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Is Eddoes Good For Diabetics?

Top Five Reasons Why You Should Eat Taro Root (arbi)

Top Five Reasons Why You Should Eat Taro Root (arbi)

Top five reasons why you should eat Taro root (Arbi) By Salome Phelamei | Updated: Sep 17, 2015, 13:27 PM IST Have you ever eaten this delicious food Taro root, also known as arbi in Hindi? If not, you should start including this nutty vegetable into your diet to enjoy the rich nutrients of this wonderful gift of nature. The leaves, roots, and corms of taro can be used as dietary ingredients, but the plant must be cooked before consuming. The scientific name for Taro is Colocasia esculenta. Also Read:Want quick relief from acidity? Try these 10 home remedies Colocasia esculenta, believed to be native to Southern India and Southeast Asia, usually grows wild in wet or dry places. This vegetable is also easy to digest and has many healing properties. Taro is also loaded with potassium, phosphorous, magnesium, manganese and copper. Taro also includes several calcium, vitamin C, vitamin E and B vitamins. Taro root contains a good amount of dietary fiber and carbohydrates, as well as vitamins A and C. Also Read:Lesser known health benefits of pears Here are some benefits of this delicious root vegetable: Blood pressure and heart health: Taro root is low in sodium content and fat, but contains minerals like potassium and magnesium which help in fluid retention. It also helps to relieve stress and pressure on blood vessels and arteries. Cancer: Taro root is rich in vitamin A, vitamin C and other phenolic antioxidants, which help in the elimination of free radicals that cause several cancers in the body. Diabetes: Dietary fiber found in taro root lowers the risk of developing diabetes as it helps in regulating the glucose and insulin in the body. Taro root is also a great alternative for diabetics due to its low glycaemic index. Weight loss: Since taro root has a low caloric co Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Taro Root

Health Benefits Of Taro Root

Home Vegetables Health benefits of Taro root What is taro root? Amongst root tubers used as food, taro is one of the most popular edible tubers food globally. As vegetable root it is used in various parts of South and South East Asia, Pacific Islands, West African regions and South American region around Amazon. This tuber is rich in starch and can be cooked very similar to potato fry, bake, boil or steam. It offers a sweet nutty flavor to food. It has a hairy outer skin which often has to be removed. Raw taro root is toxic in nature and it is inedible before cooking. Edible taro root is known by various other names cocoyam, dasheen, colocasia, eddo root, elephants ear (plant and leaves), kalo, etc. In India it is known as Arbi (Hindi), chembu kizhangu (Malayalam), sivapan-kizhangu (Tamil) chamagadda or chaama dumpa (Telegu) kacchalo (Punjabi). In Fillipino tagalong it is known as gabi ugat. In Spanish it is referred as yautia or malanga. Taro has special place in native Hawaiian food. Hawaiian taro or Kalo as it is popularly known, is used in staple diet in Hawaii. According to an anecdote, Kalo was ancestor of these islanders and power which kept Hawaiians united as family. Kalo food festival is time when Hawaiians celebrate with Hawaiian taro roots recipes. Poi or mashed taro root is a popular Hawaiian food made from taro root. Another variety, Purple taro plant has tubers with light purple colour due to presence of few phytonutrients. They offer beautiful color to the food. Taro root is rich in carbohydrates most of this is in form of digestible starch. 100 grams of taro root offers about 110 calories of energy. Around one sixth of root by weight are dietary fibers. It is rich source of vitamin E and other vitamins including Vitamin A , folic acid, riboflavin. It o Continue reading >>

This One Ingredient Can Prevent Diabetes, Colon Cancer And Hypertension!

This One Ingredient Can Prevent Diabetes, Colon Cancer And Hypertension!

