diabetestalk.net

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetics?

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Have Diet Soda?

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Have Diet Soda?

Hey, you are not subscribed. Click here to subscribe Now . Home Diabetes Is It Safe For Diabetics To Have Diet Soda? Is It Safe For Diabetics To Have Diet Soda? Instead of having sugary drinks, diabetics can having diet soda, but in limited quantities only. Intake of diet soda has both pros and cons, especially for people with diabetes. By:DoctorNDTV Updated: Aug 22, 2018 01:36 IST Experts say that diabetics can have diet soda, but strictly in limited quantities There are both pros and cons of diet soda for diabetics But their consumption should be in limited quantities only Diabetes is such a health condition where you might never know what to eat and what not to eat. The bottom line for people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes is to avoid foods and drinks which can cause a spike blood sugar levels. Apart from keeping a check on sugary foods, it is also important to keep a check on the intake of your carbs in order to properly manage diabetes. Nutritionists and health experts say that eating the right kind of healthy foods can help in reversing type 2 diabetes. Overweight and obese people are more prone to risks of diabetes. Obesity is in fact, one of the leading causes of diabetes. Processed foods which are high in preservatives, sugar, unhealthy fats can contribute to weight gain, obesity and ultimately, diabetes. Similarly, drinking sugary drinks is equally harmful for people with diabetes. However, diet soda is a drink which many diabetics would think of resorting to. Ketogenic diets can help you shed those extra kilos and cause massive reductions in the blood sugar and insulin levels. They claim to be low in calories and sugar and are often considered as good alternative to sugary drinks. But is that true? A doctor, on the condition of anonymity, mentions that they Continue reading >>

Could Artificial Sweeteners And Diet Soda Also Lead To Diabetes?

Could Artificial Sweeteners And Diet Soda Also Lead To Diabetes?

Could Artificial Sweeteners And Diet Soda Also Lead To Diabetes? Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. Does zero calories necessarily mean zero increase in diabetes risk? (Photo by Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images) Artificial sweeteners mayhavezero calories, but do they offer zero additional risk for developing diabetes? Well, if you attended a presentation at the Experimental Biology 2018 conference in San Diego , you may say, rats, the risk may be far from zero. To be fair, nothing has zero health risk. Even though eating broccoli in general is quite healthy, you could still bludgeon yourself with broccoli, and eating huge amounts of broccoli could lead to obesity as well as some serious gas and loss of friends. However, the main advertised benefit of artificial sweeteners, such as those in diet soda, is thatthey don't contain the calories and the accompanying obesity, diabetes, and other health-related risks ofsugar. The study presented by Brian Hoffmann, George Ronan, andDhanush Haspulafromthe Medical College of Wisconsin suggested that things may not be that sweet for artificial sweeteners. They did a combination of in vitro (which essential means inside a test tube or similar equipment) and in vivo (meaning in a live animal) experiments usingrats that were specially designed to be moresusceptible to developing diabetes. For the in vitro experiments, the research team placed cells from the inside lining of the rats' small blood vessels into test tubes and exposed these cells to either sugar or a common artificial sweetener. Why the inside lining of blood vessels? Well, one of the effects of diabetes is to cause damage to small blood vessels, which then results in many of the complications of diabetes such as loss of eyesight, kid Continue reading >>

Should You Ditch Diet Sodas?

Should You Ditch Diet Sodas?

The debate about which foods belong in a “healthy diet” (and which don’t) is ongoing – especially when it comes to diabetes. Are carbs the enemy? Should you cut out gluten? Should you sign up for that 21-day detox? And, one of the most controversial questions: Should you drink diet soda? While many organizations, such as the ADA and AND take a fairly neutral stance on artificial sweeteners found in diet sodas, stating that there is room for nutritive sweeteners (non-caloric, alternative sweeteners) in an otherwise healthy diet, I personally take a more conservative approach with my clients. Nutritional science is still a relatively new scientific field, relative to other bodies of scientific research, leaving a lot to still be discovered about long-term effects of many processed foods that have not even been around for a century. In general, I am an advocate for whole foods—foods that are as minimally processed as possible and provide an abundance of nutritive value to those that consume them. Within this logic, since diet sodas fall short of providing any nutritional value, they should be treated more as a novelty than a dietary staple. If you are still on the fence about consuming diet sodas regularly, here are some things to consider before picking up that sugar-free cola: Even “natural” sugar alternatives are processed Some sodas get their sweetness from more natural sources than others – but this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s good for you. Stevia, for instance, is a sugar substitute derived from the stevia plant, which has been used for over a thousand years by native tribes in South America to sweeten foods and teas. Unfortunately, the stevia that is found in your local grocery store is a cousin far removed from the traditional stevia leaf vers Continue reading >>

