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Is Diabetes Hereditary Disease?

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Is Diabetes A Hereditary Disease?

The entire approach and foundation of Orthodox Medicine is based on Luis Pasteur's Germ Theory, a flawed concept. A disease condition is viewed by the orthodoxy as an isolated event, confined to the area in which it manifests itself (E.g. an ear infection, eye infection, gum infection, lung cancer, skin cancer, diabetes, heart disease, etc. ). Under this theory, for unknown reasons, microbes or tumors indiscriminately grow in the patient and must be cut (surgery), burned (radiation), or poisoned (drugs) out of the body. In the orthodox model, the solution is sought through mechanical and chemical means. Seeking to understand WHY the infection or disease condition appeared in the first place, is not explored. The quick fix with a prescription for drugs to smother the symptoms is the typical orthodox 'answer'. A contemporary of Pasteur, Antoine Bechamp, had a different opinion as to why disease conditions 'took hold'. Bechamp felt that the ENVIRONMENT, or the ECOLOGY of the blood played the critical role in deciding whether disease conditions would manifest or not. It is important to discover the stressors (environmental, biological, chemical, psychological, and emotional) in a patie Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Nikhil

    My friend's father has diabetes (who was diagnosed with diabetes long after my friend's birth). The doctor told the friend that he has more chances of getting diabetes than a normal person and he must make lifestyle changes as he is more likely to get the disease. Does it mean that diabetes is genetic (hereditary)?

  2. Charles

    Does it mean that diabetes is genetic (hereditary)?
    Yes, Type 2 Diabetes most definitely contains a genetically inherited component. However, there is also a very strong environmental influence, which is the reason why your friend's doctor recommended that your friend change his lifestyle (because the onset of T2D is heavily determined by environmental factors, and is by no means 100% genetically predetermined).
    According to the World Health Organization...
    Genetics in the Development of (Type 2) Diabetes
    It has long been known that T2D is, in part, inherited. Family studies have revealed that first degree relatives of individuals with T2D are about 3 times more likely to develop the disease than individuals without a positive family history of the disease (Flores et al., 2003; Hansen 2003; Gloyn 2003). It has also been shown that concordance rates for monozygotic twins, which have ranged from 60-90%, are significantly higher than those for dizygotic twins. Thus, it is clear that T2D has a strong genetic component.
    Environmental Risk Factors
    The major environmental risk factors for T2D are obesity (> 120% ideal body weight or a body mass index > 30 k/m2) and a sedentary lifestyle (van Dam, 2003; Shaw and Chisholm, 2003). Thus, the tremendous increase in the rates of T2D in recent years has been attributed, primarily, to the dramatic rise in obesity worldwide (Zimmet et al., 2001). It has been estimated that approximately 80% of all new T2D cases are due to obesity (Lean, 2000). This is true for adults and children. In the Pima Indians, 85% of the T2D children were either overweight or obese (Fagot-Campagna et al., 2000). Another study in the US reported that IGT was detected in 25% of obese children age 4-10 years, and in 21% of obese adolescents (Sinha et al., 2002). Undiagnosed T2D was detected in 4% of the adolescents.
    ..
    The other major T2D risk factor is physical inactivity. In addition to controlling weight, exercise improves glucose and lipid metabolism, which decreases T2D risk. Physical activity, such as daily walking or cycling for more than 30 minutes, has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of T2D (Hu et al., 2003). Physical activity has also been inversely related to body mass index and IGT. Recently, intervention studies in China (Pan et al., 1997), Finland (Tuomilehto J et al., 2001) and the US (Diabetes Prevention Program Study Group, 2002) have shown that lifestyle interventions targeting diet and exercise decreased the risk of progression from IGT to T2D by approximately 60% . In contrast, oral hypoglycemic medication only reduced the risk of progression by about 30%.
    That being said, I would strongly nudge your friend in the right direction, and start asking them to go on walks or bike rides (with you), and remind them from time to time to drink less sodas and processed foods (assuming that they do).
    Just as a side note, the American Heart Association recommends that only an additional 36g of sugar be added to your daily diet (for an adult male; 25g for adult female).

