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Is Drinking A Lot Of Water Good For Diabetics?

Does Drinking Water Bring High Glucose Levels Down?

Does Drinking Water Bring High Glucose Levels Down?

The one major feature uniting Types 1 and 2 diabetes is high blood sugar levels resulting from your body producing too little insulin. Increasing your water intake helps to treat and prevent these spikes in blood glucose levels in a variety of ways. The beneficial effects of water on blood glucose levels extend to people without diabetes, as a study published in 2011 in "Diabetes Care" indicates that drinking adequate amounts of water decreases your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Video of the Day Water Intake and Glucose Levels When your blood glucose levels are too high, your body tries to rid itself of some of this glucose in your urine. Drinking more water can help to replenish your fluids, potentially helping your body excrete more glucose in your urine. Increasing your water intake has the added benefit of potentially decreasing the amount of glucose you get from food. According to Dr. Richard Holt and colleagues, people who drink too little water tend to consume as much as 30 percent more calories than those who drink adequate amounts of water, potentially leading to dangerous spikes in blood sugar. Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Fluid Intake: What Every Diabetic Should Know

The Importance Of Fluid Intake: What Every Diabetic Should Know

All too often, attention to quality and volume of fluid intake takes a back seat to other topics for people with diabetes. With so much else going on, you have to remember that the amount and type of fluid you drink can make a huge difference in your blood sugar and energy levels! For example, if you have recently been diagnosed with pre-diabetes and you find yourself drinking a 6 pack of diet soda each day, a change in your soda habit could actually improve your lab numbers and prevent you from having to start medications. This is not the case with everyone, but it has worked for many individuals and it might work for you. We also know that one positive habit leads to another, so if decreasing your intake of artificially sweetened sodas and increasing your water intake is your first positive step, there may be some more phenomenal steps ahead! Research is finding that those who consume artificial sweeteners in diet drinks exhibit the same traits of obesity, elevated blood sugars and unhealthy fats as those who drink sweetened drinks like sodas and commercially-sweetened teas. This is not meant to encourage the consumption of sweetened drinks, but rather to encourage drinking fresh water, brewed tea, or all natural lime or lemon water instead. It's been shown that those who consume drinks sweetened with artificial sweeteners also tend to crave more sweets and more calories overall than those who avoid them. Drinking naturally unsweetened liquids then can help control those sweet cravings. So just how much liquid does the body need? The amount usually depends on exercise level, age, body size, and blood sugar level. You need 1 cc of fluid intake per calorie eaten. If you consume 2000 calories in a day, you should be drinking about 2000 cc’s of fluid. One 8oz cup contai Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus is a condition in which your ability to control the balance of water within your body is not working properly. Your kidneys are not able to retain water and this causes you to pass large amounts of urine. Because of this, you become more thirsty and want to drink more. There are two different types of diabetes insipidus: cranial and nephrogenic. Cranial diabetes insipidus may only be a short-term problem in some cases. Treatment includes drinking plenty of fluids so that you do not become lacking in fluid in the body (dehydrated). Treatment with medicines may also be needed for both types of diabetes insipidus. A note about thirst and water balance in your body Getting the balance right between how much water your body takes in and how much water your body passes out is very important. This is because a large proportion (about 70%) of your body is actually water. Also, water levels in your body help to control the levels of some important salts, particularly sodium and potassium. Your body normally controls (regulates) water balance in two main ways: By making you feel thirsty and so encouraging you to drink and take more water in. Through the action of a chemical (hormone) called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) which controls the amount of water passed out in your urine. ADH is also known as vasopressin. It is made in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus. It is then transported to another part of your brain, the pituitary gland, from where it is released into your bloodstream. After its release, ADH has an effect on your kidneys. It causes your kidneys to pass out less water in your urine (your urine becomes more concentrated). So, if your body is lacking in fluid (dehydrated), your thirst sensation will be triggered, encouraging you to drink. As Continue reading >>

Is Coconut Water Good Or Bad For Diabetics Person?

Is Coconut Water Good Or Bad For Diabetics Person?

