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Is Diabetes Can Be Transmitted?

How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans?

How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans?

Question Originally asked by Community Member victoria black How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans? Answer There are two types of diabetes; the most common type - Type II is a metabolic disorder believed mostly to be due to a persons genes, obesity, poor diet, smoking and low exercise. People who are not overweight, and who exercise, do not smoke and drink moderately have about an 80% lower chance of getting Type II Diabetes. Check out Health Central’s Diabetes section for more. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cort Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Advice

Diabetes Health Advice

Is Diabetes Transferable? Diabetes is characterized by increased blood sugar or blood glucose levels. Glucose is obtained from the food that is consumed. The glucose gives the cells the energy they need to perform various functions. The hormone insulin aids in this process. In type 1 diabetes, the body is unable to produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body either does not produce or cannot use the insulin properly. Type 2 diabetes is also known as diabetes mellitus and is the more common of both types. When there is an inadequate amount of insulin in the body, the glucose remains in the blood, thereby elevating blood sugar levels. Diabetes health risks are many. If the glucose remains in the blood over time, many serious complications such as kidney, eye and nerve damage can occur. Gestational diabetes is another type of diabetes that occurs in pregnant women due to the effect of hormonal changes. Diabetes health problems can occur in any type of diabetes. These problems develop when an individual is unable to manage diabetes properly. A common complication that occurs in diabetic individuals is hyperglycemia which is characterized by excessively high blood sugar levels. If left untreated, conditions such as kidney failure, nerve damage and blindness can occur. Unmanaged diabetes can also lead to high cholesterol and elevated blood pressure. This contributes to circulation disorders and heart disease. Diabetes often leads to frequent infections since the immune system is affected. Intake of too much insulin can lead to hypoglycemia wherein dizziness, headache, sweating and fainting can occur. The diabetes health plan involves proper diet, lifestyle modifications and medication. Type 2 diabetes is initially treated with dietary changes, regular exercise and weight re Continue reading >>

Diabetes Facts And Myths

Diabetes Facts And Myths

en espaolLa diabetes: mitos y realidades You want to educate yourself about diabetes so you can help your child manage it. This means having the right information. There's so much online content about diabetes, but it's not always accurate. Even well-meaning family members and friends can give bad information. And this can hurt your child. Here's the truth about some of the common things you might hear. Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes? No, it doesn't. Type 1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed. This happens because something goes wrong with the body's immune system . It has nothing to do with how much sugar a person eats. Sugar doesn't cause diabetes. But sugar can play a role in type 2 diabetes . Eating too much sugar (or sugary foods and drinks) can make people put on weight. Gaining too much weight can lead to type 2 diabetes in some people. Of course, eating too much sugar isn't the only reason why people gain weight. Weight gain from eating too much of any food can make a person's chances of developing type 2 diabetes greater. Yes! People with diabetes can still enjoy sweets sometimes. But like everyone, they should put the brakes on eating too many. Kids with type 1 diabetes don't grow out of it. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin , at least until scientists find a cure for diabetes. Kids with type 2 will always have a tendency to get high blood sugar levels. But sometimes taking steps to live a healthier life can lower their blood sugar. If people eat healthy foods and exercise enough to get their blood sugar levels back on track, doctors might say they can stop taking insulin or other medicines . Can you ca Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Infectious? Condition May Spread Through Toxic Meat And Blood Transfusions Like Mad Cow Disease

Is Diabetes Infectious? Condition May Spread Through Toxic Meat And Blood Transfusions Like Mad Cow Disease

