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Is Diabetes The Leading Cause Of Death?

Leading Causes Of Death In The U.s. | Apr 19, 2017

Leading Causes Of Death In The U.s. | Apr 19, 2017

A 2015 study compiled by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Center for Health Statistics found that there were around 2.6 million deaths registered in 2014. In their research, these organizations examined the leading causes for fatalities and found the top 10. Let’s take a closer look: Heart disease Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of both men and women in the U.S., leading to the deaths of around 615,000 people in 2014 alone. According to The Heart Foundation, someone has a heart attack every 34 seconds in this country. It’s important to note that heart disease affects men and women differently, especially in terms of symptoms, causes and outcomes. This is an ongoing topic of research and discussion among medical professionals and public health officials alike, but there are major distinctions to take into consideration. For example, men’s heart troubles tend to stem from plaque build-up in the major coronary arteries, while women experience problems with smaller blood vessels that cease to constrict and dilate properly, according to Cedars Sinai. A history of irregular menstrual cycles, estrogen deficiencies and polycystic ovary syndrome are also specific causes of heart disease in female patients. Cancer While heart disease is a concentrated illness, cancer’s ability to grow and spread lands it as the second highest cause of death in the U.S. Around 1.7 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed in 2017 with the most common types projected to be breast, lung and prostate cancers, according to the American Cancer Society. Researchers continue to look into cures for this disease and the federal government is taking an assistive role as well. The 21st Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Leading Causes Of Death In The United States

The Top 10 Leading Causes Of Death In The United States

Nearly 75 percent of all deaths in the United States are attributed to just 10 causes, with the top three of these accounting for over 50 percent of all deaths. Over the last 5 years, the main causes of death in the U.S. have remained fairly consistent. The most recent data (2014) (resource no longer available at www.cdc.gov) reveals that annually there were 2,626,418 deaths registered in the U.S., which equates to: An age-adjusted death rate, which accounts for the aging population, of 823.7 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population A life expectancy at birth of around 78.8 years Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the U.S., accounting for almost 1 in every 4 deaths, and affecting significantly more men than women. The top 10 leading causes of death in the U.S.: Death rates below are calculated on an annual basis per 100,000 of estimated population. Age-adjusted rates are used to compare relative mortality risks among groups and over time. Below, we expand on each of the causes of death and ask whether they can be prevented. 1: Heart disease Deaths: 614,348 Rate: 192.7 Age-adjusted rate: 167.0 Percentage of total deaths: 23.4 percent Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. and also the leading cause of death worldwide. More than half of the deaths that occur as a result of heart disease are in men. Heart disease is a term used to describe several conditions, many of which are related to plaque buildup in the walls of the arteries. As the plaque builds up, the arteries narrow, this makes it more difficult for blood to flow and creates a risk for heart attack or stroke. Other types of heart problems include angina, arrhythmias, and heart failure. The key to preventing death from heart disease is to protect the hear Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Seventh Leading Cause Of Death In The U.s.

Diabetes: The Seventh Leading Cause Of Death In The U.s.

Did you know: More than 30 million people in the United States are living with diabetes each year. Did you know: Every year, 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes. Did you know: November is American Diabetes Month. If you or a loved one has diabetes, the Southern Nevada Health District has education, self-management classes, as well as support programs to help lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. You can learn more about these resources at the Health District’s Get Healthy Clark County site. They also offer the information in Spanish at Viva Saludable. Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes The Third-leading Cause Of Death?

Is Diabetes The Third-leading Cause Of Death?

The Centers for Disease Control lists diabetes as the seventh-leading cause of death in the U.S. at 76,488 people per year. However, a new study done by researchers at Boston University School of Public Health found that almost four times as many Americans die of diabetes than as reported on death certificates. Without clear guidelines for which conditions to cite as the cause of death and with the U.S.’s fragmented health care system, it can be hard for current treating physicians to know all of the relevant information about a patient to make that decision. “We argue diabetes is responsible for 12 percent of deaths in the U.S., rather than 3.3 percent that death certificates indicate,” Andrew Stokes, assistant professor of global health at the Boston University School of Public Health and lead study author, said in an interview. What is diabetes? In type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, making the body unable to produce enough insulin to process sugar. There is no clear cause for type 1 diabetes, and those with it are usually diagnosed before 40—most commonly in children. Type 2 diabetes, caused by genetics and lifestyle factors, occurs when the body can’t use the insulin it produces. Type 2 is by far the most common, affecting 95 percent of those with the disease. Prediabetes, while less serious, is also dangerous. In people with prediabetes, their blood sugar is higher than normal, and without any lifestyle changes, they are likely to develop diabetes. Though these conditions collectively affect 1 in 3 people, most don’t know they have it. In fact, 25 percent of people with diabetes go undiagnosed, and that number jumps to 90 percent for prediabetes. Prevention is the best cure There is no cure for diabetes, Continue reading >>

