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Is Diabetes Listed As A Disability?

Applying For Disability With Diabetes

Applying For Disability With Diabetes

Diabetes, clinically named diabetes mellitus, is a disease that happens when the cells within the pancreas, known as the beta cells, arent able to produce adequate insulin. This causes hyperglycemia, high levels of glucose in the blood. The most common symptoms are blurred vision, lethargy, extreme thirst, excessive urine production and in type 1, unexplained weight loss. There are three different types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. Type 1 and type 2 are chronic conditions. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results in the permanent destruction of the pancreatic beta cells. This type of diabetes accounts for the majority of childhood cases and can be fatal if not treated with insulin injections or an insulin pump, along with close monitoring of blood glucose levels. Type 1 diabetes is thought to be genetic and usually triggered by an environmental factor, such as an infection. If type 1 diabetes is not treated and managed properly it can result in coma or death. Treatment for type 1 diabetes is a lifelong affair. Type 2 diabetes is due to a loss of the ability to produce insulin, insulin resistance (which means that insulin is present, but the cells do not respond correctly to it), reduced insulin sensitivity or a combination of these factors. Most often regular exercise and a healthy diet can help to manage this type of diabetes, though additional medications including insulin or medications designed to stimulate insulin secretion can be a part of management, depending upon the bodys needs. Type 2 diabetes must also be monitored and treated or many complications can ensue. Gestational diabetes is very similar to type 2 diabetes, though it is only developed during pregnancy. Women with gestational diabetes did not have diabetes before Continue reading >>

9.00 Endocrine Disorders - Adult

9.00 Endocrine Disorders - Adult

Section 9.00 Endocrine Disorders A. What is an endocrine disorder? An endocrine disorder is a medical condition that causes a hormonal imbalance. When an endocrine gland functions abnormally, producing either too much of a specific hormone (hyperfunction) or too little (hypofunction), the hormonal imbalance can cause various complications in the body. The major glands of the endocrine system are the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal, and pancreas. B. How do we evaluate the effects of endocrine disorders? We evaluate impairments that result from endocrine disorders under the listings for other body systems. For example: 1. Pituitary gland disorders can disrupt hormone production and normal functioning in other endocrine glands and in many body systems. The effects of pituitary gland disorders vary depending on which hormones are involved. For example, when pituitary hypofunction affects water and electrolyte balance in the kidney and leads to diabetes insipidus, we evaluate the effects of recurrent dehydration under 6.00. 2. Thyroid gland disorders affect the sympathetic nervous system and normal metabolism. We evaluate thyroid-related changes in blood pressure and heart rate that cause arrhythmias or other cardiac dysfunction under 4.00; thyroid-related weight loss under 5.00; hypertensive cerebrovascular accidents (strokes) under 11.00; and cognitive limitations, mood disorders, and anxiety under 12.00. 3. Parathyroid gland disorders affect calcium levels in bone, blood, nerves, muscle, and other body tissues. We evaluate parathyroid-related osteoporosis and fractures under 1.00; abnormally elevated calcium levels in the blood (hypercalcemia) that lead to cataracts under 2.00; kidney failure under 6.00; and recurrent abnormally low blood calcium levels (hypocalc Continue reading >>

Can You Receive Disability Benefits For Diabetes?

Can You Receive Disability Benefits For Diabetes?

Can You Receive Disability Benefits for Diabetes? According to the American Diabetes Association, a total of 25.8 million children and adults in the United States8.3% of the populationhave diabetes . In 2007 alone, more than 70,000 death certificates listed diabetes as the underlying cause of death. Diabetes is known to result in such severe conditions as blindness, kidney disease, neuropathy, and even necrosis of the limbs (usually legs) that necessitates amputation. With such an extensive list of complications and a skyrocketing death toll, one might think that diabetes would be recognized as a disabling condition in the SSAs blue book. So, Does Diabetes Qualify for SSDI Benefits? The answer to this question is both yes and no. In and of itself, diabetes is not considered sufficiently disabling by the SSA, though it can cause disabling conditions that do qualify. This is because diabetes, when managed through an appropriate treatment regimen, does not typically interfere with a persons ability to engage in substantial gainful activity, i.e. work. One of the SSAs most important screening tests is to determine if you can continue to perform the work you had been doing before with reasonableaccommodations from your employer that do not cause an undue burden on said employer. For many diabetics, the accommodations that employers have to make are more than reasonable and do not pose an undue burden on their business. Because of this, people with diabetes are not commonly considered disabled. Over time, however, diabetes can result in conditions that the SSA does recognize as disabling, such as blindness and nervous system disease (neuropathy). In some severe cases, diabetics may require amputation of their extremities, such as their feet. Yet, not even these horrific symp Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Filing For Disability

