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Is Eating Fat Good For Diabetes?

Fats And Diabetes

Fats And Diabetes

Fat is very high in calories with each gram of fat providing more than twice as many calories compared to protein and carbohydrate. Eating too much fat can lead to you taking in more calories than your body needs which causes weight gain which can affect your diabetes control and overall health. The type of fat is important too. Having too much saturated fat in your diet can cause high levels of what’s known as ‘bad cholesterol’ (low-density lipoprotein or LDL), which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). People with diabetes are at increased risk of CVD, so it’s even more important to make healthier food choices. In this section Should I avoid fat completely? Fat plays a very important role in the body, so you need to include a small amount of it in your diet. Fat in our body fulfils a wide range of functions, which include: supplying energy for cells providing essential fatty acids that your body can't make transporting fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) providing a protective layer around vital organs being necessary in the production of hormones. However, fats are high in calories, so it’s important to limit the amount you use – especially if you’re trying to manage your weight. Next time you’re cooking or shopping, have a look at the nutritional label to see what types of fats are in the product you’re buying. The main types of fat found in our food are saturated and unsaturated, and most foods will have a combination of these. All of us need to cut saturated fat and use unsaturated fats and oils, such as rapeseed or olive oil, as these types are better for your heart. Saturated fats Saturated fat is present in higher amounts in animal products, such as: butter cream cheese meat meat products and poultry processed foods like pastri Continue reading >>

This Kind Of Fat Lowers Your Risk For Diabetes

This Kind Of Fat Lowers Your Risk For Diabetes

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. Not all saturated fats are created equal, it appears. A pair of new studies suggests that certain sources of saturated fat may be worse than others—especially when it comes to raising risk for type 2 diabetes. In one study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers from Harvard University and the Universitat Rovira i Virgili in Spain tracked 3,349 Spanish adults for about 4.5 years. Overall, they found that people who consumed higher amounts of saturated fats and animal fats were twice as likely to develop diabetes than those who consumed a lower amount. When the researchers broke down the results by specific food type, the consumption of butter (at 12 grams a day) and cheese (at 30 grams a day) were both linked to an increased risk of diabetes. On the other hand, people who ate whole-fat yogurt actually had a lower risk than those who didn’t. The researchers have several explanations for these findings. Yogurt contains healthful ingredients, like probiotics and protein, that may have protective effects when it comes to diabetes risk, says lead author Marta Guasch-Ferre, a nutrition research fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Even though the results were adjusted to account for other food intake, unhealthy eating patterns may have influenced them. “Butter and cheese often come with carbohydrates, like toast or crackers,” Guasch-Ferre says. Plus, people who eat more yogurt tend to have better diets than those who don’t, she adds. The study did not find any significant links between diabetes risk and consumption of red meat, processed meat, eggs or whole-fat milk. That was a surprise to the researchers, who suspect that other factors may have diluted these results. They poi Continue reading >>

Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did The Film What The Health Get Itright?

Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did The Film What The Health Get Itright?

Professor of Cardiology, Summa cum Laude grad, Kahn Center for Longevity and GreenSpace Cafe. www.drjoelkahn.com @drjkahn. Author The Plant Based Solution NEW Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did the Film What the Health Get itRight? The documentary What the Health is receiving a huge amount of attention and most of it is positive. Many reports of people attempting to eat better are filling social media. I discussed the film on a local TV station in Detroit after two reporters indicated that the movie had made a big impact on their diets. There have even been reports that restaurants serving healthier fare have seen an uptick in customers attributing the change to the film. I have seen this in my own plant-based restaurant and have a What The Health Happy Hour that has been very popular. Naturally, there have been critics of the movie defending their viewpoint that meat based diets are healthy, but most have rallied around a statement in the film by Neal Barnard, MD that sugar does not cause diabetes. As the answer to this question may be important to you, I have done some research and share it here but this is in NO way an endorsement to add back soda and candy bars to your diet. In a world stressed by growing obesity and its medical consequences, limiting sugar is a universal recommendation from all health experts. 1) Type 1 diabetes is not caused by sugar. All agree on this as type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease leading to destruction of the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. However, patients with type 1 diabetes can develop and reverse insulin resistance (IR) in their muscles and liver so understanding the origin of IR is important. 2) Who is Neal Barnard, MD? Dr. Barnard is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and Continue reading >>

