diabetestalk.net

Is Glipizide An Insulin?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Glipizide And Metformin (metaglip)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Glipizide And Metformin (metaglip)?

A A A Medications and Drugs Brand Names: Metaglip Generic Name: glipizide and metformin (Pronunciation: GLIP ih zyd and met FOR min) What is glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? Glipizide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glipizide and metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glipizide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion, swelling or rapid weight gain; pain or burning with urination; nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, shortness of breath, uneven heartbeats, seizure). Less serious side effects may include: cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat; headache, dizziness; mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, st Continue reading >>

Compare Glipizide Vs Insulin - Iodine.com

Compare Glipizide Vs Insulin - Iodine.com

3.2/ 5 average rating with 332 reviewsforGlucotrol Afrezza (insulin) is effective at controlling blood sugar, but you can't use it if you've had lung problems or smoke. Glucotrol (glipizide) is an oral medicine so it might be a good alternative for those who don't like injections. Protects your organs and blood vessels by preventing the harmful effects of high blood sugar levels. Okay to use by people with kidney problems. Available as a generic form and is relatively cheap. Afrezza (insulin) is as effective as other mealtime insulin products. Starts working faster and stays in your body for a shorter time than other mealtime insulin products, so you're less likely to have severely low blood sugar. If you don't like needles, Afrezza (insulin) is a good alternative since you inhale it. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about ways to lower your copay, such as coupons. Has a higher risk than other diabetes medicine for causing blood sugar levels to be too low. While taking Glucotrol (glipizide), your blood sugars should be checked 2 to 5 times a week, but less often once you are on a stable dose. Needs to be taken 30 minutes before a meal for it to be most effective. Not recommended if you're a smoker or if you've smoked in the last 6 months. Afrezza (insulin) only comes in 3 different strengths, so it can be inconvenient if you need a lot of insulin. If you're pregnant, you'll need to talk to your doctor before you start Afrezza (insulin). There is no generic available, and may not be covered right away by Medicare or other insurances. Continue reading >>

Difference Between Glipizide And Metformin

Difference Between Glipizide And Metformin

Glipizide vs Metformin Glipizide and metformin, both these drugs are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. What are Glipizide and Metformin? Glipizide is an oral, rapid and short acting, anti-diabetic drug belonging to the class of medications called sulfonylureas. Glipizide lowers blood sugar by causing the pancreas to produce insulin and helping the body use this insulin efficiently. This medication will only help lower blood sugar in people whose bodies produce insulin naturally but the body is not being able to utilize it well due to resistance to the insulin. Metformin is in a class of drugs called biguanides. Metformin helps to control the amount of glucose in your blood. It decreases the amount of glucose you absorb from your food and the amount of glucose made by your liver. Metformin also increases your body’s response to insulin, a natural substance that controls the glucose metabolism in the body. Difference in mode of action Glipizide is not used to treat type 1 diabetes in which the body does not produce insulin and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood in diabetes type 1 or in cases of diabetic ketoacidosis. Glipizide is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely when on glipizide. Before starting glipizide, you should make sure that it’s safe for you to take it. Inform your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease, chronic diarrhea or a blockage in your intestines, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD), a disorder of your pituitary or adrenal glands, a history of heart disease, or if you are malnourished. Metformin is the first-line drug of choice for the treatm Continue reading >>

The Use Of Glipizide Combined With Intensive Insulin Treatment For The Induction Of Remissions In New Onset Adult Type I Diabetes.

The Use Of Glipizide Combined With Intensive Insulin Treatment For The Induction Of Remissions In New Onset Adult Type I Diabetes.

