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Is Diabetes Fatal

What It’s Like To Have Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Have Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

One of the greatest dangers of type 2 diabetes is that it can be slow and silent. Many people with the condition don’t experience any symptoms at all, even though their unbalanced blood sugar is already affecting their cells and tissue. You might be one of those people. How can you tell if you're at risk for developing type 2 diabetes? You may be more likely to develop the condition if you: Are overweight, with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or higher Are inactive Are age 45 or older Have a family history of type 2 diabetes Are African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, Asian-American, or a Pacific Islander Have low levels of HDL, or the “good” cholesterol Have high levels of triglycerides (a type of fat) in your blood Although the telltale signs of type 2 diabetes may develop slowly over many years, the condition will cause symptoms for many people. Do any of these sound familiar? Increased thirst Frequent urination Increased hunger Unexplained weight loss Extreme fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Sores that are slow to heal Skin, bladder, or gum infections Whether you're experiencing any of these symptoms or not, uncontrolled levels of high blood sugar over time can lead to tissue damage throughout your body, from your eyes to your toes. Uncontrolled Diabetes Is Scary — and Even Deadly Type 2 diabetes damages essential systems in your body: your blood vessels, nerves, or both. The consequences of uncontrolled diabetes can be very serious, and some can eventually be fatal. They include: Infections Amputations due to infections in the feet These complications sound scary — and they are. Fortunately, controlling your blood-glucose levels can help prevent many of these secondary problems, or at least manage them if they have already developed. Take Action Tod Continue reading >>

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

Type 2 diabetes typically shows up later in life, although the incidence in younger people is increasing. The disease, which is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar), or hyperglycemia, usually results from a combination of unhealthy lifestyle habits, obesity, and genes. Over time, untreated hyperglycemia can lead to serious, life-threatening complications. Type 2 diabetes also puts you at risk for certain health conditions that can reduce your life expectancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diabetes is the 7th most common cause of death in the United States. However, there is no defining statistic to tell you how long you’ll live with type 2 diabetes. The better you have your diabetes under control, the lower your risk for developing associated conditions that may shorten your lifespan. The top cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is cardiovascular disease. This is due to the fact that high blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels, and also because people with type 2 diabetes often have high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, and other factors that increase the risk of heart disease. When you have type 2 diabetes, there are many factors that can increase your risk of complications, and these complications can impact your life expectancy. They include: High blood sugar levels: Uncontrolled high blood sugar levels affect many organs and contribute to the development of complications. High blood pressure: According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), 71 percent of people with diabetes have high blood pressure. High blood pressure increases the risk of kidney disease, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and other complications. Lipid disorders: According to the ADA, 65 percent of those with diabetes have high low- Continue reading >>

How Diabetes May Raise Your Fatal Heart Attack Risk By 50 Percent

How Diabetes May Raise Your Fatal Heart Attack Risk By 50 Percent

Your heart health depends on more than what’s going on in your chest: Having diabetes increases your chances of dying from a heart attack, a new study from the University of Leeds suggests. After tracking more than 700,000 people for 8 years, the researchers discovered that those with diabetes were 56 percent more likely to die from a STEMI heart attack—where your coronary artery is completely blocked—and 39 percent more likely to die from a NSTEMI heart attack—where your coronary artery is partially blocked—than people without the condition. Related: 6 Real Guys Who Suffered Heart Attacks Tell You What It Really Feels Like The link still remained even after the researchers took other risk factors into account, such as pre-existing health conditions like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart failure, as well as factors like family history and smoking status. That likely means there’s something about diabetes itself that’s hurting your heart, says lead researcher Chris Gale, Ph.D. Related: 5 Surprising Habits That May Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes One possibility: The long-term elevated blood sugar and low-grade inflammation seen in diabetes damages blood vessels, including those that feed the heart. Over time, this can cause atherosclerosis, which hardens and narrows your arteries, allowing plaque to build up on their inner lining. And that can raise your risk of a fatal heart attack, says Gale. These findings are especially alarming because diabetes—a condition where glucose, or blood sugar, builds up in your blood—is becoming so common. In fact, nearly 10 percent of the population is diabetic, and another 37 percent has prediabetes, meaning those people are on their way to developing the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Co Continue reading >>

Fatal Coma In Diabetes.

Fatal Coma In Diabetes.

