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Is Ed A Symptom Of Diabetes?

Diabetes, Men, And Sex

Diabetes, Men, And Sex

Sexual dysfunction. You've seen the ads on television, you've heard the jokes, and, if you're like most men, you've tried your best to block it from your mind. But if you have diabetes, this is one touchy subject you shouldn't ignore. A full 75 percent of diabetic men have some trouble achieving or maintaining an erection long enough to have intercourse. But diabetes doesn't have to be a deathblow to your sex life. You can protect your sexual functioning by keeping your diabetes under control. And if the condition has already started to derail your physical relationships, your doctor can help you get back on track. How does diabetes cause sexual dysfunction? Erections take teamwork from several parts of the body: Your brain makes you aroused, your nerves sense pleasurable feelings, and your arteries carry a flood of blood to the penis. Unfortunately, poorly controlled diabetes can ruin that teamwork. Blood sugar that stays too high for too long can both deaden your nerves and damage the arteries that feed your penis. You can still get aroused, but you'll have trouble turning those feelings into action. The breakdown doesn't happen overnight. Most men have diabetes for many years before they notice a problem with erections. Diabetic men rarely have any erectile dysfunction before they reach 30. The key is controlling your diabetes. But when it comes to blood sugar, how high is too high? There's a national movement to describe sugar levels in terms of A1C (also known as glycosylated hemoglobin or HbA1c)), a lab test that reports average blood glucose over a period of two to three months. If your A1C is below 7 percent, your blood sugar is under control. But as A1C gets higher than 7 percent your long-term risk of damage to nerves and arteries increases, and that can also Continue reading >>

Erectile Dysfunction And Diabetes

Erectile Dysfunction And Diabetes

It is estimated that about 35% to 75% of men with diabetes will experience at least some degree of erectile dysfunction -- also called ED or impotence -- during their lifetime. Men with diabetes tend to develop erectile dysfunction 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. As men with diabetes age, erectile dysfunction becomes even more common. Above the age of 50, the likelihood of having difficulty with an erection occurs in approximately 50% to 60% of men with diabetes. Above age 70, there is about a 95% likelihood of having some difficulty with erectile dysfunction. The causes of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes are complex and involve impairments in nerve, blood vessel, and muscle function. To get an erection, men need healthy blood vessels, nerves, male hormones, and a desire to be sexually stimulated. Diabetes can damage the blood vessels and nerves that control erection. Therefore, even if you have normal amounts of male hormones and you have the desire to have sex, you still may not be able to achieve a firm erection. Men with diabetes having trouble with achieving and/or maintaining an erection can take oral medications like sildenafil (Revatio, Viagra), tadalafil (Adcirca,Cialis), avanafil (Stendra), or vardenafil (Levitra, Staxyn). However, because people with diabetes also tend to have problems with their heart, these medications may not be appropriate and could cause dangerous interactions with some heart medicines. Talk to your doctor to determine what treatment is best. Additional treatments men with diabetes might want to consider include intracavernous injection therapy, vacuum erection (not constriction) devices, venous constriction devices (for venous leak syndrome), intraurethral therapy, penile prostheses (inflatable and malleable) Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes And Ed

The Link Between Diabetes And Ed

Men with diabetes face many difficulties, but few problems are more frustrating than erectile dysfunction (ED), especially for younger men. Half of men with diabetes have sexual troubles caused by diabetes.4 When blood sugar levels are out of control, nerve and blood vessel damage occurs throughout your body. Nerve damage breaks down the ability to turn sexual stimulation into an erection.6 Poor blood circulation reduces blood flow to the penis. Together they impact your ability to get an erection that is rigid and lasts long enough for sexual satisfaction. Although ED and diabetes are two separate conditions, they tend to go hand in hand. Half of men with diabetes will experience ED within 10 years of their diagnosis.8 For some men, ED may be the first symptom of diabetes even if they have not yet been diagnosed, particularly in men younger than 45.6 Left untreated, ED can damage self-confidence and relationships. The first goal in treating ED is to manage your diabetes. This includes keeping your blood sugar and blood pressure under control. If ED persists, treatments are available. While oral medications are a common first therapy, they don’t work for all men with diabetes. The penile implant may be an option. The implant is concealed inside the body. It offers support for an erection whenever and wherever desired. Did you know? Continue reading >>