/ This one ingredient can prevent diabetes, colon cancer and hypertension! This one ingredient can prevent diabetes, colon cancer and hypertension! If you knew it would be so good for your health, you would eat it often. Taro roots, arbi, arvi or colocasia roots are white roots that are known for their characteristic nutty flavour. A popular vegetable in North Indian cuisine, arbi or taro roothas a host of health benefits due to a wide range of nutrients present in them. Here are some benefits of this root vegetable: Due to its low glycemic index [1], arbi is good for reducing fatigue and hence is consumed by athletes for energy build up. Due to its low glycemic index and being a good dietary carbohydrate [1], arbi is a great alternative for diabetic people. Taro roots are also a rich source of dietary fibre, which helps in regulating the glucose and insulin levels in the body, thereby lowering the risk of developing diabetes. Taro roots or arbi is high in carbohydrates and calories. Regular consumption of arbi, thus, assists in healthy weight gain [2]. You can also gain weight with this expert recommended diet plan . The high dietary fibre [4] content of arbi is very useful during digestion. The high starch content also helps in easy digestion of the root. A study [2] indicates that consumption of arbi roots can help ward off conditions like gastroenteritis, diarrhea, bloating, flatulation, constipation and irritable bowel syndrome and help in the smooth functioning of the digestive tract. Do you know what could interfere with your digestion ? The anti-inflammatory activity and presence of Vitamin E help in reducing dandruff and prevent hair loss. In fact, arbi juice can be used in reducing the symptoms of alopecia [3] and prevent baldness too. Arbi is rich in antioxi Continue reading >>

Eddoes | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Eddoes | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I've been trying to look for the nutritional values of these. They are supposedly high in carbs but low in sugar? Not sure how that works. Jerusalems are carby but in the form of inulin so therefore not digestible (hence the nickname, fartichokes). Does anyone have any info on Eddoes? I have done a Google but simply can't find the info. Thanks WJ. It's where I got the original info from. It says; which is why I'm a bit confused. I've been searching for blooming ages for more info but can't find it. The lappie lives but not if my frustration gets any worse! this was for fro Tescos eddoes and is of course only as accurate as the person who recorded it. I sounds about right for a root veg. I have to admit I had to look it up, I knew of dasheen and taro which are similar but I've never eaten it. Wiki says taro is toxic when raw, and that it is recommended to take milk or other calcium rich foods with it so don't go poisoning yourself! Found a study looking at GI, GL of carribean foods. Continue reading >>

Caribbean Food Goes Back To Its Roots + Recipes

Caribbean Food Goes Back To Its Roots + Recipes

Caribbean Food Goes Back to Its Roots + Recipes The Caribbean islands, land of white sand beaches and tourist delights, is a collection of approximately 31 islands that starts alphabetically with Anguilla and goes right through to the United Virgin Islands. Local cuisine is diverse, as would be expected from such a cultural crossroads, and features flavors of French, Creole, African and Caribbean International cooking, sometimes in surprising new combinations. One of the most traditional ways of keeping healthy in the islands is by reverting back to basics with what is termed ground provision. This is a local way of collectively referring to root vegetables, such as yams, sweet potatoes, cassava, eddoes and dasheen root. Since the islands were originally agrarian, many of the national dishes of the Caribbean use some form of ground provision in their signature dishes, whether boiled, fried, mashed, baked or made into a pie. They add a unique flavor and also thicken the dish, adding texture and complex layers of flavor that cannot be found with any other vegetable. Barbados serves Bajan Flying Fish with a side of ground provision; the Dominican Republic favors sancocho, a hearty soup with chunks of ground provision; and in Jamaica it forms the basis of Ital food, which is food prepared without any animal products, sugar or salt. Yah mon! Yams are irregular potato-shaped root vegetables that come in about 200 varieties. The outer skin can be deep-brown, purple or white in color. The inside is pure white and becomes creamy when cooked. It is packed with manganese, which activates the bodys enzymes, adding vitamin B6 and C, potassium and dietary fibers. It is of particular interest to women as it assists with PMS, morning sickness, and development of healthy breast tissue. Continue reading >>

