diabetestalk.net

Is Drinking A Lot Of Water Good For Diabetics?

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

Skipping meals could potentially push your blood glucose higher. When you don't eat for several hours because of sleep or other reasons, your body fuels itself on glucose released from the liver. For many people with type 2 diabetes (PWDs type 2), the liver doesn't properly sense that the blood has ample glucose already, so it continues to pour out more. Eating something with a little carbohydrate signals the liver to stop sending glucose into the bloodstream and can tamp down high numbers. Skipping meals can also lead to overeating, which can cause an increase in weight. And if you take certain diabetes medications that stimulate the body's own insulin such as common sulfonylureas, or you take insulin with injections or a pump, you risk having your blood glucose drop too low when you skip or delay meals. Going Low-Carb Low-carb diets "are not balanced and deprive the body of needed fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Constance Brown-Riggs, M.S.Ed, R.D., CDE, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes (Career Press, 2010). Recently, Brown-Riggs counseled a PWD type 2 who ate very little carbohydrate. The result: poor energy and severe headaches. Brown-Riggs helped the person balance out his meal plan by suggesting fruits, grains, and other carb-containing foods. "His headaches subsided, his energy level was restored, and he was happy to learn that he could eat healthy sources of carbohydrate and manage his blood glucose levels successfully," Brown-Riggs says. The keys to success are to manage portions of all foods, spread your food out over your day, and work with your health care team to devise an individualized meal, activity, and medication plan. Eating Pasta Al Dente It is best to eat your spaghetti al dente, says David J. A. Jenkins, M. Continue reading >>

Really? The Claim: Drinking Water Can Help Lower The Risk Of Diabetes.

Really? The Claim: Drinking Water Can Help Lower The Risk Of Diabetes.

THE FACTS There are many reasons to stay properly hydrated, but only recently have scientists begun to consider diabetes prevention one of them. The amount of water you drink can play a role in how your body regulates blood sugar, researchers have found. The reason: a hormone called vasopressin, which helps regulate water retention. When the body is dehydrated, vasopressin levels rise, prompting the kidneys to hold onto water. At the same time, the hormone pushes the liver to produce blood sugar, which over time may strain the ability to produce or respond to insulin. One of the largest studies to look at the consequences was published last year in Diabetes Care, a publication of the American Diabetes Association. French scientists tracked more than 3,000 healthy men and women ages 30 to 65 for nearly a decade. All had normal blood sugar levels at the start of the research. After nine years, about 800 had developed Type 2 diabetes or high blood sugar. But those who consumed the most water, 17 to 34 ounces a day, had a risk roughly 30 percent lower than that of those who drank the least. The researchers controlled for the subjects’ intake of other liquids that could have affected the results, mainly sugary and alcoholic drinks, as well as exercise, weight and other factors affecting health. The researchers did not look at eating habits, something future studies may take into account. THE BOTTOM LINE There is some evidence that proper hydration can help protect against high blood sugar, though more research is needed. Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dwarf Hamsters

Diabetes In Dwarf Hamsters

Disclaimer: This is simply based on my opinion and experience treating diabetic dwarf hamsters. My sample size is small and I do not pretend to be a medical professional. If your hamster has diabetes then the best thing you can do is to see a veterinarian immediately! Let’s start with the basics. So, What is diabetes? So, here’s a greatly simplified answer. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar levels in the body. It’s supposed to work like this: when you eat your body turns food into sugars, or glucose. Then, your pancreas is supposed to produce insulin to allow your cells to use those sugars. Insulin essentially works like a key that opens your cells to allow glucose to enter so that your body can use that glucose for energy. However, for some people, and some hamsters, that system does not work. There are two primary types of diabetes in humans: Type 1 and Type 2. In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas does not produce insulin and therefore the body is unable to use the glucose from the food you eat. When this happens the glucose builds up in the blood causing high blood sugar. If that high blood sugar isn’t treated it can damage eyes, kidneys, nerves, the heart, and even lead to death. Generally Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an autoimmune disease where the body attacks its own insulin producing cells. This is often strongly linked to genetics, but sometimes can be triggered by other causes. In Type 2 diabetes people generally are able to produce at least some of their own insulin. However, their pancreas may not be able to produce enough insulin or their body may be insulin resistant. This means that their body will not be able to efficiently use the glucose in their blood and therefore will end up with high blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus is a condition in which your ability to control the balance of water within your body is not working properly. Your kidneys are not able to retain water and this causes you to pass large amounts of urine. Because of this, you become more thirsty and want to drink more. There are two different types of diabetes insipidus: cranial and nephrogenic. Cranial diabetes insipidus may only be a short-term problem in some cases. Treatment includes drinking plenty of fluids so that you do not become lacking in fluid in the body (dehydrated). Treatment with medicines may also be needed for both types of diabetes insipidus. A note about thirst and water balance in your body Getting the balance right between how much water your body takes in and how much water your body passes out is very important. This is because a large proportion (about 70%) of your body is actually water. Also, water levels in your body help to control the levels of some important salts, particularly sodium and potassium. Your body normally controls (regulates) water balance in two main ways: By making you feel thirsty and so encouraging you to drink and take more water in. Through the action of a chemical (hormone) called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) which controls the amount of water passed out in your urine. ADH is also known as vasopressin. It is made in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus. It is then transported to another part of your brain, the pituitary gland, from where it is released into your bloodstream. After its release, ADH has an effect on your kidneys. It causes your kidneys to pass out less water in your urine (your urine becomes more concentrated). So, if your body is lacking in fluid (dehydrated), your thirst sensation will be triggered, encouraging you to drink. As Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol And Diabetes