Erectile Dysfunction And Diabetes: Take Control Today

Erectile Dysfunction And Diabetes: Take Control Today

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem for men who have diabetes — but it's not inevitable. Consider prevention strategies, treatment options and more. Erectile dysfunction — the inability to get or maintain an erection firm enough for sex — is common in men who have diabetes. It can stem from problems caused by poor long-term blood sugar control, which damages nerves and blood vessels. Erectile dysfunction can also be linked to other conditions common in men with diabetes, such as high blood pressure and coronary artery disease. Having erectile dysfunction can be a real challenge. It can leave you and your partner feeling frustrated and discouraged. Take steps to cope with erectile dysfunction — and get your sex life back on track. Talk to an expert Many men are reluctant to discuss erectile dysfunction with their doctors. But don't let embarrassment keep you from getting help. One small conversation can make a big difference. Here's what to do: Tell your doctor what's going on. Your doctor will consider underlying causes of your erectile dysfunction and can give you information about medication and other erectile dysfunction treatments. Find out your options. Ask what you need to do to control diabetes. Careful blood sugar control can prevent nerve and blood vessel damage that can lead to erectile dysfunction. Ask your doctor if you're taking the right steps to manage your diabetes. Ask about other health problems. It's common for men with diabetes to have other chronic conditions that can cause or worsen erectile dysfunction. Work with your doctor to make sure you're addressing any other health problems. Check your medications. Ask your doctor if you're taking any medications that might be worsening your erectile problems, such as drugs used to treat depres Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Erectile Dysfunction

Diabetes And Erectile Dysfunction

Tweet Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common problem amongst men who have diabetes affecting 35-75% of male diabetics. Up to 75% of men suffering from diabetes will experience some degree of erectile dysfunction (erection problems) over the course of their lifetime. Men who have diabetes are thought to develop erectile dysfunction between 10 and 15 years earlier than men who do not suffer from the disease. Over the age of 70, there is a 95% likelihood of facing difficulties with erectile function. What causes erectile dysfunction amongst diabetics? Causes of ED are extremely complex, and are based around changes that occur to the body over time affecting nerve, muscle and blood vessel functions. In order to obtain an erection, men need to have healthy blood vessels, nerves, male hormones and a desire to have sex. Without blood vessels and nerves that control erection, ED can still occur despite a desire to have sex and normal male hormones. Factors amongst men Many other factors bear on erectile dysfunction amongst diabetic men. These include: Being overweight Smoking Taking too little exercise and other lifestyle factors. Surgery can damage nerves and arteries linked to the penis, as can some injuries. Many common medications (including antidepressants and blood pressure drugs) can produce ED. Psychological factors also have an enormous influence. Anxiety, guilt, depression, low self-esteem and paranoia about sexual failure are estimated to cause between 10% and 20% of ED cases. How is ED diagnosed? Erectile dysfunction is diagnosed using several different methods. Patient history often informs the degree and nature of the ED. Medical and sexual past often has an influence, as does prescription or illegal drug use. ED patients may be physically examined, and bodily feat Continue reading >>

Can Erectile Dysfunction Be Reversed?

Can Erectile Dysfunction Be Reversed?

Erectile dysfunction is a very common experience. With or without medication, it can often be reversed. Lifestyle changes and natural remedies can help. Most males experience at least one episode of being unable to achieve an erection when desired. In extreme cases, they may be unable ever to have or sustain an erection. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is very common, affecting an estimated 30 million men in America. Most cases of ED occur in men who were previously able to sustain an erection. The condition is usually reversible, but the chances of completely curing ED depend on the underlying cause. Read on to learn about natural and medicinal ways to reverse ED. The right treatment can reduce or eliminate ED symptoms. In many cases, yes, erectile dysfunction can be reversed. A study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine found a remission rate of 29 percent after 5 years. It is important to note that even when ED cannot be cured, the right treatment can reduce or eliminate symptoms. Primary ED occurs when a man has never been able to have or sustain an erection. This is rare. Secondary ED occurs in people who once had regular erectile function. This is the most common type. Secondary ED can be reversed and is often temporary. Primary ED may require more intensive and medical-based treatments. ED is usually treatable with medication or surgery. However, a person may be able to treat the underlying cause and reverse symptoms with no medication. The best treatment may depend on the person. Some find that traditional treatments, such as surgery or medication, do not work. These men may have success using a penis pump, which draws blood into the penis and induces an erection. Methods for reversing ED fall into three categories: These help with achieving or maintaining ere Continue reading >>

