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Is Finger Millet Good For Diabetes?

What Makes Millets A Super Food For Diabetics

What Makes Millets A Super Food For Diabetics

What makes millets a super food for diabetics Millets are not just bird seed, but the secret to enjoying your grains while staying gluten free, keeping your blood sugar low and accelerating weight loss Millets are tiny seeds of the grass family that originated in Africa and Asia. Consumed traditionally in South India, these easy to cook goodies are nutritious, cultivated with less water, are pest resistant and therefore environment friendly. They come at a marginally higher expense but are richer in protein, fat, fibre and other nutrients than grains like wheat and rice. Millets are a powerhouse of the following nutrients: Fibre offers satiety therefore is a good choice to manage blood sugars and diabetes Beta-glucan [soluble fibre] lowers cholesterol and triglycerides Resistant starch helps in the growth of good bacteria in the gut Bran is not digested and aids easy bowel movement preventing constipation Millets contain higher amounts of protein in comparison to rice and wheat. Typically grains lack an essential amino acid called lysine. Finger and foxtail millet contains more lysine. High protein content increases serotonin which is a feel good factor and it helps to induce sleep B vitamins, B3, B6, and folic acid makes one feel energetic Magnesium is an anti-stress mineral and together with potassium helps to reduce blood pressure and boosts heart health Calcium and phosphorus are good for bone health, however the absorption of calcium may be not be optimal due to the presence of anti-nutrients like phytates, phenols, enzyme inhibitors and tanins Iron is vital for stamina and its absorption in finger millet [ragi] can be enhanced by malting. Most of the common food items prepared with rice or wheat can be replaced with millets either partly or whole. Millets contain Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Finger Millet (ragi)

Health Benefits Of Finger Millet (ragi)

Finger Millet (Eleusine coracana L.), also known as Ragi, is cultivated in drier parts of the world - mainly in Asia and Africa. Ragi has a distinct taste and is widely used in Southern Indian and Ethiopian dishes. Ragi is a rich source of Calcium, Iron, Protein, Fiber and other minerals. The cereal haslow-fatcontent and contains mainly unsaturated fat. It is easy to digest and does not contain gluten; people who are sensitive to gluten can easily consumeFingerMillet. Ragi is considered one of the most nutritious cereals. It has different names in local languages. It is known as Ragi in Telugu and Kannada, Kelvaragu/aariyamin Tamil, andMadua/Mangal in Hindi. Despite its popularity for generations, Finger Millet today struggles to find a place in the modern diet. We will take a look at immense health benefits that Finger Millet offers. Finger Millet/ Ragi for High Protein content Ragi has very high protein content which is of the order found in rice. Few varieties of Ragi even contain double the protein found in rice. Protein found in finger millet is good quality protein since it has eleusinin which can be easily absorbed by the body. Unlike most cereals, Ragi also contains tryptophan, methionine, and cystine which are important for maintenance of health. Ragi is full of minerals. Calcium, Phosphorous, Iron and Potassium are found in Ragi. The concentration of Calcium in Ragi is five to thirty times that found in other cereals. Finger Millet is certainly a natural alternative to health supplements. Consumption of Ragi is known to have a positive impact on people who have low hemoglobin count and those at risk of osteoporosis. In a study The Lost Crops of Africa by National Academies Press, Ragi has been called a Super Cereal. The study elaborated that people from Ugand Continue reading >>

Dietary Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes: How Millet Comes To Help

Dietary Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes: How Millet Comes To Help

Go to: Type 2 Diabetes Overview and Associated Complications Diabetes is a chronic disease that is characterized by high level of blood glucose also known as hyperglycaemia. According to WHO 2015 published figure1, 9% of the world population aged 18 and above has contracted diabetes and an estimated 1.5 million deaths per year are attributed to diabetes directly. It is well known that glucose level of a diabetic patient increases dramatically beyond the normal range after a meal. It is also true that their blood glucose level would soon drop as the body failed to store the excess glucose for later use. Diabetes is classified into Types 1 and 2. Type 1 diabetes is also known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes as the patients’ pancreas cannot produce or produces little insulin and often presents itself from childhood (Diabetes.co.uk, 2016c). Type 2 diabetes (T2D), however, often first appears in adults when the body becomes resistant to insulin or fails to make sufficient amounts of insulin (Martin et al., 1992; Weyer et al., 2001). T2D comprises 90% of people with diabetes around the world (NHS choice, 2014). This can largely be the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity. Added complication to T2D is that it presents less marked symptoms than Type 1 diabetes and is often diagnosed only when complications have already arisen. Major complications caused by hyperglycaemia include atherosclerosis that hardens and narrows the blood vessels. Other diabetes-related complications are heart disease, stroke, retinopathy, and kidney failure (Bitzur et al., 2009; Sone et al., 2011). Diabetic retinopathy leads to blindness by causing cumulative damage to the small blood vessels in the retina and contributes to 1% blindness globally. Similarly, kidney f Continue reading >>

