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Is Fresh Fruit Good For Diabetics?

Fruit List For Diabetics

Fruit List For Diabetics

Often people suffering from diabetes avoid fruits out of fear that the sugar present in fruits could push up their blood sugar level. However, this is a false conception. Most fruits, specifically fruits rich in fibers, are beneficial for reducing the blood sugar level. Sugar present in fruits is usually in the form of fructose. Unlike other forms of sugar, such as sucrose, fructose has low glucemic index. Minimal insulin is needed for the metabolism of fructose. Intake of this fruit sugar is not associated with sudden surge of the blood sugar level. Studies have shown that by reducing cholesterol and triglyceride production, fructose could protect us from diseases such as arteriosclerosis, which leads to heart diseases and stroke. Diabetes bad food includes those that have high glycemic indexes for glucose- which includes those foods that are high in saturated fats and uncontrollably high amounts of sugar in any of its forms- especially sugar from milk. Which brings us back to our main concern- what kinds of fruits can a diabetic eat? Fruits for diabetics are usually those fruits that have high fiber content and have low sugar content. If we take these criteria and apply it, the first fruit that would come to mind would be the high and mighty avocado. But beware; the large avocados have a lot of calories in it- so if you buy the large avocado from florida, make sure you regulate your calorie intake for the rest of the day. Diabetics should NOT eat cooked fruit. Always eat raw fruits in order to reap the benefits. Here's a list of fruits that are beneficial for Diabetics. Any type of wild or organic berry - Seasons: Range All Year Blueberries, Elderberries, Blackberries, Gooseberries, Strawberries etc. There are loads to choose from. You can find their respective season Continue reading >>

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

There’s compelling evidence supporting the notion that high-fructose diets are responsible for most chronic disease; insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and obesity in particular Many fruits are very high in fructose, up to 50X the sugar that most of the fruits our ancestors were exposed to due to consistent hybridization over the past century for sweetness Therefore most fruits are best limited or avoided if you have insulin/leptin resistance as determined by struggling with your weight, or, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease or cancer According to a new study, certain kinds of whole fruits—particularly blueberries, grapes, prunes and apples—may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes Consumption of fruit juices, on the other hand, was found to have greater risk. Those who drank one or more servings of fruit juice each day had a 21 percent higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to the others I believe most will benefit from restricting their fructose to 25 grams a day; and as little as 15 grams a day if you’re diabetic or have chronic health issues. This includes fructose from whole fruits By Dr. Mercola You're probably well-familiarized with my controversial stance on fructose. Compelling evidence shows that fructose is, by far, more harmful to your health than other sugars—especially when it's removed from whole fruits and highly processed and genetically modified, such as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in most processed foods. I've also, as a general rule, warned you of eating too much fruit, as many fruits can be quite high in fructose. This has caused some confusion and consternation among many readers, as fruit has long been promoted as an important part of a healthy diet. That said, there are considerations to take into account when it comes to Continue reading >>

Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Photo: Pond5 Loading your diet with fruit seems like a no-brainer, right? Your body gets a boost from nutritious superstars like fiber, vitamins, and antioxidants, plus juicy berries might even satisfy your sweet tooth. But that doesn’t mean maintaining a 24/7 fruit free-for-all is good for your health. “Fruit is high in a sugar known as fructose. Even though the sugar is coming from this healthy source, you still have to use moderation,” says Brigitte Zeitlin, MPH, RD, CDN, a dietitian at B-Nutritious. If you’re panicking because you’ve been devouring fruit salad to your heart’s content, don’t worry. Here’s what you need to know about how much fruit you should really be eating every day. Why Eating Too Much Fruit Might Impact Your Health Sugar comes in a few different forms: Glucose, fructose and sucrose. Glucose helps keep all your systems chugging along smoothly. “Carbohydrates break down into glucose, your body’s main source of fuel,” says Beth Warren, MS, RDN, CDN, registered dietitian and author of Living a Real Life with Real Food. Then you have fructose, the only type of sugar found in fruits. It’s metabolized in the liver, as opposed to in the blood stream. Sucrose, more commonly known as table sugar, is simply a combination of both glucose and fructose. High blood sugar, which is caused by too much glucose in your blood, can lead to diabetes. Refined carbohydrates, like white rice or white-flour baked goods, are common culprits leading to high blood sugar. In addition to their sugar content, they lack the fiber that prevents glucose spikes, wreaking havoc on your blood sugar levels. “Too much sugar in the blood stream at once leads to fat storage and insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes,” says Zeitlin. The lesser-known Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

Is Canned Fruit Healthy For Diabetics?

Is Canned Fruit Healthy For Diabetics?

