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Is Gatorade Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Is It Bad For Diabetics To Drink Gatorade?

Is It Bad For Diabetics To Drink Gatorade?

Is it bad for diabetics to drink Gatorade? I hear Gatorade is like the worst thing anyone can drink. But out of desperation, I'm looking for what IS good for diabetics to drink that has electrolytes. Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Gatorade is deffinately not the best drink. It is loaded with sugar and carbs. Try drinking water, or the flavored packets that you put in the water bottles (Crystal Light), and the vitamin water also has electrolytes in it. It is pretty good in taste. I am also a diabetic and the dietician as well as my physician said to leave off gatorade, the calorie intake is not appropriate for our diets. Source(s): Secret To Destroy Diabetes - Source(s): My Diabetes Cured Completely : If you are having a heat stroke or are in danger, Gatorade is about the best drink to drink down. At this point, your sugar levels maybe so low it would not matter. I don't think there really are any good drinks out there that is not loaded with sugar and other high carbs. I too am diabetic and it is hard to find things like that. I am a diabetic and I have been drinking Gatorade. I went to the doctor today and my blood sugar was over 500. Diabetics DO NOT need to drink Gatorade. You would think by now they would make a sugar free Gatorade. For the best answers, search on this site As a diabetic, the ONLY time I would drink Gatorade, is when experiencing a very bad low, when I needed to get sugar quickly. There are better products to use for this purpose, such as Glucose tablets, which are specifically formulated for it. Gatorade is much too high in sugar. As far as I'm concerned any sugar that I can avoid, is good sugar. In other words, there is no good sugar for a diabetic. I am writing to tell you what an incredible impact these methods had on Continue reading >>

Gatorade, Exercise, And My Type 2 Ii Diabetes

Gatorade, Exercise, And My Type 2 Ii Diabetes

Gatorade, Exercise, and My Type 2 II Diabetes I usually don't blog about personal events because (1) I lack any perspective on them, (2) nobody would find them that interesting, and (3) I don't have much of value to say. But I had an experience recently that I wanted to blog about, if only to have this post appear when somebody else googles "Type 2 Diabetes Gatorade exercise". I am not a Doctor (IANAD), I am not a Lawyer (IANAL) and probably neither are you. You should see your doctor with your questions. This is just my anecdote. And you know what they say: the plural of anecdote is not information. I'm a Type II diabetic and a Cyldesdale bicyclist. I've ridden several long, multi-day rides with my Type II diabetes, which is (mostly) in control. These long rides are 80 to 100 miles a day for up to four days, mostly TOSRV and DC-Pittsburgh. In 2010 I was preparing for another long ride, and my prep rides were turning out to be mostly 20 miles long with the occasional 40-miler. That's not as long as they should be, but my time was tight. I was drinking water and eating power bars and packets of honey on the bike. As the ride approached I started getting all my gear on the bike and started doing what I'd be doing on the ride, which included drinking Gatorade. In previous years I drank a 50% gatorade/water mix, but this year I started drinking more straight Gatorade. I don't know why. A curious thing started happening to me when I rode. After an hour, maybe at 1h+15m, I'd feel a blood sugar crash - loss of energy, nervousness, feelings of impending collapse. I'd get off the bike, eat something and drink some Gatorade, and it would pass. I'd get back on the bike, ride for a half-hour, and then the same thing. For the rest of the ride it would be a thirty-minute ride with a Continue reading >>

Gatorade Good Or Bad You Decide | Diabetic Connect

Gatorade Good Or Bad You Decide | Diabetic Connect

If you sometimes choose to drink something other than water to add variety, know that sports drinks contain about 15-20 grams of sugar and 50-70 calories per 8-ounce serving. The other problem is that the drinks sugar is often in the form of fructose corn syrup, which is an especially difficult form of sugar for your body to metabolize. Take the time to read labels and compare ingredients, sugar and carbohydrate amounts before choosing these products. And always check your blood sugar levels before and after exercise to make sure they fit into your plan for that day. Listed below are some sports drinks and the grams of sugar and calories for each: Allsport, 8 ounces: 70 calories, 19 g sugar Powerade, 8 ounces: 70 calories, 15 g sugar Gatorade, 8 ounces: 50 calories, 14 g sugar Continue reading >>