Diabetes may be contagious and spread through meat or blood transfusions, new research suggests. Ingesting protein 'seeds' may be responsible for the condition's onset, similar to the spread of mad cow disease from cattle to humans via infected beef, the study author claims. When these 'seeds' were given to mice, all of the animals developed type 2 diabetes symptoms within months, the study found. Similar outcomes occurred when the 'seeds' were added to healthy human pancreatic tissue in the lab, the research adds. Yet, while other experts state the findings are intriguing, they add that more research is needed before diabetes can be considered an infectious disease. 'If one disease has the potential to be transmitted in this manner, it is diabetes.' Researchers from the University of Texas injected two-month-old mice in the abdomen with these 'seeds', known as islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). IAPP are misshapen proteins that have been shown to accumulate in both human and animals with type 2 diabetes; sometimes before symptoms develop. The mice were genetically modified to produce the human form of IAPP. Results reveal that all of the mice developed symptoms of type 2 diabetes within three months. Similar outcomes occurred when IAPP was added to healthy human pancreatic tissue in the lab. Study author Dr Claudio Soto said: 'I don't want to scare anyone, but I can see this happening in diabetes more easily than it happens in brain diseases, because in brain diseases the spread is limited by the blood-brain barrier. 'If one disease has the potential to be transmitted in this manner, it is diabetes,' The Times reported. 'Treat with a great deal of caution' It is unclear if the same outcomes would occur in humans, however, the researchers believe their findings could have Continue reading >>

10 Essential Sex Tips For Diabetics

10 Essential Sex Tips For Diabetics

What's going on with your blood sugar can have a huge impact on how you feel between the sheets—and not in a good way. "Medical conditions such as diabetes can cause your sex life to take a plunge," says Lauren Streicher, MD, an assistant clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, and author of Slip Sliding Away: A Gynecologist's Guide to Turning Back the Clock on Your Sex Life. "As a diabetic, you have multiple obstacles for achieving a satisfying sex life that other people don't have." The good news is that once you understand how to deal with the symptoms that may be putting a damper on your sex life, you can boost your sexual satisfaction big time. Here's help: 1. Find some new toys. If sex feels a little (or a lot) less intense lately, diabetes may be to blame. "Diabetics often have decreased blood flow to the vagina because of blood vessel changes, which leads to less arousal and sensation," says Streicher. "Studies show that diabetics don't orgasm as easily as others due to vascular changes and nerve damage." In short: What used to work for you in terms of reaching orgasm may not be working any more, so it's time to try something new. The quickest way to get the stimulation you need is with a vibrator. "Make sure the model you use offers clitoral stimulation, because it won't help much to have something hard or overly powerful inside your vagina," Streicher says. Here are 18 sex toys experts use—and love. 2. Pay attention to pH. Increased blood sugar levels can throw the pH balance of your vagina out of whack, upping your odds of chronic vaginal infections. "When pH goes up, the healthy lactobacilli in your vagina can no longer survive, and you get bad bacteria growth like bacterial vaginosis and Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Micronesia

Diabetes In Micronesia

Diabetes is one of the most serious health threats in the islands today. It is now the main cause of death in Kosrae and in the Marshalls, the number two cause of death in Pohnpei, and the number three cause of death in Chuuk. It is rampant in other parts of Micronesia as well. Even apart from the deaths it causes, the disease has crippled and blinded many islanders. About one out of every five middle-aged Micronesians suffers from this disease. In some places, particularly Kosrae and the Marshalls, the diabetes rate is much higher, with as many as a third or a half of all older people suffering from the disease. This is far higher than the rate in the US or other countries around the world. Micronesians seem to be especially susceptible to the disease. What is even worse, diabetes appears to be on the rise. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is called a non-communicable disease–that is, one that can not be spread from one person to another. It is a disease that takes many years to develop. Diabetes is a defect in the way that our bodies process sugar, impairing the removal of sugar from the bloodstream. Sugar and carbohydrates (rice, breadfruit, taro and other starches) are a major source of energy for the body, but too much of them is a danger to our health. High levels of sugar in our bloodstream increases the risk of heart attack and stroke and can cause kidney disease. In fact, an excessive sugar level can interfere with many of the bodily systems, leading to blindness and death. Why Has It Become Such a Problem Today? In the past, islanders did not seem to suffer from a high diabetes rate even though their body was capable of storing sugar for a long period of time. In fact, the current theory is that Micronesians and other Pacific islanders could retain body sugar much Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: On Stds, And Catching Diabetes From Sex?

Ask D'mine: On Stds, And Catching Diabetes From Sex?