Diet Soda Might Still Contribute To Diabetes, Rat Study Suggests

Diet Soda Might Still Contribute To Diabetes, Rat Study Suggests

Diet Soda Might Still Contribute to Diabetes, Rat Study Suggests For as long as artificial sweeteners have existed, people have been warned about their supposed health risks such as cancer and multiple sclerosis. But while these claims are routinely debunked as nothing more than junk science, some researchincluding a new study presented this week at the annual Experimental Biology conferenceis beginning to indicate that sweeteners could actually contribute to health problems like type 2 diabetes. Researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin and Marquette University used rats vulnerable to developing diabetes for their experiments. For three weeks, different groups were fed high doses of two sugars, glucose and fructose, and two common artificial sweeteners, aspartame and acesulfame potassium. They then studied the rats blood using a large-scale technique that tracks minute metabolic changes, known as metabolomics. Just after three weeks of giving these sweeteners and sugars to our diabetes-susceptible rats, we saw biochemical changes in the blood that could potentially lead to alterations in fat and energy metabolism, lead author Brian Hoffman, a biomedical engineer at both institutions, told Gizmodo. Diabetes is what happens when our bodies become unable to maintain proper glucose levels in the bodya process thats largely regulated by the hormone insulin. This breakdown causes people to either stop responding to insulin as easily as they once did, or to stop producing insulin altogether. Excessive sugar in our diets is thought to help cause diabetes by overtaxing the bodys insulin-producing machinery, since its used to bring high blood glucose levels back to normal. Because of that, artificial sweeteners have long been advertised as a way for people to eat treats a Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Question: In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes, Does Diet Soda Consumption Contribute To Decline In Blood Sugar Control?

Question: In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes, Does Diet Soda Consumption Contribute To Decline In Blood Sugar Control?

Go to: SUMMARY OF THE EVIDENCE As the effectiveness of substituting ASBs for SSBs for weight loss and improvement of glucose control in type 2 diabetics has been called into debate, the obvious question arises: could these compounds have the opposite of their intended effect and actually negatively influence blood sugar control? Relatively few high powered randomized controlled studies have been done to study this. Hence, the most reliable articles tend to be meta-analyses. According to a 2014 meta-analysis by Christopher Gardener et al, the body of evidence for the direct effects of ASBs on glycemic control is severely limited.4 Many studies have compared Non-nutritive Sweeteners (NNS) to placebo looking for any ill effect on glycemic control with null results. However, these studies fail to address the potential effect of replacing SSBs with ASBs in the diet. The studies that directly compare NNS to sugars are limited by low sample size and other potential confounders. Although weight does not directly affect glucose control in diabetics, it is commonly accepted that a decreased BMI is correlated with a lower HgbA1C. A meta-analysis (by Paige E Miller et al) of 15 randomized controlled trials evaluated weighted mean differences in body weight and body composition between a study group using low-calorie sweeteners (LCS) such as aspartame, saccharin, steviol glycosides, or sucralose in experimental groups and full-calorie control groups. The differences were consistent with the conclusion that substituting LCS for sugar (full-calorie) resulted in a modest decrease in body weight (−0.80 kg; 95% CI: −1.17, −0.43) and may be useful in weight management.5 LCSs were also correlated with modest improvements in BMI, fat mass, and waist circumference. A double-blind cross Continue reading >>