Treatment and maintenance of a normal lifestyle in diabetes can often be very challenging as a diabetes patient suffers from a lot of related complications such as that of the heart, kidney, eye, muscles, and various other parts of the body. Hence, a patient who suffers from diabetes has to take extreme care as even a slight negligence on his part can cause serious adverse health repercussions. A well maintained and regulated lifestyle, coupled with a healthy diet and physical exercise have always been recommended by the doctors. One such regulation is with regards to the consumption of coconut water. Coconut water which is extremely rich in vitamins, potassium and several other nutrients is normally considered extremely natural and healthy. However, the high content of sugar, glucose, sodium, and potassium often gives rise the question as to whether coconut water should be consumed by those who suffer from diabetes? In this article, we try to find out the answer to the above question. We shall delve deep and analyse whether it is safe to consume coconut water for a diabetes patient. We will also find out more about the precautions which need to be observed by a diabetic when he or she consumes coconut water. Join in for the article ‘Diabetes and Coconut Water: Is Drinking Coconut Water Safe for Diabetes?’ Benefits of Coconut Water for Diabetes? Some Facts Related to Coconut Water In order to understand the question whether coconut water is beneficial for a person suffering from diabetes or not, we first need to deep dive and understand some of the properties and characteristics of coconut water. Following are a few facts related to coconut water: Coconut water is naturally full of a lot of nutrients and does not have any kind of artificial preservatives. The water Continue reading >>

Drinking Water May Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar

Drinking Water May Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar

June 30, 2011 (San Diego) -- Drinking about four or more 8-ounce glasses of water a day may protect against the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), French researchers report. In a study of 3,615 men and women with normal blood sugar levels at the start of the study, those who reported that they drank more than 34 ounces of water a day were 21% less likely to develop hyperglycemia over the next nine years than those who said they drank 16 ounces or less daily. The analysis took into account other factors that can affect the risk of high blood sugar, including sex, age, weight, and physical activity, as well as consumption of beer, sugary drinks, and wine. Still, the study doesn't prove cause and effect. People who drink more water could share some unmeasured factor that accounts for the association between drinking more water and lower risk of high blood sugar, says researcher Ronan Roussel, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at the Hospital Bichat in Paris. "But if confirmed, this is another good reason to drink plenty of water," he tells WebMD. The findings were presented here at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association. About 79 million Americans have prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to result in a diagnosis of diabetes, according to the CDC. It raises the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. An additional 26 million have diabetes, the CDC says. Roussel notes that recent research indicates an association between the hormone vasopressin, which regulates water in the body, and diabetes. Despite the known influence of water intake on vasopressin secretion, no study has investigated a possible association between drinking water and risk of high blood sugar, he Continue reading >>

Water And Diabetes

Water And Diabetes

Tweet As water contains no carbohydrate or calories, it is the perfect drink for people with diabetes. Studies have also shown that drinking water could help control blood glucose levels. Lowering blood glucose levels The bodies of people with diabetes require more fluid when blood glucose levels are high. This can lead to the kidneys attempting to excrete excess sugar through urine. Water will not raise blood glucose levels, which is why it is so beneficial to drink when people with diabetes have high blood sugar, as it enables more glucose to be flushed out of the blood. Dehydration and diabetes Having high blood glucose levels can also increase the risk of dehydration, which is a risk for people with diabetes mellitus. People with diabetes insipidus also have a heightened dehydration risk, but this is not linked to high blood glucose levels. Diabetes mellitus Drinking water helps to rehydrate the blood when the body tries to remove excess glucose through urine. Otherwise, the body may draw on other sources of available water, such as saliva and tears. If water access is limited, glucose may not be passed out of the urine, leading to further dehydration. Diabetes insipidus Diabetes inspidus is not associated with high blood glucose levels, but leads to the body producing a large amount of urine. This can leave people regularly feeling thirsty, and at a higher risk of dehydration. Increasing how much water you drink can ease these symptoms, and you may be advised to drink a specific amount of water a day by your doctor. Read more on dehydration and diabetes How much water should we drink? The European Food Safety Authority advises that we take in the following quantities of water on average each day: Women: 1.6 litres - around eight 200ml glasses per day Men: 2 litres Continue reading >>