Got questions about life with diabetes? So do we! That's why we offer our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and community educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil is taking on some good ol' fashioned questions about sex and diabetes. Some pillow-talk should of course be confined to the bedroom, but when there are vital diabetes or health-related questions involved then a little public sex-talk can be a healthy thing. btw, next month (April) happens to be Sexually Transmitted Infections Awareness Month, so in the immortal words of Salt-N-Peppa from their 1991 song: "Let's Talk About Sex, Baby"... {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Nikki, type 1 from Nevada, asks: Hey, Wil, are persons with diabetes more or less likely than "normal" people to get sexually transmitted diseases? [email protected] D'Mine answers: Because having diabetes raises the risk of sexual dysfunction in both men and women, you might expect that our rates of STD's would be less. After all, you can't catch it if your not getting it, right? But you'd be wrong. Sadly, having diabetes seems to make everything worse. Yeah, you guessed it. It turns out the "D" in STD stands for diabetes. While I couldn't find any "hard" statics (sorry, I couldn't resist) the folks at Joslin say that STDs are more easily transmitted to people with diabetes. What the eff's up with that? Well, your best biological protection from a STD is your skin. (Being careful and selective about whom you sleep with is your best environmental protection; and wearing a condom is your best engineered protection.) But back to your skin, which is usually naked when you get a STD. Skin is really amazingly tough stuff. Uh... unless you have diabetes. In our case, our skin is often c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

What is diabetes? What are the types of diabetes? Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that occurs when your blood sugar (glucose), is too high (hyperglycemia). Glucose is what the body uses for energy, and the pancreas produces a hormone called insulin that helps convert the glucose from the food you eat into energy. When the body either does not produce enough insulin, does not produce any at all, or your body becomes resistant to the insulin, the glucose does not reach your cells to be used for energy. This results in the health condition termed diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, because it usually is diagnosed during childhood. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the body does not produce insulin because the body’s immune system attacks insulin-producing cells from the pancreas called beta cells. Type 1 diabetes is treated by using insulin. Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This occurs when blood sugar levels get too high over time, and the cells become insensitive or resistant to insulin (termed insulin resistance). There are multiple medications used to treat type 2 diabetes. What warning signs and symptoms of diabetes are unique to men? Signs and symptoms of diabetes unique to men include: What warning signs and symptoms of diabetes are the same in men and women? There are diabetes warning signs and symptoms that both women and men have in common, for example: Excessive thirst and hunger Irritability Slow-healing wounds Skin infections Breath odor that is fruity, sweet, or an acetone odor Diabetes Diet: Healthy Meal Plans for Diabetes-Friendly Eating How does diabetes affect men differently than wom Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Transferable?

Is Diabetes Transferable?

First of all, diabetes is definitely not contagious. There a two types of diabetes. Both of them aren't curable, but with the right treatment, people can live just about as long as any other healthy person. Type 1: ... is an autoimmune disorder. The immune system destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreasas as an overreaction, so that for people suffering from type 1 diabetes, insulin is essential for survival. Most likely, type 1 diabetes is diagnosed in the childhood. Though it's rare, it's also possible to develope it about the age of thirty. The patients need to inject insulin several times of the day, every time they eat or their blood sugar appears to be too high. Plus, they need to consider very different things, challenging their lifestyle. Type 2: ... begins with an insulin resistance one can manage at first by dietary changes and by increasing exercise. If that isn't successful anymore, one gets oral anti diabetics, and if that on the other hand isn't successful enough anymore, one starts slowly with injecting insulin, still taking the oral anti diabetics. The treatment consistently gets adjusted on the state of health of the particular patient by their doctors. Though you have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, if your ancestors suffered from it, the chance of getting ill are only highly increased, if you get overweight and if you underexercise. If you know that, you can avoid further increasing the risk. If there is only one side if ancestors in which someone had a type 2 diabetes, your chances to get it are at approximately 10%, if that is the case on both sides, there is a 30% - if you're overweight. One could also add a type 3 and a type 4 to that list, if one considers gestational diabetes, a condition in which the insulin re Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Spread?

How Does Diabetes Spread?