For some people, having a few drinks at home or in the pub is part of everyday life. And having diabetes shouldn’t get in the way of this. But when you have diabetes, it’s a bit more complicated. You might want to know whether it's safe to drink alcohol, and how much is okay. So yes, you can still drink, but you need to be aware of how it can affect your body and how to manage this. For example, drinking can make you more likely to have a hypo, because alcohol makes your blood sugars drop. It can affect your weight too, as there can be a lot of calories in alcoholic drinks. We’ll give you all the facts here. Alcohol and risk factors for Type 2 We don’t know exactly what causes Type 2 diabetes. But we do know that your family history, age and ethnic background affects your risk of developing it, and we know you’re more likely to develop it if you’re overweight. These are all called risk factors. Alcohol isn’t a risk factor in itself. But it can contain a lot of calories, which can lead to putting on weight. Take a look at our information about risk factors and find out your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Government guidelines on alcohol units To help keep health risks from alcohol at a low level, it’s safest not to regularly drink more than 14 units a week. These guidelines are the same for men and women. But what does this actually mean when you’re in the pub or having dinner with a glass of wine at home? It means you shouldn’t drink more than six medium glasses of wine or six pints of lager a week. But the size of the glass and type of alcohol affects the number of units, so it’s best to check the guidelines at drinkaware.co.uk Alcohol and hypos If you use insulin or some other diabetes medications like sulphonylureas, you’re more likely to Continue reading >>

What Drinks Are Good And Bad For People With Diabetes?

What Drinks Are Good And Bad For People With Diabetes?

When a person has diabetes, insulin, a hormone that helps cells absorb glucose, is either nonexistent or in short supply. A person with diabetes is unable to use insulin properly, which causes sugars to build up in the blood. Diabetes can be dangerous if it is not properly managed. Different drinks can affect blood sugar levels in a number of ways. Contents of this article: The best drinks for people with diabetes The following drinks are good choices for people with diabetes. Things to look out for when choosing a drink Many drinks contain lots of sugars and carbohydrates. Paying attention to food labels and nutritional facts can provide important information. Labels should state the serving size and carbohydrate content of any drink. People with diabetes have different bodily needs, so there are no exact dietary rules. However, some tips can help. To make it easier to control blood sugar, it is important to: eat a balanced diet and manage the amount of carbohydrate consumed keep carbohydrate levels consistent from day to day consume managed amounts of carbohydrate, because the brain and body need some carbohydrate to function. Paying attention to food labels and nutritional facts can provide important information. Labels should state the serving size and carbohydrate content of any drink. The worst drinks for people with diabetes The following drinks are bad choices for people with diabetes. Soda and energy drinks Sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. For people who already have diabetes, this type of drink provides large amounts of sugar and requires little digestion. Drinking sodas without healthy food can lead to large spikes in blood sugar levels. As it is important to spread carbohydrate intake out evenly, it would be Continue reading >>

