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Is Drinking A Lot Of Water Good For Diabetics?

Is Lemon Water Good For Type Ii Diabetics?

Is Lemon Water Good For Type Ii Diabetics?

Drinking lemon water seems to be all the rage these days. But there is currently no evidence suggesting that it offers any benefits related to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or other health conditions. Even so, lemon water is a good beverage option if you have diabetes. It's easy to make, refreshing, low in calories and carbohydrates and can help keep you hydrated, like plain water. So there's no reason not to reach for a glass the next time you're thirsty. Nutrient Content of Lemon Water Lemons and other citrus fruits are on the American Diabetes Association's list of diabetes "super foods" because they are rich in soluble fiber and vitamin C, which may help reduce blood sugar, among other benefits. However, lemon water contains very little of either nutrient. For example, 2 tablespoons of lemon juice contain only about 12 mg of vitamin C and 0.1 g of dietary fiber. To put this in perspective, the recommended intake for vitamin C is 75 to 90 mg per day for adults, and the recommended intake for fiber is 21 to 28 g per day, depending on age and sex. Therefore, drinking lemon water is unlikely to provide enough fiber or vitamin C to have specific beneficial effects for people with T2DM. A review article published in the July 2014 issue of "Advances in Nutrition" suggests that naringinen, a chemical compound found in lemons and other citrus fruits, may have antidiabetic properties. To date, these effects have been studied only in animals. For example, naringenin supplementation in diabetic rats decreased fasting blood sugar and A1C, a measure of long-term blood sugar control. It also increased insulin levels. Research is needed to determine if naringenin has similar effects in humans. Even if it does, the amount of naringenin in lemon water is likely to have no effect be Continue reading >>

Is Your Dog Drinking Too Much Water?

Is Your Dog Drinking Too Much Water?

Ed King from Charleston, SC asked: My dog (mixed breed), I think part Greyhound, recently started drinking water excessively. Her normal 2 Qts. a day now exceed 5 Qts. No changes were made diet or exercise. She’s 8. Possible causes? cures? Hi Ed, thank you for your question. This is such a common problem that I hope I can help your furry friend as well as many others out there. Increased drinking is a common symptom in middle age and older dogs and can have a number of different causes that are not always easy to identify. With such a dramatic increase in water intake in your fur baby, this is most likely a medical problem that should be identified as soon as possible. The three most common causes of increased drinking in middle aged and older dogs are diabetes mellitus, kidney disease and Cushing’s disease. Diabetes mellitus Diabetes is typically caused by a low production of insulin or the body not responding to insulin anymore. This can be easily tested for by looking for glucose (sugar) in the urine or a high blood sugar. When the blood sugar goes over 200, glucose appears in the urine. You can test for glucose in the urine at home using these test strips: click here. The great thing about these strips is that you can use them to test for diabetes but also get an idea if there is possible infection in the urine by checking for trace amounts of blood and protein. You can also get the less expensive strips that just check for glucose here. Diabetes in dogs is treated by giving insulin injections twice daily with your veterinarian’s supervision because getting the right insulin dose can be difficult. If she has diabetes, it is important to begin treatment right away, while she is still eating well and not acting sick. Once they become sick with ketoacidosis, inte Continue reading >>

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

Your body is made up of nearly two-thirds water, so it makes sense to drink enough every day to stay hydrated and healthy. Water, tea, coffee, milk, fruit juices and smoothies all count. We also get fluid from the food we eat, especially from fruit and veg. Does it matter what we drink? Yes, particularly when it comes to fruit juices and sugary drinks – you can be having more calories and sugar than you mean to because you’re drinking them and not noticing. Five ways to stay hydrated… Water is the best all-round drink. If your family likes flavoured waters, make your own by adding a squeeze of lemon or lime, or strawberries. Children often need reminding to drink, so give them a colourful water bottle with a funky straw. Tea, coffee, chai and hot chocolate – cut back on sugar and use semi-skimmed or skimmed milk. Herbal teas can make a refreshing change and most are caffeine-free. Fruit juices (100 per cent juice) contain vitamins and minerals and 150ml provides one portion of our five a day – but remember, fruit juices only count as one portion, however much you drink. They can harm teeth, so for children, dilute with water and drink at meal times. Milk is one of the best drinks to have after sport. It’s hydrating and a good source of calcium, protein and carbohydrate. Choose skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. …and two drinks that are great for hypos Fizzy sugary drinks provide little else apart from a lot of sugar, so only use these to treat hypos. Otherwise, choose sugar-free alternatives Energy drinks – the only time when these drinks can be helpful in diabetes is when you need to get your blood glucose up quickly after a hypo. Energy drinks are high in sugar and calories. Quick quenchers Add slices of cucumber, lemon, or mint leaves to a glass of iced wa Continue reading >>

Is Coconut Water Good Or Bad For Diabetics Person?