Diet Soft Drinks - Health Risks Of Artificially Sweetened Fizzy Drinks And Sodas

Diet Soft Drinks - Health Risks Of Artificially Sweetened Fizzy Drinks And Sodas

Diet soft drinks generally don't affect blood sugar levels Soft drinks (also called pop, sodas, fizzy drinks) generally refer to flavoured non-alcoholic drinks. Diet soft drinks, which are artificially sweetened are often a popular option for people with diabetes as they generally have an insignificant effect on blood glucose levels . As a general rule, people with diabetes wishing to have a soft drink will usually want to choose diet soft drinks over sugary versions. Exceptions to this general rule are if someone with diabetes actively needs to treat or avoid low blood sugar levels developing as a result of medication such as insulin . The majority of diet drinks have no sugar and should not raise blood sugar levels. However, it is worth checking the carbohydrate value on the packaging if you are unsure or are trying a new diet soft drink. Diet drinks in pubs, bars and restaurants Most bars and restaurants in the UK these days serve at least one diet soft drink. Diabetes.co.uk is aware that people with diabetes are occasionally served full sugar soft drinks accidentally by bar or restaurant staff. This is more likely to happen in loud or busy environments. It may be possible to reduce the chances of being served a sugary soft drink by accident by: Checking with the bar or waiting person that it is a diet soft drink Asking for the diet soft drink in a can or bottle (where this is possible) Telling the bar or waiting person why you need it to be a diet drink Artificially sweetened soft drinks are often referred to as diet drinks because the sweeteners used are very low calorie. It would make sense to assume that low or zero calorie drinks would not contribute to weight gain but some research studies have indicated that diet drinks may be associated with weight gain. One Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Soda?

Can Diabetics Drink Diet Soda?

When you have diabetes, it's easy to feel limited by what you can eat and drink. Although you might occasionally be tempted to stray from your healthy meal plan, you're best to avoid dietary temptations and consume only what your doctor deems appropriate. If you've been previously accustomed to drinking soda, diet alternatives should be safe for you. Video of the Day The American Diabetes Association lists diet soda among the beverages that are safe for diabetics to consume. Diet soda is typically sweetened with one of five artificial sweeteners, including aspartame. These sweeteners do not contain calories, and the ADA reports that they will not cause a blood glucose reaction. Many common flavors of soda are available in diet versions, including cola, root beer, lemon-lime and orange. Risks of Diet Soda The safety of artificial sweeteners is highly contested, although the National Cancer Institute reports that no proof exists linking the Food and Drug Administration's approved artificial sweeteners to cancer. A greater risk in frequently consuming artificially sweetened soda is consuming unhealthy foods because you aren't drinking a high-calorie beverage. A study published in 2010 in the "Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine" that found those who drink heavy amounts of diet soda are more likely to be obese than those who don't drink diet soda, and obesity is a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes. Even if drinking diet soda is safe for diabetics, you shouldn't make a habit of consuming this type of beverage. Diet soda has little nutritional value, and consuming a caffeinated flavor can harm your ability to sleep soundly. Excessive caffeine consumption can also lead to side effects, including anxiety and restlessness. Ceasing to consume caffeine can lead to symptoms su Continue reading >>

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diet Soda And Diabetes: Things To Consider

Diabetes is a condition characterized by high amounts of sugar in the blood. These high blood sugar levels are a result of the body's inability to either produce or use a hormone called insulin. Insulin's role is to move sugar from the blood and into the cells of the body where it is used to make energy. Contents of this article: Sugary sodas and diabetes Diabetes is marked by high blood sugar, known medically as hyperglycemia. As such, drinks which have a lot of sugar in them should be avoided as they cause spikes in blood sugar. There are three major types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. There is no direct cause of type 1 diabetes. Factors that can increase the risk of type 1 diabetes include: Drinking cow's milk at an early age may also play a role in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. The body is unable to use insulin fully or make enough of it to keep up with sugar intake. Type 2 diabetes shows links to: Inactivity Genes Age Family history of type 2 diabetes Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes affects women during pregnancy. If the body cannot make enough insulin to carry the sugar to cells to be used or if there is insulin resistance present, the woman may be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. One recent study posted in the BMJ found a link between drinking sugary drinks and the risk of type two diabetes. Another study posted in Diabetes Care found that people who drink 1-2 sugar-sweetened drinks every day have a 26 percent greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who do not. Other things to consider about sugar-sweetened sodas: Plaque loves soda: The bacteria that make Continue reading >>

Diet Soda Intake And Risk Of Incident Metabolic Syndrome And Type 2 Diabetes In The Multi-ethnic Study Of Atherosclerosis (mesa)

Diet Soda Intake And Risk Of Incident Metabolic Syndrome And Type 2 Diabetes In The Multi-ethnic Study Of Atherosclerosis (mesa)

