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Is Diabetes Notifiable To Dvla?

Driving With Diabetes

Driving With Diabetes

Tweet Having diabetes does not mean you cannot drive a car or a motorbike. Given that your diabetes is well controlled, and your doctor states that you are safe to drive, there is no reason why you cannot have a driving licence or hang on to your existing licence. Nonetheless, you may need to let your car insurance company and the Driving and Vehicle Licence Agency (DVLA) know that you have diabetes depending on your type of diabetes and how it is controlled. You should also keep up to date with the latest DVLA guideline changes to driving with diabetes. Who do I need to inform about my diabetes? No matter how your diabetes is treated, you must by law inform your insurance company that you have diabetes. If your diabetes is treated with insulin, you must inform the DVLA. If you are applying for a driving licence for the first time, and your diabetes is treated with tablets or insulin, you also must inform the DVLA. In addition: You must inform the DVLA if any diabetes complications develop that may affect your ability to drive safely. If you fail to inform the DVLA or your insurance company then your driving insurance will be invalid. You do not need to tell the DVLA if you are treated by diet alone or by tablets that do not bring on hypoglycemia. However, if you change from tablets to insulin treatment, then they must be informed. You do not need to tell the DVLA if you are treated by: Diet alone By tablets which carry no risk of hypoglycemia Non-insulin injectable medication such as Byetta or Victoza (unless you are also on tablets which do carry a risk of hypos) Tablets which are deemed to carry a risk of hypoglycemia are sulfonylureas and prandial glucose regulators. Unless you have other complications or reasons that may affect your ability to drive. For informatio Continue reading >>

Applying For A Driving Licence And Informing The Dvla

Applying For A Driving Licence And Informing The Dvla

If you have diabetes and drive, there are a number of factors which can play a part in whether you need to inform the Driving and Vehicle Licence Agency (DVLA). There is a lot of confusion about what needs to be done and additional forms that need to be completed if you have diabetes and are applying for a licence. Essentially, you need to tell the DVLA about your diabetes depending on how it’s treated and the type of licence you want or are applying for. This section details the forms you will have to complete when applying for a driving licence and the conditions you must meet in order to receive a driving licence. Do I need to inform the DVLA? If you don’t tell the DVLA about your diabetes or any other medical conditions that affect your driving when you should, you can be fined up to £1,000 and could even be prosecuted if you are involved in an accident as a result. For all If any of the following factors apply, you must inform the DVLA (denoted by * in the Figure 1): If you have suffered more than one episode of severe hypoglycemia within the last 12 months (driving cars or motorcycles only) If you have suffered any episode of severe hypoglycaemia within the last 12 months (buses, coaches or lorries) If you experience severe hypoglycemia whilst driving If you lose awareness of hypoglycemia If you have visual impairment in both your eyes or in one eye if it is your only fully functioning eye If you need to have laser treatment in both your eyes or in one eye if it is the only fully functioning eye If you have poor blood circulation or loss of sensation (such as caused by neuropathy) that means you need to drive only particular types of vehicles, such as those with automatic gearboxes or with hand operated accelerators or brakes If you develop a complication of Continue reading >>

Advice For Drivers With Diabetes Controlled By Insulin, Or Other Medications Which Carry A Risk Of Inducing Hypoglycaemia

Advice For Drivers With Diabetes Controlled By Insulin, Or Other Medications Which Carry A Risk Of Inducing Hypoglycaemia

Anyone who is under insulin control for their diabetes or is treated by tablets in the Sulphonylurea or Glinide class, may apply for or renew vocational entitlements to drive categories C1, C1E, D1, D1E, C, CE, D or DE. Applying for or renewing vocational entitlements Stage one – application forms request application form DL1(NI) and a DIAB1 (VOC) medical questionnaire from Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA) customer services by telephoning 0300 200 7861 complete and return these to DVA for assessment before moving onto stage two Stage two – your own doctor's medical questionnaire if you are cleared to move on to stage two, you will be issued with form DIAB2 (VOC) medical questionnaire this form will be sent to either your own GP or your diabetes consultant (whoever manages your condition) DVA will pay for any fee charged for this questionnaire if required, you may also be issued with a DLM1 Medical Examination Report which must be completed by your own doctor* you are responsible for any fees that may be charged for completing the DLM1 form * Please read the ‘Further guidance’ section below for information on whether a DLM1 form is required. Stage three (insulin treatment only) – specialist medical questionnaire and examination This stage only applies to those treated with insulin. an independent hospital consultant who specialises in the treatment of diabetes will be nominated by DVA - the consultant will complete an Annual Diabetes Examination report based on an examination and assessment of you at the examination, the consultant will need to see the preceding three months continuous blood sugar/glucose readings available on a blood sugar/glucose meter with memory function and covering a three month period during which you were on insulin DVA will pay the fee fo Continue reading >>