The Disease That May Be A Leading Cause Of Death

The Disease That May Be A Leading Cause Of Death

Survey estimates that diabetes accounts for many more deaths in the United States than are being reported on death certificates — and that diabetes is actually the third leading cause of death. So when a patient dies from a heart attack, stroke or heart disease that is caused by diabetes or when a patient dies from kidney failure, or if a patient dies 6 months after an amputation, the death certificate does not say that the death was caused by diabetes. About 12% of deaths in 30- to 84-year-olds from 1997 to 2011 could be attributed to diabetes, the latest data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate. But during that time, only 3.3% of death certificates listed diabetes as the underlying cause of death. The prevalence of diabetes has been rising rapidly throughout the world. Global age-standardized diabetes prevalence increased from an estimated 4.3% in 1980 to 9.0% in 2014 in men, and from 5.0% to 7.9% in women. The United States is no exception to this trend. Using combined criteria of self-reported diagnosis, fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c, the prevalence of diabetes among adults aged 20+ rose from 8.4% in 1988–94 to 12.1% in 2005–10. Trends are similar when HbA1c is the sole criterion. Diabetes is associated with many diseases and disabilities, including ischemic heart disease, renal disease, visual impairment, peripheral arterial disease, peripheral neuropathy, and cognitive impairment. And it can increase the risk for many other diseases, even cancer. It is also associated with mortality. In 2010, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. It was listed as the underlying cause of death on 69,091 death certificates (2.8% of total deaths) a Continue reading >>

Tb, Diabetes Leading Causes Of Natural Deaths In 2015 - Stats Sa

Tb, Diabetes Leading Causes Of Natural Deaths In 2015 - Stats Sa

Johannesburg - The leading underlying natural causes of death among South Africans in 2015 were tuberculosis and diabetes, Statistics South Africa said on Tuesday. Tuberculosis was responsible for 8.3% of deaths among males, while among women diabetes was the leading underlying natural cause of death responsible for 7.1% of their deaths, StatsSA said in a statement. The institution analysed 10 leading underlying natural causes of death, and results showed that six of the top ten causes were non-communicable diseases, while the other four were communicable diseases. Tuberculosis was the leading underlying natural cause of death in 2015, accounting for 7.2% of deaths. It was followed by diabetes which accounted for 5.4% of the deaths. "Although tuberculosis has maintained its position as the number one leading underlying natural cause of death, the proportions over time have been declining, whilst proportions for diabetes mellitus, hypertensive diseases, other viral diseases and chronic lower respiratory diseases have been increasing," it said. 460 236 deaths in 2015 Notably, influenza and pneumonia moved from second place in 2013 to sixth in 2015, while diabetes climbed from fifth position in 2013 to second position in 2015, it said. The rise in non-communicable diseases was notable in males and females aged 65 and above. According to data collected, non-communicable diseases accounted for 62.5% of the top 10 leading causes of death among females aged 65 and above, whereas among males in the same age group the diseases constituted 48.0%. There were 460 236 deaths in 2015, with the highest number of deaths recorded among those aged 60–64 years at 7.8%. The lowest number of deaths was among those aged 5–9 and 10–14 years. There were also more male deaths than female Continue reading >>

