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Is Fresh Coconut Good For Diabetics

Is Coconut A Good Food For People With Diabetes?

Is Coconut A Good Food For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetic People Have Coconut Water? What Are The Implications?

Can Diabetic People Have Coconut Water? What Are The Implications?

Of course they can. When consumed in moderate quantities (around 250 milliliters twice a day), there is absolutely no problem in drinking coconut water in diabetes. Obviously it contains a good amount of sugar however, since it is natural and also since the coconut water contains plenty of rich minerals, it does no harm to the body even if you are a diabetic. In fact, owing to its rich nutritional composition, it can even reverse the diabetes. Lots of researches also demonstrate that coconut water can reverse the diabetes. Just make sure you don’t tipple into it excessively. Implications of Coconut Water on Diabetics Good Coconut water has a rich composition of minerals, fiber and amino acids which help regulate the blood glucose, prevent dehydration and control body weight. Besides, the magnesium present in it increases the insulin sensitivity which is perhaps most crucial in case of diabetes. Bad On the other side, coconut water also contains potassium. So, when drunk in excess amounts, it can result in large quantities of potassium to build up in the bloodstream causing problems for kidney and heart. To know more about coconut water and its relationship with diabetes, benefits, effects, associated risks and precautions, you can have a look at the complete guide here. Continue reading >>

Coconut Meat & Diabetes Nutrition

Coconut Meat & Diabetes Nutrition

For thousands of years, coconut has been part of the daily diet of many Pacific islanders, and various coconut-based products are now available in the U.S. to provide your diet with a delicious exotic touch. If you have diabetes, carbohydrates are the most important nutritional factor to control it. Counting your carbs at each meal is the best way to keep your blood sugar levels in check. However, most diabetes exchange lists do not include coconut meat and other related products and it can be difficult to know how coconut can fit in your diabetes diet. Video of the Day Fresh Coconut Meat A piece of fresh coconut meat of about 2 by 2 inches and about 1/2 inch thick contains 159 calories, 6.9 g of carbohydrates and 4 g of dietary fiber. When tracking your carb intake with diabetes, you can subtract the dietary fiber from the total carbohydrates to determine the available carb content, also called net carb, of a food. In this case, a small piece of fresh coconut meat would contain 2.9 g of available carbs. If you eat two to three pieces that size, double or triple the amount of carbs. Use available carbs when tracking your carb intake, as they give a more accurate picture of how your food choices will influence your blood sugar levels after your meal. Dessicated Coconut Unsweetened dessicated coconut meat contains 187 calories, 6.7 g of carbohydrates and 4.6 g of fiber per ounce, which is the equivalent of 2.1 g of available carbohydrates. The same serving of sweetened dessicated coconut meat provides 129 calories, 14.7 g of carbohydrates and 2.8 g of fiber, or approximately 11.9 g of available carbohydrates. Stick with unsweetened coconut products to keep your carb intake within your recommended target and avoid making your blood sugar levels rise above the desirable ran Continue reading >>

The Coconut Craze: Coconut Oil

The Coconut Craze: Coconut Oil

Last week I wrote about coconut water. I’m curious — how many of you drink coconut water, or have at least tried it? As I mentioned in my posting, I’m not a big fan of it. But unless you’re guzzling down glass after glass of this tropical beverage, there are really no major harmful ramifications. But what about coconut oil? Controversial Coconut Oil Many nutrition topics are murky, and the issue of whether coconut oil is a “good” fat or a “bad” fat is a prime example. A lot of people swear by coconut oil for various reasons. Those who enjoy baking like coconut oil because it makes a mean flaky pie crust and lends a unique, rich flavor to pastries and other goodies. Others use coconut oil for everyday cooking, claiming that it adds great flavor to vegetables, oatmeal, and even popcorn. Coconut oil is used extensively in Thai and Indian dishes, which, of course, is partly why these dishes are so tasty. And then, there are those who swear by coconut oil for its supposed numerous health benefits, such as promoting weight loss, improving blood glucose control, and helping to treat heart disease. Can a tropical oil really live up to all these claims? A Bit of Background The use of coconut oil for cooking is nothing new in tropical regions. In the early 1900’s, this oil was actually used in the US as a cooking oil, but it gradually fell out of favor in the 1960’s when scientists began to examine coconut oil’s possible role in heart disease. The link between coconut oil and heart disease stems from the fact that coconut oil is primarily a saturated fat (92% of the fatty acids in this oil are saturated). And, for the most part, saturated fat, or the “bad” fat, is linked with promoting heart disease. But the tricky thing about saturated fats is that not Continue reading >>

Is Coconut Water Good Or Bad For Diabetics Person?