Is Coconut Water Good Or Bad For Diabetics Person?

Treatment and maintenance of a normal lifestyle in diabetes can often be very challenging as a diabetes patient suffers from a lot of related complications such as that of the heart, kidney, eye, muscles, and various other parts of the body. Hence, a patient who suffers from diabetes has to take extreme care as even a slight negligence on his part can cause serious adverse health repercussions. A well maintained and regulated lifestyle, coupled with a healthy diet and physical exercise have always been recommended by the doctors. One such regulation is with regards to the consumption of coconut water. Coconut water which is extremely rich in vitamins, potassium and several other nutrients is normally considered extremely natural and healthy. However, the high content of sugar, glucose, sodium, and potassium often gives rise the question as to whether coconut water should be consumed by those who suffer from diabetes? In this article, we try to find out the answer to the above question. We shall delve deep and analyse whether it is safe to consume coconut water for a diabetes patient. We will also find out more about the precautions which need to be observed by a diabetic when he or she consumes coconut water. Join in for the article ‘Diabetes and Coconut Water: Is Drinking Coconut Water Safe for Diabetes?’ Benefits of Coconut Water for Diabetes? Some Facts Related to Coconut Water In order to understand the question whether coconut water is beneficial for a person suffering from diabetes or not, we first need to deep dive and understand some of the properties and characteristics of coconut water. Following are a few facts related to coconut water: Coconut water is naturally full of a lot of nutrients and does not have any kind of artificial preservatives. The water Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

7 0 We’ve written before about the signs and symptoms of diabetes. While there are a lot of sources about what symptoms diabetes causes, and even some good information about why they’re bad for you, what you don’t often get are the “whys”. And while the “whys” aren’t necessarily critical for your long-term health, they can help you to understand what’s going on with your body and why it acts the way it does. That, in turn, can help with acceptance and understanding of how to better treat the symptoms, which in turn can help you stay on a good diabetes management regimen. In short, you don’t NEED to know why diabetes causes excessive thirst, but knowing the mechanism behind it can make your blood glucose control regimen make more sense and help you stick to it. So why DOES diabetes cause thirst? First, we’d like to start by saying that excessive thirst is not a good indicator of diabetes. For many people, the symptom creeps up so slowly that it’s almost impossible to determine if your thirst has noticeably increased (unless you keep a spreadsheet of how much water you drink, in which case you also probably get tested pretty regularly anyway). It’s also a common enough symptom that a sudden increase in thirst can mean almost anything. Some conditions that cause thirst increases include allergies, the flu, the common cold, almost anything that causes a fever, and dehydration caused by vomiting or diarrhea. So while excessive thirst is one of those diabetes symptoms that happens, and needs to be addressed, it’s not always a great sign that you should immediately go out and get an A1C test. Why does diabetes cause thirst? Excessive thirst, when linked to another condition as a symptom or comorbidity, is called polydipsia. It’s usually one of the Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dwarf Hamsters

Diabetes In Dwarf Hamsters

Disclaimer: This is simply based on my opinion and experience treating diabetic dwarf hamsters. My sample size is small and I do not pretend to be a medical professional. If your hamster has diabetes then the best thing you can do is to see a veterinarian immediately! Let’s start with the basics. So, What is diabetes? So, here’s a greatly simplified answer. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar levels in the body. It’s supposed to work like this: when you eat your body turns food into sugars, or glucose. Then, your pancreas is supposed to produce insulin to allow your cells to use those sugars. Insulin essentially works like a key that opens your cells to allow glucose to enter so that your body can use that glucose for energy. However, for some people, and some hamsters, that system does not work. There are two primary types of diabetes in humans: Type 1 and Type 2. In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas does not produce insulin and therefore the body is unable to use the glucose from the food you eat. When this happens the glucose builds up in the blood causing high blood sugar. If that high blood sugar isn’t treated it can damage eyes, kidneys, nerves, the heart, and even lead to death. Generally Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an autoimmune disease where the body attacks its own insulin producing cells. This is often strongly linked to genetics, but sometimes can be triggered by other causes. In Type 2 diabetes people generally are able to produce at least some of their own insulin. However, their pancreas may not be able to produce enough insulin or their body may be insulin resistant. This means that their body will not be able to efficiently use the glucose in their blood and therefore will end up with high blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Does Drinking Water Bring High Glucose Levels Down?

Does Drinking Water Bring High Glucose Levels Down?