The use of glipizide combined with intensive insulin treatment for the induction of remissions in new onset adult type I diabetes. Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine 92717. To determine if glipizide could enhance remission induction in new onset type 1 diabetes compared to intensive insulin treatment alone, 27 patients with type 1 diabetes were intensively treated in an open randomized trial with subcutaneous injections for one month. The insulin was randomly either discontinued (Group A) or the insulin discontinued and glipizide begun (Group B) Three patients in Group A (22%) and 7 in Group B (54%, p < .05) underwent insulin-free remissions for 10.3 +/- 4.4 and 8.7 +/- 2.6 months, respectively (p = NS). Mean blood glucose levels during insulin treatment were lower in patients entering remissions (94 +/- 3 mg/dl versus 102 +/- 5 mg/dl, p < 0.05). C-peptide levels were performed 0, 4, 8, and 24 weeks after insulin treatment. When all patients were examined, mean stimulated C-peptide levels at 4 weeks (0.58 +/- 0.09 pm/ml) were increased compared to time 0 (0.32 +/- 0.05 pm/ml, p < 0.02). Patients not entering remission had higher 4-week stimulated values (0.67 +/- 0.12 pm/ml) compared to time 0 values (0.29 +/- 0.06 pm/ml, p < .01), whereas remission patients' mean C-peptide levels remained similar at 0, 4, 8 and 24 weeks. These data indicate that a) insulin treatment plus glipizide induces higher rates of remission compared to intensive insulin treatment alone, b) the intensity of initial metabolic control may be an important determinant for remission induction, and c) endogenous insulin secretion is not associated with remission induction, suggesting that glipizide alters insulin sensitivity or is immunomodulatory in the context of new onset type Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Getting Started When most people find out they have Type 2 diabetes, they are first instructed to make changes in their diet and lifestyle. These changes, which are likely to include routine exercise, more nutritious food choices, and often a lower calorie intake, are crucial to managing diabetes and may successfully lower blood glucose levels to an acceptable level. If they do not, a drug such as glyburide, glipizide, or metformin is often prescribed. But lifestyle changes and oral drugs for Type 2 diabetes are unlikely to be permanent solutions. This is because over time, the pancreas tends to produce less and less insulin until eventually it cannot meet the body’s needs. Ultimately, insulin (injected or infused) is the most effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes. There are many barriers to starting insulin therapy: Often they are psychological; sometimes they are physical or financial. But if insulin is begun early enough and is used appropriately, people who use it have a marked decrease in complications related to diabetes such as retinopathy (a diabetic eye disease), nephropathy (diabetic kidney disease), and neuropathy (nerve damage). The need for insulin should not be viewed as a personal failure, but rather as a largely inevitable part of the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. This article offers some practical guidance on starting insulin for people with Type 2 diabetes. When to start insulin Insulin is usually started when oral medicines (usually no more than two) and lifestyle changes (which should be maintained for life even if oral pills or insulin are later prescribed) have failed to lower a person’s HbA1c level to less than 7%. (HbA1c stands for glycosylated hemoglobin and is a measure of blood glucose control.) However, a recent consensus statement from Continue reading >>

How Glipizide Might Help With Your Type 2 Diabetes Management

How Glipizide Might Help With Your Type 2 Diabetes Management

Glipizide is an oral medication that is used to treat Type 2 diabetes. The drug is available in immediate-release tablets and extended-release tablets. Patients who currently take the medication as part of their diabetes treatment state that Glipizide has helped with lowering their blood sugar levels, and it seems that the extended-release tablets are favored over the immediate-release tablets. One of the main benefits from the drug is that it helps to lower your A1C levels by 1-2%. We will discuss the benefits and the downsides of Glipizide in more detail below. What is Glipizide? Glipizide is an oral medication used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. It is available in brand-name form as well as generic form, with the brand-names being Glucotrol and Glucotrol XL. Glipizide works by helping your pancreas produce more of your body’s natural insulin, which in turn regulates your blood sugar levels. Glipizide is used in conjunction with diet and exercise as part of a diabetes management plan. Glipizide is part of a class of diabetes drugs known as Sulfonylureas, which are designed to help your body’s pancreas to produce more of the body’s natural insulin. Diabetes medication aren’t designed to cure your Type 2 diabetes, but instead they are designed to treat the symptoms of diabetes, including blurry vision, excessive hunger, excessive thirst, frequent urination and sores that won’t heal. Further reading: Usually, the first diabetes medication that your doctor may prescribe is Metformin. However, many times, Glipizide is a popular choice for doctors to prescribe because many patients find that their bodies tolerate Glipizide better than Metformin. What are the Benefits of Glipizide? Glipizide can help lower your A1C levels by an average of 1-2%. Since Glipizid Continue reading >>

Insulin Versus Glipizide Treatment In Patients With Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus. Effects On Blood Pressure And Glucose Tolerance.

Insulin Versus Glipizide Treatment In Patients With Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus. Effects On Blood Pressure And Glucose Tolerance.