  3. Erin Giglio

    The trouble with questions like this--"is this disease genetic?"--is that diseases are complicated phenotypes that arise from interactions with both individuals' genetic makeup and also the changes in gene expression that happen as a result of the environment of that individual over their lifetime.
    To put it another way: neither nature without nurture nor nurture without nature are particularly interesting, because the first amounts to a little vial of DNA in a microcentrifuge tube and the second amounts to, uh, a whole lot of nothing.
    In the case of Type II diabetes, there is both a strong environmental component--persistent obesity in humans is so likely to lead to diabetes that one of the two original mouse obesity model strains was named 'db' for diabetes--and also a genetic component that affects the likelihood of developing Type II diabetes in a number of ways. Some genetic variants may be less likely to develop obesity even under the high-fat diets that typically are used to create obese phenotypes in mice. Some variants may be more or less likely to develop insulin resistance even in the presence of high levels of adipose tissue. Both of these variations would affect your likelihood of getting Type II diabetes... depending on your environment and the level of body fat you carry, and that last one is going to be dependent on not only your genetic makeup but also your environment and (almost certainly) epigenetic influences from your parents.
    With respect to Type II diabetes and actual specific genetic variations that have been identified, there's the twin study cited in another answer here, which was done in Danish twins and really just looked at whether there was a genetic component done at all. GWAS studies have, predictably, resulted in several candidate loci, all with relatively small effects on risk--which makes sense, because metabolism is a complex thing and many players are probably involved in competing roles. (I'd link more, but I'm new here--hitting up a Google Scholar search for "type ii diabetes genetic variance" nets you a whole bunch more GWAS studies talking about specific types of variation noted.)

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http://www.drpompa.com/additional-res... In this video, Dr. Pompa discusses natural solution for diabetes, insulin resistance type 1 diabetes, type 1 diabetes vs type 2 diabetes, diabetes and genetics; true cellular detox support solutions. TIIR, Toxin Induced Insulin Resistance is considered to cause 1/3 of the diabetic population. He reviews the connection between diabetes and cellular inflammation and the reasons the cellular healing national diabetes program was created. Dr. Pompa briefly describes each of the 5R's of True Cellular Detox, R1 removing the source, R2 regenerating the cell membrane, R3 restoring cellular energy, R4 reducing inflammation and R5 reestablishing methylation. About how things like epigenetics, heavy metals, mold exposure, ATP energy, different types of stress, stressors and the Cellular Healing Diet all tie in together.

Genetics Of Type 1a

Type 1 diabetes is a complex genetic disorder. There are now at least 20 insulin-dependent genes associated with the development of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a complex genetic disorder. It occurs more frequently in families in which there are other relatives with type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune conditions. Children have a 5% to 6% chance of developing diabetes if their father has type 1 diabetes, and a 3% to 4% chance if their mother has type 1 diabetes. It is thought that some of the mother’s chromosomal material, or DNA, gets inactivated when passed on to the child, thereby accounting for the difference in the children’s diabetes risk. If a sibling has type 1 diabetes, the risk is 5-6%; however, if the sibling has identical MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) haplotypes, the risk increases. When one identical twin has diabetes, the risk of the other twin developing diabetes traditionally has been thought to be about 40%. Recent research suggests that the number may be much higher. A number of genes have been identified that are associated with the development of diabetes. The chromosomal locations of these “diabetes genes” are called inherited susceptibility lo Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Nikhil

    My friend's father has diabetes (who was diagnosed with diabetes long after my friend's birth). The doctor told the friend that he has more chances of getting diabetes than a normal person and he must make lifestyle changes as he is more likely to get the disease. Does it mean that diabetes is genetic (hereditary)?