Abstract Analysis of causes of death in a population of 3,113 diabetics was carried out for a period of eight years and those patients dying of some form of diabetic coma identified. Of 1,274 deaths, only 22 (1.73%) were primarily due to coma; 7 hypoglycaemia, 8 ketoacidosis, 3 hyperosmolar coma and 4 lactic acidosis. Three of the ketoacidosis patients may have died from other causes. Most deaths occurred in patients with long-standing diabetes. In the hypoglycaemic group all were on insulin and several had been difficult to control for many years. Infection was an important precipitating factor for ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar coma. Phenformin was the cause of all cases of fatal lactic acidosis. It is reassuring that death from coma is a comparatively rare event in known treated diabetic patients. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Severe hypoglycemia, or diabetic shock, is a serious health risk for anyone with diabetes. Also called insulin reaction, as a consequence of too much insulin, it can occur anytime there is an imbalance between the insulin in your system, the amount of food you eat, or your level of physical activity. It can even happen while you are doing all you think you can do to manage your diabetes. The symptoms of diabetic shock may seem mild at first. But they should not be ignored. If it isn't treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that causes you to faint, requiring immediate medical attention. Diabetic shock can also lead to a coma and death. It's important that not only you, but your family and others around you, learn to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know what to do about them. It could save your life. Hypoglycemia is a low level of blood sugar. The cells in your body use sugar from carbohydrates for energy. Insulin, which normally is made in the pancreas, is necessary for sugar to enter the cells. It helps keep the levels of sugar in the blood from getting too high. It's important to maintain the proper level of sugar in your blood. Levels that are too high can cause severe dehydration, which can be life threatening. Over time, excess sugar in the body does serious damage to organs such as your heart, eyes, and nervous system. Ordinarily, the production of insulin is regulated inside your body so that you naturally have the amount of insulin you need to help control the level of sugar. But if your body doesn't make its own insulin or if it can't effectively use the insulin it does produce, you need to inject insulin as a medicine or take another medication that will increase the amount of insulin your body does make. So if you need to me Continue reading >>

The Aftermath Of A Fatal Diabetes-related Accident

The Aftermath Of A Fatal Diabetes-related Accident

A driver with diabetes faces up to 14 years in prison for smashing into a vehicle while suffering from hypoglycemia. Pennsylvania is a state that has a tough “driving while diabetic” law. All first-time driver’s license applicants in the state must answer a series of questions designed to uncover any compromised ability to safely operate a vehicle. Also, physicians, emergency personnel, and law enforcement officers are required to report to the state any disabling condition which might affect a license holder’s ability to drive. A driver with diabetes in the Quaker State embarks upon an essentially lifelong course of documenting he or she isn’t a road menace. Despite these efforts, the grim reality is that poorly controlled diabetes still continues to place drivers, pedestrians, and passengers at grave risk. In January of this year, a 41-year-old Pennsylvania man entered non-negotiated guilty pleas to two felony counts of vehicular homicide and a misdemeanor count of reckless endangerment. In 2012, he’d collided with a vehicle at an interstate on-ramp, killing the 64-year-old driver of the other car. Within a day of the crash, a 91-year-old passenger in that car succumbed to her injuries. The injuries were so severe that the four surviving occupants of each vehicle, including the man’s two-year old son, had to be airlifted to Pittsburgh-area hospitals. The accident happened in the middle of a clear August day. Accident reconstruction technicians and state troopers investigating the crash established that the car had been traveling in a straight line to the point of impact at a speed of between 88 miles per hour and 93 miles per hour, and that the driver never applied the brakes. Allen Powanda, the assistant district attorney who handled the case, told Insu Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes

Types Of Diabetes

Today, there are 11 million Canadians living with diabetes or prediabetes. Every three minutes, another Canadian is diagnosed. Chances are that diabetes affects you or someone you know. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic, often debilitating and sometimes fatal disease, in which the body either cannot produce insulin or cannot properly use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that controls the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Diabetes leads to high blood sugar levels, which can damage organs, blood vessels and nerves. The body needs insulin to use sugar as an energy source. What is the pancreas and what does it do? The pancreas is an organ that sits behind the stomach and releases hormones into the digestive system. In the healthy body, when blood sugar levels get too high, special cells in the pancreas (called beta cells) release insulin. Insulin is a hormone and it causes cells to take in sugar to use as energy or to store as fat. This causes blood sugar levels to go back down. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and kills the beta cells of the pancreas. No, or very little, insulin is released into the body. As a result, sugar builds up in the blood instead of being used as energy. About five to 10 per cent of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes generally develops in childhood or adolescence, but can develop in adulthood. Type 1 diabetes is always treated with insulin. Meal planning also helps with keeping blood sugar at the right levels. Type 1 diabetes also includes latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), the term used to describe the small number of people with apparent type 2 diabetes who appear to have immune-mediated loss of pancreatic beta cells. What is type 2 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus (diabetes) In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus (diabetes) In Dogs