Type 2 Diabetes And Filing For Disability

How to Prove you are disabled and win your disability benefits 1) It is estimated that there are over 23 million people in the United States with diabetes, and 90 percent of those 23 million have type 2 diabetes. That is 8 percent of the United States population. It is also estimated that nearly 24 percent of diabetes cases are left undiagnosed. Nearly 20 percent of all Americans over age 65 have type 2 diabetes. 2) Type 2 diabetes is sometimes referred to as adult-onset diabetes, since it used to be diagnosed most commonly in the adult years after a lifetime of inactivity and poor nutrition. As obesity rates in children limb, more and more children are increasingly being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. 3) Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high levels of sugar in the blood (blood glucose). It most often occurs with obesity and insulin resistance. Many cases of diabetes can be managed by regular exercise and healthy eating habits. The best diet for someone with type 2 diabetes is one that is low in fat and high in soluble fiber. 4) Symptoms of type 2 diabetes can range from fatigue, blurred vision, and increased thirst and appetite, to increased urination, unexplained weight loss, slow healing infections, and erectile dysfunction. 5) If not properly managed, type 2 diabetes can cause complications such as heart disease, kidney failure, blindness, and even amputation of limbs. 6) Treatments for type 2 diabetes can vary greatly, depending upon the progression of the disease. Some people may manage symptoms through self monitoring their blood glucose, making dietary changes, exercising, and losing weight, while others will progress to the point of needing to take insulin and/or oral medications such as Metformin. Some will finally elect for gastric bypass surgery. 7) The Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes - Condition Diabetes is a medical condition in which a person’s level of glucose, or blood sugar, is elevated. In a properly functioning circulatory system, blood carries glucose to all the cells in the body in order to produce energy, while the pancreas produces insulin to help the body absorb excess glucose. High levels of glucose in the blood are an indication that the body is not producing enough insulin, or that the insulin produced is not working as it should to help the body absorb glucose, indicating a Diabetic or pre-Diabetic condition. There are three types of Diabetes: Type 1, or “juvenile” Diabetes Type 2, or “adult onset” Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is the medical name for both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Pre-Diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, indicating that an individual has a high risk of developing full-fledged Diabetes. Diabetes is a very serious disease which can result in high blood pressure, damage to the eyes, nerve damage, kidney disease, heart disease, blindness, and stroke. In addition, it is not uncommon for a long term diabetic to loose limbs to amputation because of poor circulation. Symptoms The presence of Diabetes is generally indicated by some combination of several symptoms. A diabetic will often experience unexplained: frequent need to urinate, especially if it is combined with extreme thirst, chronic hunger, especially between meals, fatigue, weight loss, and/or general feelings of irritability Many diabetics report dry, itchy skin and trouble with genital itching and fungal infections. A tingling sensation or numbness in the feet is another indication, as is blurred vision. Finally, the skin of many diabetics is slow to heal from wounds, skin abrasions, or so Continue reading >>

Getting Disability Benefits For Diabetes

Getting Disability Benefits For Diabetes

An individual may qualify for Social Security disability benefits based on uncontrolled diabetes or related symptoms like peripheral neuropathy or poor vision. While diabetes that is well-controlled with medication won't form the basis of a successful claim on its own, most disability applicants with diabetes also suffer from other medical problems that limit their ability to work. When filing for disability benefits for diabetes, it's important to list all your symptoms and diagnoses, even those unrelated to your diabetes. Diabetes Mellitus: Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic medical condition marked by an inability to process glucose in the blood. When the pancreas fails to produce sufficient amounts of the hormone insulin, which sends signals to other body cells to absorb excess glucose, blood sugar levels rise. Elevated blood sugar levels often can be controlled through medication and diet, but persistently high blood sugar levels may give rise to neuropathy (nerve damage) causing numbness, burning, and tingling in the extremities. Other complications of diabetes include cardiovascular disease, kidney problems, skin infections, and visual changes. Type 1 diabetes, often referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, typically manifests in childhood and requires daily insulin injections and monitoring of blood sugar levels. Individuals with Type 1 diabetes are unable to produce the insulin which regulates blood sugar levels. Only about five to ten percent of diabetic individuals suffer from Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, also called adult-onset diabetes, occurs when the body's cells become resistant to insulin and thus fail to process sufficient amounts of glucose. Type 2 diabetes is most common in those over 45, and it is strongly associated with o Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes – How Can You Win A Claim