The one major feature uniting Types 1 and 2 diabetes is high blood sugar levels resulting from your body producing too little insulin. Increasing your water intake helps to treat and prevent these spikes in blood glucose levels in a variety of ways. The beneficial effects of water on blood glucose levels extend to people without diabetes, as a study published in 2011 in "Diabetes Care" indicates that drinking adequate amounts of water decreases your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Video of the Day Water Intake and Glucose Levels When your blood glucose levels are too high, your body tries to rid itself of some of this glucose in your urine. Drinking more water can help to replenish your fluids, potentially helping your body excrete more glucose in your urine. Increasing your water intake has the added benefit of potentially decreasing the amount of glucose you get from food. According to Dr. Richard Holt and colleagues, people who drink too little water tend to consume as much as 30 percent more calories than those who drink adequate amounts of water, potentially leading to dangerous spikes in blood sugar. Continue reading >>

Type 1 & 2 Diabetes: Five Simple Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Type 1 & 2 Diabetes: Five Simple Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes can seem complicated and overwhelming, full of charts and devices and concerned-looking medical professionals. There’s talk of hormones and endocrine systems, of obscure organizations and dietary plans. It all comes down to this: What it’s really about-the one, single thing it’s about-is lowering that sky-high blood sugar number. That’s it. Everything follows from getting that blood sugar number down. It doesn’t matter how you got there, and it doesn’t matter what you did. What’s important, what’s critical for you right here, right now, is to lower that number. Here are five simple ways to lower your blood sugar. The list doesn’t including the most obvious choices (medication) because you know them already. These are some methods you might not have thought about. 1. Stay on your feet The simple answer that doctors give diabetics (especially type 2s) who want lower their blood sugars is to exercise. And it works! But what if you’re not the exercising type? What if the sight of a treadmill or exercise bike or running shoes gives you the fits? That’s okay, too, actually. You might want to consider simply spending a chunk of each day on your feet. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, simple activities like sweeping the floor or dusting the shelves or taking the dog out for a walk are all healthy ways to stay active. You will burn calories, and you will move that blood sugar number down. 2. Drink water Believe it or not, evidence suggests that staying hydrated can have an effect on blood sugars and whether or not people develop type 2 diabetes. Is the effect it a big one? We’re not sure yet. But a 3,000-person study cited in the New York Times showed that people who drank the most water-17 to 34 ounces a day-were 30 Continue reading >>

Water And Diabetes

Water And Diabetes

Tweet As water contains no carbohydrate or calories, it is the perfect drink for people with diabetes. Studies have also shown that drinking water could help control blood glucose levels. Lowering blood glucose levels The bodies of people with diabetes require more fluid when blood glucose levels are high. This can lead to the kidneys attempting to excrete excess sugar through urine. Water will not raise blood glucose levels, which is why it is so beneficial to drink when people with diabetes have high blood sugar, as it enables more glucose to be flushed out of the blood. Dehydration and diabetes Having high blood glucose levels can also increase the risk of dehydration, which is a risk for people with diabetes mellitus. People with diabetes insipidus also have a heightened dehydration risk, but this is not linked to high blood glucose levels. Diabetes mellitus Drinking water helps to rehydrate the blood when the body tries to remove excess glucose through urine. Otherwise, the body may draw on other sources of available water, such as saliva and tears. If water access is limited, glucose may not be passed out of the urine, leading to further dehydration. Diabetes insipidus Diabetes inspidus is not associated with high blood glucose levels, but leads to the body producing a large amount of urine. This can leave people regularly feeling thirsty, and at a higher risk of dehydration. Increasing how much water you drink can ease these symptoms, and you may be advised to drink a specific amount of water a day by your doctor. Read more on dehydration and diabetes How much water should we drink? The European Food Safety Authority advises that we take in the following quantities of water on average each day: Women: 1.6 litres - around eight 200ml glasses per day Men: 2 litres Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

The answer is yes, indirectly it will reduce insulin resistance and help a person reduce their hunger. Drinking 8 glasses of water a day appears to bring down one's blood sugars by reducing insulin resistance due to proper hydration. While at the same time the more water you drink the less hungry a person is so they tend to eat less during the day, similar to drinking a glass of water prior to eating fills the stomach causing a person who is dieting to reach satiation (fullness) sooner. If your blood sugars are very high and your kidney is not able to process all the sugar, water will help remove the excess sugar and ketones out of your system. Drinking water is important for everyone but for diabetics, especially type 1 diabetics, it is crucial to remove excess ketones from the blood stream and reduce dehydration when blood sugars are high. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Adopting good eating and drinking habits is important to manage diabetes. Drinking water is a healthy solution to reduce sugar impact in a diabetic diet. The number of types 2 diabetes cases will increase by 50% in 2015 as compared to 2005, according to the WHO. Moreover, type 2 diabetes, which used to be diagnosed in middle-aged individuals a few decades ago, is now reaching the paediatric population. If someone has diabetes symptoms he has to see a doctor without waiting more. Though there are a variety of factors that lead to type 2 diabetes, the trend is highly correlated to an increase in calorie intake, especially from added sugars. No sugar for a better blood glucose In case of diabetes, decrease quantity of calories related to sugars in drinking habits is highly recommended. According to the American Heart Association, added sugars shouldn’t exceed : 100 calories for a woman 150 calories for a man Pure water contains no calories and no sugar. That is why drinking water should be considered as the main source of hydration. ​ Continue reading >>

Have Enough Water For Good Heath?