Animals Affected Dogs Overview Diabetes mellitus (known simply as diabetes) is a serious disease of dogs. The main characteristic of diabetes is an inability to control the level of sugar in the blood. This leads to chronically high blood sugar levels, which in turn lead to the symptoms of the disease. Management of diabetes in dogs is challenging but possible. With proper treatment, many diabetic dogs lead essentially normal lives. However, without treatment the disease inevitably leads to serious complications. Diabetes in dogs is similar to type 1 (juvenile onset) diabetes in humans. Symptoms Symptoms of diabetes include: Weight loss Normal or increased appetite in the early stages of the disease; appetite may decline in the later stages. Lethargy A sudden change in the appearance of the eyes due to the formation of cataracts. In the end stages of the disease, coma and death Risk Factors and Prevention A genetic or hereditary predisposition to diabetes appears to be a primary risk factor. Dogs that suffer from one or multiple bouts of pancreatitis may develop diabetes as a consequence of damage to the pancreas. Dogs aged 4 - 14 years are at highest risk of pancreatitis. Female dogs are diagnosed with diabetes more often than males. Miniature Poodles, Miniature Schnauzers, Pugs, Samoyeds, and Toy Poodles suffer diabetes at higher rates than other breeds. Syndromes such as Cushing's disease and periodontal disease predispose dogs to diabetes. Complications Untreated diabetes leads to emaciation, chronic lethargy and weakness. Diabetic dogs are prone to urinary tract infections. House soiling may occur as well, due to increased frequency of urination. Insulin administration is the main method of treating diabetes in dogs. However, some dogs may suffer from accidental ov Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease caused by inherited and/or acquired deficiency in production of insulin by the pancreas, or by the ineffectiveness of the insulin produced. Such a deficiency results in increased concentrations of glucose in the blood, which in turn damage many of the body's systems, in particular the blood vessels and nerves. There are two principle forms of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as insulin-dependent) in which the pancreas fails to produce the insulin which is essential for survival. This form develops most frequently in children and adolescents, but is being increasingly noted later in life. Type 2 diabetes (formerly named non-insulin-dependent) which results from the body's inability to respond properly to the action of insulin produced by the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is much more common and accounts for around 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide. It occurs most frequently in adults, but is being noted increasingly in adolescents as well. Certain genetic markers have been shown to increase the risk of developing Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is strongly familial, but it is only recently that some genes have been consistently associated with increased risk for Type 2 diabetes in certain populations. Both types of diabetes are complex diseases caused by mutations in more than one gene, as well as by environmental factors. Diabetes in pregnancy may give rise to several adverse outcomes, including congenital malformations, increased birth weight and an elevated risk of perinatal mortality. Strict metabolic control may reduce these risks to the level of those of non-diabetic expectant mothers. Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) refer to levels of blood glucose concentration above the normal r Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus, disorder of carbohydrate metabolism characterized by impaired ability of the body to produce or respond to insulin and thereby maintain proper levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Diabetes is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, though these outcomes are not due to the immediate effects of the disorder. They are instead related to the diseases that develop as a result of chronic diabetes mellitus. These include diseases of large blood vessels (macrovascular disease, including coronary heart disease and peripheral arterial disease) and small blood vessels (microvascular disease, including retinal and renal vascular disease), as well as diseases of the nerves. Causes and types Insulin is a hormone secreted by beta cells, which are located within clusters of cells in the pancreas called the islets of Langerhans. Insulin’s role in the body is to trigger cells to take up glucose so that the cells can use this energy-yielding sugar. Patients with diabetes may have dysfunctional beta cells, resulting in decreased insulin secretion, or their muscle and adipose cells may be resistant to the effects of insulin, resulting in a decreased ability of these cells to take up and metabolize glucose. In both cases, the levels of glucose in the blood increase, causing hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). As glucose accumulates in the blood, excess levels of this sugar are excreted in the urine. Because of greater amounts of glucose in the urine, more water is excreted with it, causing an increase in urinary volume and frequency of urination as well as thirst. (The name diabetes mellitus refers to these symptoms: diabetes, from the Greek diabainein, meaning “to pass through,” describes the copious urination, and mellitus, from the Latin meaning “sweetened wi Continue reading >>

Why Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis So Dangerous?