How Water Impacts Blood Sugars

How Water Impacts Blood Sugars

This article was originally from the weekly Diabetes Daily Newsletter. To receive your copy, create a free Diabetes Daily account. Picture a glass of water. Mix in a little sugar and stir until it dissolves. Now place it outside on a hot, sunny day. As the water evaporates, the remaining water gets sweeter and sweeter. If you have diabetes, this happens to your blood when you’re dehydrated. Because your blood is 83% water, when you lose water, the volume of blood decreases and the sugar remains the same. More concentrated blood sugar means higher blood sugars. The lesson: stay hydrated to avoid unnecessary high blood sugars. How Much Water Should I Drink? The average person loses about 10 cups of water per day through sweat and urination. At the same time, you gain fluid from drinking liquids and eating food. So how much you need to drink is a tricky question. You may have heard the “drink 8 glass of water a day” rule. Where did this rule come from? As Barbara Rolls, a nutrition research at Pennsylvania State University says: “I can’t even tell you that, and I’ve writen a book on water!” It turns out that there’s no basis for this in the medical literature. The easiest way to tell is looking at your urine. If it’s a little yellow, you’re probably hydrated. If it’s darker, then you need to drink more fluids. You can also go with your own intuition. Are you thirsty? Drink! If you’re busy or stuck at a desk for long periods, make sure you have a water bottle so you can easily answer when your body calls for water. Does Coffee or Tea Count? Yes! Although consuming caffeine can cause your body to shed some water, you still gain more water than you shed. And studies have shown that this effect is partically non-existent for people who drink caffeine re Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Adopting good eating and drinking habits is important to manage diabetes. Drinking water is a healthy solution to reduce sugar impact in a diabetic diet. The number of types 2 diabetes cases will increase by 50% in 2015 as compared to 2005, according to the WHO. Moreover, type 2 diabetes, which used to be diagnosed in middle-aged individuals a few decades ago, is now reaching the paediatric population. If someone has diabetes symptoms he has to see a doctor without waiting more. Though there are a variety of factors that lead to type 2 diabetes, the trend is highly correlated to an increase in calorie intake, especially from added sugars. No sugar for a better blood glucose In case of diabetes, decrease quantity of calories related to sugars in drinking habits is highly recommended. According to the American Heart Association, added sugars shouldn’t exceed : 100 calories for a woman 150 calories for a man Pure water contains no calories and no sugar. That is why drinking water should be considered as the main source of hydration. ​ Continue reading >>

Is Lemon Water Good For Type Ii Diabetics?

Is Lemon Water Good For Type Ii Diabetics?

Drinking lemon water seems to be all the rage these days. But there is currently no evidence suggesting that it offers any benefits related to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or other health conditions. Even so, lemon water is a good beverage option if you have diabetes. It's easy to make, refreshing, low in calories and carbohydrates and can help keep you hydrated, like plain water. So there's no reason not to reach for a glass the next time you're thirsty. Nutrient Content of Lemon Water Lemons and other citrus fruits are on the American Diabetes Association's list of diabetes "super foods" because they are rich in soluble fiber and vitamin C, which may help reduce blood sugar, among other benefits. However, lemon water contains very little of either nutrient. For example, 2 tablespoons of lemon juice contain only about 12 mg of vitamin C and 0.1 g of dietary fiber. To put this in perspective, the recommended intake for vitamin C is 75 to 90 mg per day for adults, and the recommended intake for fiber is 21 to 28 g per day, depending on age and sex. Therefore, drinking lemon water is unlikely to provide enough fiber or vitamin C to have specific beneficial effects for people with T2DM. A review article published in the July 2014 issue of "Advances in Nutrition" suggests that naringinen, a chemical compound found in lemons and other citrus fruits, may have antidiabetic properties. To date, these effects have been studied only in animals. For example, naringenin supplementation in diabetic rats decreased fasting blood sugar and A1C, a measure of long-term blood sugar control. It also increased insulin levels. Research is needed to determine if naringenin has similar effects in humans. Even if it does, the amount of naringenin in lemon water is likely to have no effect be Continue reading >>

How Much Water Should A Type 2 Diabetic Drink?

How Much Water Should A Type 2 Diabetic Drink?

