pcos girls tends to be chubby i am considered underweight ( 105 lbs for 5.6). I know for a fact that i am insulin resistant (very roughly it's like glucose intolerance), because wh Continue reading >>

Gluten Intolerance: Symptoms, Gluten, Intolerance Versus Allergy

Gluten Intolerance: Symptoms, Gluten, Intolerance Versus Allergy

Gluten intolerance is a wheat-related disorder. Symptoms, including belly pain and bloating, occur after eating foods that contain gluten, such as, wheat, barley, and rye. Researchers often call gluten intolerance non-celiac gluten sensitivity because, although celiac disease has similar symptoms, they are separate conditions. In celiac disease, the body's immune system attacks its own tissues, triggered by gluten in the diet. It only happens in people who have a genetic vulnerability. Scientists have identified certain genes that may be behind celiac disease. However, gluten intolerance is less well understood and scientists are unsure why it occurs. Here are some key points about gluten intolerance. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Gluten intolerance is a wheat-related disorder. Symptoms include bloating and belly pain. Diagnostic tests will rule out celiac disease, while treatments focus on dietary adjustments. People with gluten intolerance should avoid eating wheat-based foods such as bread. Symptoms of gluten intolerance occur after the individual has consumed wheat. The following checklist gives some signs to look out for: It is important to get medical advice for these symptoms to rule out other causes. Gut symptoms can be vague and many conditions affecting the gut have overlapping symptoms. Diagnosing gluten problems requires that the individual continues to eat gluten. Diagnosis cannot be made if the patient decides to stop eating gluten before seeing a doctor. Severe belly pain is not a symptom of gluten intolerance. Severe pain requires immediate medical attention. Gluten is the name for the proteins that give wheat its unique baking qualities. It determines the ability of wheat dough to absorb water, stick together, and remai Continue reading >>

The 14 Most Common Signs Of Gluten Intolerance

The 14 Most Common Signs Of Gluten Intolerance

The 14 Most Common Signs of Gluten Intolerance Written by Adda Bjarnadottir, MS on September 29, 2016 Gluten intolerance is a fairly common problem. It is characterized by adverse reactions to gluten , a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. Celiac disease is the most severe form of gluten intolerance. It is an autoimmune disease that affects about 1% of the population and may lead to damage in the digestive system ( 1 , 2 ). However, 0.513% of people may also have non-celiac gluten sensitivity , a milder form of gluten intolerance that can still cause problems ( 3 , 4 ). Both forms of gluten intolerance can cause widespread symptoms, many of which have nothing to do with digestion. Here are the 14 main signs and symptoms of gluten intolerance. Bloating is when you feel as if your belly is swollen or full of gas after you've eaten. This can make you feel miserable ( 5 ). Although bloating is very common and can have many explanations, it may also be a sign of gluten intolerance. In fact, feeling bloated is one of the most common complaints of people who are sensitive or intolerant to gluten ( 6 , 7 ). One study showed that 87% of people who had suspected non-celiac gluten sensitivity experienced bloating ( 8 ). Bottom Line: Bloating is one of the most common symptoms of gluten intolerance. It involves the belly feeling swollen after eating. Occasionally getting diarrhea and constipation is normal, but it may be a cause for concern if it happens regularly. These also happen to be a common symptom of gluten intolerance. Individuals with celiac disease experience inflammation in the gut after eating gluten. This damages the gut lining and leads to poor nutrient absorption, resulting in significant digestive discomfort and frequent diarrhea or constipation ( 9 ). However Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease Vs. 'gluten-sensitive'

Celiac Disease Vs. 'gluten-sensitive'