Driving With Diabetes: The Facts

Driving With Diabetes: The Facts

Given it’s World Diabetes Day today (Monday 14 November) what better time to highlight the potential effects of diabetes mellitus on one aspect of daily life so many people take for granted: driving. Diabetes mellitus, commonly known as diabetes, is a chronic disease linked to high levels of glucose in the blood. Statistics show that the number of people with diabetes is increasing every year. The effects on living with diabetes day to day are well known, but what’s not so well known is how diabetes can also affect your driving. How does diabetes affect your driving? Millions of people with diabetes live full and busy lives. For many, being able to drive plays an important part in that. However, if you have diabetes, there is a risk of developing hypoglycaemia and ‘severe hypoglycaemia’ (a diabetic emergency that will affect your fitness to drive). Hypoglycaemic episodes can be very sudden events, with symptoms ranging from feeling nauseous to a loss of concentration, and potentially loss of consciousness. An episode of ‘severe hypoglycaemia’ means you’ll need assistance from another person. This is why it’s so important that you keep your diabetes under control. Treating diabetes Diabetes can be treated with insulin, tablets and/or diet control – it all depends on the individual. The treatment aims to control your blood glucose levels, and attempt to avoid the extremes of hyper and hypoglycaemia. Do you need to tell DVLA that you have diabetes? If you’re keeping your diabetes under control with diet only, then you don’t need to tell DVLA. However, if you're taking medication to control your diabetes, the following applies: So, to summarise, it’s a legal requirement to tell DVLA if you have a medical condition that could affect your driving. Of c Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Driving

Diabetes And Driving

For information about recent changes to Diabetes and Driving please link to the the Diabetes UK website www.diabetes.org.uk//About_us/News_Landing_Page/DVLA-agrees-to-redraft-licence-forms-for-drivers-with-diabetes/ There is no reason why you cannot be issued with or keep your driving licence if you have diabetes. However it does mean that there are certain points to consider to ensure that your driving is safe and hazard-free. For example, informing the dvla and your insurance company, managing hypoglycaemia and driving, your eyesight and restricted licenses. Download our New Safe driving and the DVLA leaflet Your blood glucose should be above 5.5mmol/l before driving see Driving Safely Informing the Driver Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA) You must by Law notify the Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) about your diabetes when you are diagnosed and if you are treated with Insulin or Tablets. You must tell them if you are already on tablets or insulin and are applying for a driving licence for the first time. You DO NOT need to tell the DVLA about your diabetes if you are treated by diet alone but you must tell them if you start taking tablets or change from tablets to insulin treatment. If your diabetes is treated with INSULIN you will not be able to hold a HGV, PSV OR LGV Vehicle Licence. However, legislation has been introduced to allow an application for the C1 licence needed to drive vans and small lorries (between 3.5 and 7.5 tonnes) subject to individual assessment. Applications will need a general check up by their GP and an individual medical assessment by a consultant. Medical legal requirements for driving Group 2 drivers are required to notify DVLA if they have diabetes treated with tablets. If they are then started on exenatide, liraglutide or a gliptin th Continue reading >>

Driving And My Diabetes

Driving And My Diabetes

Guidance on driving and employment for people with diabetes. Depending on how diabetes has affected your health and what treatment you are taking there may be implications for whether or not you can drive. The authority that sets the standards for driving is the Driver and Vehicle Licensing agency (DVLA). A panel of medical advisors review cases individually but there are a set of guidelines available from the DVLA providing general advice and describing the current standards. The underlying principle is that the individual must be safe to drive and motor vehicle and will not endanger other road users. Current specific guidance is available from the DVLA website . There are higher medical standards in place for the driving of lorries and buses because of the size and weight of the vehicles involved and also the length of time drivers may spend at the wheel in the course of their occupation. The medical standards are published in a booklet, ' At a Glance Guide to the Current Medical Standards of Fitness to Drive ' available on the website. The following information is copied from the DVLA list of common questions. The role of the Drivers Medical Group in DVLA is to promote road safety by establishing whether drivers who have medical conditions are able to satisfy the medical standards required for safe driving. To undertake this task, DVLA employs its own fully qualified Medical Advisers who are supported by administrative staff. The Secretary of State has appointed a number of Advisory Panels to provide expert advice on the medical standards required for safe driving. There are separate Panels covering the major medical conditions/disorders. The Panels consist of experts in their medical field and meet on a regular basis and will review the standards in the light of me Continue reading >>

