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Is Diabetes Capitalized

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Eighty year old Mrs. Susheela Satyanarayana, a diabetic, approached #AyurVAID in severe pain and swelling in both the knees. Today two months later, after treatment at AyurVAID Jayanagar and Domlur, she is hale and hearty with no pain at all. Says her Daughter in law Aparna, an IT professional: She is all recharged after treatments, wakes up at 4 am and is active throughout the day. In the video here, she endorses #AyurVAID, and its doctors and therapists who instilled confidence in her to undergo the treatment and be rid of the pain she was suffering. AyurVAID Hospitals is a chain of Ayurveda hospitals providing evidence based root-cause precision medical care. It offers the most effective Ayurvedic Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment in India at our hospitals in Bangalore (Karnataka), Kochi (Ernakulam, Kerala) and Kalmatia in Himalayas (Almora, Uttarakhand). Now, Ayurveda medical care is available to you on cashless basis at AyurVAID Hospitals. India's 1st Ayurveda hospital accredited by NABH, Quality Council of India Winner of prestigious National award for Best Ayurveda Centre of the year 2017 from Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Government of India Recipient of Economic Times

India Is The Diabetes Capital Of The World. Add To It's A Country With Torrid Temperatures And Those Who Administer Insulin While Travelling Find It A Harrowing Experience To Store. Any Suggestions On How To Help Them?

I am an Insulin dependent diabetic and I am taking insulin injections since last 5 years. I have been advised by my doctor(s) that once removed out of the cold chain, the vial will retain its efficacy for 30 days, at normal room temperatures. Assuming that one is taking about 30-40 units/day, a vial will come for 7-9 days, which is within this threshold limit of 30 days. I find many people traveling with Insulin Pen in their pockets along with the regular pens used for writing. Suggest that you clarify this with your Doctor, before hand. Best wishes Ask New Question Continue reading >>

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  1. finel

    Are names of diseases ever capitalized? For example, I'm trying to determine if the following is correct:
    The plaintiff could no longer work due to a health condition called pertussis.