Is Coconut Water Good Or Bad For Diabetics Person?

Treatment and maintenance of a normal lifestyle in diabetes can often be very challenging as a diabetes patient suffers from a lot of related complications such as that of the heart, kidney, eye, muscles, and various other parts of the body. Hence, a patient who suffers from diabetes has to take extreme care as even a slight negligence on his part can cause serious adverse health repercussions. A well maintained and regulated lifestyle, coupled with a healthy diet and physical exercise have always been recommended by the doctors. One such regulation is with regards to the consumption of coconut water. Coconut water which is extremely rich in vitamins, potassium and several other nutrients is normally considered extremely natural and healthy. However, the high content of sugar, glucose, sodium, and potassium often gives rise the question as to whether coconut water should be consumed by those who suffer from diabetes? In this article, we try to find out the answer to the above question. We shall delve deep and analyse whether it is safe to consume coconut water for a diabetes patient. We will also find out more about the precautions which need to be observed by a diabetic when he or she consumes coconut water. Join in for the article ‘Diabetes and Coconut Water: Is Drinking Coconut Water Safe for Diabetes?’ Benefits of Coconut Water for Diabetes? Some Facts Related to Coconut Water In order to understand the question whether coconut water is beneficial for a person suffering from diabetes or not, we first need to deep dive and understand some of the properties and characteristics of coconut water. Following are a few facts related to coconut water: Coconut water is naturally full of a lot of nutrients and does not have any kind of artificial preservatives. The water Continue reading >>

Coconuts, Coconut Milk, Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconuts, Coconut Milk, Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconut oil has been called a “superfood” with positive effects on heart and brain health, weight loss (especially abdominal fat) and a whole host and anti-inflammatory effects. But is coconut oil really a superfood? Or is it just the newest fad out there on the internet? Coconuts Coconuts have traditionally been the main staple food in many Asian and Pacific populations. In those same populations, coconut has also long been used as a medicine to treat infections, respiratory conditions, constipation, diarrhea, indigestion, kidney stones, and other disorders. Coconut meat (the whitish flakes) is high in fiber, protein, minerals such as manganese, selenium and iron and contains Vitamin C and B vitamins along with plant sterols. Coconut meat is also high in calories from fats—the fats are primarily the saturated fats along with high amounts of omega-6 fatty acids. Coconut flour is the finely ground coconut meat. Coconut milk (pressed from coconut meat) is similar to coconut meat as far as its nutritional profile—it is high in fiber, protein, richer than coconut meat in minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium and contains Vitamins C, E and B vitamins. Coconut milk is also high in plant sterols and calories from fats. These fats are also in the saturated form with high levels of omega-6 fatty acids. Coconut water is diluted coconut milk and is much lower in calories. Finally, coconut oil is very high in calories from saturated fats and omega-6 fatty acids with essentially no vitamins, minerals, protein or fiber—in other words, pure fat. The fats in coconut oil are in the form of medium-chain triacylglycerols, or MCT. Fats and Health For many years, fats in food were considered the main cause for fats on the body. Continue reading >>