Why Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis So Dangerous?

The main thing, which Carol Linn Miller so very correctly points out, is that diabetic ketoacidosis can be fatal. But having been through it, what makes the condition so dangerous is you don't necessarily feel like you need to get it treated. You go off into a kind of la-la land, and don't take necessary action. If you wait too long, you may die. I didn't go to an ER until I suddenly went blind, and it turned out I was near death. I knew something was wrong, but the part of my brain that tells you "Danger! Danger!" wasn't working. Continue reading >>

What Happens If Diabetes Goes Untreated?

What Happens If Diabetes Goes Untreated?

Diabetes is on the rise. The number of people affected in the U.S. has tripled since 1980, with nearly 26 million Americans affected in 2011, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can be managed with a combination of lifestyle changes, diet and medications. Insulin injections are necessary to treat type 1 diabetes and advanced cases of type 2 diabetes. Untreated diabetes can result in life-threatening metabolic crises. Even if emergency situations are avoided, poorly controlled diabetes damages blood vessels and nerves throughout the body, with devastating consequences over time. Video of the Day Untreated diabetes can be fatal. One dangerous short-term complication is diabetic ketoacidosis, a rapidly progressing condition. Low insulin levels cause sugar to build up in the blood. The body breaks down fat for fuel, resulting in a buildup of byproducts called ketones and lowering the blood pH. Classic signs and symptoms of DKA are breathing that sounds like sighs, confusion, nausea, vomiting, lightheadedness, dehydration and a fruity smell on the breath. Trauma, stress and infections raise the risk for DKA. Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state is another dangerous complication of untreated diabetes. Prominent signs and symptoms include weakness, leg cramps, visual problems, low-grade fever, abdominal bloating and dehydration. HHS is most common in older adults with type 2 diabetes. The condition develops with profoundly high blood sugar levels. Both DKA and HHS are life-threatening medical emergencies. Untreated or poorly controlled diabetes can damage your eyes. Blood vessel leakage and an overgrowth of new vessels can damage the vision-perceiving portion of the eye. These changes -- known as diabetic retinopathy -- Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a by-product called ketones. Most cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with type 1 diabetes, although it can also be a complication of type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine feeling very thirsty vomiting abdominal pain Seek immediate medical assistance if you have any of these symptoms and your blood sugar levels are high. Read more about the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. Who is affected by diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a relatively common complication in people with diabetes, particularly children and younger adults who have type 1 diabetes. Younger children under four years of age are thought to be most at risk. In about 1 in 4 cases, diabetic ketoacidosis develops in people who were previously unaware they had type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis accounts for around half of all diabetes-related hospital admissions in people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis triggers These include: infections and other illnesses not keeping up with recommended insulin injections Read more about potential causes of diabetic ketoacidosis. Diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis This is a relatively straightforward process. Blood tests can be used to check your glucose levels and any chemical imbalances, such as low levels of potassium. Urine tests can be used to estimate the number of ketones in your body. Blood and urine tests can also be used to check for an underlying infec Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Mellitus Fatal?

Is Diabetes Mellitus Fatal?

I am a 50 year old male who has diabetes. Just diagnosed. Could I die from this? I will do my best to treat it. Diabetes mellitus is a condition in which blood sugar levels are not adequately controlled by the body's endocrine system. It can cause many long term health problems especially if it goes untreated, or incompletely treated. The most common problems that can occur over time is nerve damage in the feet and hands (causing pain, tingling, and numbness), foot ulcers that can require amputation, problems with eyesight, and coronary artery disease and heart attacks. Because of the increase risk of infections in the feet, and heart attacks, there is a possibility that diabetes could contribute to a fatal disease. The good news is, that with some dedication from both you and your doctor, your blood sugars can be controlled which can reduce the likelihood that you will suffer from these effects of diabetes. I suggest that you schedule frequent appointments with your primary care physician, or whoever you plan on using to help you control your diabetes. He or she can discuss in detail the monitoring that is necessary both in the doctor's office and at home. You can also discuss the methods you are trying to control your blood sugar, and additional actions such as exercise and weight loss which can be very helpful at both controlling your diabetes and reducing your risk for heart attacks. Good luck. This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intend Continue reading >>

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