What To Do When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

What To Do When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy You have to monitor your blood glucose levels and blood pressure, and, most likely, take severalmedications. If this is you, and youre experiencing problemswithyour sex life, theres a good chance yourefeeling anxious, frustrated and depressed. You may know erectile dysfunction (ED) is the inability to get or maintain anerection. But did you know how common the condition is among men with diabetes ? The risk of ED approaches 50 percent for men with diabetes and increases with age, says endocrinologist Kevin Borst, DO . Erectile dysfunction can stem from problems caused by poor long-term blood sugar control, which damages nerves and blood vessels. ED is also linked to other conditions common among men withdiabetes, such as high blood pressure, coronary artery disease and obesity . The same elevated blood glucose levels that cause blood vessel and nerve damage in other parts of the body can lead to problems with blood flow and nerve damage in the penis, explains Dr. Borst. But even when theres a medical reason behind it, ED can leave any man and his partner feeling frustrated and discouraged. If you or your partner are experiencing ED, youre not alone. And you can take steps to improve your situation. Tell your doctor whats going on. He or she will consider the underlying causes of your ED and can give you information about medication and other ED treatments. Ask what you need to do to control your diabetes, because managing it well will be critical. Careful blood sugar control can prevent the nerve and blood vessel damage that lead to ED, says Dr. Borst. Be sure to address all your health issues w Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Erectile Dysfunction: What Is The Connection?

Diabetes And Erectile Dysfunction: What Is The Connection?

Erectile dysfunction, also called impotence, is not being able to get and maintain an erection for long enough to have sexual intercourse. There are many causes of erectile dysfunction (ED) which can be physical, psychological, or both. One of the most common causes of ED is diabetes. Studies suggest that 35-75 percent of men with diabetes will go on to develop ED. They will also tend to develop ED some 10-15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Why can diabetes cause erectile dysfunction? Diabetes can cause ED because it can damage the blood supply to the penis and the nerves that control an erection. When a man becomes sexually aroused, a chemical called nitric oxide is released into his bloodstream. This nitric oxide tells the arteries and the muscles in the penis to relax, which allows more blood to flow into the penis. This gives the man an erection. Men with diabetes struggle with blood sugar level swings, especially if their condition isn't managed poorly. When their blood sugar levels get too high, less nitric oxide is produced. This can mean that there is not enough blood flowing into the penis to get or keep an erection. Low levels of nitric oxide are often found in those with diabetes. Other causes of erectile dysfunction Listed below are some other reasons for ED: nervous system problems including damage to spinal cord or brain smoking, drinking too much alcohol, and using some illegal drugs some medications such as those taken for high blood pressure and depression Pelvic injury or surgery on the prostate, bowel or bladder may cause damage to nerves connected to the penis. This nerve damage can also lead to ED. Tests and diagnosis A doctor will often perform some of the following tests to diagnose ED: Blood tests to check for a raised blood sugar level, Continue reading >>

Ed In Type 1 Diabetes Often Resolves

Ed In Type 1 Diabetes Often Resolves

BARCELONA If a man with type 1 diabetes develops erectile dysfunction, the first appearance spontaneously resolves more than half the time, according to data collected from nearly 700 men followed for 16 years. But of those men whose first erectile dysfunction (ED) episode resolves, more than half will experience a recurrence. Furthermore, although these recurrences may resolve as well, the likelihood of resolution falls over time, and the chance of resolution also drops as repeated cycles of ED and resolution accumulate, Dr. Hunter Wessells said at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Factors affecting this pattern of ED onset and resolution appear to include modifiable risks such as glycemic control, blood pressure, and body mass index, and a "point of no return" for ED resolution "may be postulated based on patients age, level of hemoglobin A1c, and duration of ED," said Dr. Wessells, professor and chairman of urology at the University of Washington in Seattle. The findings suggest that a window of opportunity exists when ED first appears to boost the chance of resolution through improved glycemic control and other interventions. "I counsel men with type 1 diabetes and new-onset ED that with increased exercise, better blood pressure control, weight loss, and better glycemic control they have a good chance of reversing their ED," Dr. Wessells said in an interview. "Its an opportunity to intervene. We dont yet have firm evidence for this, but as a clinician I give this advice. We need to run a clinical trial to show whether, for example, lowering HbA1c can reverse ED. If you have a man with ED and an HbA1c of 10%, if you bring him down to 7% I think you could probably reverse his ED, but currently that is just my speculation." Dr. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Erectile Dysfunction