Coconut Water And 9 Other Brilliant Ideas To Prevent Or Reverse Diabetes

Coconut Water And 9 Other Brilliant Ideas To Prevent Or Reverse Diabetes

Here’s a surprise. Brand new research published in the February 2015 Journal of Medical Food suggests that coconut water improves diabetes. The catch is that it was a rat study, not a human study. Nevertheless, many animal model studies extrapolate to humans so don’t dismiss the research just yet okay?! The rats in the study got diabetes from a potent compound called alloxan. Even though alloxan has only been proven to induce diabetes in rats, I’m bothered by the fact you’re eating alloxan every single day without knowing it! Soon, I will list 9 other ideas (vitamins and medications) to protect you from alloxan. Alloxan is a potent compound that destroys beta cells in rats. The question is can it do that to humans? Alloxan is pervasive in our food supply and there’s a ton of research correlating its ability to induce diabetes in clinical trials, that’s why it’s used in all the studies. Trust me, they are not giving all these lab rats a plate of muffins, they are using “alloxan monohydrate” and injecting it. Then the rats get diabetes, and testing begins. Alloxan is a by-product of the flour-bleaching process that makes flour “white.” You can make a choice to buy unbleached or whole wheat flour, instead of white flour that might be contaminated. Let me be clear, I may not like that we eat alloxan in white flour products, but it has never been tied to diabetes in humans, just critters. What should you do if you just got diagnosed with diabetes? First, eliminate carbohydrates, in particular the white flour products that have alloxan. Second, clean out your pantry and become acquainted with real food again. Third, grab a copy of my diabetes book, I tell you secrets that you deserve to know, like how statin drugs can raise blood sugar and what to do! To Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Can You Eat Coconut Oil If You Have Diabetes? If you’re living with diabetes, you’ve likely been through the diet overhaul. Out with the rippled chips, white bread, and full-fat cheese. In with the whole-wheat toast, tofu, and celery sticks. Now you may want to replace the fats you use in your cooking. You may have heard coconut oil may be a good substitute, but you may not be sure how it would affect your diabetes. Is it better or worse? Here’s what you need to know about coconut oil and diabetes. Coconut oil, also known as copra oil, is derived from the meat of mature coconuts. The oil is rich in antioxidants and energy-boosting triglycerides, and low in cholesterol. Not only does the oil have a sweet, nutty flavor, but it also leaves behind little grease. It’s commonly used as a replacement for butter and olive or vegetable oils when baking or cooking. Coconut oil also has many cosmetic uses, such as: a natural skin moisturizer a leave-in condition for your hair an ingredient in homemade soap scrub and lotion recipes If you have diabetes, you know that maintaining a healthy weight is a key component of a diabetes meal plan. This is especially true of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes generally begins with your body’s resistance to insulin. Insulin resistance is linked to excess weight. A 2008 study found that people who consumed medium-chain fats like coconut oil as part of a weight loss plan lost more fat than participants who used olive oil. Coconut oil is high in medium-chain fats. This means coconut oil, a solid fat, is harder to convert to stored fat. This makes it easier for your body to burn it off. Although separate studies, such as this 2009 study in Lipids, have corroborated this, there isn’t enough research to definitively support this claim. Re Continue reading >>

Coconut For Diabetes

Coconut For Diabetes

Coconut is a very nutritious food that can be eaten raw or used as an ingredient in cooking. The milk of the coconut makes a very refreshing drink and is reputed to be extremely nutritious. Coconut is good for diabetes management as it has a beneficial impact on blood sugar levels. To understand how raw or tender coconut is good for diabetes management it is necessary to have some basic knowledge about diabetes. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder where the body is unable to convert glucose or sugar that is absorbed from food, into energy. The conversion of glucose to energy requires the presence of insulin, a hormone that is secreted by the pancreas. 1 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 2 Warning: 3 Foods to Avoid These 3 Foods Should Come with a Warning Label Nucific In diabetes, either the pancreas cannot secrete insulin (type 1 diabetes) or the body does not utilize the insulin effectively (type 2 diabetes). As the body is unable to convert glucose into energy, the glucose remains in the bloodstream causing high blood sugar levels which has a very damaging effect on the body. Diabetics are prone to developing many other diseases like coronary heart disease and kidney disease. In fact, the majority of deaths in the case of diabetics is due to coronary heart disease. Benefits: Coconut meat is a rich source of nutrients and fiber. Coconut fiber helps in regulating blood sugar levels and can also reduce the risk of heart disease by helping to lower cholesterol levels. It has anti-cancer properties and acts as an aid in the digestive process. Coconut fiber helps bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract kill dangerous bacteria and also helps to expel intestinal parasites. It helps regulate blood sugar Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Coconut Water?