Starch And Root Vegetables And Diabetes

Starch And Root Vegetables And Diabetes

There are a whole range of root vegetables and most of them are also starches – a type of carbohydrate. Basically, some plants store glucose as starch – giant chains of sugars. So when it comes to root vegetables and starches, are they safe for type 2 diabetics to eat or not? Well, let's dig in and explore the facts. Root Vegetables Nutrition Facts As you can see the veggies from swede up are relatively low in carbs, while the ones downwards are high in carbs – potatoes being the highest. Glycemic Index of Root Veggies Glymeic index (GI) is a valid measure for higher carb foods but just remember the amount of carbs you eat is the most important thing that influences blood sugar and A1C. GI is a measure of how fast different food affects blood sugar levels. Anything below 55 is considered a low GI and anything above that is considered high GI. The lower the GI the better it's going to be for you if you're diabetic, the higher…well the worse it is. Health Hubs sums it up well: “Root vegetables and tubers are relatively concentrated sources of sugars and starches and tend to contain only small amounts of fiber. This can be problematic for diabetics because they can produce a large glycemic response in situations when they are not combined with high fiber foods…The lowest GI vegetables are yams, carrots and sweet potatoes with GI values of 38, 47 and 55 respectively. High GI root vegetables include potatoes (GI of 60-90), parsnip (97), rutabaga (71), and beets (65).” As you can see, yams and carrots are really your best 2 options here, followed by a small amount of sweet potato on the odd occasion. BUT, that's only when it comes to GI levels – you still have to keep the amount of carbs in mind. If you eat raw carrots it lowers their GI even more, down to jus Continue reading >>

Is Cassava A Diet Alternative For Diabetics?

Is Cassava A Diet Alternative For Diabetics?

A large basket filled with cassava.Photo Credit: slpu9945/iStock/Getty Images Is Cassava a Diet Alternative for Diabetics? Joshua Beidler has been writing about health and nutrition since 2008. In addition to being the author of two books, he has written for "Vision Magazine" and other publications. Beidler holds a certificate in clinical nutrition, as well as a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of San Diego. Cassava is widely cultivated as a food crop in tropical and subtropical areas of Africa, Asia and Latin America. The starchy roots of this plant are used to make tapioca and many other foods. If cassava is not properly prepared, it contains toxic compounds that may increase your risk of developing diabetes. However, cassava may be a healthier choice for diabetics than some other starches because of its relatively low glycemic index. The edible part of the cassava plant is a starchy tuber which has similar nutritional properties to other root crops such as potatoes, taro, and yams. One ounce of cassava contains nearly 11 g of carbohydrates, but less than 1 g each of protein and fat. This portion size provides 10 percent of the Recommended Daily Allowance for vitamin C. It is a poor source of most other vitamins and minerals. In an 1994 article for the journal "Acta Horticulturae," A.O. Akanji says that cassava has been suspected of causing diabetes. However, several studies have shown a low incidence of diabetes in Africans who eat cassava regularly. In one study published in the December 2006 issue of "Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology," none of the 1,381 subjects had diabetes, even though cassava accounted for a full 84 percent of their caloric intake. A second study, published in the October 1992 issue of "Diabetes Care," noted that Tanzanians wh Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Suitable Foods For Diabetics

Diabetes: Suitable Foods For Diabetics

"A great book that shatters so many of the nutritional fantasies andfads of the last twenty years. Read it and prolong your life." "NH&WL may be the best non-technical book on diet everwritten" Joel Kauffman, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of the Sciences,Philadelphia, PA Diabetes affects different people in different ways, depending on their degree of diabetic complication, but, while different amounts of carbs may be eaten for this reason, the types of foods to eat and to avoid is the same for all. Below are lists of foods to avoid, and foods to eat. Below those are two lists of fruit and vegetables which give quantities that provide 10 grams or 5 grams of carbs. These lists are by no means exhaustive. They are here to help you to decide what and how much you can eat to eat to manage your condition. NOTE that the lists do not mention nuts. This is because nuts generally come in packets which list their carb content. The 'nuts' to beware of are peanuts as these are not true nuts, but legumes (like peas and beans) and have a higher ratio of carbs to protein and fat. Below is a list of foods to avoid. Some will be obvious others less so. Sugar and artificial sweeteners, including honey. The only allowed sweetener is stevia. (Sugar is a problem as it is addictive. I suggest you cut down gradually until you can do without. The other option is to go 'cold turkey' and stop it altogether. This will give you withdrawal symptoms, just like stopping any other addictive drug. But this will wear off within about two weeks.) Sweets and chocolates, including so-called sugar-free types. (If you want a chocolate treat, say once a week, then eat Continental dark chocolate with 70% or more cocoa solids, not the British stuff where sugar is the first named ingredient.) Foods which Continue reading >>