Diabetes And Erectile Dysfunction

Men with diabetes are at a higher risk of erectile dysfunction, or impotence, especially if their diabetes is not well controlled. There are many effective treatments available. Discuss the problem with your doctor as soon as you notice a change. On this page: Men with diabetes are at a higher risk of erectile dysfunction or impotence, especially if their diabetes is not well controlled. Erectile dysfunction means you cannot have an erection that is sufficient to perform sexual intercourse. Many men experience short-term episodes of erectile dysfunction but, for about one in 10 men, the problem may continue. See your doctor if you notice any failure to achieve an erection. Causes of erectile dysfunction Erectile dysfunction can be caused by physical and psychological factors including: stress, anxiety and nervousness problems in relationships poor health drinking too much alcohol cigarette smoking some medications some operations low levels of the male hormone testosterone. Physical erectile dysfunction happens over a period of months or years and is often a gradual loss of function. If erections still occur spontaneously overnight or in the morning, this indicates that the problem may be psychological. The link between diabetes and erectile dysfunction The reasons why men with diabetes are more prone to problems with erectile dysfunction are not fully understood. However, we do know that men with diabetes are more likely to develop erectile problems when their diabetes is not well controlled. Over the long term, poor control may result in increased damage to the nerves and circulation that controls blood flow to the penis. If blood glucose levels are kept in the normal range, it will help reduce the chance of these problems occurring. Diagnosis of erectile dysfunction Continue reading >>

When Viagra Doesn’t Work

When Viagra Doesn’t Work

Treating Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a common occurrence in men with diabetes. The incidence of erectile dysfunction increases progressively with age, from 5% in men age 20 to 75% in men over age 65. The cause of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes is usually related to a decrease in the blood supply to the penis as well as to injury to the nerves that are responsible for the erection mechanism. A decrease in testosterone production has also been identified as the cause in some men with diabetes. Since 1998, when sildenafil (brand name Viagra) first came on the market, oral therapy has been successfully used to treat erectile dysfunction in many men with diabetes. (Sildenafil was followed in 2003 by the drugs tadalafil [Cialis], vardenafil [Levitra] and avanafil [Stendra], which work in much the same way.) Some 50% of men with Type 1 diabetes who try the drugs report improved erections, and some 60% men with Type 2 diabetes do, too. However, that leaves a large percentage of men with diabetes and erectile dysfunction who do not respond to therapy with one of these pills. This article takes a look at what can be done to treat those men who do not respond to oral therapy. Why therapy fails There are a number of reasons a man may not achieve the desired result from an oral erectile dysfunction drug. In some cases, a man may experience drug side effects severe enough to outweigh any potential benefit of taking the drug. Possible side effects of these drugs include headache, facial flushing, nasal congestion, and transient abnormal vision. (In October 2007, the FDA added a warning about sudden hearing loss to the package labels of oral erectile dysfunction drugs. While it’s not absolutely clear that the drugs can cause sudden hearing loss, a number o Continue reading >>

Recognizing Diabetes Symptoms In Men

Recognizing Diabetes Symptoms In Men

Diabetes is a disease in which your body cannot produce enough insulin, cannot use insulin, or a mix of both. In diabetes, sugar levels in the blood go up. This can cause complications if left uncontrolled. The potential health consequences are often serious. Diabetes raises the risk of cardiovascular disease and can cause problems with your eyes, skin, kidneys, and nervous system. Diabetes can also cause erectile dysfunction (ED) and other urological problems in men. Fortunately, many of these complications are preventable or treatable with awareness and attention to your health. Diabetes Symptoms Early symptoms of diabetes are often undetected because they may not seem that serious. Some of the mildest early diabetes symptoms include: frequent urination unusual fatigue blurred vision weight loss, even without dieting tingling or numbness in hands and feet If you allow diabetes to go untreated in these early stages, complications can occur. These complications include issues with your skin, eyes, and nerves (including nerve damage, or neuropathy). Watch out for bacterial infections in your eyelids (styes), hair follicles (folliculitis), or fingernails or toenails. Additionally, make note of any stabbing/shooting pains in your hands and feet. All of these are signals that you may be experiencing complications from diabetes. Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is the inability to achieve or maintain an erection. It can be a symptom of many health issues, including high blood pressure, stress, smoking, medication, kidney disease, and circulatory or nervous system conditions. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, men with diabetes are at risk for ED. The organization states that 20 to 75 percent of men with diabetes have erectile dysfunction. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