Can Diabetics Drink Coconut Water?

Coconut water is considered a healthy drink being rich in electrolyte, potassium and other nutrients. Many people believe that it is a healthy drink for diabetics too, as coconut water is low in calories, devoid of any artificial sweetener and is high in fibre. However, according to Dr Pradeep Gadge, diabetologist, Shreya Diabetes Centre, Mumbai, ‘Diabetics can have coconut water occasionally only if their sugar level is managed well. It is better they don’t make it a daily indulgence. Remember, coconut water is sweet and it does raise one’s sugar level, and that can be damaging for diabetics.’ That said, we aren’t telling you to quit coconut water just yet. It is better you ask your doctor or dietician whether coconut water is beneficial for you. There are many contradictory opinions about coconut water for diabetics and it is better that you don’t fall prey to advise of quacks. ‘Many think coconut water is healthy because it is natural, but there are contradictory opinions on this. We have patients who come to us and say that sugar level increases after consumption of this drink. In such case it is not advisable for every diabetic to consume coconut water regularly,’ points out Dr Gadge. So, it is better to make it an occasional indulgence if you are already struggling to keep your blood sugar under control. In fact, if you are a diabetic and suffer from a chronic kidney condition it is better to stay away from coconut water, warns Dr Gadge. ‘Coconut water is also rich in potassium, so if you suffer from kidney diseases or have any other condition that makes potassium levels rise in your blood, consumption of coconut water could be a disaster,’ he says. While potassium is an essential nutrient which helps in various functions of the body including Continue reading >>

Is Drinking Coconut Water Safe For Diabetics?

Is Drinking Coconut Water Safe For Diabetics?

Coconut water is one of the best natural drinks abundantly available around us. I’m not kidding. One look at the web magazines and web pages, and you’ll see celebrities promoting this refreshing drink as their ultimate ‘weight control’ weapon. It’s sweet, tasty, nutrient-dense—all without being too high in calories. And this is why coconut water is often recommended to those with high blood sugar levels. But, is it advisable to drink coconut water for diabetes? Let’s find out. Coconut Water—A Brief So, what’s so unique about this drink? Coconut water is fresh, sterile, and devoid of artificial sweeteners and preservatives. It is, therefore, safe for all to consume coconut water without worrying about any health risk. This drink is also an excellent electrolyte replenishment. It is rich in two essential salts—potassium and sodium, along with calcium, phosphorous, zinc, manganese, iron, copper, and fundamental amino acids. Coconut water also contains natural sugars like fructose (15%), glucose (50%) and sucrose (35%). Now let’s find out here can diabetic patient drink coconut water. Coconut Water For Diabetes – Is It Safe? Good news for people with diabetes around the world! Call it a work of the plentiful natural sugars or its sterile nature—coconut water has joyfully passed the safety test for diabetes—as stated in the February 2015 edition of the Journal of Medicinal Food (1). However, one should not exceed the limit of drinking coconut water every day, no matter how much you like it. This is because despite being a healthy drink coconut water does contain fructose, and although low in content (around 15%), fructose can interfere with your blood sugar levels. So, when should you stop? An ideal recommendation is 8 ounces (250 ml) twice a day. Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Coconut Fiber And Diabetes