  2. Charles

    Does it mean that diabetes is genetic (hereditary)?
    Yes, Type 2 Diabetes most definitely contains a genetically inherited component. However, there is also a very strong environmental influence, which is the reason why your friend's doctor recommended that your friend change his lifestyle (because the onset of T2D is heavily determined by environmental factors, and is by no means 100% genetically predetermined).
    According to the World Health Organization...
    Genetics in the Development of (Type 2) Diabetes
    It has long been known that T2D is, in part, inherited. Family studies have revealed that first degree relatives of individuals with T2D are about 3 times more likely to develop the disease than individuals without a positive family history of the disease (Flores et al., 2003; Hansen 2003; Gloyn 2003). It has also been shown that concordance rates for monozygotic twins, which have ranged from 60-90%, are significantly higher than those for dizygotic twins. Thus, it is clear that T2D has a strong genetic component.
    Environmental Risk Factors
    The major environmental risk factors for T2D are obesity (> 120% ideal body weight or a body mass index > 30 k/m2) and a sedentary lifestyle (van Dam, 2003; Shaw and Chisholm, 2003). Thus, the tremendous increase in the rates of T2D in recent years has been attributed, primarily, to the dramatic rise in obesity worldwide (Zimmet et al., 2001). It has been estimated that approximately 80% of all new T2D cases are due to obesity (Lean, 2000). This is true for adults and children. In the Pima Indians, 85% of the T2D children were either overweight or obese (Fagot-Campagna et al., 2000). Another study in the US reported that IGT was detected in 25% of obese children age 4-10 years, and in 21% of obese adolescents (Sinha et al., 2002). Undiagnosed T2D was detected in 4% of the adolescents.
    ..
    The other major T2D risk factor is physical inactivity. In addition to controlling weight, exercise improves glucose and lipid metabolism, which decreases T2D risk. Physical activity, such as daily walking or cycling for more than 30 minutes, has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of T2D (Hu et al., 2003). Physical activity has also been inversely related to body mass index and IGT. Recently, intervention studies in China (Pan et al., 1997), Finland (Tuomilehto J et al., 2001) and the US (Diabetes Prevention Program Study Group, 2002) have shown that lifestyle interventions targeting diet and exercise decreased the risk of progression from IGT to T2D by approximately 60% . In contrast, oral hypoglycemic medication only reduced the risk of progression by about 30%.
    That being said, I would strongly nudge your friend in the right direction, and start asking them to go on walks or bike rides (with you), and remind them from time to time to drink less sodas and processed foods (assuming that they do).
    Just as a side note, the American Heart Association recommends that only an additional 36g of sugar be added to your daily diet (for an adult male; 25g for adult female).

  3. Erin Giglio

    The trouble with questions like this--"is this disease genetic?"--is that diseases are complicated phenotypes that arise from interactions with both individuals' genetic makeup and also the changes in gene expression that happen as a result of the environment of that individual over their lifetime.
    To put it another way: neither nature without nurture nor nurture without nature are particularly interesting, because the first amounts to a little vial of DNA in a microcentrifuge tube and the second amounts to, uh, a whole lot of nothing.
    In the case of Type II diabetes, there is both a strong environmental component--persistent obesity in humans is so likely to lead to diabetes that one of the two original mouse obesity model strains was named 'db' for diabetes--and also a genetic component that affects the likelihood of developing Type II diabetes in a number of ways. Some genetic variants may be less likely to develop obesity even under the high-fat diets that typically are used to create obese phenotypes in mice. Some variants may be more or less likely to develop insulin resistance even in the presence of high levels of adipose tissue. Both of these variations would affect your likelihood of getting Type II diabetes... depending on your environment and the level of body fat you carry, and that last one is going to be dependent on not only your genetic makeup but also your environment and (almost certainly) epigenetic influences from your parents.
    With respect to Type II diabetes and actual specific genetic variations that have been identified, there's the twin study cited in another answer here, which was done in Danish twins and really just looked at whether there was a genetic component done at all. GWAS studies have, predictably, resulted in several candidate loci, all with relatively small effects on risk--which makes sense, because metabolism is a complex thing and many players are probably involved in competing roles. (I'd link more, but I'm new here--hitting up a Google Scholar search for "type ii diabetes genetic variance" nets you a whole bunch more GWAS studies talking about specific types of variation noted.)

  4. -> Continue reading
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This video provides an animated introduction to diabetes type 1 and type 2.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/join -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.

The Genetics Of Diabetes

Why me? How did I deserve this? Am I to blame? These are questions that many people ask when diagnosed with a serious condition or disease. Unfortunately, there’s no clear-cut answer when it comes to diabetes. Unlike some traits, diabetes doesn’t seem to be inherited in a simple pattern, and there is a lot of misinformation out there about its causes. (Have you ever had to explain that diabetes doesn’t happen because someone ate too much sugar?) It’s apparent, though, that some people are born more likely to develop diabetes than others. We know that type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different causes, but genetics plays an important role in both types. People with diabetes inherit a predisposition to the disease, then something in their environment triggers it. Identical twins are proof that genes alone are not enough, however. Identical twins have identical genes; therefore, they should have the same genetic risk for a disease—right? Not necessarily. Research has found that if one identical twin has type 1 diabetes, the other twin will get the disease about 50 percent of the time. For type 2 diabetes, that risk rises to as much as 4 in 5. In both type 1 and type 2, identic Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Nikhil

    My friend's father has diabetes (who was diagnosed with diabetes long after my friend's birth). The doctor told the friend that he has more chances of getting diabetes than a normal person and he must make lifestyle changes as he is more likely to get the disease. Does it mean that diabetes is genetic (hereditary)?