  2. JEL

    General Rule
    Generally, style guides agree that the names of diseases are not routinely capitalized. However, style guides also agree that any part of the name of a disease that is a proper noun in its own right is usually capitalized.
    APA Style Guide advice on the subject is reflected in this blog post at the APA Style Blog site:
    ... the dictionary tells you whether a word is a proper noun (i.e., a specific person, place, or thing), and proper nouns are capitalized in English and therefore in APA Style (see Publication Manual sections 4.16 and 4.18). Their opposite, regular or “common” nouns (which refer to general persons, places, or things), are lowercase in English and thus in APA Style as well.
    (From "Do I Capitalize This Word?", at APA Style Blog.)
    Another source, The Mayfield Handbook of Technical and Scientific Writing, has this to say on the subject:
    Do not capitalize medical terms except for any part of a term consisting of a proper noun:
    infectious mononucleosis
    brachial plexus
    Parkinson's disease
    (From "Section 9.1: Capitalization" in The Mayfield Handbook of Technical and Scientific Writing.)
    The AP Stylebook gives a terse version of the usual convention:
    Capitalize a disease known by name of person or geographical area: Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Ebola virus.
    [From The Associated Press Stylebook, as quoted at Glossophilia in "Capitalizing and pronouncing Ebola (and the naming of other diseases)".]
    Other style guides that I consulted, online and off, did not differ substantively from the APA Style Guide, Mayfield Handbook and AP Stylebook with regard to capitalizing disease names.
    Note: If the use of a specific style guide is mandated for writing containing the names of diseases, that style guide should be consulted and any rules or exceptions therein should be observed.
    Special Cases, Exceptions
    Scientific nomenclature in English: when an organism name (which may also be or contain the name of a disease) is used as a technical (scientific) reference to the organism, this from section 9.1 of the Mayfield Handbook usually applies:
    Capitalize and put in italics the phylum, class, order, family, and genus of plants and animals. Do not capitalize the species.
    Homo sapiens
    Esox lucius
    (op. cit.)
    These conventions for the scientific names of organisms may apply when the name of a disease is also the name of a family or genus of organisms, as shown by Salmonella in the following excerpt from the Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine:
    Such symptoms are most likely due to other organisms such as rotavirus, Salmonella, Shigella, or Escherichia coli.
    (Influenza. (n.d.) Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. (2008). Retrieved November 9 2015 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/influenza.)
    Observe that "rotavirus" is neither italicized nor capitalized. This seeming anomaly is due to "rotavirus" being the name of a virus used generically. A virus is not a species:
    Viruses
    Italics Use with Virus Names
    A virus is not a species; a virus belongs to a species. Italicize species, genus, and family of a virus when used in a taxonomic sense. Note however, that it is fine to not mention taxonomy of a virus, especially one like dengue or polio that is well known.
    Do not italicize a virus name when used generically. If you capitalize a virus name (other than one that has a proper name in it so that you must capitalize it), then you need to italicize it.
    (From "Scientific Nomenclature", in Emerging Infectious Diseases.)
    Historical events: the names of historical events, or abridgements of such names, are sometimes also used as the names of diseases. This circumstance often results in capitalization that appears to deviate, or actually does deviate, due to scribal error, from the style conventions for disease name capitalization. Two notable examples of the problem area are "Black Death" and "Spanish Flu". Of the two examples, "Spanish Flu" is the more complicated case, yet neither case is a special challenge with regard to conventional capitalization.
    Black Death is frequently used as the popular name of bubonic plague. It may, however, refer instead to a historical event, an epidemic of bubonic plague in the Middle Ages, and it is then capitalized according to the convention detailed at, for example, WriteExpress:
    Capitalize Historic Periods and Events
    The names of historic periods and events are generally capitalized.
    (From WriteExpress, "How to Capitalize".)
    Spanish Flu, as an abridgement of "1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic", or as an abridgement of any of the various names given to that historical event, observes the usual convention with respect to the capitalization of historical events. When the name is used instead with reference to the disease, then "Spanish", being a specific name (proper noun), retains its capitalization: so, if the reference is not an abridgement of the name of the 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic event, but rather a reference to a disease only, the conventional capitalization is "Spanish flu".
    Specificity assimilation: Another special case of disease name capitalization arises when proper nouns in the names of diseases become so thoroughly identified with the disease as to no longer depend on the specificity of proper nouns for their meaning.
    When this assimilation has occurred may be difficult to ascertain, but generally, as mentioned earlier, a good dictionary will show the term with capitalization as encountered in use. However, the chosen dictionary may also present multiple options for capitalization, and it will remain entirely up to individual writers to discern and choose the most appropriate form.
    This perhaps troublesome assimilation of the specificity of proper nouns has at least partly occurred with the name "Black Death". For example, "Black Death" is allowed two forms by the Merriam-Webster online dictionary:
    black death
    noun, often capitalized B&D
    Definition of BLACK DEATH
    1 : plague
    2 : a severe epidemic of plague and especially bubonic plague that occurred in Asia and Europe in the 14th century.
    (From "black death", at Merriam-Webster.)
    It can safely be assumed, given the usual conventions for disease names and the names of historical events, that what the dictionary refers to as "often capitalized B&D" is that no capitalization was frequently encountered by lexicographers when the term was used with sense 1, while capitalization of both words was frequently encountered when the term was used with sense 2.

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What Are The Common Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

India is the diabetes capital of the world. Type 2 diabetes or insulin resistant diabetes is a silent killer. Many people never realize they have diabetes before significant organ damage occurs. The common signs and symptoms include Obesity especially truncal (around the waist or pot belly) is a high risk factor. Polyuria or excessive urination because glucose acts like an osmotic agent in kidney pulling water out. Nocturia or desire to pass urine in night secondary to polyuria. Polydypsia or excessive thirst due to loss of water in urine. Excessive hunger(polyphagia) Some people can also have weight loss. Poor wound healing Fatigue In late stages Visual loss due to retinal damage Kidney failure and hypertension due to kidney damage. Leg ulcers and gangrene due to poor wound healing. Diabetes is an independent risk factor for heart attack and stroke (metabolic syndrome). Diabetics are also more prone for cancers. Diabetic keto acidosis (DKA) is a life threatening medical emergency caused by very high sugar and dehydration. Patient can become comatose, have seizures and have rapid breathing. Many diabetics discontinue medications abruptly without their doctors advice as their blood Continue reading >>

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  1. kaley

    I am writing to tell you what an incredible impact these methods had on my life! I have had type 2 diabetes for 27 years. For me, the worst part of this horrible disease is the severe pain I constantly get in my feet. The pain is so bad that I avoid standing and walking as much as possible. I've got to tell you that within the first month, my feet stopped hurting altogether and I can now walk totally pain free.
    Believe it or not, I even danced at my niece's wedding last month, something I have not done in a many years. I've been following the book for six months now and my blood sugar is well within normal range. I feel great!
    I recommend you use the Type 2 Diabetes Destroyer to naturally reverse your diabetes.