Many diabetics assume they should avoid fruit due to its high sugar content, but the American Diabetes Association recommends eating fruits because they’re loaded with vitamins, minerals and fiber. Canned fruit is on the American Diabetes Association’s list of healthy foods for diabetics, but some types of canned fruit are better than others. Video of the Day Diabetics must control the amount of carbohydrates they eat because carbohydrates raise blood glucose levels. Fruit contains carbohydrates, so you need to count fruit as carbohydrates in your meal plan. Most fruits have a low glycemic index, which is a measurement of how much a particular food raises blood sugar. Because fruit contains fructose, a natural sugar, having fruit as a snack or for dessert is a good way to satisfy your sweet tooth and get beneficial nutrients. Canned Fruit vs. Fresh Fruit Fresh fruit is usually a better choice for diabetics than canned fruit. Canned fruit packed in heavy syrup has added sugar than can raise your glucose levels. The best kinds of fruit are fresh, frozen or canned without added sugars. Some canned fruits are packed in their own juice or in water. Unlike fruit juice, such as orange juice, canned fruit and fresh fruit have plenty of fiber. A fiber-rich diet is important for diabetics because fiber slows the speed at which carbohydrates enter your bloodstream, helping to prevent spikes in your blood sugar, according to Elisa Zied, R.D., author of "Nutrition at Your Fingertips." Fiber in the diet is also associated with a healthy weight, which can help manage diabetes. Canned Fruit Recommendations The American Diabetes Association recommends eating only canned fruits packed in their own juices, water or light syrup. Avoid canned fruits in heavy syrup. The cost of canned fr Continue reading >>

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Ex-Diabetic Sidebar: When I was diabetic, my doctors and the hospital's dietitian told me that I would have to avoid fruits. I found that kind of strange, especially, since some of my hospital meals included applesauce, tangerine slices and orange juice! Avoiding fruits was difficult for me because I had a "sweet tooth" -- a strong craving for sweets. Being diabetic, my body craved sugar and I loved sweets -- not just fruits -- I loved apple pie, brownies, chocolate chip cookies, and ice cream. During my research, I discovered how to stop the cravings (see below). I also learned that eating some whole fruit can be beneficial, despite the sugar content in most fruits. Why? Because it's better to eat an apple than some cookies or ice cream to satisfy your craving for something sweet! :-) In addition, studies have shown that the nutrients within most fruits (e.g. antioxidants, Vitamin C, fiber, water) can help prevent and reverse the damage to blood vessels and body tissues caused by Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and other similar diseases. The key is to make sure that you follow an effective reverse diabetes nutritional program such as the one defined in the "Death to Diabetes" 10-Step Reverse Diabetes Wellness Program. Most whole fruits are on the moderate to low end of the Glycemic Index (GI), making them a pretty good choice for most people with diabetes. Many fruits are also packed with vitamins A and C, as well as water,fiber and antioxidants (flavonoids) such as catechin, quercetin, and anthocyanidin. Top 10 Fruits | Reverse Diabetes The following is a list of the top 10 fruits that most diabetics can eat because, for most diabetics, these fruits don't cause large or sustained blood glucose spikes. As a result, eating these fruits can help to satisfy your sweet to Continue reading >>

Why Eating Fresh Fruit Could Actually Lower Your Risk Of Diabetes

Why Eating Fresh Fruit Could Actually Lower Your Risk Of Diabetes

You might have heard about papaya’s probiotic powers, or the mega-nutritous (and protein-packed) jackfruit—but usually when nutrition pros talk about fruit, they’re advising you choose from the low-sugar options (and definitely skip the dried variety altogether). But according to a new study, nature’s candy may reduce the risk for developing diabetes. The observational study, published in PLOS Medicine, tracked the health and diet of more than 500,000 adults in China for seven years. It found that those without diabetes at the start who ate fresh fruit daily were found to have a 12 percent lower risk of developing the disease than those who ate none. “The sugar in fruit is not the same as the sugar in manufactured foods and may be metabolized differently.” And the more frequently they ate it, the lower their diabetes risk: More than three days a week resulted in a 17 percent lower risk of dying from any cause, and a 13 percent to 28 percent lower risk of developing diabetes-related complications (compared to those who consumed fruit less than once a week). While it sounds great—eat more fruit, don’t get diabetes!—it may also sound contradictory. If high sugar consumption is a leading cause in developing diabetes and fruits are packed with sugars, is it really smart to OD on oranges? “The sugar in fruit is not the same as the sugar in manufactured foods and may be metabolized differently,” the lead author, Huaidong Du, MD, a research fellow at the University of Oxford, tells The New York Times. “And there are other nutrients in fruit that may benefit in other ways.” So go ahead and pass that pomegranate, pineapple, or pitaya—just keep doing it in moderation. Here’s how to make the most of your summer fruits: our ultimate smoothie guide. And Continue reading >>

Avoid Fruit With Diabetes?

Avoid Fruit With Diabetes?

