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Is Edema Caused By Diabetes?

Lower Limb Oedema In Diabetes

Lower Limb Oedema In Diabetes

Rowan Hillson October 2, 2017 Vol 34.8 October 2017 Quincy (1719) advocated Pulvis Hydragosus for dropsy (oedema): Take Cream of Tartar Mechoacan, Jalap Dwarf-Elder seeds Gamboge Nutmegs Mix into a Powder. This is an admirable good Medicine It wonderfully brings down the swellings in Dropsies and Cachectick Constitutions.1 Later that century William Withering said: In the year 1775, my opinion was asked concerning a family receipt for the cure of the dropsy. I was told that it had long been kept a secret by an old woman in Shropshire who had sometimes made cures after the more regular practitioners had failed it was not very difficult to perceive, that the active herb could be no other than the Foxglove.2 It did indeed cure the dropsy although usually while demonstrating the plants considerable toxicity. Fluid accumulates in tissues when more fluid leaves capillaries than is cleared by the lymphatic system. Causes include: raised capillary pressure, for example in heart failure, fluid overload, or venous obstruction (such as thrombosis); reduced plasma osmotic pressure, for example with low plasma albumin; and increased capillary permeability, for example in infection or inflammation. Malformed or damaged lymphatics prevent adequate fluid drainage.3 Hi I have very swollen feet, and lower legs are now Rock hard, I am not sure this is diabetes related help please????? Xxx.4 People with diabetes can get oedema virtually anywhere legs, abdomen, lungs, maculae and may have multiple reasons for oedema. This article discusses lower limb oedema of course if that is present, fluid retention may be present elsewhere. Some causes are discussed. Lower limb oedema is usually obvious, often pitting on gentle pressure but non-pitting when chronic. Adipose tissue does not pit but obes Continue reading >>

Peripheral Edema And Diabetes

Peripheral Edema And Diabetes

By Elizabeth Woolley | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Peripheral edema is swelling from the collection of fluid in the feet, ankles, and legs. It can occur in one or both of your lower extremities. If you have diabetes, you need to take extra precautions when you have edema. Edema is the result of damage to capillaries or increased pressure causing capillaries to leak fluid into surrounding tissues and result in swelling. People with diabetes often have circulation problems that can cause wounds to heal slowly or not at all. Edema makes it more difficult for wounds to heal. Therefore, controlling edema is essential. There are many common causes of edema that are fairly benign. Some examples of more common causes of peripheral edema, not specifically related to diabetes, include physical inactivity, standing or sitting for long periods of time, surgery, burns, hot weather, pregnancy, menstruation, menopause, contraceptive pills, certain medications, excessive salt intake, malnutrition, or a bad diet. Edema may present in only one extremity (rather than both) due to deep venous thrombosis (DVT), cellulitis , osteomyelitis , trauma, a ruptured Baker's cyst , or a lymphatic obstruction. Peripheral edema can also be associated with more serious conditionsmany of which can be associated with diabetes complications such as heart disease , venous insufficiency, liver disease, and kidney disease . Certain diabetes medications can also cause edema, specifically the thiazolidinedione drugs Actos and Avandia. These drugs have come under a cloud because of their potential cardiac adverse effects, and should not be used in anyone who has had a history of congestive heart failure. People with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or heart failure (such as congestive Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Edema