Good Fats, Bad Fats

Good Fats, Bad Fats

What's the difference between good fats and bad fats? "Good" fats help protect your body against heart disease; "Bad" fats pose a threat to your heart and blood vessel system. Making heart healthy food choices and keeping a healthy body weight can help prevent and treat heart disease. Eating too much of any kind of fat is not good for your health. But when it comes to your heart, some types of fats are healthier for your heart than others. So how do you make smart choices? Learn how to recognize good fats and bad fats. “Bad” Fats “Good” Fats Saturated, Hydrogenated & Trans Fats Mono-and Polyunsaturated Fats Strictly limit intake: Use in moderation: Solid at room temperature Liquid at room temperature Animal Fats (Saturated fats) Meats, cheese, cream, butter, Lard, chicken skin Plant Oils Olive, safflower, canola, Sunflower, soy, peanut oils Tropical Oils Coconut and palm oils Nuts and avocados Hydrogenated Oils (Trans fats) Stick margarines, shortening, fast-food, processed food Omega-3 fats Salmon, mackerel, herring, Flaxseeds, walnuts, soybean and Canola oils Understanding Bad Fats ”Bad” fats pose a threat to your heart and blood vessel system because they increase your body’s production of cholesterol. “Bad” fats also cause clogging of your blood vessels, or athersclerosis. If there is a block in the blood flow to your heart, this can lead to a heart attack. If the blood vessels in your brain are blocked, this can lead to a stroke. “Bad” fats increase your risk for coronary heart disease, and need to be limited in your diet: Saturated fats, which usually come from animal sources, are naturally solid at room temperature. Examples are lard, butter, milk fat, meat, chicken and pork skin, ice cream and cheese. Beware of coconut and palm oils as well Continue reading >>

Dietary Fat And The Development Of Type 2 Diabetes

Dietary Fat And The Development Of Type 2 Diabetes

The recent release of results from the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (FDPS) (1) and the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) (2) strongly confirm the hypothesis that interventions that alter diet and physical activity to achieve weight loss can prevent or postpone the development of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. The next challenge will be to translate these impressive results into clinical practice. It seems relevant in this context to ask, “What is the best dietary intervention strategy to improve insulin action and prevent diabetes?” In the current issue of Diabetes Care, van Dam et al. (3) assess the association between diet and development of diabetes over a 12-year period in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). They find that consumption of a high-fat diet and high intakes of saturated fat are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. However, this association disappears when they adjust for BMI. They also find that frequent consumption of processed meats is associated with an increased risk for diabetes. Does this study alter the recommendations we make to individuals at risk for developing diabetes? Controversy over the role of high-fat diets in insulin resistance A large body of experimental data generated in laboratory animals strongly supports the notion that high-fat diets are associated with impaired insulin action. It appears from animal studies that saturated fats, in particular, have the most detrimental effects. Based on this information, along with the known risks of high saturated fat intake on cardiovascular disease risk, professional organizations such as the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have made recommendations that Americans aim for a Continue reading >>