Fruits provide us with health-enhancing vitamins and phytochemicals as well as fiber, all important components of our diets, and there is no reason why people with diabetes should forego these benefits. However, you may have to be careful about the fruits you choose, how often you eat them and when you eat them. If you take a look at the glycemic index (GI), a measure of how fast carbohydrate foods (which include fruits) are converted in the body to blood glucose, you’ll see that there are big differences between fruits. I recommend choosing fruits that rank low on the glycemic index. Low rankings are those that score below 55, intermediate-GI foods score between 55 and 70 and high GI foods score above 70. For example, some good fruit choices would include an average-sized apple that scores 38; cherries, which score 22; grapefruit (25); an average-sized orange (44); an average-sized pear (38); a plum (39). Intermediate GI fruits include banana (55); cantaloupe (65); mango (55); papaya (58); pineapple (66). High GI fruits include dried dates (103); and canned fruit cocktail (79). How quickly fruit will raise your blood sugar depends on such considerations as whether you eat the fruit after a high-fat meal or drink it as a glass of fruit juice on an empty stomach. You’ll also want to consider what your blood-sugar level is when you eat the fruit. If you’re monitoring your blood glucose, you should be able to figure out how it responds to eating fruit. It is also important to pay attention to the size of the fruit you eat – choose a small or medium-sized apple over a large one (or eat only half of the large one). A quick and easy measure of the right serving size of fruit is the amount that can comfortably fit in the palm of your hand. Anything bigger than that is Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Good news for fruit lovers everywhere: eating fresh fruit is associated with a lower risk of diabetes and a lower risk of complications if you already have the disease, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. Featured recipe: Fresh Fruit Salad If you've been steering clear of fruit because of the sugar content, there's no reason to do so, according to this study. Over a seven-year time period, researchers analyzed the diet and health outcomes of more than 500,000 Chinese adults. The researchers found that higher fruit consumption was not associated with higher blood sugar, even for people with diabetes. Adults who consumed fruit more frequently actually had a lower risk of developing diabetes. The study only analyzed fresh fruit consumption, not dried fruit or fruit juice, so we turned to a few registered dietitians and certified diabetes educators to clarify the best and worst fruits, appropriate serving sizes, and how many carbohydrates you should get from fruit each day. First it's important to note that "diabetes care is individualized," says Staci Freeworth, RD, CDE, and professor of nutrition at Bowling Green State University. This is why it is important for people with diabetes to see a certified diabetes educator (CDE). These specialists can break down how many carbohydrates you should be eating each day based on your individual needs and health history. Best Fruits to Eat Recipe to Try: Purple Fruit Salad Whether you have diabetes or not, the consensus from dietitians is the same regarding which fruits are best to eat. "The best fruits for everyone to eat are the ones that create the least influence on blood sugar, often termed 'low glycemic load,'—even if you don't have diabetes," says Daphne Olivier, RD, CDE, founder of My Food Coach. "These in Continue reading >>

Are Peaches Good For Diabetics?

Are Peaches Good For Diabetics?

ByGunjan Rastogi , Onlymyhealth editorial team Gorging on peaches can lead to unstable blood glucose levels thus, diabetics need to keep an eye on their intake of this sumptuous summer treat. Moderate intake of peaches as a part of diabetes diet can aid in stabilising the elevated blood glucose levels of diabetics. Take a look at the nutritional properties of peaches to know whether they are good for diabetics or not. Carbohydrates increase the production of glucose in the bloodstream thus, a threat to diabetics. Diabetics need to keep a tab on their carbohydrate intake to avoid spike in the already tumultuous glucose levels. Peaches like other fruits are not just a source of carbohydrates, but they are also packed with numerous vitamins, fibre and antioxidants. Adding peaches in diabetics diet is good for health, but their consumption should be moderate. Mentioned below is the calorie count and amount of carbohydrates in peaches: One small peach Calories- 31, Carbohydrates - 7.5 grams One large peach Calories 61, Carbohydrates- 15 grams One cup slices of peach Calories- 69, Carbohydrates - 16.2 grams Peaches are packed with fibre that functions to control blood glucose. Fibre in sugary fruits slows down the process of sugar absorption and reduces the rate at which glucose passes to the bloodstream thus, preventing rise in blood glucose level. Fibre content in peaches: The added sugar in the processed or canned food is much more harmful than natural sugar of peaches. Diabetics can eat moderate amount of fresh peaches, but must stay away from canned and frozen varieties of peaches. They contain added sugar and other preservatives. One cup of serving of canned peach is equivalent to 160 calories and 32.55 grams of sugar. Also Read: Safest Foods for Diabetics The foods wh Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Fruit Juice While whole fruits are a healthy, fiber-rich carbohydrate option for diabetics, the same can’t be said for fruit juice. They may offer more nutritional benefit than soda and other sugary drinks, but fruit juices — even 100 percent fruit juices — are chock full of fruit sugar, and therefore cause a sharp spike in blood sugar. Skipping the glass of juice and opting for the fiber-packed whole fruit counterpart will help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels and fill you up on fewer calories, aiding in weight loss. For a refreshing and healthy drink alternative, choose zero-calorie plain or naturally-flavored seltzer and jazz it up with a wedge of lemon or lime. Continue reading >>