Effect Of Consumption Of Finger Millet On Hyperglycemia In Non-insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (niddm) Subjects

Effect Of Consumption Of Finger Millet On Hyperglycemia In Non-insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (niddm) Subjects

, Volume 57, Issue34 , pp 205213 | Cite as Effect of consumption of finger millet on hyperglycemia in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) subjects The effect of consumption of finger millet based diets on hyperglycemiawas studied in 6 noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) subjects.All the experimental diets were planned to be isocaloric and also tocontain 75 g equivalent of carbohydrate load so that glycemic responsecould be compared with a 75 g glucose load. The glycemic response tobreakfast items compared to that of glucose was determined by comparingthe areas under the 2 hr glucose response curve. Consumption of fingermillet based diets resulted in significantly lower plasma glucose levels,mean peak rise, and area under curve which might have been due to thehigher fiber content of finger millet compared to rice and wheat. Thelower glycemic response of whole finger millet based diets may also havebeen due to the presence of antinutritional factors in whole finger milletflour which are known to reduce starch digestibility and absorption. Dietary managementGlycemic responseNIDDMWhole andgerminated finger millet This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Jenkins DJ, Wesson V, Wolever JM, Osima A, Wong CC (1988) Wholemeal versus whole grain breads: proportion of whole or cracked gram and the glycaemic response. Br Med J 297: 950960. Google Scholar Toma ED, Lintas C, Clementi A, Marcelli M (1988) Soluble and insoluble dietary fiber in diabetic diets. Eur J Clin Nutr 42(4): 313319. Google Scholar Thorne JJ, Jenkins DJA, Thompson LU (1983) Factors affecting starch digestibility and the glycaemic responses with special reference to legumes. Am J Clin Nutr 4: 95103. Google Scholar Ram Continue reading >>

Ragi Helps Lower Risk Of Diabetes

Ragi Helps Lower Risk Of Diabetes

Q I am prediabetic. Someone told me eating ragi would be better than eating rice. Is that true? — G.H., Winterville A I am sure no one would have asked me this question 10 years ago, but not only do we have more diversity in our local citizenry but also greater interest in foods not grown or raised in eastern North Carolina. Ragi is not only of interest to those preparing Indian foods, but also to those looking for interesting vegan, vegetarian and/or gluten-free foods. I asked Bhvana Aneja, a clinical dietitian at Vidant Medical Center, to answer your question. Aneja provides nutrition assessments and intervention for patients throughout the hospital with a special interest in providing healing nutrition to patients in the intensive care units. In her answer she also provides us a way to prepare ragi. Here is what she wants you to know. Ragi is a cereal grain or finger millet originally from Ethiopia but also grown in India and Africa. It is a small-seeded grain, which is considered to be drought and pest resistant, and its scientific name is Elusine corcana. Eating ragi may in fact be healthier than white rice for some people, especially with diabetes, and here is why. Eating whole grains can be beneficial for prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Among people eating millet, a lower incidence of diabetes has been reported. Ragi contains much higher amounts of dietary fiber and minerals and more protein than rice. When comparing its calcium content to other popular cereals like rice, wheat, barley, oats and maize, it’s the best. It also has certain compounds that can contribute to antioxidant activity — the activity that helps prevent or delay cell damage. This helps resist aging and also metabolic diseases like diabetes and heart disease. People who eat Continue reading >>