Best Electrolyte Drinks For Diabetes

Best Electrolyte Drinks For Diabetes

If you have diabetes and you are looking to stay hydrated with an electrolyte drink, you know it can be difficult to find one that isn’t too high in sugar and carbohydrates. If you have started an exercise regime, it can also be challenging to keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Exercise removes glucose from the blood without using insulin, and is crucial in getting diabetes under control, but it is a delicate balance for your blood sugar being too high when you are inactive, and too low when you are active. It is important that the electrolyte drink matches your activity level, and you are not drinking an electrolyte drink with 25 carbohydrates while you are sitting inside, or one with zero carbohydrates while you are combining Zumba, Jazzercize and CrossFit. In regards to these parameters, perhaps you were advised to choose an electrolyte drink that uses artificial sweeteners. While writing The New Menu for Diabetes, I did some research on artificial sweeteners and was shocked that these were recommended for diabetics. The studies clearly showed that these in fact should be avoided, and I wanted to go more in depth in this article regarding why you should avoid Splenda and Acesulfame K. Why You Should Avoid the Following Electrolyte Drinks The following is based on my research and opinion. 1. Powerade Zero After doing some research, I noticed that Powerade Zero was the drink of choice for many diabetics due to it having zero calories. What’s in Powerade Zero? UK Label: Water, citric acid, mineral salts (sodium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, potassium phosphate), natural berry flavouring with other natural flavourings, acidity regulator (E332), sweeteners (sucralose, acesulfame K), colour (E133). US Label: Water, Citric Acid, Natural Flavor Continue reading >>

Sports Drinks | Diabetes Health

Sports Drinks | Diabetes Health

As little as 15 years ago, drinking fluids during sports practice or exercise was considered a sign of weakness. In fact, water was often withheld from athletes as punishment or as an attempt to make them tough. Today we know better, and staying well hydrated is the name of the game. Athletes or anyone who plays sports or exercises is well advised to consume liquids before, during and after exercise to aid in rehydration and prevent heatrelated illnesses. We now have many choices of sport drinks to choose from, along with good old water. Sports drinks are formulated with four purposes in mind: improving hydration, enhancing performance, optimizing recovery and adding weight or lean mass. Each drink uses slightly different ingredients, depending on the purpose. Drinks for aiding in fluid replacement typically contain carbohydrates and electrolytes such as sodium and potassium. These promote rapid fluid and carbohydrate absorption and are more effective than water alone. Athletes who do strength training or low-intensity exercise for less than an hour can usually get by with just plain water as long as they drink enough. For longer and more intense activities, a sports drink can be beneficial. Sports drinks have a high glycemic index, so diabetics need to check caloric and carbohydrate content and adjust insulin and nutrition intake as necessary. The type 2 diabetic needs to be cautious regarding the calories in sports drinks. Sixteen ounces of a typical sports drink (the amount commonly recommended for one hour of exercise) contains 120 calories, about the same as a can of regular soda. Diabetics who exercise for long periods of time may be more prone to dehydration, especially if blood glucose levels are high due to increased urine production. The color of urine can be Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

Summer Precautions For Diabetics

Summer Precautions For Diabetics

Summertime brings the heat, and along with it comes increased cases of dehydration. Diabetics have a more serious risk for dehydration and should take extra precautions, according to an expert at Baylor College of Medicine. “Everyone needs to stay hydrated during these hot summer months, but diabetics are at a higher risk and could face additional challenges because of blood sugar levels,” said Dr. Alan Garber, professor of medicine-endocrinology at Baylor. “Uncontrolled blood sugar levels are an independent cause of dehydration in diabetics.” As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys’ capability to absorb the sugar decreases. When this happens, individuals may pass more urine than usual, resulting in a quicker loss of fluids. “Dehydration is more dangerous in diabetics than non-diabetics because it can lead to ketoacidosis,” Garber said. “Ketoacidosis is the buildup of acid in the blood and can be potentially life-threatening.” Rehydration with fluids that contain electrolytes is crucial during these hot months. Garber recommends rehydrating with sugar-free sports drinks or Pedialyte and not drinking alcohol or caffeinated drinks. Alcohol and caffeine act as diuretics, which increase water loss from the body. People should drink 1,500 to 2,000 milliliters more than their insensible loss (water loss due to perspiration and urination) to keep the kidneys functioning well, he said. Besides staying hydrated, proper foot care is essential for diabetics. During the summer, it’s important to keep feet clean and dry because sweaty socks can cause ulcers to develop on the feet. “It’s important to check for sores daily because these sores can lead to a major source of infection,” Garber said. “Infection is the leading cause of diabetic amputation.” Ex Continue reading >>

Substitute For Gatorade?

Substitute For Gatorade?