Diabetes And Edema

Edema is a medical condition caused by the abnormal fluid retention in the spaces between the body's cells or in the circulatory system. This medical condition causes puffiness and swelling in several areas of the body, including legs, arms, feet, hands, lungs, heart, or stomach area. Is there a connection between edema and diabetes? Let’s find out. There are basically three main types of edema associated with diabetes - macular edema, pulmonary edema, and foot and leg edema. The causes of diabetic edema include: Acute liver failure, cirrhosis Renal artery stenosis Chronic hepatitis Cardiovascular complications Nephrotic Syndrome or acute renal failure Medications used to treat diabetes Other factors such as premenstrual fluid retention, thiamine deficiency, protein losing enteropathy, pregnancy and acute anaphylaxis, also contribute to diabetic edema. Macular edema is a condition in which the macular tissue area, near the center of the retina gets filled with fluid. This area is mainly responsible for vision. Macular edema caused from diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes. The vision loss can progress, leading to eventual blindness. There are two types of macular edema, focal macular edema and diffuse macular edema. The first one is caused by vascular abnormalities, and can be treated using focal laser treatment. The second type is caused by dilated retinal capillaries. This condition can be treated with grid laser treatment, which is used to seal the leakages. Macular edema is caused by the increasing deposition of fluids and proteins on or under the macula of the eye. The macula is identified as a pale yellow area close to the center of the retina. A local swelling results from fluid and protein retention in the macula. The swelling soon directly press Continue reading >>

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Tweet Edema (known as oedema in the UK) is a build up of fluid in the body (water retention) which causes swelling. Edema commonly affects the legs, ankles, feet and wrist. Water retention is often treatable, with treatment varying depending on the cause. Symptoms of edema The main symptom of edema is swelling of the affected area. Other symptoms that may occur, along with swelling, include: Weight gain Aching limbs Stiff joints Discolouration of skin Hypertension (high blood pressure) What causes swelling in the legs, feet and ankles? Swollen ankles and legs will often be brought on, or aggravated, by long periods of standing. A number of medications can increase the risk of oedema. Such medications include corticosteroids, blood pressure medications and the contraceptive pill. Water retention may also be caused by a number of conditions including: A high intake of salt can increase the problems of swelling in people with kidney disease. Treatment for edema Treatment for edema may vary depending on the cause. Water retention may be resolved if the underlying cause can be adequately treated. Regular physical activity and preventing long periods of standing can help reduce water retention. A low dietary salt intake is advisable, particularly if fluid retention has been brought on by kidney disease. If you are overweight, weight loss can help with reducing fluid retention. Diuretics, also known as ‘water tablets’, help to remove fluid from the body and may be prescribed for some causes of oedema. Prevention You can reduce your risk of edema by taking steps to prevent kidney disease and heart failure from developing. This can be achieved through good control of blood glucose levels, regular exercise and a healthy diet. If you can avoid long periods of standing, this wi Continue reading >>

Edema

Edema

Abnormal accumulation of fluid in various body tissues, causing swelling. The swelling may affect any of a number of body sites, such as the legs, ankles, and feet; the hands; the back or abdomen; and even the eyelids. Edema may be caused by a number of different medical conditions and can also be a side effect of certain drugs. Here are some possible causes: Congestive heart failure may result in edema. To compensate for heart failure, in which the heart fails to circulate adequate amounts of blood, the kidneys retain sodium to help the body hold on to water and increase the volume of blood. Deep vein thrombosis, the formation of a blood clot in a deep vein within the leg, can cause edema by damaging the valves within the veins that control normal blood flow. This type of edema most commonly makes the ankles swell but may also cause swelling in the calf or even the thigh. Kidney diseases, such as diabetic nephropathy, may cause edema due to excess sodium and fluid retention. Edema may be a side effect of certain drugs, including the oral diabetes drugs pioglitazone (brand name Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia). People sometimes experience mild edema when starting on insulin therapy, but this generally goes away within a few weeks. If you experience any unusual swelling, be sure to contact your doctor. It may be the result of a medical condition you don’t know you have. Treating edema involves treating the underlying medical condition that is causing it or adjusting medication as necessary. This article was written by Robert S. Dinsmoor, a Contributing Editor of Diabetes Self-Management. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provide Continue reading >>