8 Amazing Taro Root Benefits

8 Amazing Taro Root Benefits

The health benefits of taro root include its ability to improve digestion , lower blood sugar levels, prevent certain types of cancers , protect the skin , enhance vision, increase circulation, decrease blood pressure, aid the immune system, and prevent heart disease, while also supporting muscle and nerve health. Taro root, which is the thick, tuber stalk of the taro plant is an extremely important part of global cuisines and diets, as it has been for thousands of years. In fact, taro is considered to be one of the first cultivated plants in human history. Its scientific name is Colocasia esculenta and it has a fascinating history. It is believed to be native to Southeast Asia and southern India , but it is cultivated and used in many places all around the world. Fascinatingly, it seems as though every culture uses taro in a slightly different way, depending on how it is prepared and the variety of the crop that is grown. It is also one of the few crops that can grow in flooded areas, due to its petioles, which can transfer materials even whilst underwater. It is a staple food in African, Indian, and Oceanic cuisines, but it can be found everywhere from Japan, Egypt, and Suriname to the United States, Fiji, and Spain. The most common form is dasheen, and the plant is also commonly known as elephant ears, due to the shape of the broad leaves. The leaves, roots, and corms can be used as dietary ingredients, but the plant must be cooked. It is actually toxic in raw form , due to the high content of oxalates, but those dangerous substances can be eliminated when cooked with some baking soda or if steeped overnight. The reason that this plant is so widely used is due to the ease with which it grows and the size/sustenance it can provide. More than 11.3 million metric tons Continue reading >>

What Is Taro Good For?

What Is Taro Good For?

Dubbed as the potatos hairy and unfortunate-looking cousin, taro is actually a culinary favorite in many cultures around world. In Hawaii, its transformed into poi, a traditional dish of mashed taro roots and water, and served to guests or fed to babies. 1 Taro chips (baked not fried), on the other hand, is becoming a popular healthy alternative to MSG-loaded processed potato chips, and can be found in many health stores today. Despite its odd and unappetizing appearance, theres actually more to taro than meets the eye. Heres everything you need to know about taro. The Potato of the Tropics: What Is Taro? Large and herbaceous, taro (Colocasia esculenta) is a perennial from the Araceae (aroid) family that can be identified by its frilly, heart-shaped leaves that grow at the end of long and stout petioles, resembling an elephants ear. The taro plant can grow anywhere between 5 to 6 feet tall. 2 It also goes by other names, such as dasheen, Chinese potato, cocoyam, curcas and dalo. 3 Taro is native to India and Southeast Asia, and has earned the moniker the potato of the tropics. 4 It grows best in warm humid climates, thriving in marshy locations with wet soils. Its an extremely hardy plant, which contributes to its popularity in these regions. In fact, taro is one of the few crops that can grow in flooded regions. 5 The starchy, underground-growing corm, known as the taro root, is a staple food in these areas, as well as in China, Hawaii, Africa and the Caribbean. 6 The taro root is usually the size of a turnip but oblong-shaped, with a brown and fibrous (sometimes hairy) skin. The surface has circular rings that indicate where it has been attached to the scaly leaves. 7 When cut, the flesh of the taro root in most varieties is usually white or cream-colored, although t Continue reading >>