Dietary Fats, Carbohydrates And Diabetes

Dietary Fats, Carbohydrates And Diabetes

Nutrition-wise blog Eating fewer carbohydrates may not be the answer to diabetes prevention and management. A balance of healthy fats and fewer refined grains and added sugars may reduce risk. It's becoming clearer that among the macronutrients — carbohydrates, protein and fat — some impart more health benefit than others. For example, whole grains are superior to refined grains. There is still much to figure out in the amounts or balance of nutrient that is optimal in disease prevention and treatment. While there is increasingly strong evidence that replacing saturated fat with unsaturated fats provides cardiovascular benefits, there is controversy around amounts and types of carbohydrates and fats for blood glucose management in the prevention or management of diabetes. Researchers at Tufts University analyzed results of 102 trials, which included 4,660 adults, to evaluate how saturated fat, mono- and polyunsaturated fats and carbohydrates affected key risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Specifically, the researchers assessed how these macronutrients affected blood sugar and insulin levels, as well as insulin sensitivity and production. A common practice in diabetes management is to significantly reduce all carbohydrates. This often leads to consumption of more animal protein and fat, especially saturated fat. This study suggests it is not reduction in carbohydrates alone that improves outcomes. Rather it is the inclusion of healthy fats, such as those from fish, nuts, seeds and oils, eaten in place of refined grains, added sugars and animal fats that may offer the greatest reduction in risk. Per the study analysis, a 5 percent increase in calories from healthy fats (and similar reduction in calories from refined carbohydrate and saturated fat) resulted in improved Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat? Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein. The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar. Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable. Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks. A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health. Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes. Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calories and 5 grams of fat, only 1.6 grams of which are saturated fat. Eggs are versatile and can be prepared in different ways to suit your tastes. You can make an already-healthy food even better by mixi Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Despite the fact that health professionals for years have recommended reducing its intake, butter intake is still quite high, at 23 sticks per American per year. Its creamy delicious goodness just has not gone away. But is butter making a comeback in the nutrition science world? Is it really not as bad as we once thought? Although it was vilified in the 1980’s and 1990’s, has it been pardoned from its unhealthy label? History Butter has always been a staple in the American diet. In the 1920’s, Americans consumed approximately 72 sticks (18 pounds) of butter per year. The Great Depression hit and then World War II, with these events causing a steep decline in butter consumption with a concurrent rise in margarine use. Butter continued to decrease in the American diet throughout the 1950’s – 1980’s. At that point, the role of butter stayed fairly steady at around 20 sticks (5 pounds) per year. Rising intake just recently started in the 2010’s decade. Nutritional Content Butter is 100% fat, meaning all of the calories that butter provides are in the form of fat. One tablespoon of butter contains 102 calories, all from the 11 grams of total fat. Looking at the fat content more closely, that tablespoon of butter contains 7 grams of saturated fat and 3 grams of monounsaturated fat, as well as approximately 31 mg of cholesterol. Is Butter Recommended for Diabetics? For years, saturated fats in butter and other foods were discouraged because of the strong association with cardiovascular diseases. Eating a diet high in saturated fat raises blood lipids, increasing the likelihood that arteries will be occluded by the lipids and eventually lead to serious complications such as heart attack and stroke. This is a known scientifically proven fact. The American Heart Ass Continue reading >>

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 29 million people in America have diabetes and 86 million have prediabetes. Insulin resistance is recognized as a predictor of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. But what causes insulin resistance? In this NutritionFacts.org video, Dr. Michael Greger talks about how fat affects insulin resistance, and about how the most effective way to reduce insulin sensitivity is to reduce fat intake. We’ve also provided a summary of Dr. Greger’s main points below. Insulin Resistance of People on High-Fat Diets vs. High-Carb Diets In studies performed as early as the 1930s, scientists have noted a connection between diet and insulin intolerance. In one study, healthy young men were split into two groups. Half of the participants were put on a fat-rich diet, and the other half were put on a carb-rich diet. The high-fat group ate olive oil, butter, mayonnaise, and cream. The high-carb group ate pastries, sugar, candy, bread, baked potatoes, syrup, rice, and oatmeal. Within two days, tests showed that the glucose intolerance had skyrocketed in the group eating the high-fat diet. This group had twice the blood sugar levels than the high-carb group. The test results showed that the higher the fat content of the diet, the higher the blood sugar levels would be. What Is Insulin Resistance? It turns out that as the amount of fat in the diet goes up, so does one’s blood sugar spikes. Athletes frequently carb-load before a race because they’re trying to build up fuel in their muscles. We break down starch into glucose in our digestive tract; it circulates as blood glucose (blood sugar); and it is then used by our muscle cells as fuel. Blood sugar, though, is like a vampire. It needs an invitation to enter our cells. And that invit Continue reading >>