Toll of diabetes affected has been increasing at an exponential rate. Diabetes is spread by deregulated processes within the body, and is not contagious in any case. Individuals in Type 1 diabetic condition are unable to produce any insulin in their bodies, whereas Type 2 diabetes patients have resistance for its utilization within the body. Untreated insulin resistance leads to diabetes. The likelihood of getting diabetes becomes more when some of the organs respond slowly or stop responding due to damaged blood vessels. This leads to hardening of the arteries, which increases chances of a heart attack and stroke besides restricting streamlined circulation of blood within brain as well as heart. Effect of high blood sugar Sugar in the blood is moderated by insulin. In the process of digestion, insulin moves glucose into the cells where it gets broken down for energy. In the diabetic condition, body becomes unresponsive to insulin, with inability to utilise glucose. Blood sugar becomes too high and restricts conversion of food into energy. Thereafter, increased sugar in blood starves cells for energy. Ballooning of blood vessels due to inadequate blood circulation can cause severe complications to eyes and kidneys, and damage could be permanent. Moreover, weak arteries due to high blood sugar can also impact nerves. All in all, high blood sugar levels due to uncontrolled diabetes influence every mechanism of body. Sugar in blood damages blood vessels throughout the body by getting attached to proteins. Due to this, structure of the blood vessels gets weakened as they become thick and hard. Risk factors With increased number of diabetes cases over the years, risk factors to develop diabetes have also increased. Among most identified factors causing diabetes are obesity, Continue reading >>

When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

Mike’s doctor looked and sounded concerned. “Your sugars are up, your blood pressure is up, and you’ve gained 10 pounds since I last saw you, ” she said. “You were doing so well. What happened? ” “I don’t know,” said Mike. “I’m just down. Exercising and checking my blood glucose don’t seem worth the effort now. My neuropathy is burning holes in my feet. It’s been a hard year.” “Sounds to me like you’re depressed,” said the doctor. She then wrote out a prescription for a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for Mike’s depression and another for a refill of Mike’s usual blood pressure medicine, but this time with a higher dose. The doctor didn’t ask about Mike’s sex life, and Mike didn’t volunteer that what was really bothering him was that he and his wife Barbara had stopped having sex about 10 months before. He couldn’t count on getting erections or keeping them, and without them, he withdrew, both physically and emotionally. He and Barbara were miserable. Unfortunately, both of the medicines his doctor had just prescribed can have the side effects of decreasing sex drive and making it harder for men to have erections. So the new treatments were potentially going to make Mike’s problem worse. Mike hadn’t mentioned his sexual problems to his doctor because he felt embarrassed about them, and his doctor apparently didn’t think to ask about sexual issues. Had she known about Mike’s erection difficulties, she might have prescribed a drug for erectile dysfunction rather than an antidepressant. But Mike had already bought some Viagra on the Internet. It had helped a little with the erections, but not much, and it did nothing for his energy level or low mood. Barbara was at her wit’s end. She thought Mike’s wit Continue reading >>

About Type 2 Diabetes

About Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Most of the people with diabetes in the United States have type 2 diabetes, and it is on the rise, especially in younger people. More preteens, teens, and young adults are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes than ever before. Causes Like type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes is inherited. This means a group of genes that can lead to type 2 is passed down from mothers and fathers to their children. Not everyone who inherits the genes will develop it, but if you have the genes for type 2 diabetes, you've got a greater chance of developing it. Your chances are even higher if you're also overweight and don't get much exercise. Having a sweet tooth won't cause type 2 diabetes, but a diet high in simple sugars and other unhealthy foods can cause you to gain weight. Most people who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweight. In addition to being overweight, there are some other factors that put a person at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes, including: Having a family history of diabetes. Being older than 40. Having gestational diabetes during a pregnancy. Giving birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds. Being African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, or Native American. Insulin Resistance and Impaired Fasting Glucose Insulin resistance is when cells have trouble using insulin. The cells resist insulin's message to open up, and don't work as fast to let the sugar in. When this happens, the pancreas works harder to make more insulin, which it releases into the blood to keep blood sugar levels normal. Insulin resistance can lead to a condition called impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose. This happens when the pancreas can't make enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels in a normal Continue reading >>