  2. gertrude

    Type 2 diabetes, usually referred to as adult onset, is when your body produces insulin but can not use it properly. This type can be treated successfully with the right diet and exercise in most circumstances. Read here https://tr.im/MHtYq
    If blood sugars are not kept under control at some point insulin will probably be integrated / oral medications are also available. People with diabetes can live long, happy lives but must be diligent in their care and make sure you see your endocrinologist on a regular basis.

  3. Comment

    Leave them lower-case. If it's E. coli or Salmonella you capitalize them because they're genus names.

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Diabetes, one of the most talked about diseases in India, is growing rapidly with as many as 69 million people suffering from type-2 diabetes. But, awareness about the disease is very poor. To create awareness about the disease, we are running a special series on Diabetes called Live well with Diabetes. CNBC-TV18 is India's No.1 Business medium and the undisputed leader in business news. The channel's benchmark coverage extends from corporate news, financial markets coverage, expert perspective on investing and management to industry verticals and beyond. CNBC-TV18 has been constantly innovating with new genres of programming that helps make business more relevant to different constituencies across India. India's most able business audience consumes CNBC-TV18 for their information & investing needs. This audience is highly diversified at one level comprising of key groups such as business leaders, professionals, retail investors, brokers and traders, intermediaries, self-employed professionals, High Net Worth individuals, students and even homemakers but shares a distinct commonality in terms of their spirit of enterprise. Subscribe to our Channel: https://goo.gl/hKwgtm Like us on

Is India The Diabetes Capital Of The World?

News and opinion on healthy longevity from a unique perspective P Pushpam, a resident of Chennai, India, was denied her job appointment with the Indian Railways on the grounds that she was a chronic diabetic. The court ruled in her favor and pointed out the impracticality of discriminating against people suffering from diabetes in a country that has over 40 million diabetics. As India makes its demographic transition toward lower birth rates and higher life expectancy, the prevalence of non-communicable diseases is on the rise. India is the Diabetes Capital of the World with over 60 million diabetics in the country, that is projected to at least double by 2030. The country ranks second, between China with 90 million and USA with 24 million diabetics. About 17% of the country has diabetes and about 77 million are considered to be pre-diabetic, which refers to those individuals who have higher than normal blood glucose levels, but not high enough to categorize them as diabetic. Smoking, poor physical activity and alcohol use are some pertinent risk factors of diabetes in India. A survey revealed that close to 40% of Indian men are daily smokers and approximately 18% of the study resp Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. kaley

    I am writing to tell you what an incredible impact these methods had on my life! I have had type 2 diabetes for 27 years. For me, the worst part of this horrible disease is the severe pain I constantly get in my feet. The pain is so bad that I avoid standing and walking as much as possible. I've got to tell you that within the first month, my feet stopped hurting altogether and I can now walk totally pain free.
    Believe it or not, I even danced at my niece's wedding last month, something I have not done in a many years. I've been following the book for six months now and my blood sugar is well within normal range. I feel great!
    I recommend you use the Type 2 Diabetes Destroyer to naturally reverse your diabetes.

  2. gertrude

    Type 2 diabetes, usually referred to as adult onset, is when your body produces insulin but can not use it properly. This type can be treated successfully with the right diet and exercise in most circumstances. Read here https://tr.im/MHtYq
    If blood sugars are not kept under control at some point insulin will probably be integrated / oral medications are also available. People with diabetes can live long, happy lives but must be diligent in their care and make sure you see your endocrinologist on a regular basis.

  3. Comment

    Leave them lower-case. If it's E. coli or Salmonella you capitalize them because they're genus names.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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