My husband has mild type 2, diagnosed just before Christmas. He's taking metformin ER, doing well with diet - mostly counting carbs, readings are well within range, A1C has come down, and he's lost 20 lbs since Dx. The problem is that he has a physical job, performed mostly outdoors. Each summer for years, he has relied on Gatorade to prevent severe muscle cramping due to electrolyte loss. If he doesn't drink at least a quart of it on the hottest afternoons, he truly suffers in the evening/night hours. A quart of the drink has 57 g of carbs. If he drinks it, he won't be able to have lunch, which is not an option. Does anyone know of a no- (or very low) carb substitute? My husband has mild type 2, diagnosed just before Christmas. He's taking metformin ER, doing well with diet - mostly counting carbs, readings are well within range, A1C has come down, and he's lost 20 lbs since Dx. The problem is that he has a physical job, performed mostly outdoors. Each summer for years, he has relied on Gatorade to prevent severe muscle cramping due to electrolyte loss. If he doesn't drink at least a quart of it on the hottest afternoons, he truly suffers in the evening/night hours. A quart of the drink has 57 g of carbs. If he drinks it, he won't be able to have lunch, which is not an option. Does anyone know of a no- (or very low) carb substitute? It's Peeps from the thyroid board. I finally made it back to Healthboards and just stopped by this board for the first time. I should be in bed...but spotted your post and wanted to reply. When I saw the diabetes dietician, she recommended V8 DIET Splash. It is a 'free exchange' when drinking one serving (8 oz). She told me I could have that several times throughout the day as a free carb choice, but only to drink 1 serving at a time. I ho Continue reading >>

What’s To Drink?

What’s To Drink?

Staying Hydrated in the Heat On a hot day, nothing quite hits the spot like a cold drink. But cold (and hot) beverages are not just enjoyable; they’re necessary for good health. Drinking adequate fluids in hot or cold weather keeps your body hydrated and running smoothly. When your body doesn’t have enough fluids, you can feel sluggish and irritable, get headaches, and have trouble controlling your blood glucose levels. You tend to need more fluids in hot weather because more are lost through sweat. Water is a good choice for staying hydrated because it has no calories, carbohydrate, fat, alcohol, or caffeine. Beverages that contain calories, carbohydrate, fat, or caffeine still provide needed fluids, but when drunk in large quantities, they can make weight control and blood glucose control more difficult. Alcohol has a diuretic effect, meaning it increases urine output, so beverages containing alcohol can promote dehydration. When you’re thirsty, having a drink containing alcohol is not a good choice; it’s better to drink nonalcoholic beverages first to quench your thirst before drinking any alcoholic drinks for pleasure. However, alcoholic beverages also contain calories, carbohydrate, and, less commonly, fat. While water is a good choice for health reasons, many people enjoy beverages with a little more flavor, such as fruit juices, soft drinks, tea, or coffee. There’s nothing inherently wrong with any of these beverages — and in fact, fruit juices, teas, and coffees contain beneficial antioxidants — but a high consumption of sweetened beverages has been identified as one of the reasons the United States is having an obesity epidemic. Part of the problem is that people tend to ignore the calories, carbohydrate, and fat in beverages. Studies suggest that Continue reading >>

Gatorade & Diabetics

Gatorade & Diabetics

Yes, diabetics can actually benefit from Gatorade. Physically active diabetics who require periodic intake of carbohydrate to prevent hypoglycemia from occurring during and following activity should consume carbs during exercise. Also, people with diabetes are prone to dehydration by way of their increased urine output, and Gatorade can help in that regard as well. People with diabetes should always consult a physician before making any change in dietary intake. Continue reading >>

Gatorade: Is It Good For You?

Gatorade: Is It Good For You?

According to Gatorades website, the drink was born in the lab when researchers looked at why athletes were falling ill after strenuous exercise in the heat. They found that these athletes were losing electrolytes and fluid with exertion, but not replacing them. Gatorade was developed to replace crucial electrolytes and carbohydrates while hydrating at the same time. While its marketed as a sports drink, Gatorade isnt only consumed by athletes. Children drink it at lunch or after soccer practice, and its even developed a reputation as a hangover cure. But while Gatorade may contain less sugar than soda, is it actually good for you? When you exercise, its important to stay hydrated. Water is the most logical form of hydration. However, sports drinks like Gatorade contain sugar and electrolytes like sodium and potassium. Sports drinks can help replace what we lose during longer duration exercise, especially in the heat. Electrolytes and carbohydrates help athletes refuel and rehydrate. This is what makes sports drinks popular. Electrolytes help regulate the bodys fluid balance while the carbs provide energy. Gatorade claims their product hydrates better than water because of these additional ingredients. Some research backs their claims. A report from the University of California, Berkeley says that sports drinks might be better than water for children and athletes who engage in prolonged, vigorous physical activity for more than one hour, especially in hot conditions. However, you should note that those exercising less than 60 to 90 minutes may not need Gatorade to maintain or improve performance. So, what about use of sports drinks for the average person? The vast majority of people who drink Gatorade are not athletes. And according to the Berkeley study , most people w Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Gatorade Affect My Blood Sugar Level?