Sexually Transmitted Diseases Could Increase Your Diabetes Risk

Sexually Transmitted Diseases Could Increase Your Diabetes Risk

Sexually transmitted diseases could significantly increase your chances of getting diabetes, according to a new study. Scientists revealed STDs, like chlamydia, increase your risk of diabetes by up to 82 per cent - the same as having a high body mass index. But the results weren’t just confined to STDs - intestinal infections also raised the risk of diabetes by 88 per cent. The researchers found any diagnosis of sexual and gender identity disorders increased the risk of diabetes by 130 per cent. Shockingly, this is the same as having high blood pressure. Chicken pox, shingles and other viral infections increased someone’s chances of developing diabetes as much as high cholesterol. The team developed a new screening algorithm that allowed them to predict the likelihood of developing diabetes using the records of almost 10,000 people and assessing their medical history. Vital signs, prescription medicine and reported illnesses were available to the scientists. Fri, October 2, 2015 The Top 10 most contagious illnesses Study co-author Dr Mark Cohen professor at UCLA said: “There's so much more information available in the medical record that could be used to determine whether a patient needs to be screened, and this information isn't currently being used.” The pre-screening algorithm was found to be more effective than screening based on traditional factors, such as blood pressure, BMI, age, gender and smoking. It was also 14 per cent better at identifying those who don’t have the disease. The team even suggest it could identify 400,000 people who haven’t yet been diagnosed. The pre-screening tool also identified factors that lowered the risk of diabetes. Regular migraines decreased someone’s chances of developing the condition as much as being 29 years younge Continue reading >>

New Study Finds Type 2 Diabetes May Be Transmissible

New Study Finds Type 2 Diabetes May Be Transmissible

New research suggests that type 2 diabetes might be transmissible and spread from person to person, according to a study in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. Type 2 Diabetes The pancreas produces insulin, a hormone, to convert glucose (also called blood sugar) into energy. People with diabetes can’t produce enough insulin or their body doesn’t respond to insulin, and typically must monitor blood sugar levels and inject insulin into the body periodically. Type 2 diabetes–the most common form of diabetes, is also called adult-onset diabetes, which means it was acquired. More than 420 million people worldwide have type 2 diabetes, and its causes remain largely unknown. It has been linked to being overweight and/or consuming too much glucose, but not everyone that is overweight and over consuming sugar gets the disease. The new study performed by researchers at the University Houston has found that type 2 diabetes shares similarities with a group of transmissible neurodegenerative diseases known as “prion diseases.” “Mad Cow” and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Connection Prion diseases, also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE’s), are a group of progressive neurodegenerative conditions–the most notorious being the so-called “mad cow disease” and the human equivalent, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It has been known that up to 80 percent of all people with type 2 diabetes also have an accumulation of what are called misfolded islet amyloid polypeptide proteins (IAPP). IAPP cells grow in a process called folding, and it is thought that misfolded IAPP damages the beta cells in the pancreas such that they impair the body’s ability to produce insulin needed to lower blood sugar levels. Misfolded prion proteins also are suspected to be the causes of Continue reading >>

Research Suggests Type 2 Diabetes Could Be Transmitted Like Mad Cow Disease

Research Suggests Type 2 Diabetes Could Be Transmitted Like Mad Cow Disease

2 pictures It is estimated that about 6 percent of the world's population suffers from type 2 diabetes. Labelled a global health epidemic by the World Health Organization, rates of the disease increased dramatically from about 30 million cases in 1985 to around 390 million by 2015. A new study has now found a previously undiscovered mechanism that raises the possibility of type 2 diabetes being transmitted in a way similar to infectious diseases such as Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (mad cow disease). Unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 is known to develop with age and is generally thought to occur as a result of lack of exercise and obesity. The dramatic increase in the disease all across the world over the past 50 years is still not clearly understood by scientists. Whether it’s breakfast, lunch, or dinner, these six comfort food favorites from Eggland's Best ... A team of researchers at the University of Texas has been focusing on a number of abnormal protein deposits found in over 90 percent of patients with type 2 diabetes. It was identified that this large majority of patients suffering from the disease had aggregates of a misfolded form of the protein islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). Small amounts of misfolded IAAP proteins were then injected into mice and the researchers found that this induced the formation of protein deposits in the animal's pancreas. Most striking was the observation that within weeks of receiving the misfolded IAAP aggregates the mice displayed several symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes, from elevated blood glucose levels to a loss of pancreatic beta cells. The research is yet to identify how these misfolded IAAP proteins could bring on a case of type 2 diabetes but the scientists hypothethize that once a large enough volume of these Continue reading >>

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