  2. Charles

    Does it mean that diabetes is genetic (hereditary)?
    Yes, Type 2 Diabetes most definitely contains a genetically inherited component. However, there is also a very strong environmental influence, which is the reason why your friend's doctor recommended that your friend change his lifestyle (because the onset of T2D is heavily determined by environmental factors, and is by no means 100% genetically predetermined).
    According to the World Health Organization...
    Genetics in the Development of (Type 2) Diabetes
    It has long been known that T2D is, in part, inherited. Family studies have revealed that first degree relatives of individuals with T2D are about 3 times more likely to develop the disease than individuals without a positive family history of the disease (Flores et al., 2003; Hansen 2003; Gloyn 2003). It has also been shown that concordance rates for monozygotic twins, which have ranged from 60-90%, are significantly higher than those for dizygotic twins. Thus, it is clear that T2D has a strong genetic component.
    Environmental Risk Factors
    The major environmental risk factors for T2D are obesity (> 120% ideal body weight or a body mass index > 30 k/m2) and a sedentary lifestyle (van Dam, 2003; Shaw and Chisholm, 2003). Thus, the tremendous increase in the rates of T2D in recent years has been attributed, primarily, to the dramatic rise in obesity worldwide (Zimmet et al., 2001). It has been estimated that approximately 80% of all new T2D cases are due to obesity (Lean, 2000). This is true for adults and children. In the Pima Indians, 85% of the T2D children were either overweight or obese (Fagot-Campagna et al., 2000). Another study in the US reported that IGT was detected in 25% of obese children age 4-10 years, and in 21% of obese adolescents (Sinha et al., 2002). Undiagnosed T2D was detected in 4% of the adolescents.
    ..
    The other major T2D risk factor is physical inactivity. In addition to controlling weight, exercise improves glucose and lipid metabolism, which decreases T2D risk. Physical activity, such as daily walking or cycling for more than 30 minutes, has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of T2D (Hu et al., 2003). Physical activity has also been inversely related to body mass index and IGT. Recently, intervention studies in China (Pan et al., 1997), Finland (Tuomilehto J et al., 2001) and the US (Diabetes Prevention Program Study Group, 2002) have shown that lifestyle interventions targeting diet and exercise decreased the risk of progression from IGT to T2D by approximately 60% . In contrast, oral hypoglycemic medication only reduced the risk of progression by about 30%.
    That being said, I would strongly nudge your friend in the right direction, and start asking them to go on walks or bike rides (with you), and remind them from time to time to drink less sodas and processed foods (assuming that they do).
    Just as a side note, the American Heart Association recommends that only an additional 36g of sugar be added to your daily diet (for an adult male; 25g for adult female).

  3. Erin Giglio

    The trouble with questions like this--"is this disease genetic?"--is that diseases are complicated phenotypes that arise from interactions with both individuals' genetic makeup and also the changes in gene expression that happen as a result of the environment of that individual over their lifetime.
    To put it another way: neither nature without nurture nor nurture without nature are particularly interesting, because the first amounts to a little vial of DNA in a microcentrifuge tube and the second amounts to, uh, a whole lot of nothing.
    In the case of Type II diabetes, there is both a strong environmental component--persistent obesity in humans is so likely to lead to diabetes that one of the two original mouse obesity model strains was named 'db' for diabetes--and also a genetic component that affects the likelihood of developing Type II diabetes in a number of ways. Some genetic variants may be less likely to develop obesity even under the high-fat diets that typically are used to create obese phenotypes in mice. Some variants may be more or less likely to develop insulin resistance even in the presence of high levels of adipose tissue. Both of these variations would affect your likelihood of getting Type II diabetes... depending on your environment and the level of body fat you carry, and that last one is going to be dependent on not only your genetic makeup but also your environment and (almost certainly) epigenetic influences from your parents.
    With respect to Type II diabetes and actual specific genetic variations that have been identified, there's the twin study cited in another answer here, which was done in Danish twins and really just looked at whether there was a genetic component done at all. GWAS studies have, predictably, resulted in several candidate loci, all with relatively small effects on risk--which makes sense, because metabolism is a complex thing and many players are probably involved in competing roles. (I'd link more, but I'm new here--hitting up a Google Scholar search for "type ii diabetes genetic variance" nets you a whole bunch more GWAS studies talking about specific types of variation noted.)

  4. -> Continue reading
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