Insulin versus glipizide treatment in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Effects on blood pressure and glucose tolerance. Division of Endocrinology Metabolism and Hypertension, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA. Am J Hypertens. 1995 May;8(5 Pt 1):445-53. Insulin resistance that exists in patients with essential hypertension and in those with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) may be the common denominator for the impaired glucose homeostasis and elevated blood pressure (BP) levels in patients with NIDDM. Therefore, treatment that improves insulin action may also improve BP levels. Consequently, a four-phase (glipizide v insulin) cross-over design study was conducted to determine a better effect of glipizide treatment on insulin sensitivity and the effect this has on BP in 19 NIDDM patients. Patients were subjected to 1 month of diet only (phase I) followed by 3 months of glipizide treatment (phase II), then an additional 1 month of diet only (phase III), and finally 3 months of insulin treatment (phase IV). At the end of phases I, II, and IV oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed and plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide levels were analyzed. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, glycated hemoglobin, fructosamine, and 2-h postprandial plasma glucose were also analyzed at each phase. Supine and sitting BP levels and body weights were determined biweekly during the study. With the exception of higher plasma insulin and C-peptide levels during the OGTT (area under the curve) in phase IV (insulin) v phase II (glipizide) (both P < .05), and higher fasting plasma insulin levels (P < .06) Continue reading >>

Combined Therapy With Insulin Plus Oral Agents: Is There Any Advantage?

Combined Therapy With Insulin Plus Oral Agents: Is There Any Advantage?

Physicians in many countries use combinations of antihyperglycemic agents to achieve the best glycemic control possible under the conditions faced by individual patients with type 2 diabetes. This widespread use of combined therapies, including oral agents combined with insulin, suggests that the diabetes community accepts the value of this tactic. A routine need for combined therapies was explicitly acknowledged by the investigators in the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study. Review of the results of 9 years of monotherapy with various agents in the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study found that fasting plasma glucose (FPG) was kept below 7.8 mmol/l (140 mg/dl) in only 18% of participants using metformin, 24% using a sulfonylurea, and 42% using insulin (1). Corresponding values for keeping A1C below 7% were 13% with metformin, 24% with a sulfonylurea, and 28% with insulin. Regardless of which agent was used as initial therapy, a progressive worsening of glycemic control ensued, largely because of a gradual decline of endogenous insulin production. A substudy embedded in the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study compared early addition of basal insulin to a sulfonylurea with insulin alone and showed that over 6 years of treatment the combined regimen achieved lower median A1C (6.6 vs. 7.1%) and also less major hypoglycemia (1.6 vs. 3.2% annually) (2). The U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study investigators concluded that “the majority of patients need multiple therapies to attain these glycemic targets in the longer term” (1). However, combined therapy with oral agents and insulin has not been accepted as desirable by all experts. This article describes an argument in favor of combined therapy in a recent debate examining the advantages and limitations of this approach. Because reports Continue reading >>

Which Diabetes Drug Is Best For Diabetics With Kidney Disease?

Which Diabetes Drug Is Best For Diabetics With Kidney Disease?

Highlights Sitagliptin is as effective as glipizide at lowering blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Sitagliptin is less likely than glipizide to cause dangerously low blood sugar levels. Patients on sitagliptin tend to lose weight, while those on glipizide gain weight. Some blood-sugar-lowering drugs have caused kidney problems in patients with type 2 diabetes, so physicians are especially cautious when prescribing these agents to diabetics who also have chronic kidney disease (CKD). Previous research indicates that the diabetes drugs sitagliptin and glipizide may not cause considerable kidney damage. New clinical trial results presented during the American Society of Nephrology's Annual Kidney Week compared the two drugs. Sitagliptin and glipizide act on different targets but generate the same result--they boost the effects of insulin, which lowers blood sugar levels. Juan Arjona Ferreira, MD, (MSD Corp.) and his colleagues conducted a 54-week study to compare the efficacy and safety of sitagliptin and glipizide in patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate or severe CKD who were not on dialysis. The researchers randomized 426 patients to receive sitagliptin or glipizide. Among the major findings at the end of the study: Blood glucose levels dropped to a similar extent in patients in both groups. Patients receiving sitagliptin were less likely to experience hypoglycemia--or dangerously low blood sugar levels--than patients receiving glipizide (6.2% vs 17.0%). Patients who took sitagliptin tended to lose a small amount of weight, while most patients who took glipizide experienced a slight weight gain. Study authors for "Efficacy and Safety of Sitagliptin vs. Glipizide in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Moderate to Severe Chr Continue reading >>