Eat Fat To Improve Diabetes Control

Eat Fat To Improve Diabetes Control

When I tried to lose weight as a young adult, fat-free diets were the rage. That was the 1970s, but have things changed much since then? The other day I picked up a bag of candy with the words “fat free” on the label. It made me laugh. It’s hard to believe some still think fat free automatically means something is good for you. There are fats that we should avoid, especially the hydrogenated oils so popular in processed foods. But there are also fats that are good for us, even helpful to those of us with diabetes. Fats are essential to keep our cardiac and neurological systems healthy. When I started looking for healthful fats, I found many in the Mediterranean diet. It was interesting to learn that this way of eating improves heart health and decreases the risk of Type 2 diabetes. A Mediterranean diet also happens to be rich in good fats like olive oil, fatty fish, and nuts. Are you looking for the best fats? Olive oil is a great place to start. Extra-virgin olive oil, which comes from the first room temperature pressing of the olives, is loaded with a variety of antioxidants, including vitamin E. Another of the substances in olive oil, oleic acid, decreases LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and may increase HDL (“good”) cholesterol. It lowers blood pressure by strengthening your cardiovascular system. It also improves fasting blood glucose levels according to recent studies. The best sources of oleic acid are olives, olive oil, and avocados. Relying on fatty fish for protein is another reason that the Mediterranean lifestyle is so healthy. Those fish contain omega-3 fatty acids, something we could all use more of. Some of the best sources of these essential oils are cold-water fish like wild salmon, mackerel, herring, sardines, and fresh tuna. Some of us do not li Continue reading >>

“sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes”: Did The Film What The Health Get It Right?

“sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes”: Did The Film What The Health Get It Right?

The documentary What the Health is receiving a huge amount of attention and most of it is positive. Many reports of people attempting to eat better are filling social media. I discussed the film on a local TV station in Detroit after two reporters indicated that the movie had made a big impact on their diets. There have even been reports that restaurants serving healthier fare have seen an uptick in customers attributing the change to the film. I have seen this in my own plant-based restaurant and have a What The Health Happy Hour that has been very popular. Naturally, there have been critics of the movie defending their viewpoint that meat based diets are healthy, but most have rallied around a statement in the film by Neal Barnard, MD that “sugar does not cause diabetes”. As the answer to this question may be important to you, I have done some research and share it here but this is in NO way an endorsement to add back soda and candy bars to your diet. In a world stressed by growing obesity and its medical consequences, limiting sugar is a universal recommendation from all health experts. 1) Type 1 diabetes is not caused by sugar. All agree on this as type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease leading to destruction of the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. However, patients with type 1 diabetes can develop and reverse insulin resistance (IR) in their muscles and liver so understanding the origin of IR is important. 2) Who is Neal Barnard, MD? Dr. Barnard is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and an adjunct associate professor of medicine there. He has published over 70 scientific publications (including long term studies on diet and diabetes) and 18 books including several New York Times bestsellers on health and diabe Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Saturated Fat Helps Avoid Diabetes

Saturated Fat Helps Avoid Diabetes

The saturated fat heptadecanoic acid was most beneficial for metabolism in a study of dolphins Dolphins with the highest levels of this saturated fat in their blood had lower insulin and triglyceride levels When dolphins with low heptadecanoic acid levels were fed fish high in the saturated fat, their markers of metabolic syndrome, including elevated insulin, glucose, and triglycerides, normalized Heptadecanoic acid is found in certain fish as well as whole milk, whole milk yogurt, and, especially, butter By Dr. Mercola About one in three Americans now has diabetes or pre-diabetes. That's nearly 80 million people, the majority of whom suffer from type 2 diabetes – a preventable and, often, reversible condition. The problem is that many Americans are unaware that the foods they're eating could be setting them up for a dietary disaster, and this isn't their fault. Public health guidelines condemn healthy fats from foods like butter and full-fat dairy and recommend whole grains and cereals – the opposite of what a person with diabetes, or any person really, needs to stay healthy. For the last 50 years, Americans have been told to eat a high complex carbohydrate, low saturated fat diet. Even diabetics have been told to eat 50 to 60 percent of their daily calories in the form of processed carbs! Research, including a new study involving dolphins, again suggests that this movement away from traditional full-fat foods is contributing to the rising rates of diabetes and metabolic syndrome across the globe. Dolphin Study Suggests Saturated Fats Are Beneficial for Diabetes Researchers from the National Marine Mammal Foundation (NMMF) discovered that dolphins are able to switch in and out of a diabetes-like state, as well as develop metabolic syndrome, a cluster of symptoms th Continue reading >>