The Mayo Clinic has reported that recommended daily water intake is influenced by climate, exercise and health factors. The best way to know the specific amount of water that a diabetic should consume is by consulting a doctor. Nevertheless, there are a few guidelines all people can follow concerning hydration. Benefits of Water Water supports all of your body's functions. If your body is not properly hydrated, it is not able to work at full capacity. Being fully hydrated will boost energy and help raise your metabolic rate. A diabetic's body does not always work at its full potential, and fatigue can be a common ailment. Drinking plenty of water can help prevent fatigue and improve your body's physical performance. Water is especially useful for hydration for a diabetic because water has no calories, no fat and no cholesterol, things a diabetic needs to avoid. Required Water Consumption According to the American Diabetic Association, unless otherwise specified by a personal physician, a diabetic's daily water intake requirement is the same as a that of a healthy person. The Institute of Medicine suggests that men drink about 13 cups, or 3 liters, of liquid a day; women should drink about 9 cups, or 2.2 liters. This amount includes water and other beverages. However, carbonated drinks and caffeinated drinks should be kept at a minimum. Opt instead for herbal teas or water to help keep the body hydrated. Herbal teas and water are always the best choice for the diabetic. Ways to Stay Hydrated Begin by drinking eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day. An 8-ounce glass is equal to a cup, and 8 cups is about 1.9 liters. Remember that this is only a starting point for meeting your daily fluid requirements. When tracking daily water consumption, keep in mind that many common hous Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Fluid Intake: What Every Diabetic Should Know

The Importance Of Fluid Intake: What Every Diabetic Should Know

All too often, attention to quality and volume of fluid intake takes a back seat to other topics for people with diabetes. With so much else going on, you have to remember that the amount and type of fluid you drink can make a huge difference in your blood sugar and energy levels! For example, if you have recently been diagnosed with pre-diabetes and you find yourself drinking a 6 pack of diet soda each day, a change in your soda habit could actually improve your lab numbers and prevent you from having to start medications. This is not the case with everyone, but it has worked for many individuals and it might work for you. We also know that one positive habit leads to another, so if decreasing your intake of artificially sweetened sodas and increasing your water intake is your first positive step, there may be some more phenomenal steps ahead! Research is finding that those who consume artificial sweeteners in diet drinks exhibit the same traits of obesity, elevated blood sugars and unhealthy fats as those who drink sweetened drinks like sodas and commercially-sweetened teas. This is not meant to encourage the consumption of sweetened drinks, but rather to encourage drinking fresh water, brewed tea, or all natural lime or lemon water instead. It's been shown that those who consume drinks sweetened with artificial sweeteners also tend to crave more sweets and more calories overall than those who avoid them. Drinking naturally unsweetened liquids then can help control those sweet cravings. So just how much liquid does the body need? The amount usually depends on exercise level, age, body size, and blood sugar level. You need 1 cc of fluid intake per calorie eaten. If you consume 2000 calories in a day, you should be drinking about 2000 cc’s of fluid. One 8oz cup contai Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

The answer is yes, indirectly it will reduce insulin resistance and help a person reduce their hunger. Drinking 8 glasses of water a day appears to bring down one's blood sugars by reducing insulin resistance due to proper hydration. While at the same time the more water you drink the less hungry a person is so they tend to eat less during the day, similar to drinking a glass of water prior to eating fills the stomach causing a person who is dieting to reach satiation (fullness) sooner. If your blood sugars are very high and your kidney is not able to process all the sugar, water will help remove the excess sugar and ketones out of your system. Drinking water is important for everyone but for diabetics, especially type 1 diabetics, it is crucial to remove excess ketones from the blood stream and reduce dehydration when blood sugars are high. Continue reading >>

Is Red Wine At Dinner Good For Type 2 Diabetes?

Is Red Wine At Dinner Good For Type 2 Diabetes?

A glass of red wine each evening with dinner may offer heart health perks to people with type 2 diabetes. A two-year study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine is the first long-term study aimed at assessing the effects and safety of drinking moderate amounts of alcohol in people with type 2 diabetes, who are more at risk for developing cardiovascular disease than the general population. Those with type 2 diabetes also tend to have lower levels of HDL, the "good" cholesterol. The researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev reported that over two years, red wine helped improve signs of cardiac health by modestly increasing levels of HDL cholesterol and lowering overall cholesterol. The randomized controlled intervention trial involved 224 controlled diabetes patients aged 45 to 75, who generally abstained from alcohol. The patients were randomly assigned to drink 5 ounces of red wine, white wine, or mineral water (the control group) with their dinner for two years. They were all given instructions to follow a well-balanced Mediterranean diet plan that did not have a calorie restriction. The researchers performed genetic tests that showed how quickly the patients metabolized alcohol, as well as various lipid (cholesterol) tests. They also measured glucose control, blood pressure, liver function tests, medication use, and other symptoms at several time points during the two-year follow-up. Compared with the group that drank water, patients in the red wine group had improvements in their lipid tests, the study showed. "Red wine was found to be superior in improving overall metabolic profiles, mainly by modestly improving the lipid profile, by increasing good HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1, one of the major constituents of HDL cholesterol, while decrea Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

More in diabetes