Yourdiabetes - Dvla

Yourdiabetes - Dvla

If you are on a diabetes medication that requires you to inform the DVLA, (see table) it is your responsibility to do so. Hypoglycemia (low blood glucose levels) can lead to confusion and affect your ability to drive. This can increase the risk of accidents. Your ability to recognize and treat hypos, and the development of diabetes complications, may affect your ability to drive safely. By law you must inform the DVLA if you are on any of the medications listed in table 1 and / or You need laser treatment on both eyes, or in the remaining eye - if you have sight in one eye only. You are unable to read (with glasses or contact lenses if necessary) a car number plate at 20.5 metres (67 feet) or 20 metres (65 feet) where narrower characters are used. You develop any problems with your circulation or sensation in your legs or feet that make it necessary for you to drive certain types of adapted vehicles. You suffer from more than one episode of severe hypoglycaemia (severe hypoglycaemia is defined as a hypo requiring a third party intervention to treat the hypo) within 12 months, or if you or a carer are at high risk of developing severe hypoglycaemia. For Group 2 (bus or lorry) one episode of hypoglycaemia should be reported immediately. You develop impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia (delay or difficulty in recognizing the warning symptoms of a low blood glucose level) You suffer severe hypoglycaemia while driving. An existing medical condition get worse or you develop any other condition that my affect your driving ability. For drivers on insulin you must inform the DVLA, your licence will then be renewed every one, two or three years. Any changes to your condition or treatment which occurs between renewals should be reported when they happen and not wait until your ren Continue reading >>

Disclosing Medical Conditions To The Dvla - Direct Line

Disclosing Medical Conditions To The Dvla - Direct Line

All these could affect your driving, so its best to double check with DVLA. Whats the process of declaring a medical condition to DVLA? You can see whether your medical condition is notifiable by looking at the full list of health conditions on the government website. Click on one of the conditions listed and youll be directed to the right form to complete and return. Once youve disclosed your medical condition and sent off the form to DVLA, theyll usually make a decision and respond within six weeks. DVLA might contact your doctor, arrange a medical examination or ask you to take a driving test. Whether you can carry on driving depends on if you surrendered your licence voluntarily or if your doctor revoked your licence for medical reasons. If you surrendered your licence voluntarily, but your doctor has deemed you fit to be behind the wheel, then you should be fine to drive. Check the government website for more information on when you can start driving again. How can bad eyesight have a negative effect on my driving? In 2015, 64 people were killed or seriously injured due to drivers with poor eyesight. We tested five different drives in the Transport Research Laboratorys advanced driving simulator, the Digicar. Each scenario had a different level of vision for the participant, and once the vision dropped below the legal requirement, the drivers performance also dropped considerably. Poor eyesight makes it harder to stay in the right lane, maintain the correct speed and leave a safe distance to the car in front. Not only that, but it also takes longer to react to unexpected hazards. Do I need to let DVLA know if I need glasses for driving? At the beginning of your practical exam you have a quick eye test; to read a number plate from 20 metres away. If you cant read t Continue reading >>

Fitness To Drive

Fitness To Drive

Driving licences in the UK are issued by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) or the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA) in Northern Ireland. This is dependent upon not having, or developing, a medical condition or disability which affects ability to drive. It is the responsibility of the driver to inform the DVLA/DVA of any such medical condition which may affect ability to drive safely. It is the responsibility of doctors to advise patients that medical conditions (and drugs) may affect their ability to drive and for which conditions patients should inform the DVLA. The DVLA requires people to surrender their licence voluntarily when they have been advised not to drive.[1]Its website stresses that "You can be fined up to £1,000 if you don't tell DVLA about a medical condition that affects your driving. You may be prosecuted if you're involved in an accident as a result." Under General Medical Council (GMC) guidance, currently under consultation, it is a doctor's responsibility to inform the DVLA/DVA if the patient fails to act.[2, 3] Drivers should also inform their insurance company of any condition disclosed to the DVLA/DVA. This article provides an overview of common conditions, but is not exhaustive. The DVLA's 'At a glance guide to the current medical standards of fitness to drive' is the standard reference text on this subject and is available online at GOV.UK Current medical guidelines: DVLA guidance for professionals. If in doubt, contact the medical adviser of the DVLA or your defence union. Conditions for which the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency should be notified[4] The DVLA website lists almost 200 conditions in alphabetical order for which people MAY need to notify. For any condition which potentially could interfere with driving capacity, ref Continue reading >>