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes Basics

Basics of diabetes Diabetes is a condition caused by lack of a chemical in the body (a hormone) called insulin. There are two major forms of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes eventually no insulin is produced and individuals require insulin injections for survival. It used to be thought this only presented in children, but it is now clear this can occur at any age. The other more common form of diabetes called type 2 diabetes occurs due to the body's resistance to the effects of insulin in addition to an insufficient quantity of insulin. However, in this type of diabetes there is usually some insulin produced. For both types of diabetes, blood glucose levels are elevated. Furthermore, people with diabetes are prone to certain complications not seen in those without diabetes. These complications involve the eye (retinopathy), kidney (nephropathy) and nerves (neuropathy). People with diabetes also get early hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), leading to early heart attacks and strokes. The good news for people with diabetes is that with proper care all of these problems can be avoided. Immediate medical attention Uncontrolled diabetes presents with frequent thirst and urination. Over time, patients will become dehydrated as the glucose is "spilling" over into the urine. If insulin deficiency is severe enough, fat stores are used for energy as glucose cannot get into cells. This problem is much more common with type 1 diabetes and is called "ketoacidosis". It can be diagnosed at home with a simple urine test. When significant ketones are found in the urine, it is important to be in touch with a physician immediately. There are other conditions that require immediate attention. Blurry vision in someone with known diabetic eye disease or someone with a long history of di Continue reading >>

Diabetic Macular Edema

Diabetic Macular Edema

Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) is an accumulation of fluid in the macula—part of the retina that controls our most detailed vision abilities—due to leaking blood vessels. In order to develop DME, you must first have diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a disease that damages the blood vessels in the retina, resulting in vision impairment. Left untreated, these blood vessels begin to build up pressure in the eye and leak fluid, causing DME. DME usually takes on two forms: Focal DME, which occurs because of abnormalities in the blood vessels in the eye. Diffuse DME, which occurs because of widening/swelling retinal capillaries (very thin blood vessels). Diabetic Retinopathy and DME are common problems for diabetics. Roughly 8% of the U.S. population is diabetic, and about 28% of those diabetics have eye trouble because of it. Often, DME is associated with: those who have had diabetes for an extended amount of time, severe hypertension (high blood pressure), fluid retention, hypoalbuminemia (low levels of protein in body fluids), and hyperlipidemia (high levels of fats in the blood). DME Symptoms: Common symptoms of DME are blurry vision, floaters, double vision, and eventually blindness if it goes untreated. Treatments for DME: The treatments for focal and diffuse DME differ, but they both involve laser procedures. Most doctors use focal laser treatment to treat focal DME and grid laser treatment to treat diffuse DME. The goal of both kinds of procedures is to stop the leakage in the macula. DME Procedure Recovery: Normal recovery time after a DME procedure is 3-6 months. As the eye heals and the swelling in and around the macula subsides, you may experience sensitivity to light, irritation in the eye, and black spots in the center of your vision. These are nor Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

If you are diabetic, you need to worry about a lot more things like heart diseases and leg swelling. This causes peripheral edema in some cases and can be painful. If you see symptoms of swelling in your ankles, lower legs or feet, it is time to pay your physician an emergency visit. Diabetes expand blood circulation in an inappropriate way, which can cause swelling in the lower leg region. However, there could be other reasons as well that would cause the swelling. So a visit to the doctor is a must. Diabetes is a serious disease which gives rise to many further complications; swelling in the legs is one of them. Let’s discuss a few reasons that could be contributing to the swelling and its cure. What can lead to leg swelling? For any diabetic patient, it is a must to consult a doctor in case you notice any changes in the body. A patient who’s been living with diabetes for several years needs to be extra careful because this disease comes with so many attached risks. If you are diabetic and have noticed some leg swelling recently, the following could be a few reasons for it. The main reason for leg swelling in diabetes is peripheral edema. Fluids collect in the feet, ankles and leg and this condition can become quite severe if left untreated. A consultation with a doctor is a must. Sometimes, a diabetic may suffer from diabetic neuropathy. This is a condition that leads to numbness in legs and feet. As a result, the diabetic may not be able to feel an injury, maybe something even as severe as a sprain or a fracture and continue to use the limb. But the swelling caused by the injury is what will raise concern, which is why a consultation with the doctor becomes very important. Diabetics have low immunity towards infections and your swelling could very well be a sign Continue reading >>