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes – How Can You Win A Claim

If you are diabetic and unable to work because of your diabetes you may want to know if you qualify for social security disability benefits and how can you win your disability application. This article will give you a look at how I approach a SSDI or SSI claim to put in the best light possible for success at a financial future when your diabetes prevents you from working. How is Diabetes Defined by Social Security Social security used to recognize diabetes as one of its listed disorders. This means that if certain criteria are met then you are found disabled without regard to what you can or can not do in terms of basic work activities. However in 201l social security did away with the listing and only kept a new portion of it that gave what the ssa administration called guidance. (1) The social security administration guidance still is instructive in determining disability for diabetes as the “guidance” they give in listing 9.00 discusses in general endocrine disorders and how they can be disabling. Watch Tips for Diabetics and SSDI As paraphrased from listing 9.00, Diabetes mellitus is a pancreatic gland disorder that disrupts the production of insulin. There are two types of diabetic disorders . Type 1 Diabetes: This goes by the name of insulin dependant diabetes or juvenile diabetes. It is an absolute deficiency in insulin that commonly begins in childhood and is a chronic lifelong illness. Type 2 Diabetes: This is often call adult onset or non insulin dependant where the cells of the body fight off insulin affecting blood sugar metabolism. In some cases diabetes can be controlled and in others it is not controlled well. These are usually the persons that end up with severe symptoms that affect their ability to work . Statistics on Diabetes Are Staggering The nu Continue reading >>

Can I Get Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes?

Can I Get Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes?

Diabetes refers to a group of illnesses that result from the body’s inability to effectively produce or use insulin. This condition is characterized by high blood glucose levels. Over time, high blood sugar levels can affect other bodily functions. For example, diabetes can affect the body’s ability to fight infections and can cause serious problems for the heart, kidneys, nerves, eyes, and feet. Whether your diabetes has been recently diagnosed or you have had it for years, the complications associated with this disease can make it difficult to get around, to take care of yourself, and to hold down a job. Diabetes Can Have Serious Complications If your diabetes is well managed and you do not suffer any complications, then you can continue to work and your Social Security disability application will be denied. However, many people are not that lucky. Diabetes can have significant complications that may make you eligible for Social Security disability. These side effects include: Neuropathy. Diabetes can result in nerve damage in the legs and feet. Retinopathy. Diabetes may affect your vision to the point where you are unable to perform your work duties. Organ damage. Diabetes can cause severe damage to organs such as the liver or kidneys. These complications can be devastating and result in your total disability. Are You Eligible for Social Security Disability? The Social Security Administration (SSA) uses a five-step process to determine whether a person with diabetes qualifies for Social Security disability benefits. Specifically, the SSA is going to ask: Are you working? If you are employed and earning more than $1,170 a month ($1,950 if you are blind), then your application will likely be denied—regardless of the severity of your diabetes. Is your disability s Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Social Security Disability Insurance

Diabetes & Social Security Disability Insurance

Determine if an individual is working (engaging in substantial gainful activity) according to the SSA definition. Earning more than $1,170 a month as an employee is enough to be disqualified from receiving Social Security disability benefits. Conclude the diabetes disability must be severe enough to significantly limit one’s ability to perform basic work activities needed to do most jobs. For example: Walking, standing, sitting, lifting, pushing, pulling, reaching, carrying or handling Understanding/carrying out and remembering simple instructions Responding appropriately to supervision, co-workers and usual work situations Evaluate impairments that result from endocrine disorders under SSA medical listings for other body systems. For example: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, potentially life-threatening complication of Diabetes Mellitis (DM) and usually requires hospital treatment to correct the acute complications of dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and insulin deficiency. You may have serious complications resulting from your treatment, which the SSA evaluates under the affected body system. For example, the SSA evaluates cardiac arrhythmias under the Cardiovascular System (4.00), intestinal necrosis under the Digestive System (5.00) and cerebral edema and seizures under Neurological (11.00). Recurrent episodes of DKA may result from mood or eating disorders, which SSA evaluates under Mental Disorders (12.00). Explore the ability of an individual to perform work they have done in the past despite their diabetes. If the SSA finds that a person can do his past work, benefits are denied. If the person cannot, then the process proceeds to the fifth and final step. Review age, education, work experience and physical/mental condition to determine what other wor Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes A Disability?