Fruit May Have Benefits For Diabetes

Fruit May Have Benefits For Diabetes

A large study has found that eating fresh fruit may reduce the risk for developing diabetes, and the risk for its complications. Fresh fruit has well-known health benefits. But some experts, and some people with diabetes, question whether its high sugar content could pose risks. The study, in PLOS Medicine, tracked diet and health in 512,891 Chinese men and women ages 30 to 79 for an average of seven years, controlling for smoking, alcohol intake, blood pressure and other factors. Among those without diabetes at the start, eating fresh fruit daily was associated with a 12 percent lower risk of developing the disease compared with those who ate none. The more frequently they ate fruit, the lower their risk. In people who were already diabetic, those who ate fruit three times a week had a 17 percent lower risk of all-cause mortality, and a lower risk for diabetic complications like heart and kidney disease, than those who didn’t eat fruit. The study was observational and the reason for the effect remains unclear. But the lead author, Dr. Huaidong Du, a research fellow at the University of Oxford, said “the sugar in fruit is not the same as the sugar in manufactured foods and may be metabolized differently. And there are other nutrients in fruit that may benefit in other ways.” Continue reading >>

Pears And Diabetes

Pears And Diabetes

Pears: A Sweet You Can Eat Type 2 Diabetes: Overview We naturally have sugar in the bloodstream that provides energy to every body cell. Healthy levels of this sugar, glucose, are maintained by insulin, a hormone secreted when blood sugar rises too high. Type 2 diabetes happens when your body doesn’t make enough insulin or your body’s cells don’t respond normally to insulin, called insulin resistance. This causes high blood sugar and immediately starts to starve cells of energy. Over time, high blood sugar damages sensitive tissues, such as those in the extremities, eyes, and kidneys. What Should I Eat? Following a regular meal plan, being active, taking medications, and tracking your blood sugar levels will help you manage your diabetes. Indeed, you may be able to control your diabetes just by eating healthfully and exercising regularly. Most people benefit from 3 meals plus 2 to 3 snacks every day. For easy snacking ideas, click here. What are Carbohydrates? Carbohydrates provide energy, and every cell needs energy. Carbohydrates are found in fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, seeds, beans, and dairy and come in three forms, sugars, starches, and fiber. Sugars are the simplest, most easily absorbed carbohydrates and include glucose needed to sustain energy. Starches are longer chains of sugars. Fiber is the indigestible part of a plant. While it is generally not digested, it may offer cardiovascular and digestive benefits. Why Pears? Everyone’s digestive system needs carbohydrates, and it is best to balance them with fiber, protein, or fat at every meal. Balancing carbohydrates decreases the rate of absorption of glucose, so your blood sugar won’t spike as dramatically. Good carbohydrate choices are those that already contain these nutrients, such as fiber-ri Continue reading >>

A Guide To Fruit: How Much Can People With Diabetes Safely Eat?

A Guide To Fruit: How Much Can People With Diabetes Safely Eat?

Q: What are the recommended servings depending on calorie needs for people with diabetes? A: The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (part of the National Institutes of Health) recommends different amounts of fruit depending on how many calories you eat in a day. 1,200-1,600 calories per day: Two fruit servings per day 1,600-2,000 calories per day: Three fruit servings per day 2,000-2,400 calories per day: Four fruit servings per day A: It depends what kind of fruit you’re talking about. If it’s a round fruit like an apple or orange, it should be on the smaller size—about the size of a tennis ball. For fruit that can be measured by the cup like cubed melon or fresh berries, a serving is one cup. Q: Is fruit juice a nutritious choice? A: Unfortunately, not really. Drinking fruit juice doesn’t give you the same nutritional benefits as eating the entire fruit. And it’s tough to stick to four ounces or less, which is all you should be drinking at a time. A: Some fruit is higher in sugar than others. Recommended fruits for diabetics include cantaloupe, strawberries, clementine, avocado, banana, blackberries and more. If you go with frozen or canned fruit, make sure there aren’t any added sugars (the syrup is often packed with sugar). And when eating dried fruit, keep a close watch on portion sizes—they’re small and one serving (usually just a few tablespoons) and can be eaten really quickly. Try your best to stay away from syrup-filled canned fruit, fruit rolls, regular jam and jelly and sweetened applesauce. For other advice about what diabetics should and should not eat, check out these blogs: Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

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