OBJECTIVE We determined associations between diet soda consumption and risk of incident metabolic syndrome, its components, and type 2 diabetes in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Diet soda consumption was assessed by food frequency questionnaire at baseline (2000–2002). Incident type 2 diabetes was identified at three follow-up examinations (2002–2003, 2004–2005, and 2005–2007) as fasting glucose >126 mg/dl, self-reported type 2 diabetes, or use of diabetes medication. Metabolic syndrome (and components) was defined by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CI for type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and metabolic syndrome components were estimated, adjusting for demographic, lifestyle, and dietary confounders. RESULTS At least daily consumption of diet soda was associated with a 36% greater relative risk of incident metabolic syndrome and a 67% greater relative risk of incident type 2 diabetes compared with nonconsumption (HR 1.36 [95% CI 1.11–1.66] for metabolic syndrome and 1.67 [1.27–2.20] for type 2 diabetes). Of metabolic syndrome components, only high waist circumference (men ≥102 cm and women ≥88 cm) and high fasting glucose (≥100 mg/dl) were prospectively associated with diet soda consumption. Associations between diet soda consumption and type 2 diabetes were independent of baseline measures of adiposity or changes in these measures, whereas associations between diet soda and metabolic syndrome were not independent of these factors. CONCLUSIONS Although these observational data cannot establish causality, consumption of diet soda at least daily was associated with significantly greater risks of select incident metabolic syndrome components Continue reading >>

Diet Sodas And Diabetes?

Diet Sodas And Diabetes?

In the 1980s, throughout the development of sucralose (Splenda), more than 100 studies were conducted to assess its effect on human health, including its potential to impact blood glucose, or blood sugar. There was no impact. As a result, Splenda was determined safe, including for persons with diabetes, by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration, the World Health Organization, and virtually every other leading health organization worldwide. Gut sweet taste receptors But in recent years, the discovery of gut sweet taste receptors in the body have led some to question Splenda’s safety. It appears that Splenda activates these receptors. But would activating them mean anything? Would doing so raise blood sugar? The data suggest not. Clinical trials conducted since the FDA’s approval of Splenda have significantly added to the conclusion that Splenda does not affect blood sugar levels.1,2,3 But the hysteria continued. Some anti-Splenda crusaders have argued that most of the studies involved just one dose of the sugar substitute. Splenda, diet sodas, and diabetes? | New research So this year, scientists from Leicester Clinical Research Centre in the United Kingdom decided to create an air-tight case against the Splenda-phobic crowd. They conducted an impeccably-designed, randomized controlled trial4 that investigated the effect of Splenda intake three times per day for 12 weeks. The amount of Splenda consumed was pretty hefty – the equivalent of five cans of diet soda each day. Forty-seven healthy men with no personal or family histories of diabetes participated in the study. Half of the group was randomly selected to be the Splenda consumers. The other half took a placebo. The study evaluated key measures in the prevention and control of type 2 diabetes, including: HbA1c, Continue reading >>

Is Sugar Free Soda The Best For Diabetes?

Is Sugar Free Soda The Best For Diabetes?

Is Sugar Free Soda the Best for Diabetes? By Stacey Hugues | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD You know that sugar-sweetened beverages aren't good for your health, especially when you have type 2 diabetes. But what about diet soda or other sugar-free beverages? The Research on Sugar-Free Soda and Diabetes Some research has suggested a link between daily diet soda consumption and type 2 diabetes. However, the jury's still out as to whether there are any cause and effect here or simply an association. In a 2009 study, the authors proposed that it's the other behaviors that might go along with drinking diet soda (namely overeating other food), that is to blame for weight gain, insulin resistance, and diabetes. That same take-home message has been echoed by other research. Sweeteners and diet soda* can have a place in a well-balanced diabetes diet in moderation. While water is still the preferred beverage of choice, an occasional diet soda likely will not impact your condition and it may help you fulfill a craving, helping you stay on your plan. How Much Fluid Do You Need to Drink Each Day? Typically, 64 to 80 ounces of fluid (8 to 10 cups) a day is the right amount for most people, including type 2 diabetics. This number is based on average maintenance fluid needs. It includes fluid that is found in food (like fresh fruit), but since that is hard to calculate, only cups of liquid are generally counted. You should ask your doctor if this is the right amount of fluid for you as many factors can affect fluid needs - including caffeine intake, weight, and kidney function. Additionally, when it is very hot or you are exercising, you may need more fluid. If you find yourself so thirsty that you are regularly drinking more water than recommended, or you feel that your thirst is Continue reading >>