Understanding Oral Diabetes Medications

Understanding Oral Diabetes Medications

by Gail Brashers-Krug Today, almost 21 million Americans have diabetes, and more than 90 percent of those have type 2, or insulin resistant diabetes. Doctors often prescribe oral medications to treat type 2 diabetes, either alone or combination with insulin therapy. This article provides a guide to those oral medications. Which Diabetics Use Pills? With a few exceptions, diabetes comes in two types. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin on its own. To treat type 1, you must restore the proper amount of insulin—either by taking insulin (through injection or inhalation), or by receiving a transplant, either of an entire pancreas or of specialized pancreas cells, called islet cells. Type 1 cannot be treated with oral medications. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body produces enough insulin, but gradually becomes insulin resistant—that is, loses the ability to process insulin. Type 2 is usually controlled first through diet and exercise, which improve your body’s ability to process its insulin. For most type 2 diabetics, however, diet and exercise changes are not enough. The next step is oral diabetes medication. Moreover, most type 2 diabetics eventually stop producing enough insulin, and often cease insulin production altogether. As a result, many type 2 diabetics will ultimately need insulin therapy in combination with their pills. How Do the Different Pills Work? Oral diabetes medications attack the problem in three ways. More insulin: Some pills stimulate your pancreas to produce more insulin. The first successful “diabetes pills” were the sulfonylureas (glyburide, glipizide, glimepiride, tolazamide, chlorpropamide, and tolbutamide). These are insulin secretagogues, that is, chemicals that cause your pancreas to produce more ins Continue reading >>

Description And Brand Names

Description And Brand Names

Drug information provided by: Micromedex US Brand Name Metaglip Descriptions Glipizide and Metformin combination is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. Normally, after you eat, your pancreas releases insulin to help your body store excess sugar for later use. This process occurs during normal digestion of food. In type 2 diabetes, your body does not work properly to store the excess sugar and the sugar remains in your bloodstream. Chronic high blood sugar can lead to serious health problems in the future. Proper diet is the first step in managing type 2 diabetes but often medicines are needed to help your body. With two actions, the combination of glipizide and metformin helps your body cope with high blood sugar. Glipizide stimulates the release of insulin from the pancreas, directing your body to store blood sugar. Metformin has three different actions: it slows the absorption of sugar in your small intestine; it also stops your liver from converting stored sugar into blood sugar; and it helps your body use your natural insulin more efficiently. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: Tablet Copyright © 2018 Truven Health Analytics Inc. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. Continue reading >>

Why Some Diabetics Gain Weight - And What You Can Do To Drop The Pounds

Why Some Diabetics Gain Weight - And What You Can Do To Drop The Pounds

One of the worst things a diabetic can do is gain weight. Unfortunately, that?s exactly what many of them do - even if they eat right, get plenty of exercise, and take their medications. What they don?t realize is that those medications may be the reason they?re gaining weight. Weight gain is a common side effect from oral anti-diabetic drugs. These include Glucotrol or glipizide. Glipizide triggers the pancreas to secrete insulin and use it efficiently. This lowers your blood sugar levels. The good news is you can avoid this weight gain or melt away those extra pounds by taking enough of a safe supplement. And you can find it in any health food store. The nutrient is chromium. You may be familiar with using chromium to help regulate blood sugar. In fact, you?re probably taking a few hundred micrograms of it already. But this isn?t nearly enough to cancel out this weight gain. You may need to take much more. In a study published in Diabetes Care, researchers followed a few dozen patients with type-2 diabetes. All of them were taking glipizide. They gave half of them 1,000 mcg of chromium picolinate a day for six months. Most multivitamins have only 200 mcg. They gave the control group a placebo along with glipizide. Continued Below... How to beat almost any health problem... by rejuvenating every single cell in your body! This European breakthrough can reverse the effects of aging in your body's cells. Studies show it leads to healthier cholesterol, a sharper memory, a stronger liver and more. At the end of the study, the patients who took glipizide with the placebo gained about five pounds. They also had substantially more abdominal and body fat. Those who took the chromium gained either nothing or up to two pounds, had a significant loss of body fat, and had lower blo Continue reading >>