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

By Tracey Neithercott; Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN If you're still spreading peanut butter and jelly on colorless Wonder bread or heaping your stir-fry on top of a pile of Uncle Ben's, it's time to wean yourself off the refined stuff and explore whole grains. Kudos to you if you've already made this trade-in; whole grains are higher in nutrients and will raise your blood glucose less than their refined counterparts do. Plus, unlike refined grains, they may protect your heart and help you maintain weight loss. The reason for the nutritional disparity between refined carbohydrates and whole grains lies in the processing. Whole grains contain an outer bran layer, a middle endosperm, and inner germ, but refined grains are stripped of everythingincluding protein and many key nutrientssave for the endosperm. Because they're less processed, whole grains have a lower glycemic index value than refined grains. Another point in the whole-grains column is their relatively high fiber content, which can help lower cholesterol levels, control blood glucose, and keep you feeling full long after eating. "It's really important to eat foods that are going to fill you up and not leave you hungry an hour later," so you don't binge post-meal, says Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian-nutritionist and author of the book Nutrition at Your Fingertips. Zied suggests gradually replacing your current processed foods, such as regular pretzels, with whole grains like air-popped popcorn (sans butter, of course, and not the microwave stuff). "You just really have to be aware," she says. "You need to think, 'Where am I willing to compromise?' " Many of these grains can be cooked just as you prepare rice. To do this, boil water or stocklook to your grain's packaging for grain-to-liquid rat Continue reading >>

Millets Can Work Magic On Diabetes: Study

Millets Can Work Magic On Diabetes: Study

Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study Millet can significantly bring down sugar levels in those suffering from type-2 diabetes. Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images) From a humble crop that once satiated the poor to the base of a gourmet meal for the health conscious, millets have made a comeback. While flavours of the grain may vary to suit modern palates, a doctor's ideal recipe is still traditional. A research paper has documented this formula and tracked its impact on people with diabetes. The study, undertaken by M V Hospital for Diabetes , found that replacing rice based dosas with ones made of foxtail millet (Thinai) can significantly bring down sugar levels in those suffering from type-2 diabetes. The research, published recently in the Indian Journal of Medical Research, is based on a survey undertaken on 105 patients in Chennai diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. "We wanted to estimate the effect of a single change in the diet in one of the meals and check the rise in their sugar levels," said Dr Vijay Viswanathan, who was part of the study team. A WHO-ICMR study based on non-communicable diseases' risk factor surveillance showed that the prevalence of diabetes is 10.4% of the population. In summers, diabetes-related emergencies spike by 25%, with many reporting exhaustion and dehydration. The participants surveyed, aged between 35 and 55, were divided into two groups. While one group was given rice dosa for breakfast on one day, the others ate dosas made of millets. Two days later, the plates were swapped be tween the groups. On both days, researchers first measured their fasting blood glucose levels and one and a half hours after breakfast, their levels again.While the glycaemic Continue reading >>

Here Is Why Millet Is A Miracle Food For Diabetics

Here Is Why Millet Is A Miracle Food For Diabetics

Since learning that two slices of wheat bread can raise blood sugar levels higher than a candy bar, many diabetics tend to avoid it. In fact, in order to stay ahead of the blood-sugar game that many diabetics have to play, many are discovering that their bodies actually feel better when they’re not eating wheat. While this can be due to an additional underlying viral condition that comes along with their disease, the point remains that it’s another food they can’t eat and this can become frustrating. While already feeling limited in their dietary intake, and like they’re left without a choice in the world after avoiding wheat, many diabetics feel hopeless that there are alternatives. This in turn can raise their stress levels and actually raise their blood sugar along with it. The Name Of The Game Is Keeping The Blood Sugar Down Regulating blood sugar levels is what’s on every diabetics mind, and it can make mealtimes stressful. Eating shouldn’t be stressful. In an attempt to figure out what they can eat, diabetics have finally found magic in Millet. Millet is as versatile as rice, without the blood sugar surge. A study done in India comparing the glycemic index of rice dosa (a type of pancake made from a fermented batter that is somewhat similar to a crepe) to millet dosas, has shown to have promising health benefits for diabetics when it comes to blood sugar levels. Advertisement The research, published recently in the Indian Journal of Medical Research, is based on a survey undertaken on 105 patients who have type-2 diabetes, in order to “estimate the effect of a single change in the diet in one of their meals and check the rise in their sugar levels," said Dr Vijay Viswanathan, who was part of the study team. The participants aged between thirty-five a Continue reading >>

Millet Connection - The Hindu

Millet Connection - The Hindu

Millets in ones diet can help prevent diabetes, says Dr. Vijay Viswanathan. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Prolonged exposure to diabetes damages important organs like the eye, the kidney, the heart and nerves, as the result of damage to small blood vessels. Heredity, obesity, stress, rich diet, and lack of physical activity are some of the causes for diabetes. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problems. Physical activity/exercise helps the muscles convert glucose to energy. But there is a risk of developing hypoglycemia. Shifting to a healthy diet and a brisk walk of more than five hours a week helps keep blood glucose level normal. As far as diet is concerned, millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet (Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil: Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi: Bajra, Tamil: Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi: Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua; Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets ar Continue reading >>