3303.0 - Causes Of Death, Australia, 2016

3303.0 - Causes Of Death, Australia, 2016

Footnote(s): (a) Standardised death rate. Deaths per 100,000 of estimated mid-year population. See Glossary for further information. (b) All causes of death data from 2006 onward are subject to a revisions process - once data for a reference year are 'final', they are no longer revised. Affected data in this table are: 2007-2013 (final), 2014 (revised), 2015-2016 (preliminary). See Explanatory Notes 55-58. See also Causes of Death Revisions, 2012 and 2013 (Technical Note) in Causes of Death, Australia, 2014 (cat. no. 3303.0). (c) The age-standardised death rates for 2012-2015 presented in this table have been recalculated using 2016-census-based population estimates. As a result, these rates may differ from those previously published. (d) Deaths registered on Norfolk Island from 1 July 2016 are included in this publication for the first time, see Explanatory Notes 12-15. Source(s): Standardised death rates for Diabetes (E10-E14) in Australia, per 100,000, 2007-2016 (a)(b)(c)(d)-Standardised death rates for Diabetes Mellitus (E10-E14) in Australia, per 100,000, 2007-2016 Footnote(s): a) This graph presents deaths for which Diabetes (E10-E14) is the underlying cause of death. The underlying cause of death refers to the disease or injury which initiated the train of morbid events leading directly to death. (b) Associated causes of death are all causes listed on the death certificate other than the underlying cause of death. (c) The associated causes listed are based on the WHO tabulation of leading causes. See Explanatory Notes 35-37 for further information. Groupings of deaths coded to Chapter XVIII: Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00-R99) are not included in analysis, due to the unspecific nature of these causes. (d) Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes

What Is Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, or when the body cannot make good use of the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, that acts like a key to let glucose from the food we eat pass from the blood stream into the cells in the body to produce energy. All carbohydrate foods are broken down into glucose in the blood. Insulin helps glucose get into the cells. Not being able to produce insulin or use it effectively leads to raised glucose levels in the blood (known as hyperglycaemia). Over the long-term high glucose levels are associated with damage to the body and failure of various organs and tissues. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Leading Cause Of Death Within Guyana’s Workforce

Diabetes Leading Cause Of Death Within Guyana’s Workforce

In observance of World Diabetes Day, the Lions Club of Diamond-Grove, East Bank Demerara, held an interactive session and screening for diabetes at the Ramada Princess hotel on Tuesday. Chairperson of the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation, Kesaundra Alves, delivered the feature address on behalf of Public Health Minister Volda Lawrence. Alves outlined that in the region of the Americas, “there are some 54 countries where the situation is quite alarming”. She said Guyana and Trinidad occupy the top two positions with regard to the incidents of diabetes and deaths of persons during their working life and those becoming sick or chronically ill or disabled due to diabetes. According to the Department of Public Information, Alves noted that in the World Health Organisation country profile for 2016 it was revealed that most deaths occurred in the 30 to 69 age range, with 160 men and 180 women succumbed to diabetes in Guyana for that year. Alves noted too that the sustainability of the country’s economy will be severely compromised if on a yearly basis, human resources are lost at this rate. The health official urged persons to be more cognisant of their health and reiterated that the disease can be prevented or better managed by a change of lifestyle that helps to reduce the risk factors. “Diabetes is a long-term condition that causes high blood sugar levels. So first, we have to take a look at our diet. It is ill-advised to indulge in eating habits that will jeopardise our health, so let’s craft a healthy eating plan; one that has less consumption of sugar, our sugary drinks and snacks and all the processed foods high in sugar that we consume. It is crucial that we control our blood glucose levels so let us take a keen look at the household nutrition and make Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Causes Of Death

The Top 10 Causes Of Death

Top 10 causes of death worldwide Of the 56.4 million deaths worldwide in 2015, more than half (54%) were due to the top 10 causes. Ischaemic heart disease and stroke are the world’s biggest killers, accounting for a combined 15 million deaths in 2015. These diseases have remained the leading causes of death globally in the last 15 years. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease claimed 3.2 million lives in 2015, while lung cancer (along with trachea and bronchus cancers) caused 1.7 million deaths. Diabetes killed 1.6 million people in 2015, up from less than 1 million in 2000. Deaths due to dementias more than doubled between 2000 and 2015, making it the 7th leading cause of global deaths in 2015. Lower respiratory infections remained the most deadly communicable disease, causing 3.2 million deaths worldwide in 2015. The death rate from diarrhoeal diseases almost halved between 2000 and 2015, but still caused 1.4 million deaths in 2015. Similarly, tuberculosis killed fewer people during the same period, but is still among the top 10 causes with a death toll of 1.4 million. HIV/AIDS is no longer among the world’s top 10 causes of death, having killed 1.1 million people in 2015 compared with 1.5 million in 2000. Road injuries killed 1.3 million people in 2015, about three-quarters (76%) of whom were men and boys. Leading causes of death by economy income group More than half (52%) of all deaths in low-income countries in 2015 were caused by the so-called “Group I” conditions, which include communicable diseases, maternal causes, conditions arising during pregnancy and childbirth, and nutritional deficiencies. By contrast, less than 7% of deaths in high-income countries were due to such causes. Lower respiratory infections were among the leading causes of death across Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Leading Cause Of Death In Mexico