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

Your body is made up of nearly two-thirds water, so it makes sense to drink enough every day to stay hydrated and healthy. Water, tea, coffee, milk, fruit juices and smoothies all count. We also get fluid from the food we eat, especially from fruit and veg. Does it matter what we drink? Yes, particularly when it comes to fruit juices and sugary drinks – you can be having more calories and sugar than you mean to because you’re drinking them and not noticing. Five ways to stay hydrated… Water is the best all-round drink. If your family likes flavoured waters, make your own by adding a squeeze of lemon or lime, or strawberries. Children often need reminding to drink, so give them a colourful water bottle with a funky straw. Tea, coffee, chai and hot chocolate – cut back on sugar and use semi-skimmed or skimmed milk. Herbal teas can make a refreshing change and most are caffeine-free. Fruit juices (100 per cent juice) contain vitamins and minerals and 150ml provides one portion of our five a day – but remember, fruit juices only count as one portion, however much you drink. They can harm teeth, so for children, dilute with water and drink at meal times. Milk is one of the best drinks to have after sport. It’s hydrating and a good source of calcium, protein and carbohydrate. Choose skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. …and two drinks that are great for hypos Fizzy sugary drinks provide little else apart from a lot of sugar, so only use these to treat hypos. Otherwise, choose sugar-free alternatives Energy drinks – the only time when these drinks can be helpful in diabetes is when you need to get your blood glucose up quickly after a hypo. Energy drinks are high in sugar and calories. Quick quenchers Add slices of cucumber, lemon, or mint leaves to a glass of iced wa Continue reading >>

Best Electrolyte Drinks For Diabetes

Best Electrolyte Drinks For Diabetes

If you have diabetes and you are looking to stay hydrated with an electrolyte drink, you know it can be difficult to find one that isn’t too high in sugar and carbohydrates. If you have started an exercise regime, it can also be challenging to keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Exercise removes glucose from the blood without using insulin, and is crucial in getting diabetes under control, but it is a delicate balance for your blood sugar being too high when you are inactive, and too low when you are active. It is important that the electrolyte drink matches your activity level, and you are not drinking an electrolyte drink with 25 carbohydrates while you are sitting inside, or one with zero carbohydrates while you are combining Zumba, Jazzercize and CrossFit. In regards to these parameters, perhaps you were advised to choose an electrolyte drink that uses artificial sweeteners. While writing The New Menu for Diabetes, I did some research on artificial sweeteners and was shocked that these were recommended for diabetics. The studies clearly showed that these in fact should be avoided, and I wanted to go more in depth in this article regarding why you should avoid Splenda and Acesulfame K. Why You Should Avoid the Following Electrolyte Drinks The following is based on my research and opinion. 1. Powerade Zero After doing some research, I noticed that Powerade Zero was the drink of choice for many diabetics due to it having zero calories. What’s in Powerade Zero? UK Label: Water, citric acid, mineral salts (sodium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, potassium phosphate), natural berry flavouring with other natural flavourings, acidity regulator (E332), sweeteners (sucralose, acesulfame K), colour (E133). US Label: Water, Citric Acid, Natural Flavor Continue reading >>

If I Drink A Gallon Of Water A Day And I Urinate More Than 8 Times Day Is That Considered

If I Drink A Gallon Of Water A Day And I Urinate More Than 8 Times Day Is That Considered "frequent Urination"? Could That Be Linked To A Possible Case Of Diabetes?

If you drink much, you pee more often. That's normal. How often do you wake up to pee during the night when you don't drink? We say 1 to 2 times is about normal. If you want to know if you have diabetes (mellitus), see your doctor, please don't ask on the internet. If you are middle aged and overweight, you might have type II diabetes mellitus without peeing too much (polyuria) or drinking too much (polydipsia). Your doctor will measure your fasting blood sugar to rule that out. There also is a rare condition we call diabetes insipidus, where one is unable to concentrate one's urine and so looses a lot of urine, often more than 8 - 12 liters a day, either due to the lack of antidiuretic hormone ADH or the lack of response of the body (more precisely the kidneys) to it. Diabetes just describes urinating a lot. In the old days physicians had to taste the urine, if it tasted sweet because of the sugar in the urine it was diabetes mellitus , if it had no sweet tast it was refered to as diabetes insipidus. How much you would need to drink daily isn't clear, I would suggest just a bit more than 1 liter a day instead of the often quoted 2 - 3 liters a day . Metabolic processes will generate about 300 ml of water a day, your food contains about 800 ml of water daily. The rest of your intake is what you drink. You perspire without you noticing (perspiratio insensibilis) about 600 ml a day, you loose water through breathing (400ml), defecating (200ml) and more through your skin (400ml) totalling another 1 liter a day, and then you need water for urine (600 ml/day?) in which the waste you want to get rid of is dissolved. Drinking too much water (more than 10 liters a day) can overrun your internal regulating system which normally would cause you to urinate more water with almost n Continue reading >>