How John Fagley Reversed His Diabetes By Eating More Fat

How John Fagley Reversed His Diabetes By Eating More Fat

How John Fagley reversed his diabetes by eating MORE fat in Diabetes stories , Intermittent fasting , Keto , Success stories Many people in John Fagleys family had suffered complications of diabetes, despite following the recommended treatment. When John developed type 2 diabetes himself he decided to do something different. He decided to eat MORE fat. Heres how he quickly normalized his blood sugar and lost 35 pounds in a few months: I have a family history on both sides of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and I know what happens to people who follow the recommended treatment. When my fasting blood glucose gradually increased from 95 mg/dL (5.3 mmol/l) to 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/l) during the last half of 2013, I realized that at age 58, I was in for the fight of my life, literally! I was already aware of the glycemic index of food, and I eliminated starch, added sugar and processed food from my diet. However, I was still eating several pieces of fruit every day. My fasting blood glucose gradually improved a bit over the next two months and I lost 15 pounds (7 kg). I was spending a good deal of time on the internet researching diabetes. Eventually, I came across articles from Joel Friel and Tim Noakes recommending very low levels of carbohydrate intake. Next, I read Gary Taubes Good Calories, Bad Calories, which I now regard as the most important book I have ever read. His thoroughly researched description of how carbs, and NOT fats or lack of activity are the likely root cause of our epidemic of obesity, diabetes and heart disease gave me the confidence to eat more fat and even saturated fat to replace the carbs I was giving up. As I read his book, I realized that poor science, pompous egos and greed had stolen many years of life from my relatives, and especially my father. Continue reading >>

Eating More 'healthy Fats' May Lower Diabetes Risk

Eating More 'healthy Fats' May Lower Diabetes Risk

Eating More 'Healthy Fats' May Lower Diabetes Risk By Agata Blaszczak-Boxe, Contributing Writer | Replacing some of the meat and cheese in your diet with vegetable oils or nuts could help slow the progression of diabetes in some people, according to a small new study. People with " prediabetes " have levels of blood sugar, or glucose, that are higher than normal but not high enough to warrant being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and older had prediabetes, and 29.1 million had diabetes, with the vast majority of the cases being type 2, according to the American Diabetes Association. In the new study, researchers found that, in people with a type of prediabetes in which muscles do not take up glucose properly, eating more of so-called polyunsaturated fat, which is found in vegetable oils and nuts, and less saturated fat, found in meat and cheese, seemed to improve certain factors related to the risk of developing type 2 diabetes . "The findings suggest that increasing dietary intake of polyunsaturated fats may have a beneficial effect for patients with a certain type of prediabetes," study co-author Nicola Guess, a diabetes researcher at King's College London,said in a statement. [ 9 Healthy Habits You Can Do in 1 Minute (Or Less) ] In the study, the researchers looked at 14 endurance-trained athletes, 23 obese people, 10 people with prediabetes and 11 people with type 2 diabetes. The researchers tested the people's blood sugar levels and the levels of fatty acids in their blood. The participants also filled out a questionnaire about their diet, and from this, the researchers calculated how much saturated fat and polyunsaturated fat they had consumed in the past three months. Among the people who had a type of prediabetes in which gl Continue reading >>

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