Diabetes: Leading Cause Of Death In Mexico

The World Health Organization released that as of 2016, diabetes was the leading cause of death in Mexico, being responsible for with 14.7% of Mexico’s deaths and thus seizing over 76,000 lives that year. The percent of the population that died to diabetes has tripled since 1990, and by 2050, scientists predict that half of Mexico’s population will suffer from diabetes. The rise of the epidemic started in the 1970s-1980s, when more efficient methods of producing many crops was introduced. Due to these advancements in agriculture, while much more food was being produced, there was a smaller variety of crops. Farmers tended to produce crops that were cheaper and easier to grow, are staples of the Mexican diet (such as corn), thus resulting in a diet that’s high in carbs and fat, and low in protein. Also, the introduction and widespread accessibility of fast food has added to this problem. Mexico is the world’s largest consumer of soda- with each person consuming an average of 500 cans annually. Also, selling at just one pesos per bottle, carbonated beverages tend to be significantly cheaper than healthier alternatives. For many, soda is a part of their everyday routine. Also, as for many of the people in Mexico who work long hours every day and need a meal that they can eat on the go, fast food and street vendors are a regular and cheap source of meals. The pollution in Mexico’s cities also contribute to these rising epidemic. Cities are overpopulated and are lacking space, thus providing citizens no place to run and do exercise to begin with. Even then, the air and noise pollution discourage more citizens from living active lifestyles. Diabetes has had a heavy toll on the people who are affected by it. It’s has been demonstrated to lead to other conditions su Continue reading >>

Diabetes 9th Leading Cause Of Death In Women

Diabetes 9th Leading Cause Of Death In Women

KARACHI - The Diabetic Association of Pakistan and WHO Collaborating Centre Karachi observed World Diabetes Day at a local hotel on Sunday. World Diabetes Day is celebrated every year on November 14, at global level. The scientific session in the morning was meant for the doctors. The session started with the welcome address by Professor A Samad Shera, Secretary General Diabetic Association of Pakistan, Honorary President International Diabetes Federation, Founder President Diabetes in Asia Study Group and Director WHO Collaborating Centre for Diabetes . He introduced the theme of the World Diabetes Day “Women and Diabetes”. He said diabetes is a chronic, debilitating and costly disease. World Diabetes Day provides the opportunity to improve care for the many millions living with diabetes and to encourage governments to do more to prevent diabetes in the many more at risk. He further said currently there are 415 million people living with diabetes worldwide. By 2040, the number will rise to 642 million. There are currently over 199 million women living with diabetes . This total is projected to increase 313 million by 2040. Diabetes is the 9th leading cause of death in women globally, causing 2.1 million deaths per year. Pakistan has also seen a sharp rise in the diabetes prevalence. These facts and figures reiterate the importance of urgent action. He further said Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented; a healthy lifestyle is an important part of effective management of the disease. 70 per cent of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented by healthy eating and regular physical activity (30 minutes brisk walk daily before meal). Discussing Insulin Therapy he said Type 1 diabetes is rare in Pakistan and it is diagnosed early. The only treatment is Insulin injection which should Continue reading >>