Nutritional Value Of Eddoes

Nutritional Value Of Eddoes

An eddoe is a circular root vegetable that bares resemblance to a yam or sweet potato. Originally a product of Asia, eddoes have found their way into multiple cuisines, such as Caribbean, Chinese and Indian. Knowing the nutrient content of eddoes will better help you find a place for them in your diet. They are most commonly baked, boiled, fried and roasted. Root vegetables are notorious for being high in carbs, and eddoes are no exception. One cup of cooked eddoes contains 28 grams of carbs. This macronutrient helps boost energy levels and promotes brain function. The recommended daily intake of carbs for adults is 45 to 65 percent of total calories. Protein is used for cell regeneration and muscle growth. In contrast to carbs, eddoes have a low amount of protein. Once cup contains only 2 grams. The daily recommended intake of this macronutrient is 46 grams a day for women 19 to 70 years old and 56 grams for men 19 to 70 years old. Doctors advise people to watch their fat intake, especially saturated and trans fats. The daily recommendation for total fat is 25 to 35 percent of total calories. Saturated fat should be limited to 7 percent or less and trans fat should be kept under 1 percent. Eddoes have zero grams of saturated and trans fat. Dietary fiber is beneficial and creates a feeling of fullness so you eat less. Fiber also helps keep cholesterol levels under control. Eddoes have a high fiber content. One cup of cooked eddoes contains 4 grams. Men 50 years of age or younger should aim for 38 grams of fiber per day, and men over 51 should get at least 30 grams. Women 50 years of age or younger should get 25 grams, and women over 51 should aim for 21 grams. A high intake of sodium is known to cause water retention, which raises the risk for high blood pressure. When Continue reading >>

Taro Root: A Super Food & Low Glycemic Food For Weight Loss

Taro Root: A Super Food & Low Glycemic Food For Weight Loss

Taro Root: a Super Food & Low Glycemic Food for Weight Loss Taro Root or Yautia as it is called in Latin Countries, and Dasheen Roots as they are call in Hawaii, Eddoe as it is called in Japan, India, and China, and grows all over the world, even in the US, and its a wonderful healing food that has many uses and has more health benefits than potatoes. Low Glycemic Index Food Taro Root is a low glycemic index food that means it breaks down into glucose in the liver very slowly thus making it great for weight loss and for lowering blood sugar too making great for diabetics. And it also works wonders for those with hypoglycemia because it gives long lasting energy for a long period of time. And because it gives long lasting energy you dont seem to get hungry thus you lose weight. Taro Root contains lots of fiber that helps you feel full and also helps you lose weight. Nutritious Food Taro Root contains lots of vitamins A, C, B, and E vitamins as well as lots of trace minerals such as copper, magnesium, calcium, iron, selenium, manganese, zinc, potassium, and beta-carotene and cryptoxanthin which are great antioxidants helping to protect you from disease and slow the aging process and a good amount of protein too! In fact Taro Root is more nutritious than potatoes and its a gluten free. Taro Root is a cholesterol free and low in sodium too, contains B vitamins important for boosting up your immune system and its a good low fat food. High in Vitamin A Taro leaves can be cooked and eaten too, and they contain more than 160% of your daily requirement of Vitamin A. And the leaves and the roots contain polyphenols that are powerful antioxidants that protect from heart disease, strokes, and cancer. High in Vitamin E and Magnesium Taro Root is very high in Vitamin E thus helping Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Sweet Potatoes If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Sweet Potatoes If I Have Diabetes?