Glipizide Vs Insulin

Glipizide Vs Insulin

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I was diagnosed in 10/07 and have been on glipizide and metformin ever since. After reading about the possible heart and pancreas cell damage done by glipizide, and after spending more than a year trying to guess the right amount to eat at the right time to keep from going hypo (and several very scary lows)..I am wondering if insulin might not be easier to use?? Some doctors now advocate early use of insulin for exactly the reason you state - to prolong the activity of the islets. However, you will be still faced with the same problem - learning how to adjust your food intake to match your insulin dose. For years I kept a food log along with my insulin log and registered all I ate with it's carbs and calories. I now know pretty much how many carbs I'm eating at a meal and can keep my intake pretty consistent. Some doctors now advocate early use of insulin for exactly the reason you state - to prolong the activity of the islets. However, you will be still faced with the same problem - learning how to adjust your food intake to match your insulin dose. For years I kept a food log along with my insulin log and registered all I ate with it's carbs and calories. I now know pretty much how many carbs I'm eating at a meal and can keep my intake pretty consistent. If you are on basal/bolus (MDI) then you can adjust your basal to match your food, instead of the other way around. I had lows in the 40's on glipizide, only twice last year in the 50's on insulin. Insulin is much more controllable. Thank you for the information! I think I will ask my doctor about this as I am already micromanaging my food Continue reading >>

Increased Mortality With Combining Sulfonylurea And Insulin

Increased Mortality With Combining Sulfonylurea And Insulin

About 11,000 patients using both insulin and sulfonylurea were evaluated… Ulrik M. Mogensen, MD, of the department of cardiology at University Hospital Rigshospitalet in Denmark, and colleagues evaluated patients receiving sulfonylurea with insulin and 16,910 patients receiving metformin with insulin to determine the differences in outcomes of treatment combinations. Outcome endpoints measured included all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, hypoglycemia and a composite endpoint of myocardial infarction, stroke and CV death. The metformin plus insulin group was younger, had experienced less comorbidity and a longer duration of monotherapy treatment, and used metformin more often before insulin therapy vs. the sulfonylurea plus insulin group. There was a two to five times greater risk for mortality among the sulfonylurea group compared with the metformin group. Glibenclamide, tolbutamide and glipizide plus insulin led to the greatest odds of all outcome endpoints compared with metformin plus insulin. Compared with metformin plus insulin, there was an increased risk for mortality among all sulfonylurea plus insulin combinations. When using glimepiride plus insulin as a reference, researchers found no significant differences of mortality for combinations of insulin plus glibenclamide, gliclazide, glipizide and tolbutamide. Increased mortality (RR=1.7; 95% CI, 1.48-1.95), CV death (RR=1.35; 95% CI, 1.07-1.7) and the combined endpoint (RR=1.25; 95% CI, 1.05-1.49) were all associated with the use of sulfonylurea plus insulin. One percent of patients had been hospitalized with hypoglycemia at baseline. During follow-up, 3.5% were hospitalized with hypoglycemia; 85% once, 10.6% twice, 3.4% three times and 3% more than three times. Compared with the sulfonylurea plus insuli Continue reading >>

Glipizide - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Glipizide - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Christof Schaefer, in Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation (Second Edition) , 2007 Insulin as a proteohormone does not reach the mother's milk, and is not absorbed intestinally. Any effect on the infant can therefore be ruled out. Neither glibenclamide nor glipizide were detected in the breastmilk of three mothers. Hypoglycemia was not observed in any of the children. In another eight women receiving a single dosage of glibenclamide, no substance was found in milk. A high protein-binding of 98% could explain these results (Feig 2005). Only small amounts of metformin are found in mothers milk; the weight-adjusted dose for a fully breastfed child is 0.10.7% (Briggs 2005, Gardiner 2003, Hale 2002). Hypoglycemia was not reported in breastfed infants. Metformin concentrations in breast milk remained stable over the time of observation. Growth, motor-social development, and illness requiring a pediatrician's visit were assessed in 61 nursing infants (21 male, 40 female) and 50 formula-fed infants (19 male, 31 female) born to 92 mothers with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) taking a median of 2.55g metformin per day throughout pregnancy and lactation. At 3 and 6 months of age, the weight, height, and motor-social development did not differ between breast- and formula-fed infants. No infants had retardation of growth, or of motor or social development. Intercurrent illnesses did not differ (Glueck 2006). Up to 16.2% of the weight-related dosage of tolbutamide can pass into the milk (Moiel 1967). There are no data on the other oral antidiabetics, acarbose, glibornuride, gliclazide, glimepiride, gliquidone, glisoxepide, miglitol, pioglitazone, repaglinide, and rosiglitazone. There is also insufficient experience on the antihypoglycemics glucagon and diazoxide. Insulin and metfor Continue reading >>

More in diabetes