Type 1 & 2 Diabetes: Five Simple Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Type 1 & 2 Diabetes: Five Simple Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes can seem complicated and overwhelming, full of charts and devices and concerned-looking medical professionals. There’s talk of hormones and endocrine systems, of obscure organizations and dietary plans. It all comes down to this: What it’s really about-the one, single thing it’s about-is lowering that sky-high blood sugar number. That’s it. Everything follows from getting that blood sugar number down. It doesn’t matter how you got there, and it doesn’t matter what you did. What’s important, what’s critical for you right here, right now, is to lower that number. Here are five simple ways to lower your blood sugar. The list doesn’t including the most obvious choices (medication) because you know them already. These are some methods you might not have thought about. 1. Stay on your feet The simple answer that doctors give diabetics (especially type 2s) who want lower their blood sugars is to exercise. And it works! But what if you’re not the exercising type? What if the sight of a treadmill or exercise bike or running shoes gives you the fits? That’s okay, too, actually. You might want to consider simply spending a chunk of each day on your feet. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, simple activities like sweeping the floor or dusting the shelves or taking the dog out for a walk are all healthy ways to stay active. You will burn calories, and you will move that blood sugar number down. 2. Drink water Believe it or not, evidence suggests that staying hydrated can have an effect on blood sugars and whether or not people develop type 2 diabetes. Is the effect it a big one? We’re not sure yet. But a 3,000-person study cited in the New York Times showed that people who drank the most water-17 to 34 ounces a day-were 30 Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Proceed With Caution

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Proceed With Caution

Alcohol can worsen diabetes-related nerve damage.(RON CHAPPLE STOCK/CORBIS)Hoping for a beer at the ball game, or a glass of wine with dinner? If you have type 2 diabetes, that's probably OK as long as your blood sugar is under control, you don't have any complications that are affected by alcohol (such as high blood pressure), and you know how the drink will affect your blood sugar, according to the American Diabetes Association. An alcohol-containing drink a day might even help your heart (though if you don't already drink, most experts say that's not a reason to start). In moderation, alcohol may cut heart disease risk According to a study by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health, women with type 2 diabetes who drank relatively small amounts of alcohol had a lower heart-disease risk than those who abstained. A second study found that men with diabetes had the same reduction in heart risk with a moderate alcohol intake as non-diabetic men. In general, the recommendations for alcohol consumption for someone with type 2 diabetes are the same as anyone else: no more than two drinks per day for men and no more than one drink per day for women. (Make sure to measure: A drink serving is 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor such as scotch, gin, tequila, or vodka.) People with diabetes who choose to drink need to take extra care keeping food, medications, alcohol, and blood sugars in balance. Janis Roszler, RD, a certified diabetes educator in Miami, Fla., recommends: Mixing alcoholic drinks with water or calorie-free diet sodas instead of sugary (and calorie- and carbohydrate-laden) sodas and other mixers. Once you have had your drink, switch to a non-alcoholic drink, such as sparkling water, for the rest of the evening. Make sure yo Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

The answer is yes, indirectly it will reduce insulin resistance and help a person reduce their hunger. Drinking 8 glasses of water a day appears to bring down one's blood sugars by reducing insulin resistance due to proper hydration. While at the same time the more water you drink the less hungry a person is so they tend to eat less during the day, similar to drinking a glass of water prior to eating fills the stomach causing a person who is dieting to reach satiation (fullness) sooner. If your blood sugars are very high and your kidney is not able to process all the sugar, water will help remove the excess sugar and ketones out of your system. Drinking water is important for everyone but for diabetics, especially type 1 diabetics, it is crucial to remove excess ketones from the blood stream and reduce dehydration when blood sugars are high. Continue reading >>

How Much Water Should A Type 2 Diabetic Drink?