Is Diabetes A Disability?

As I got ready to go to the doctor’s office yesterday, I handed my Milan Marathon registration form to my wife Jess, and asked her to fill it out for me. “They’ll never be able to read my handwriting,” I said. In order to participate in the marathon I need a certificate of health signed by a sports doctor. It’s not supposed to be a big deal, but I was stressed about going for a physical exam. I watched Jess write my basic information on the form. At the end of the page there was a space devoted to “disability.” Jess looked up. “Do I write diabetes? Is diabetes a disability?” she asked. She and I both have autoimmune diabetes. “Don’t write anything.” We were both thinking the same thing. Diabetes is not a disability. Or is it? “We’ll let the doctor fill that part in,” I said. That blank line on a simple form shouldn’t have meant anything. It should have come and gone like every other form I’ve ever completed. Instead, it filled my mind with identity questions. I think of myself as diabetic, or a person with diabetes, if you prefer, not as disabled. But yet, if my insulin pump were to fall off during a marathon, or if my blood sugar began to plummet, I’d probably be the most disabled guy on the course. I was nervous on my way to the doctor’s. I questioned whether I’m really healthy and worried the doctor would tell me that I’m not. Maybe he wouldn’t sign the form because of my diabetes. I know plenty of people with type 1 diabetes run marathons and although I myself have run many, I always have a fear that I won’t be allowed in. Or perhaps there will be some official at the starting line who spots my insulin pump and pulls me aside just as the race begins. In the clinic I filled out a long questionnaire and went in to see to t Continue reading >>

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

There’s a lot to take in when you, or someone you love, is diagnosed with diabetes. Finding out what benefits you might be entitled to, now or in future, may not be top of your to-do list so here’s a quick overview. Is diabetes a disability? Under the 2010 Equality Act, type 1 diabetes is defined as a disability, in that it may have a ‘substantial, long-term, negative impact on a person’s ability to carry out normal, day-to-day activities’. Many people with type 2 diabetes are also covered by this definition. The aim is protect you from discrimination, such as needing time out during the working day to check your blood sugar levels or recover from a 'hypo' (low blood sugar) episode. It sounds confusing, but if your diabetes is being controlled by medication or diet, the impact of your condition on ‘normal activities’ is decided as if you were not taking medication or following a managed diet i.e. if you were not taking insulin to treat type 1 diabetes, this would have a severe impact on your abilities (it could even be fatal) and so is considered a disability. What can I claim for? If you have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you will be eligible for certain benefits, depending on the extent to which your condition affects your life. For example, everyone in the UK with diabetes is entitled to free eye checks from the age of 12 – once yearly screening for diabetic retinopathy. And if you’re on any medication for your diabetes, you’ll receive free prescriptions. There are additional benefits available to those with diabetes related to disability and long-term health, such as if you need help or if you’re unable to work. Whether or not you’re eligible depends on factors like additional health issues and how much diabetes affects your day-to-day ac Continue reading >>

Disability Benefits For Uncontrolled Diabetes And Severe Diabetic Complications

Disability Benefits For Uncontrolled Diabetes And Severe Diabetic Complications

Disability Benefits for Uncontrolled Diabetes and Severe Diabetic Complications This is a guest post by Molly Clarke. Molly is the Social Media Coordinator for Social Security Disability Help. She contributes regularly to the Social Security Disability Help blog where she works to promote disability awareness and assist individuals throughout the disability application process. Diabetes is a fairly common medical condition that can often be controlled with medication and lifestyle changes. Unfortunately, not every diabetic is able to manage their symptoms. When diabetes cannot be controlled, serious health complications can arise. These may include kidney disease, vision loss, neuropathy, or tissue necrosis. Serious side effects such as these can make it impossible to maintain employment and earn a living. If—despite following medical instructions—serious complications keep you from working, you may be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits.  The following article will give you a general overview of Social Security Disability and will provide you with the information needed to begin the application process. The Social Security Administration is responsible for two different types of benefits. These are: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - this type of benefit is offered to disabled workers and their dependent family members. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) - this type of benefit is offered to elderly, blind, or disabled individuals who earn very little income. To qualify for benefits from either program, you must first meet the SSA’s definition of disability. This definition is comprised of the following: You are considered to have a disability if you suffer from a medical condition(s) that prevents gainful employment (Gainful employment i Continue reading >>

Is Someone With Type 1 Diabetes “disabled”?