Can Drinking Gatorade Affect My Blood Sugar Level?

A woman is holding two sports drink bottles.Photo Credit: Tinatin1/iStock/Getty Images Can Drinking Gatorade Affect My Blood Sugar Level? Tara Kimball is a former accounting professional with more than 10 years of experience in corporate finance and small business accounting. She has also worked in desktop support and network management. Her articles have appeared in various online publications. Gatorade is a blend of electrolytes and carbohydrates designed to protect you from dehydration. Gatorade was created in an effort to help the Florida Gators reduce heat exhaustion and illness on the field. The blend of chloride, sodium and potassium are essential nutrients, according to the dietary guidelines released by the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Know how Gatorade affects your blood glucose readings before adding it to your diet. An 8-oz. serving of Gatorade's traditional Perform blend contains 14g of carbohydrates, all from sugar. Gatorade Prime contains 25g of carbs per serving. The Low-Calorie line of Gatorade drinks have only 5g of carbohydrates per serving. The carbohydrate content in Gatorade drinks is solely from sugar. The carbohydrate content in Gatorade will cause an increase in blood sugar readings. Carbohydrates are created from starch and sugar. When your body processes the carbohydrates in the Gatorade, it breaks down into glucose. The glucose is delivered to your body's cells to use as an energy source. Glucose absorbs into your blood stream, creating an increase in your blood glucose, which is literally a representation of the glucose saturation in your blood. If you consume Gatorade during physical activity, your exercise level may decrease your blood glucose, negating or reducing the blood sugar increase. Alternatively, exercis Continue reading >>

Suffering From Headaches And Dizziness After Cutting Back On Sweeteners? Is Gatorade Good To Drink? —mary Lou Rhoades

Suffering From Headaches And Dizziness After Cutting Back On Sweeteners? Is Gatorade Good To Drink? —mary Lou Rhoades

Q: I was a diet ice tea drinker until I read your article 14 things to avoid on a diabetic diet. In it you stated that tea is ok, its the artificial sweeteners you need to watch. Why? Ive cut way back on my habit and have been developing headaches and dizziness. My doctor says it could be caffeine withdraw. I've also cut way back to bread and lunch meats. The doctor says to drink Gatorade for the enzymes and salt. Is this good for a diabetic? I'm afraid you may have misinterpreted something in the article on 14 foods to avoid on a low-carbohydrate diet. Sugar-free iced tea is fine to drink in moderation because it will not raise blood sugar. However, some people get headaches or develop digestive trouble when they consume certain sugar substitutes. This includes both natural sweeteners like stevia and artificial sweeteners like aspartame. Although stevia, erythritol, and other natural sweeteners are generally considered healthier than artificial sweeteners, any sweeteners can be used in moderation if they don't cause side effects. As far as your doctor's recommendation to drink Gatorade, this isn't a good way to get electrolytes because it also contains sugar. Although there are sugar-free electrolyte replacement beverages like Powerade Zero, it's better to add small amounts of salt to your food to ensure adequate sodium intake and to consume low-carb foods that are high in potassium and magnesium like avocado, fish, nuts, and Greek yogurt. Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, “Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a s Continue reading >>

Are Sports Drinks Safe For Diabetics?

Are Sports Drinks Safe For Diabetics?

While it is important to prevent dehydration and replace electrolytes that you might lose through excessive sweating, you must also consider the amount of carbohydrates and calories that you are consuming throughout the day. Below is information on some common sports drinks. You can see the difference in the amount of carbohydrates and calories. Gatorade: 50 calories, 14 carbohydrates (grams) Mountain Dew Sport: 95 calories, 24 carbohydrates (grams) All Sport: 70 calories, 19 carbohydrates (grams) Rehydrate: 40 calories, 10 carbohydrates (grams) Performance: 100 calories, 25 carbohydrates (grams) So for example, if you consume four 8-oz bottles of Gatorade, you have taken in 200 calories and 56 grams of carbohydrates — and those values double if you are drinking 16-oz bottles. The calories and carbohydrates can add up quickly, causing high sugar levels. The best practice is to look at each brand’s calorie and carbohydrate counts and the number of drinks that you are consuming a day to determine if it is within your daily caloric and carbohydrate requirements. It's also a good idea to supplement sports beverages with plain water. Learn more in the Everyday Health Diabetes Center. Continue reading >>

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