Top Ten Leading Causes Of Death In The World

Top Ten Leading Causes Of Death In The World

As humans, at some point each and every one of us will pass away. Nonetheless, we can do much to extend our lives by practicing healthy lifestyles, making good decisions regarding activities that may result in bodily harm, and making regular appointments to receive medical check-ups for conditions we may be predisposed to. That said, lack of education, medical access, and financial resources alike leave many people in the developing world more prone to certain causes of death, while an obesity epidemic and increasingly sedentary lifestyles prematurely takes more and more lives in the developed world. That said, below we look at the ten leading causes of death worldwide. 10. Hypertensive Heart Disease (1.1 million deaths; 2% of all deaths) Hypertensive heart disease is a series of heart problems caused by high blood pressure. Coronary heart disease is one such problem that causes the small blood vessels supplying blood and oxygen to the heart to narrow. The other is heart failure, wherein the heart loses the ability to pump oxygen rich blood around the body. The last is the enlarging and weakening of heart muscles, thereby inhibiting the heart from pumping the blood to the rest of the body, according to the US National Library of Medicine. In America, 1 in 3 adults has hypertensive heart disease, according to the Center for Disease and Control and Prevention (CDC). Globally, according to the World Heart Federation (WHF), one billion people have high blood pressure (hypertension), and two thirds of these are found in developing countries where medical access is harder to come by. In America alone, in 2013 there were 360,000 deaths linked to hypertensive heart disease, according to the CDC. Globally, hypertension causes half of all deaths from stroke and heart disease, acc Continue reading >>

Under Nafta, Diabetes Became Leading Cause Of Death In Mexico

Under Nafta, Diabetes Became Leading Cause Of Death In Mexico

WHO claim diabetes rates in Mexico began surging just over two decades ago, around the time NAFTA came into force. Diabetes has become the leading cause of death in Mexico, according to a new study released by the World Health Organization, WHO. The United Nations agency claims diabetes rates in the Latin American country began surging just over two decades ago, around the time the North American Free Trade Agreement, NAFTA, came into force. An estimated 80,000 people die each year in Mexico from diabetes, WHO also reports, adding that nearly 14 percent of adults there suffer from the disease. “Diabetes is one of the biggest problems in the health system in Mexico,” Dr. Carlos Aguilar Salinas told NPR during a recent interview. “It’s the first cause of death. It's the first cause of disability. It's the main cost for the health system.” Why has diabetes become such an issue in Mexico after NAFTA? The answer is simple: cheap imported junk food. play-rounded-fill play-rounded-outline play-sharp-fill play-sharp-outline pause-sharp-outline pause-sharp-fill pause-rounded-outline pause-rounded-fill 00:00 ShareEmbed pause-sharp-outline pause-sharp-fill pause-rounded-outline pause-rounded-fill 0:00 0:00 Since its 1994 inception, NAFTA has allowed U.S. and Canadian restaurants and processed food manufacturers to sell products at rates much lower than their Mexican counterparts. This creates a situation where fastfood chains like McDonald's and processed food brands like Nabisco are able to dominate the country’s market, given that their products are more financially accessible. And in a country with rising poverty, inequality and food insecurity, cheap imported junk food is often the only nutritional option. In 2015, WHO reported that Mexico is the leading consumer o Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Leading Causes Of Death In The U.s.

The Top 10 Leading Causes Of Death In The U.s.

Heart disease and cancer still top the list as the leading causes of death in the United States, but the gap is closing between the two. A new report out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looks at the shifting trends in Americans' health and mortality, and the conditions most likely to take lives. In 2014, a total of 2,626,418 deaths were reported in the United States, and the age-adjusted death rate decreased 1 percent to a record low. Bob Anderson, chief of the CDC's Mortality Statistics Branch, told CBS News the 15 leading causes of death in 2014 remained the same as in 2013. "We all have to die of something at some point. When you're looking at these categories you have to account for the fact that there are competing risks, but you can't avoid death," said Anderson. Why the list, then? "We want to create a society where we live as long as we can, as healthy as we can," he said. Crunching the data provides researchers with information that will help develop prevention programs, he explained. Anderson, who oversaw the production of the National Center for Health Statistics report, shared some insights into the top ten: 1. Heart disease While heart disease has topped the list for years now, the actual number of deaths and the death rate for heart disease has come down by quite a bit over recent decades, said Anderson. "The decline goes back about 50 years. For trends in heart disease, you see a substantial increase from the beginning of 20th century to 1950 or so, and then it starts to come down. It mirrors the rise and decline in smoking in the United States "What we've seen in last 20 or 30 years is rapid decline in heart disease. The decline has been fairly rapid and rapid enough so it's sort of overshadowed the aging of the population," said Ande Continue reading >>

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