What is diabetes? What are the types of diabetes? Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that occurs when your blood sugar (glucose), is too high (hyperglycemia). Glucose is what the body uses for energy, and the pancreas produces a hormone called insulin that helps convert the glucose from the food you eat into energy. When the body either does not produce enough insulin, does not produce any at all, or your body becomes resistant to the insulin, the glucose does not reach your cells to be used for energy. This results in the health condition termed diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, because it usually is diagnosed during childhood. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the body does not produce insulin because the body’s immune system attacks insulin-producing cells from the pancreas called beta cells. Type 1 diabetes is treated by using insulin. Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This occurs when blood sugar levels get too high over time, and the cells become insensitive or resistant to insulin (termed insulin resistance). There are multiple medications used to treat type 2 diabetes. What warning signs and symptoms of diabetes are unique to men? Signs and symptoms of diabetes unique to men include: What warning signs and symptoms of diabetes are the same in men and women? There are diabetes warning signs and symptoms that both women and men have in common, for example: Excessive thirst and hunger Irritability Slow-healing wounds Skin infections Breath odor that is fruity, sweet, or an acetone odor Diabetes Diet: Healthy Meal Plans for Diabetes-Friendly Eating How does diabetes affect men differently than wom Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sexual Health In Men: Understanding The Connection

Diabetes And Sexual Health In Men: Understanding The Connection

Diabetes and Sexual Health in Men: Understanding the Connection Diabetes is a leading cause of sexual health issues in people, along with hypertension, high cholesterol, and smoking. It can affect nerve function and blood flow to any place in the body. One area that can often be affected is the genitals. In men, this can commonly manifest as erectile dysfunction, says Kenneth Snow, M.D., Joslins Acting Chief of Adult Diabetes. Men with poorly controlled diabetes are more likely to have sexualissues than those in good control. Men who have good control of their diabetes can still have issues, according to Dr. Snow, but they are more likely to be mild and responsive to therapy. The biggest cause of sexualissues for men is nerve and artery damage in the genital area, which disrupts blood flow and can cause erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction is known to occur in over one-half of men whove had diabetes for 10 years. Studies have shown that men with erectile dysfunction and diabetes are also more likely to have heart disease, because the risk factors for erectile dysfunction are the same as for coronary artery disease. The same problems that lead to decreased blood flow in the arteries in the penis, lead to blockages in the arteries of the heart, Dr. Snow says. Decreased libido often stemming from depression or low levels of testosterone Complications and sexualissues can be avoided by taking proper care of your diabetes. Keep your diabetes, blood pressure, and cholesterol under control, Dr. Snow says. Along with properly managing your diabetes, other options for treatment can include: Oral medications, including Cialis, Levitra, and Viagra Mechanical methods, such as vacuum pumps and constriction rings Meeting with a mental health professional Seek treatment early, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sexual Dysfunction: Current Perspectives

Diabetes And Sexual Dysfunction: Current Perspectives

Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in nearly all countries; it is increasing rapidly in every part of the world, to the extent that it has now assumed epidemic proportions. In 2012, more than 371 million people had diabetes,1 and this is expected to rise to 552 million by 2030,2 rendering previous estimates very conservative. Several behavioral and environmental factors have contributed to the rise in diabetes incidence in industrialized countries, including overweight (body mass index [BMI], ≥25 kg/m2), obesity (BMI, ≥30 kg/m2), physical inactivity, and increased caloric consumption; these have all been shown to be major risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes, regardless of age and sex.3 In the US, diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death for women and the fifth leading cause of death for men;4 it is also a leading cause of death in most developed countries.1 However, only a minority of people with diabetes die from diseases that are uniquely related to the condition – about 50% of people with diabetes die of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and 10%–20% die of renal failure.5 Diabetes mellitus is associated with both macrovascular (including CVD) and microvascular (including retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) complications.6,7 People with diabetes are at a greater risk of developing CVDs, such as heart attack and stroke. The increased risk of CVD results, in part, from CVD risk factors that commonly accompany diabetes mellitus,8 as type 2 diabetes is associated with clustered risk factors for coronary heart diseases (CHD) including hypertension, elevated low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL), and obesity.9 Diabetic patients also have elevated risk for sight loss, foot and leg amputation, and Continue reading >>

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