Driving And Glaucoma

Driving And Glaucoma

This section covers the DVLA requirements for driving with glaucoma. To see the IGA respone to the Parliamentary and Health Service investigation into the DVLA Drivers Medical Group, click here. To listen to Professor David Garway-Heath talk about glaucoma and the impact on driving, click here More information about driving can be found in a film showing how glaucoma can impact on sight whilst driving. Our Driving and Glaucoma leaflet is now available, click here DVLA requirements The following information is applicable to the UK only, other countries may have different regulations and it is important to check with the authority concerned. The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) is legally responsible for deciding whether a driver is medically fit enough to drive a vehicle. This includes the driver's visual ability. A driver must be able to have both good central vision and adequate peripheral vision. Glaucoma in one eye For Group One drivers, if glaucoma is diagnosed in one eye and the other eye has a normal field of vision then it is not necessary to inform the DVLA. Group Two drivers need to advise the DVLA even if they have glaucoma in one eye only, as tests are more stringent for commercial drivers. Glaucoma in both eyes For Group One drivers, the DVLA only needs to be advised of glaucoma when visual field loss affects both eyes. If you have glaucoma in both eyes, the DVLA will need further details about the vision and may arrange to contact the patient's eye specialist for an appropriate report. In addition, the DVLA will often arrange an examination of the patient's visual field at Specsavers. The minimum standards for driving a Group 1 vehicle (ordinary private car) are set out below. Group 2 vehicles (heavy goods vehicles and passenger carrying vehicles) Continue reading >>

Millions Of Motorists Fail To Disclose Medical Conditions

Millions Of Motorists Fail To Disclose Medical Conditions

MILLIONS OF MOTORISTS FAIL TO DISCLOSE MEDICAL CONDITIONS An estimated 3.4 million motorists in England and Wales have not informed the DVLA of a notifiable medical condition(s) that must be disclosed However, last year only 64 motorists were found guilty and sentenced in court for offences relating to non-disclosure of medical issues 14 per cent of drivers who had not told the DVLA did not realise they had to declare medical conditions New analysis1 by Direct Line Car Insurance reveals that of the 35.3 million licence holders in England and Wales2, an estimated 3.4 million have not disclosed notifiable medical conditions to the DVLA, putting themselves and other road users at risk. Despite the estimated scale of the issue, the insurer found that in 2015 only 64 motorists in England and Wales were convicted and sentenced in court for offences relating to non-disclosure of medical issues3. This represents less than one per cent of all licence holders who have a medical condition but have not declared it. The penalties for not declaring a medical condition include up to a 1,000 fine and the risk of prosecution if the driver is involved in an accident. Medical conditions such as visual impairments, diabetes, heart conditions or epilepsy must be disclosed to the DVLA. Additional research4 by Direct Line reveals the reasons why drivers did not declare their medical conditions to the DVLA. The majority presumed their condition did not affect their driving ability (51 per cent) and 14 per cent did not realise they had to inform them of the problem. Worryingly, five per cent did not see the point in declaring it with the DVLA and four per cent had never thought of it. One in twenty (five per cent) did not declare a medical condition(s) to the DVLA out of concern that their lic Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Driving