Coconut Fiber And Diabetes

A diet that is high in fiber may prevent diabetes, and it is also important in controlling the disease once you have it. Simple carbohydrates like sugary pastries made with white flour are released into the system quickly. When you eat foods that are high in fiber instead, the process of releasing sugar into your system is slower. Fiber helps you avoid dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Daily Fiber Intake The U.S. National Academy of Science Institute of Medicine has issued recommendations that men who are 50 years of age and younger should eat 38 grams of fiber each day. Women of this age need 25 grams each day. Men over the age of 50 should eat 30 grams of fiber daily, and older women are recommended to eat at least 21 grams each day. Fiber does not have any nutritional value, but it keeps the digestive system working properly. It lowers cholesterol and helps you have regular bowel movements and avoid constipation. Health Benefits of Coconut Fiber You can regulate your blood sugar level by adding coconut fiber to your diet. Coconut fiber is in the meat of the coconut, so you can eat flaked coconut to get this fiber. Most coconut that is sold in grocery stores is covered with sugar, so it is important to find a brand that does not have added sugar. Another way to add coconut fiber to your diet, whether you have type 2 diabetes or another version of the disease, is to use coconut flour in recipes. A healthy diabetic diet should focus on the main food groups that include protein, fat and carbohydrates. Eating baked goods is usually the least important part of a diabetic diet. Most people love to eat sweets, so you may want to experiment with using coconut flour in your favorite dessert recipes. Try using half coconut flour and half unbleached flour, or one-fourth coco Continue reading >>

Coconut, Coconut Water, And Type 2 Diabetes

Coconut, Coconut Water, And Type 2 Diabetes

Many of us have romantic, idealized views of coconut think, a tropical island and a whole lot of vacation! But of course, coconuts, along with all their byproducts are not just found in tropical holiday destinations, they can be found in modern day supermarkets (coconut flour, shredded coconut, coconut milk, coconut water, etc.). Coconuts originated in India and Southeast Asia, and were eventually brought to the Americas. Its actually believed that they got their name from the Portuguese word coco, meaning laughing face because thats what Portuguese sailors thought they looked like. So when it comes to type 2 diabetes, how healthy is coconut and coconut water, in particular. You may be wondering are coconuts actually nuts? Technically, the coconut meets the criteria for being a Coconuts have an outer layer, a fibrous husk beneath that, and coconut meat (the white stuff that we eat) inside. Importantly, coconut water is not the same thing as coconut milk. Coconut milk is the creamy, white liquid that comes from mature coconuts. Its often used in rich dishes such as curries. Coconut water (which well be focusing on in this article) comes from young coconuts. Keep that in mind the mature and the young coconuts produce different byproducts, which have different nutritional qualities. Coconut meat is moderately high in calories ( cup contains 71 calories), principally because of its high fat content made up of medium-chain fats, otherwise known as coconut oil. about coconut oil over here and it's an extremely healthy source of fat that provides many health benefits. That same quarter cup of coconut meat contains around 6.5 to 7 grams of carbohydrates, minimal protein, and around 2 grams of fiber. Coconut's high fiber content is one major benefit of the food. It contains bot Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Coconuts?

Can Diabetics Eat Coconuts?

Diabetes isn't the death sentence it was in the days before insulin, but it's still not a condition to take lightly. A healthy lifestyle is crucial to living well with diabetes, and managing your diet plays a significant part in that process. Once you've learned how foods -- especially carbohydrates -- affect your blood sugar, you can evaluate foods such as fresh coconuts and make educated estimates about whether and when you can eat them. It's Not Black and White In its infancy, diabetes management focused largely on avoiding high-sugar foods. Medical professionals now have a more nuanced understanding of how foods affect blood sugar, and educators have moved away from simple lists of foods to eat and not eat. Instead the emphasis is on managing your total carbohydrate consumption. This includes favoring carbohydrates that digest slowly over those that digest quickly, which helps avoid major swings in your blood sugar levels. Savvy meal planners also pay attention to dietary fiber, which slows the absorption of carbs and sugars from your foods. Carbs and Coconuts Fresh coconut is a very modest contributor to your daily total consumption of carbohydrates, in part because a little goes a long way. It's often shaved or shredded into dishes as a garnish because solid pieces require a jaw-tiring quantity of chewing. Consider a 2-inch square of coconut, roughly 1/2 inch thick, a good snack-sized portion. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's figures estimate that total carbohydrates would account for 6.9 grams of its 45-gram weight, or roughly 2 percent of your recommended daily allowance. Of that 6.9 grams, only 2.8 grams come in the form of sugar. Finding the Fiber Just as importantly, coconut is an exceptional source of dietary fiber. So much so, in fact, that coconut fibe Continue reading >>

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