Have Enough Water For Good Heath?

Like many people with diabetes, Gayle Hoover Thorne of Sacramento, California, was led to her type 2 diagnosis by water—or rather, the feeling that she couldn’t get enough of it. Thorne sought her doctor’s help because she was “sleeping all the time and thirsty.” When a person with diabetes overindulges in carbohydrates, they will soon experience a terrific thirst. “I can only assume that the water taken for that thirst helps dilute the sugars and flush them out,” says Thorne. Actually, thirst arises because the body is already drawing on its existing supply of water to flush out those sugars, which cannot pass out on their own. Instead, they siphon water out of the body. “When blood sugar goes up, it starts a diuretic effect, resulting in excessive water loss,” the reason frequent urination is another common diabetes symptom, says Robert Meloni, MD, and fellow of the American College of Endocrinology. “This leads to dehydration and excessive thirst, which is unrelieved until the blood sugar is lowered—then water replenishment will help.” With water estimated to make up 70 percent of our body weight (and 85 percent of our brain), everyone needs to drink adequate amounts to avoid dehydration. For those with diabetes, it’s especially essential, with water at the root of almost every preventive lifestyle measure. Going with the Flow As Thorne learned more about her diabetes, she also learned more about the benefits of water. “We know it’s important to get enough, but the VHL Family Alliance described in its March 2001 Forum Research Report that 75 percent of Americans are chronically dehydrated, and in 37 percent, the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is often mistaken for hunger,” says Thorne. “Even mild dehydration will slow down the b Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

Water Therapy To Fight Diabetes

Water Therapy To Fight Diabetes

Doctors tell us that once a diabetic, always a diabetic. There is no cure for it. We should be prepared to take medicines for life long. The problem with diabetes is – it doesn’t come alone. It starts affecting each part gradually, causing other diseases. Finally we become dejected and frustrated in life. If you have been diagnosed as borderline diabetes fear not. Good news is that there may be many natural ways to cure diabetes. The first and most important one is water. We can fight diabetes with water and natural life style. Natural Life Style guides us how to lead our life all the 24 hours of the day. CAUSE OF DIABETES What is the reason for becoming a diabetic? Is it not because we drifted away from Nature? How do we mend it? Only by following Natural methods. We commit many mistakes in mattes of our body right from the time we wake up to the time we go to bed. WATER THERAPY TO FIGHT DIABETES If we wish to avert these mistakes we should refine some of our habits like drinking water, eating food, cooking food, excretory action, doing exercise or taking rest. Diabetes can be brought under control just by following Natural Life Style. We don’t have to take medicines or take any treatment, as long as we follow this good life style. We will not be affected by diabetes again. We have observed remarkable improvement in the conditions of diabetic patients. We ourselves are astonished at the easy way the diabetes is cured totally. But the tragedy is people are unaware of such an easy treatment for diabetes. If all of us make this Natural Life Style as our life style, we can totally eradicate diabetes. We can drive it away from the world completely. The good news for the diabetic patients is – you can cure diabetes yourself, sitting at home and at no expense. So don Continue reading >>

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Managing blood sugar levels is an everyday goal for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While eating sugar doesn’t cause either type of diabetes, keeping tabs on carbohydrate and sugar intake is an important part of managing both types of diabetes. Eating healthfully can also reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. In fact, obesity is one of the leading causes of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of American adults are considered obese. Obesity puts you at risk for diabetes, as well as other troublesome conditions. Eating processed foods that are high in sugar, unhealthy fats, and empty calories increases your risk of gaining too much weight. Drinking sugary drinks is also a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. If you are working to keep your blood sugar in check or manage your weight, you might choose diet soda. Low in calories and sugar, diet sodas appear to be a good alternative to sugary drinks. Diet coke and A&W’s diet root beer, for example, claim to be entirely sugar-free. Unfortunately, even though they contain no actual sugar, they are loaded with artificial sweeteners and other unhealthy additives. At one time, there was much debate over the safety of artificial sweeteners. Many feared that these sweeteners caused certain types of cancer. Studies performed in the 1970s suggested that the artificial sweetener saccharin was linked to bladder cancer. Since that time, however, saccharin has been deemed safe. Both the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) consider the sweetener nontoxic. Aspartame, another common yet controversial sweetener, has also gained clearance fo Continue reading >>

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