Is Someone With Type 1 Diabetes “disabled”?

I have never been one to feel limited by monikers or labels. I am a woman, I am an athlete, I am diabetic, I am a sister, I am a friend, and I am disabled. None of those terms define me, but they are an authentic representation of who I am. The epithet in that list that might have surprised you (especially if you have seen me at work as a professional skier) is “disabled.” Now, I know what many of you are thinking. It goes something along the lines of, “My child with diabetes is not disabled,” or “I do not want to be viewed as disabled.” I have some news for you: if you have Type 1 diabetes, you are disabled. Now before you jump all over me, let explain few things about disability to you. I promise, I do not mean to marginalize you or the diabetes community by calling those with Type 1 diabetes “disabled.” Here is the thing, according to the Americans with Disabilities Act “An individual with a disability is defined as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities or a person who has a history or record of such an impairment.” When a person’s pancreas doesn’t make insulin, the person’s body is unable to convert glucose into useable energy without exogenous insulin. Useable energy is required to live. Failure to thrive due to an organ not producing a hormone required to sustain life is a “physical impairment that substantially limits” the major life activity of living. If this isn’t enough to convince you that diabetes is a disability covered under the ADA, let’s take a look at the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which explicitly names diabetes as a disability covered by the ADA. Simply put by the Department of Justice, “The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a civil righ Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Diabetes happens when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to process glucose. Diabetes can often be controlled with treatment -- a combination of medication and diet. As a person gets older, sometimes diabetes can't be controlled, and then it can cause damage to internal organs and other problems. Symptoms and Complications of Adult Diabetes Symptoms of both diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 include frequent urination, unusual thirst and hunger, and extreme fatigue. People with type 2 diabetes also can suffer from tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, frequent infections, and cuts that are slow to heal. Complications from diabetes include: retinopathy (eye and vision problems) nephropathy (kidney disease) neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet or hands that disrupts your ability to stand, walk, or use your hands hypertension (high blood pressure) gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage that interferes with digestion) peripheral arterial disease (reduced blood flow to your limbs) cellulitis (skin infections), and Qualifying for Disability Benefits with Diabetes If you have uncontrolled diabetes and you have been prevented from working for at least 12 months, or you expect that you won't be able to work for at least 12 months, then you may be eligible for Social Security disability (SSDI/SSD) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. But to qualify for disability benefits, the damage caused by your diabetes must severely limit what you can do, or you must have complications that fulfill the requirements of one of Social Security's disability listings. If your diabetes is uncontrolled because you don't follow your doctor's prescribed treatment, you won't be eligible for disability. For more information, see our article on failing to comply with treatmen Continue reading >>

Do You Consider Diabetes To Be A Disability?

Do You Consider Diabetes To Be A Disability?

We asked the Diabetes Community “Do you consider diabetes to be a disability”. Here’s what they had to say. Danielle Watson: Bowers No, I do not. In 34 years, the only times diabetes has kept me from doing things I want to do in life have been the times I did not take care of it. JeVonda Flint: No, not at all. Definitely not overall. People may have complications from Type 1 that cause them to be disabled, but I don’t consider myself disabled just because I have it. I teach full time and work a part time job too and never miss work for diabetes Jessica Marie Mittasch: Yes and no. Yes, because it does inhibit some of your daily life. Even a job asks if you have any disabilities and have listed diabetes as one. If people around us don’t give us leniency to take care of ourselves, we get sick or hospitalized etc. I recommend reading the following: Lauren DuBois: Even well-controlled diabetics can be faced with complications. There is a lot of shame and stigma in the diabetes community regarding this, and I can’t help myself from commenting! After 15 years, up to 80% of T1 diabetics will show some signs of diabetic retinopathy (the leading cause for blindness among working-age adults), and it’s not always split by those that did and didn’t care for themselves! Thanks for reading. Jessica Marie Mittasch: I agree. I have retinopathy and I was well controlled for a while before it happened. I probably should have worded my comment better. Amy Headrick: I think it depends on the person. I didn’t for the longest, but as I get older I see how it’s become one. I’ve lost multiple jobs due to complications with diabetes. I require extra time and unlimited breaks because of diabetes. Laura Hellings-Kinkead: No I don’t and I cannot understand why it would be un Continue reading >>

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