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Managing blood sugar levels is an everyday goal for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While eating sugar doesn’t cause either type of diabetes, keeping tabs on carbohydrate and sugar intake is an important part of managing both types of diabetes. Eating healthfully can also reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. In fact, obesity is one of the leading causes of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of American adults are considered obese. Obesity puts you at risk for diabetes, as well as other troublesome conditions. Eating processed foods that are high in sugar, unhealthy fats, and empty calories increases your risk of gaining too much weight. Drinking sugary drinks is also a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. If you are working to keep your blood sugar in check or manage your weight, you might choose diet soda. Low in calories and sugar, diet sodas appear to be a good alternative to sugary drinks. Diet coke and A&W’s diet root beer, for example, claim to be entirely sugar-free. Unfortunately, even though they contain no actual sugar, they are loaded with artificial sweeteners and other unhealthy additives. At one time, there was much debate over the safety of artificial sweeteners. Many feared that these sweeteners caused certain types of cancer. Studies performed in the 1970s suggested that the artificial sweetener saccharin was linked to bladder cancer. Since that time, however, saccharin has been deemed safe. Both the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) consider the sweetener nontoxic. Aspartame, another common yet controversial sweetener, has also gained clearance fo Continue reading >>

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

I’m confused by news that drinks containing artificial sweeteners can lead to diabetes. I know you advise against the use of artificial sweeteners, but does this study mean that we should drink “regular” instead of diet sodas? You will be much better off not drinking any sodas at all. The results of the study connecting artificial sweeteners with metabolic syndrome, a collection of conditions that together dramatically increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes, by no means vindicate sugar. Instead, they suggest that artificial sweeteners are as bad for health as too much sugar. The study, from Israel, showed that artificial sweeteners altered the collection of bacteria (known as the microbiome) in the digestive tract in a way that caused blood glucose levels to rise higher than expected and to fall more slowly than they otherwise would. This finding may solve the longstanding mystery of why drinking artificially sweetened diet sodas doesn’t lead to weight loss. It also strongly suggests that the use of artificial sweeteners has been contributing to the worldwide obesity epidemic and rising rates of type 2 diabetes. To arrive at their conclusions, the Israeli researchers gave 10-week old mice water sweetened with saccharin, sucralose or aspartame, plain water, or sugar-sweetened water. After one week, the mice that received the artificially sweetened water had developed glucose intolerance, the first step on the path to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. With glucose intolerance, the body cannot easily handle large amounts of sugar. The researchers next gave the mice antibiotics, which killed the bacteria in the animals’ digestive systems. The glucose intolerance disappeared, supporting the hypothesis that this condition is caused by a change Continue reading >>

Aspartame & Diabetes Myths | Joslin Diabetes Center

Aspartame & Diabetes Myths | Joslin Diabetes Center

Correcting Internet Myths About Aspartame An article circulating on the Internet has called into question the safety of aspartame. To the best of our knowledge, none of the symptoms the writer and her "sources" have attributed to aspartame have been proven in any clinical scientific studies. We would like to respond to her comments to assure people with diabetes, who use products with aspartame, that we are unaware of any credible scientific evidence that aspartame is associated with any of the adverse effects noted in the Internet communication. Aspartame is made up of two amino acids called aspartic acid and the methyl ester of phenylalanine. Amino acids and methyl esters are found naturally in foods like milk, meats, fruits and vegetables. When digested, the body handles the amino acids in aspartame in the same way as those in foods we eat daily. Although aspartame can be used by the whole family, individuals with a rare genetic disease called phenylketonuria (PKU) need to be aware that aspartame is a source of the protein component, phenylalanine. Those who have PKU cannot properly metabolize phenylalanine and must monitor their intake of phenylalanine from all foods, including foods containing aspartame. In the U.S., every infant is screened for PKU at birth. "Especially deadly for diabetics": there is no question that aspartame has been beneficial to people with diabetes, enabling them to enjoy sweet tasting foods without the carbohydrates. Since it does not contain calories in the usual amounts consumed, it cannot affect blood glucose levels or cause weight gain. An 8-oz glass of milk has six times more phenylalanine and thirteen times more aspartic acid than an equivalent amount of soda sweetened with NutraSweet. An 8-oz glass of fruit juice or tomato juice con Continue reading >>

More in diabetes