Millet & Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Millet & Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Tracey Roizman, DC is a writer and speaker on natural and preventive health care and a practicing chiropractor. She also holds a B.S. in nutritional biochemistry. A box of millet.Photo Credit: DAJ/amana images/Getty Images Millet is actually a group of related plants that produce small pearl-like grains and not a single plant. Millet is low in essential amino acids and higher than most grains in fat content, 75 percent of which is heart-healthy polyunsaturated fat. Millet has been shown to be potentially beneficial in the management of diabetes. Millet may make a good substitute for rice for some diabetics, according to Peter Belton, author of the book "Pseudocereals and Less Common Cereals: Grain Properties and Utilization Potential." Millet's high fiber content slows digestion and releases sugar into the bloodstream at a more even pace. This helps diabetics avoid dangerous spikes in blood sugar that lead to glucose spilling over into the urine, known as glucosuria. Millet also contains high quantities of methionine, an amino acid that is deficient in most grains, giving millet a valuable place in a vegetarian diet. Researchers at the department of biological chemistry and food science, faculty of agriculture, Iwate University, Japan reported that a high-fat diet containing 20 percent millet protein for three weeks significantly decreased glucose and triglyceride levels and increased levels of adiponectin -- a substance secreted by fat cells that regulates appetite -- in laboratory animals. Millet also increased levels of high-density lipoprotein, HDL, the good form of cholesterol. The researchers concluded that millet may potentially be useful at managing insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in Type 2 diabetes. The study was published in the February 2009 is Continue reading >>

5 Indian Millets For Sugar Control & Managing Diabetes

5 Indian Millets For Sugar Control & Managing Diabetes

Food, an energy reservoir often becomes a hurdle for people living with diabetes who have to consciously eat the right food to keep their blood sugar in check. Refined carbohydrate or sugar rich foods such as Bread, Donuts and tetra pack juices act as culprits whereas fibre and protein rich foods such as whole grains, pulses, oats, barley , millets, nuts , milk, raw veggies and fruits act as saviours. There are studies been done globally to find balanced diet, that can be recommended for diabetics, which is not only tasty but also gives energy boost. One such study reveals, Millets which are natural source of fibre, protein, calcium, magnesium, help control the blood sugar spike. Just replacing refined grains with these tiny but mighty Millets, open a whole new array of diet options for people living with diabetes. Pearl Millet (Bajra), Finger Millet (Ragi), Sorghum (Jowar), Little Millet (Varai, Sanwa) are millets that are easily available locally. Each of them supplements the diet with minerals, fibres, proteins and phytochemicals - the combination of which helps beat diabetes. Besides these nutrients, a non-nutrient yet beneficial component of millet is the fibre in it. Fibre is an indigestible part of food and helps in slow release of sugar into the blood after the breakdown of food, along with improving of insulin sensitivity ie, your body cells respond to the insulin and in turn use up the sugar released into the blood, thereby controlling blood sugar levels. Similar to fibre, proteins also help in controlled and slow release of sugar into the blood. Millets being a rich source of protein and fibre handle the sugar load in body more efficiently. Phytochemicals, found in the bran layers of millet are the non nutrient component commonly found in plant based food. It Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Finger Millet Feeding On The Early Responses During The Process Of Wound Healing In Diabetic Rats

The Effect Of Finger Millet Feeding On The Early Responses During The Process Of Wound Healing In Diabetic Rats

Volume 1689, Issue 3 , 4 August 2004, Pages 190-201 The effect of finger millet feeding on the early responses during the process of wound healing in diabetic rats Author links open overlay panel N.S.Rajasekaran In the present study, the role of finger millet feeding on skin antioxidant status, nerve growth factor (NGF) production and wound healing parameters in healing impaired early diabetic rats is reported. Hyperglycemic rats received food containing 50 g/100 g finger millet (FM). Non-diabetic controls and diabetic controls received balanced nutritive diet. Full-thickness excision skin wounds were made after 2 weeks prior feeding of finger millet diet. The rate of wound contraction, and the levels of collagen, hexosamine and uronic acid in the granulation tissue were determined. The skin antioxidant status and lipid peroxide concentration were also monitored during the study. In hyperglycemic rats fed with finger millet diet, the healing process was hastened with an increased rate of wound contraction. Skin levels of glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid and -tocopherol in alloxan-induced diabetic rat were lower as compared to non-diabetics. Altered activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were also recorded in diabetics. Interestingly, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were elevated in the wound tissues of all the groups, when compared to normal (unwounded) skin tissues. However, in diabetic rats the TBARS levels of both normal and wounded skin tissues were significantly elevated (P<0.001) when compared with control (non-diabetic) and diabetics fed with FM. Impaired production of NGF, determined by ELISA, in diabetic rats was improved upon FM feeding and further confirmed by immunocytochemical observations reflects the increased express Continue reading >>