Diabetes And Driving

You can be fined up to £1,000 if you don’t tell DVLA about a medical condition that affects your driving. You may be prosecuted if you’re involved in an accident as a result. Check with your nurse or doctor if you don’t know what type of medication you’re on. Read leaflet INF188/2 for more information about driving a car or motorbike with diabetes. Diabetes treated by insulin Car or motorbike licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated with insulin. You can also fill in form DIAB1 and send it to DVLA. The address is on the form. Bus, coach or lorry licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated with insulin. Fill in form VDIAB1I and send it to DVLA. The address is on the form. Read leaflet INS186 if you want to apply for vocational entitlement to drive larger vehicles (C1, C1E, D1, DIE, C, CE, D or DE). Diabetes treated by tablets or non-insulin injections Car or motorbike licence Check with your doctor or nurse to find out if your treatment means you need to tell DVLA. If you do need to tell DVLA, fill in form DIAB1 and send it to the address on the form. Bus, coach or lorry licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated by tablets or non-insulin injections. You must fill in: form VDIAB1SG if your diabetes is treated by sulphonylurea or glinide tablets form VDIAB1GEN if your diabetes is treated by any other tablets or non-insulin injections Send the form to DVLA. The address is on the form. Diabetes treated by diet Car or motorbike licence You don’t need to tell DVLA. Bus, coach or lorry licence You don’t need to tell DVLA. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insurance & The Dvla

Diabetes Insurance & The Dvla

Just been sorting out the insurance for the old man. On the latest insurance renewal quote if answering 'yes' to the do you have a medical condition the DVLA need to be aware of, 2 additional responses were required: As a T2 on diet & Metformin tablet control who has never had a hypo the guideline on the DVLA website suggest you don't need to tell them. By not calling them and telling them, on the basis he would be told you need to inform them as per their guidelines set out on their website are they effectively 'unaware' of the condition? 1) It adds about 100 to the insurance policy price if I were to select the 'yes' & 'unaware' options. If you answer 'yes' & 'aware no restrictions' it makes no difference to the policy price. 2) Dose he actually have a medical condition that needs to be 'declared' based on his current treatment where the DVLA are saying he does not have to inform them ? Surely if the DVLA guidance says you don't need to tell them then it's not a condition of which they need to be aware, so the rest of the questions are irrelevant ? The correct person to ask would be his GP. The GP repeated what the DVLA guidelines stated on their website, you don't need to tell them so long as you meet certain criteria which he does. Its a whole different kettle of kippers if you are on insulin or take other tablet meds and/or have had to be assisted 2 times in the last 6 months when having a hypo that you could not deal with yourself. To be safe, as it makes no difference to the policy price, I am going to suggest he marks it as 'yes' & 'aware no restrictions' Does the Insurer have more than one option to describe Diabetes eg do they show "Diabetes" and also "Diabetes 2" No, apparently they don't ask you to disclose the specific condition(s) just yes or no then with Continue reading >>

Medical Conditions And Driving

Medical Conditions And Driving

What medical conditions does the DVLA need to be made aware of, and how do you go about notifying it? We explain all in our guide. If you have any condition that may affect your ability to drive safely then you should notify the DVLA. If you dont, you could be fined up to 1,000. You may also be prosecuted if youre involved in an accident as a result. Whats more, if you have to make a claim on your car insurance after being in an accident, and it turns out you have an undisclosed medical condition, this can potentially invalidate your claim. Some of the more common conditions that people frequently ask about with regards to driving include: Due to the nature of the condition, epilepsy has the ability to affect driving safety quite significantly. If youve had any epileptic attacks, seizures, fits or blackouts then the DVLA advises you stop driving straight away. Your licence may be taken away. However, this doesnt mean that youll never be able to drive again, as you may be able to reapply in the future. When exactly depends on a number of factors, such as when you last had an attack, and whether youve suffered from sleep seizures or awake seizures. For more information see the government guide on epilepsy and driving . When it comes to strokes and driving, you only need to tell DVLA if youre still having problems one month afterwards. If youre not sure whether youre fit to drive, then you can ask your doctor. Whether you need to tell the DVLA about your diabetes largely depends on what type of medication youre on. If your condition is treated by tablets or non-insulin injections, the advice is that you check with your doctor to find out whether your treatment means you need to tell the DVLA. If your diabetes is treated with insulin, then you must inform the DVLA. For mor Continue reading >>

Information For Drivers With Diabetes

Information For Drivers With Diabetes

Further information on what drivers with different types of diabetes need to tell DVLA bylaw. Last updated 11 November 2016 see all updates This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request an accessible format. If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need aversion of this document in a more accessible format, please email [email protected] .Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request an accessible format. If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need aversion of this document in a more accessible format, please email [email protected] .Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request an accessible format. If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need aversion of this document in a more accessible format, please email [email protected] .Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request an accessible format. If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need aversion of this document in a more accessible format, please email [email protected] .Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. Continue reading >>

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