Diabetic Legs Swelling Causes And Remedies

Diabetic Legs Swelling Causes And Remedies

Many people suffering from diabetes complain about swelling in legs and feet. Usually, this swelling is painless and due to retention of fluid. There can be numerous reasons leading to such retention, from very high and uncontrolled sugar levels (which is dangerous for various organs) to the secondary complications of diabetes. Usually, fluid retention indicates that either heart of a diabetic person has become weak. Thus there is a poor flow of fluids, or kidneys are not functioning properly. In some cases, it may be due to liver disease or some anti-diabetic medications. Other reasons of such swelling could be a disease of blood vessels, or deficit of certain micronutrients and electrolytes(“Swelling and Diabetes – Swollen Legs, Ankle & Feet, Peripheral Edema,” n.d.). Let us look in detail at some leading causes of swelling of legs in diabetes. Congested heart failure The major complication of diabetes is weakening of heart and blood vessels. Congested Heart Failure (CHF) often coexists in diabetes(Nasir & Aguilar, 2012). In fact, a person suffering from diabetes is at much higher risk of heart failure(Nichols, Gullion, Koro, Ephross, & Brown, 2004). In CHF though the heart is functioning, but its pumping power is compromised, which means that it is not strong enough for blood to circulate properly in our body. Things are further made worse by stiffening of arteries(“Heart failure,” n.d.). All this leads to swelling and accumulation of fluids in the legs. Kidney failure More than one-third people suffering from diabetes have chronic kidney disease(“Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease,” 2014). Diabetes is slowly emerging one of the leading causes of chronic kidney disease. Almost half of people going for dialysis, also have diabetes(Cavanaugh, 2007). In d Continue reading >>

Is Swelling Related To High Blood Sugar?

Is Swelling Related To High Blood Sugar?

Insulin is a hormone that transfers sugar from your blood to your cells. When you have insufficient amounts of insulin -- or your cells are resistant to insulin -- a you may develop high blood sugar. High blood sugar is the predominant characterization of diabetes, but it is also associated with people who have pre-diabetes. High blood sugar can lead to complications of diabetes that include conditions which involve swelling. Video of the Day Swelling, also called edema, is the enlargement of a body tissue, such as skin or an organ. A buildup of fluid in the tissue causes swelling to take place in a local area in several parts throughout your body and leads to rapid weight gain in a short period of time. Common parts of the body that can be affected include the feet, legs, gums, face, blood vessels, joints and glands. Swelling can occur when you eat too much sodium or take diabetes medications called thiazolidinediones. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes characterized by swelling of the lenses of your eyes that is caused by damage to your blood vessels from high levels of blood sugar. Initially, you may not know you have any problems and your eyesight may appear fine. Over time, though, excessive levels of blood sugar in the capillaries that nourish your retina can cause diabetic retinopathy and vision loss. In fact, the higher the levels of blood sugar, the more likely you will damage blood vessels and develop diabetic retinopathy. High blood sugar increases your risk of an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, conditions characterized by blockage of a blood vessel supplying the brain, or bleeding into or around the brain, respectively. High blood sugar can cause more swelling associated with a stroke. Research by scientists at the Seoul Continue reading >>

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

Most patients suffering from diabetes complain of swelling in the feet and legs. The main reason for this problem is improper blood circulation due to damaged blood capillaries as a result of increased pressure. Damaged capillaries cause peripheral oedema, leakage of fluids into surrounding tissues, which causes swelling. But, there can be several other reasons that could cause swelling in the feet. Therefore proper diagnosis is important. Poor circulation is also one of the reasons why wounds in diabetic patients don’t heal quickly. Mr Bhushan Hemade of Diaped, a chain of multi-disciplinary foot clinics says ‘Foot problems are common in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious.’ They increases the risk of infections and severe complications like foot ulcers and gangrene that can even lead to limb amputation. That’s why, you should not ignore even minor swelling in your feet. In most cases, when the swelling has just started, simple lifestyle changes can reduce swelling and provide relief to a great extent. 1. Exercise regularly: Mr Hemade says ‘Regular exercise will improve bone and joint health in your feet and legs, improve circulation to your legs, and will also help to stabilize your blood sugar levels. But you should consult your doctor prior to beginning any exercise program.’ Do not practice rigorous exercises as it can lead to exercise-induced oedema. 2. Elevate your legs: Elevation of feet (above the heart level) using a support or a pillow for 10-15 minutes every day can help to reduce swelling. Elevation drains out excess fluid from the surrounding tissues and improves circulation. 3. Use compression stockings and bandages: Compression products are now widely available for foot care in diabetics. They exert pressure on the affected are Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Water Retention: How Are They Related?