Many cases of diabetes, especially type 1 diabetes, come from problems with the ability of the pancreas to regulate insulin, which is important in controlling blood sugar. The pancreas-shaped sweet potato helps to balance blood sugar in diabetics. Research shows that sweet potatoes contain adiponectin, the same hormones that are released from fat cells. Adiponectin tends to improve metabolism and insulin regulation. Unlike other starchy vegetables, sweet potatoes are considered to be an “anti-diabetic food.” This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com Yes diabetics can eat sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes contain carbohydrates which can raise blood sugar levels. However if you eat the right serving size of a sweet potato you can control the amount of sugar you take in. Also what you put on the potato is important. Avoid added sugars or sweeteners. Absolutely! Sweet potatoes are perfect for any plate but especially for people with diabetes. Compared to white potatoes, sweet potatoes are lower on the glycemic index and deliver chart topping vitamin A for eye health. The fiber helps with blood glucose control and weight management and the potassium helps control blood pressure. One important note... Take care to prepare your sweet potatoes without all of the added sugar, butter or marshmallows that many recipes call for. Go beyond the norm and try sweet potatoes roasted, mashed or even pureed into soup. One sweet potato contains 26 grams of carbs, but that’s partially offset by the 4 grams of fiber. Sweet potatoes contain healthy phytochemicals, too. One idea is to eat just half a sweet potato (topped with butter rather than sugar) and pair it with a protein food. Continue reading >>

8 Proven Taro Root Health Benefits

8 Proven Taro Root Health Benefits

Taro root is a high fiber plant which is often used as a vegetable. It is possibly underappreciated both in terms of its diverse culinary uses and its therapeutic abilities. Out here in South East Asia, taro is an extremely popular ingredient in a wide variety of food products. It is used in recipes ranging from savory soups and spicy curries to sweet deserts and even ice cream. When we talk about taro root, we are referring to the taro plants thick tuber. While it is still a relative newcomer in the West, taro is believed to be one of the first plants cultivated by humans. The taro plant which is known scientifically as Colocosia esculenta is a native of Southeast Asia and part of India but it has since spread around the globe and is now cultivated worldwide. One of the reasons that it is grown so widely is that unlike the vast majority of crops, it can actually thrive in flooded regions. As well as being extremely easy to cultivate, it provides a great deal of sustenance. Taro root is a staple part of the diet in many areas of the world including many parts of Africa and India. It is extremely popular in much of Asia, the Polynesian islands and Mediterranean Europe. The root is the part of the plant most often used in cooking but its corns and leaves are also edible. It cannot be eaten raw because of the presence of toxic oxalates which are eliminated when the plant is cooked properly or steeped in water overnight. Taro root is a great source of many minerals and vitamins which play an essential role in human health. It is high in carbohydrates and contains significant amounts of healthy dietary fiber. It is rich in various minerals including iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, manganese, copper and phosphorus. Taro root also contains a healthy dose of vitamins A, C, E Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Taro Root-eddo | About Diabetes N Strokes

Health Benefits Of Taro Root-eddo | About Diabetes N Strokes

Health Benefits Of Taro Root-Eddo-dasheen Health Benefits Of Taro Root-Eddo-dasheen Exercise Daily and Eat Healthy Foods-Taro root There are several species of the Taro root and they are grown all over the world; including Africa, India, Japan, China, South America, Turkey, Spain, Asia and the Caribbean We grew eddoes during the time we lived in Barbados, I absolutely love eddoes. I have always considered it a lovely starchy food but was ignorant as to its health benefits; now that I am better informed, I am even more convinced that my decision to adopt a plant based diet is the correct one. According to Wikipedia Eddoes appear to have been developed as a crop in China and Japan before they were introduced to the West Indies; that may have been the reason they were sometimes called Chinese eddoes. The Eddo belong to the Taro root family which is considered one of the first cultivated plants in human history; the Scientific name is Colocasis esculenta; It is cultivated in many countries around the world; it is a staple food in Africa, Asia India and the Caribbean. Taro roots contains plenty minerals and vitamins. Contains magnesium, iron, zinc, phosphorous, potassium magnesium and copper . 2 cups of cooked eddoes can supply the body with the recommended daily intake of carbohydrates for an adult. Digestive health- one of its most important functions because of its high fiber content; can help prevent conditions like excess gas, bloating, diarrhea, cramping, constipation. Antioxidants qualities can help boost the immune system and to prevent cancer. Crytoxanthin found in the taro root can lower the chance of developing lung and oral cancers, Diabetes- help lower the chances of diabetes because of its high fiber content. Boosts vision because of its antioxidants beta-caro Continue reading >>

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