Quick Fix: Millet For Diabetes

Quick Fix: Millet For Diabetes

A popular birdseed, millet doesnt have to be categorizedas only bird food. These tiny, round grains, while indigenous to Africa, have steadily spread across other continents with various varieties now readily available in markets over the world. Highly regarded for its richcontent of nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, zinc and vitamin B, millet is also a great source of heart-healthy polyunsaturated fats. Not to mention the appreciable amounts of dietary fiber, which can be beneficial in improving digestive health as well as protecting the heart against cholesterol deposition in the arteries. Apart from the above listed benefits, millet can also reduce your risk of diabetes and help manage it better. Itshigh-fiber content ensures slow release of glucose into the bloodstream, which helps maintain blood sugar levels. The grain also improves the levels of HDL (good cholesterol) in the body, which is useful for managing insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases that can be triggered by type 2 diabetes . The most importantingredient in milletthat works in preventing diabetes is the abundant supply of magnesium present in it. Magnesium acts as a co-factor for the enzymes involved in glucose metabolism as well as insulin secretion in the body. Use millet inyour breakfast porridge. Adda handful ofnuts and fruits to enhanceits nutritional value. Ground millet can be a great addition to your bread and muffin recipes. 1. Lee SH, Chung IM, Cha YS, Park Y. Millet consumption decreased serum concentration of triglyceride and C-reactive protein but not oxidative status in hyperlipidemic rats. Nutr Res. 2010 Apr;30(4):290-6. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2010.04.007. PubMed PMID: 20534332. 2. Lakshmi Kumari P, Sumathi S. Effect of consumption of finger millet on hyper Continue reading >>

Ragi ( Finger Millet) Porridge; Diabetes Friendly Thursday.

Ragi ( Finger Millet) Porridge; Diabetes Friendly Thursday.

Hypoglycemia ( decreased blood sugar level) is a major problem in diabetics. Anyone who is a diabetic, or anyone who lives in close proximity with a diabetic is familiar with this problem. One might wonder that if diabetes is a condition where the blood sugar levels are high, when does the blood sugar level drop and why is decreased blood sugar level a problem?? A certain level of blood sugar is essential for the human body to function. Just like money is the currency that makes the world function, glucose is the primary source of the energy currency called ATP ( Adenosine triphosphate) in the body. When glucose levels in the blood drop below a certain level, the body slows down and stops functioning. Signs of hypoglycemia include headache, increased sweating, dizziness.When hypoglycemia persists, individuals can become unconscious and on occasion death can also occur. Why does this happen in diabetics?? This is primarily because of the inequality between the anti-diabetic medication consumed and the food in the body at that time. Treatment of diabetes is a multi-tiered approach. The type of anti-diabetic medication the individual takes,whether oral anti-diabetic medication or insulin is used, plays an important role. Kindly read more here if interested. Bottom-line, the type of food consumed, how much of it is consumed and how frequently it is consumed are all important factors that determine the blood sugar level. So,what does one do when one is getting hypoglycemic?? One has to eat something immediately, preferably something that gives instantaneous energy like a little glucose powder, candy etc. This week the DFT team is bringing you "oil free food". So go ahead and binge on "oil free food". My conrtibution to this event is Ragi ( finger millet) porridge. My mother- Continue reading >>

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Home / Diet & Nutrition / Best Millet for Diabetes Mellitus Diabets mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problem. Role of millets in controlling diabetes mellitus Millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet(Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil:Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi:Bajra, Tamil:Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi; Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua: Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets are non-gluten, non-acid forming food and are high in protein, fiber, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. They not only help prevent diabetes but also other complications like heart disease and cancer. Millets are also relatively rich in B vitamins (especially niacin, B6 and folicacid) and phosphorus. Among the millets, pearl millet (Bajra) has the highest content of macro nutrients and micro nutrients such as iron, zinc , magnesium, phosphorus, folicacid and riboflavin. Finger m Continue reading >>

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