Diabetes And Water Retention: How Are They Related?

By pH health care professionals If you have diabetes, or if someone close to you does, perhaps you’ve noticed some swelling in the ankles where fluid has built up, causing a puffy appearance. This is typically water retention, also called edema, and is relatively common among diabetics. Let’s take a look at how diabetes and water retention are related. What is water retention? Water retention is a buildup of fluid in an area of the body, causing swelling, often in the ankles, feet, wrists and/or arms. So, how are diabetes and water retention related? The most common type of water retention is in the legs and feet (peripheral edema). Sometimes, water retention occurs as a side effect of insulin therapy or diabetes drugs. Peripheral edema is sometimes a symptom of kidney problems or heart failure related to diabetes. However, water retention can occur as a result of an injury, surgery, long plane rides, pregnancy, hormone changes and certain medications. But if you have diabetes, you need to be extra cautious as water retention can make it more difficult for wounds to heal. Read here for other causes of water retention. So, how can you be more proactive? Work with a doctor. While the water retention itself may not seem to be giving you any trouble, it may be a red flag for something else, so it’s important to be proactive and tell your doctor right away about any swelling. Utilize body composition testing on a regular basis. You can gauge whether your body’s fluids are out of balance even before you see significant swelling through body composition testing. It only takes a few minutes to get information that can save you time, money and stress. Be proactive. Get to the root cause of your water retention. There may be other factors including problems with the thyro Continue reading >>

Edema And Diabetes

Edema And Diabetes

Definition A chronic disease that results when the body's insulin does not work effectively. Insulin is a hormone released by the pancreas in response to increased levels of blood sugar (glucose) in the blood. Alternative Names Noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus; Diabetes - Type II Causes, incidence, and risk factors Diabetes mellitus, a life-long disease for which there is not yet a cure, is caused by a problem in the way the body makes or uses insulin. Insulin is necessary for glucose to move from the blood to the inside of the cells. Unless glucose gets into cells, the body cannot use it for energy. Excess glucose remains in the blood, and is then removed by the kidneys. Symptoms of excessive thirst, frequent urination, hunger, fatigue, and weight loss develop. There are several types of diabetes: type I diabetes, which requires total insulin replacement in order to live; type II diabetes, which is related to insulin resistance, obesity, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure; and gestational diabetes mellitus, which occurs during pregnancy. Diabetes affects up to 6% of the population in the U.S. and type II diabetes accounts for 90% of all cases. A main component of type II diabetes is insulin resistance at the level of the fat and muscle cells. This means the insulin produced by the pancreas cannot connect with cells to let glucose inside and produce energy. This causes hyperglycemia (high blood glucose). To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin. The cells sense this flood of insulin and become more resistant, resulting in high glucose levels and often times high insulin levels. A person with type II diabetes often does not require insulin injections. The primary treatment is exercise and diet. Type II diabetes usually occurs gradually. Some 75% to Continue reading >>

5 Tips To Reduce Feet, Leg And Ankle Swelling

5 Tips To Reduce Feet, Leg And Ankle Swelling

Swollen ankles and feet can be painful, and are common for those with diabetes. Standing or walking for long periods of time can cause an abnormal fluid buildup in the ankles, feet and legs — especially among older adults. Here are some tips that may help. Continue reading >>

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