How Much Water Should A Type 2 Diabetic Drink?

The Mayo Clinic has reported that recommended daily water intake is influenced by climate, exercise and health factors. The best way to know the specific amount of water that a diabetic should consume is by consulting a doctor. Nevertheless, there are a few guidelines all people can follow concerning hydration. Benefits of Water Water supports all of your body's functions. If your body is not properly hydrated, it is not able to work at full capacity. Being fully hydrated will boost energy and help raise your metabolic rate. A diabetic's body does not always work at its full potential, and fatigue can be a common ailment. Drinking plenty of water can help prevent fatigue and improve your body's physical performance. Water is especially useful for hydration for a diabetic because water has no calories, no fat and no cholesterol, things a diabetic needs to avoid. Required Water Consumption According to the American Diabetic Association, unless otherwise specified by a personal physician, a diabetic's daily water intake requirement is the same as a that of a healthy person. The Institute of Medicine suggests that men drink about 13 cups, or 3 liters, of liquid a day; women should drink about 9 cups, or 2.2 liters. This amount includes water and other beverages. However, carbonated drinks and caffeinated drinks should be kept at a minimum. Opt instead for herbal teas or water to help keep the body hydrated. Herbal teas and water are always the best choice for the diabetic. Ways to Stay Hydrated Begin by drinking eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day. An 8-ounce glass is equal to a cup, and 8 cups is about 1.9 liters. Remember that this is only a starting point for meeting your daily fluid requirements. When tracking daily water consumption, keep in mind that many common hous Continue reading >>

Drink More Water

Drink More Water

Last month I was taken to the emergency room because my blood pressure dropped. It turned out I had gone low because of dehydration. I’m really embarrassed because I hadn’t realized how important hydration is. It was scary. I could sit up, but only for about a minute. Then I’d have to lie down again. Couldn’t even think about standing (which is hard enough for me on a good day). I was in the ER for about 12 hours getting IV fluids before I was strong enough to go home. Lord knows what it will cost, and all because I didn’t drink enough. I didn’t know I had a viral infection. They found that on a white blood count in the ER. But I did know I was eating lots of fiber, which absorbs water, and not drinking much. I just didn’t know I could get in so much physical trouble from a little dryness. For people with diabetes, the risk of dehydration is greater, because higher than normal blood glucose depletes fluids. To get rid of the glucose, the kidneys will try to pass it out in the urine, but that takes water. So the higher your blood glucose, the more fluids you should drink, which is why thirst is one of the main symptoms of diabetes. According to the British diabetes site diabetes.co.uk, other causative factors for dehydration include insufficient fluid intake, sweating because of hot weather or exercise, alcohol, diarrhea, or vomiting. The symptoms of mild dehydration include thirst, headache, dry mouth and eyes, dizziness, fatigue, and dark-colored urine. Severe dehydration causes all those symptoms plus low blood pressure, sunken eyes, weak pulse and/or rapid heartbeat, confusion, and lethargy. But many people, especially older people, don’t get these symptoms. It seems that thirst signals become weaker as we age. Diabetes may get people used to thirst s Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Adopting good eating and drinking habits is important to manage diabetes. Drinking water is a healthy solution to reduce sugar impact in a diabetic diet. The number of types 2 diabetes cases will increase by 50% in 2015 as compared to 2005, according to the WHO. Moreover, type 2 diabetes, which used to be diagnosed in middle-aged individuals a few decades ago, is now reaching the paediatric population. If someone has diabetes symptoms he has to see a doctor without waiting more. Though there are a variety of factors that lead to type 2 diabetes, the trend is highly correlated to an increase in calorie intake, especially from added sugars. No sugar for a better blood glucose In case of diabetes, decrease quantity of calories related to sugars in drinking habits is highly recommended. According to the American Heart Association, added sugars shouldn’t exceed : 100 calories for a woman 150 calories for a man Pure water contains no calories and no sugar. That is why drinking water should be considered as the main source of hydration. ​ Continue reading >>

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