Dec. 12, 2013 -- Its not unusual for people to say they feel much better after dropping gluten from their diets, even though they don't have celiac disease , digestive experts report. What these people describe has come to be called non-celiac gluten sensitivity, or NCGS. It's a little-studied diagnosis that has contributed to the growing market for gluten-free products, expected to surpass $6.2 billion worldwide by 2018, according to one estimate. NCGS is a wildly popular topic on the Internet, says Douglas Seidner, MD. Theres a lot of discussion, a bit of confusion. Seidner is director of the Center for Human Nutrition at Vanderbilt University. He spoke about the gluten controversy last Saturday at a meeting of the American Society for Nutrition . In celiac disease , eating a protein in wheat, rye, and barley called gluten triggers inflammation in the small intestines . The problem is that little is known about NCGS, from how much gluten is needed to trigger symptoms to whether gluten is even the culprit, Seidner says. Meanwhile, he says, many people are eliminating gluten from their diets because they think it will improve their health, even if they dont have celiac disease . Gluten helps bread rise and gives bread, pasta, noodles, and other wheat products elasticity and appealing texture. About 1 in 100 people worldwide has celiac disease. The only treatment is a gluten-free diet. When someone with celiac disease eats even tiny amounts of gluten, their immune system attacks the the lining of the small intestine. This can lead to malnutrition. No one knows how common NCGS is, Seidner says, but it could affect as many as 6 out of every 100 people. NCGS is a separate condition from celiac disease, and its not known if people with the former will ever go on to develop Continue reading >>

Gluten Intolerance, Sensitivity, & Gluten-free Diets

Gluten Intolerance, Sensitivity, & Gluten-free Diets

Who really needs to go on a gluten-free diet? You do if you have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, a condition that doctors once dismissed but now recognize as legitimate. So says Stefano Guandalini, MD, director of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center. Before you go gluten-free, there's something you should do first. If you've noticed that you react badly to gluten -- with symptoms like diarrhea , stomach upset, abdominal pain , and bloating -- see a doctor to get tested for celiac disease . Do that before you start any gluten-free diet. If you have celiac disease and you eat gluten, the lining of your small intestine becomes inflamed and gets damaged, making it harder for your body to absorb nutrients . That can lead to malnutrition and weight loss . Getting diagnosed involves taking a blood test. Depending on the results, you would also get an intestinal biopsy . "If you think you might have celiac disease, the biggest mistake is to begin a diet without being tested," Guandalini says. Quitting gluten before you get the blood test for celiac disease might backfire. By the time you get tested, your immune system might not be making the antibodies that the test checks for. "The test really has to be done before [quitting gluten]. If you don't do the test and begin the diet, your antibodies slowly but progressively decrease and become normal within 3 to 6 months," Guandalini says. Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Gluten Intolerance And Gluten Allergy

Symptoms Of Gluten Intolerance And Gluten Allergy

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which your immune system responds abnormally to gluten. Gluten is present in wheat, barley, and rye. If you have celiac disease, eating gluten will cause your immune system to destroy your villi. These are the fingerlike parts of your small intestine that are responsible for absorbing nutrients. Without healthy villi, you wont be able to get the nutrition that you need. This can lead to malnutrition . Celiac disease can have serious health consequences, including permanent intestinal damage. Adults and children often experience different symptoms due to celiac disease. Children will most commonly have digestive symptoms. These can include: Recognizing celiac disease in adults can be difficult because its symptoms are often broad. They overlap with many other chronic conditions. Symptoms of non-celiac gluten sensitivity There is increasing evidence for a gluten-related condition that causes symptoms in people who dont have celiac disease and are not allergic to wheat. Researchers are still trying to discover the exact biological cause of this condition, known as NCGS. Theres no test that can diagnose you with NCGS . Its diagnosed in people who experience symptoms after eating gluten but test negative for wheat allergy and celiac disease. As more and more people go to their doctor reporting unpleasant symptoms after eating gluten, researchers are trying to characterize these conditions so that NCGS can be better understood. mental fatigue, also known as brain fog Because no laboratory test exists for NCGS, your doctor will want to establish a clear connection between your symptoms and your consumption of gluten to diagnose you with NCGS. They may ask you to keep a food and symptom journal to determine that gluten is the cause o Continue reading >>

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