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Is Diabetes A Vitamin Deficiency Disease?

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Tweet Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a number of important roles in the body, including maintaining the health of your bones, teeth and joints, and assisting immune system function. This underrated vitamin is found in certain foods but is also produced by the body in response to exposure to the sun. When the sun’s ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays are exposed to bare skin, the body converts a cholesterol derivative into Vitamin D. In fact, it’s now known that every cell and tissue within the body has a Vitamin D protein receptor. However, most of us in the UK and other Western countries are deficient in Vitamin D, including many patients with Type 2 diabetes, due to limited sunlight exposure caused by a number of factors, including more time spent at home, in the office or the car, shorter days in winter, sunscreen use in summer and fears of skin cancer. Vitamin D deficiency The signs of Vitamin D deficiency can range from bone pain and muscle weakness to depression and weakened immune system, while longer-term deficiency can result in obesity, high blood pressure, psoriasis, osteoporosis, chronic fatigue, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes. Exposing your skin to the sun for 15-20 minutes each day can help increase your body’s own production of vitamin D and thus reduce your risk of diabetes and other serious medical conditions. Alternatively, you can get your daily intake of vitamin D through dietary supplements and foods such as nuts, oily fish, eggs, powdered milk and some fortified cereals. Effects on diabetes Vitamin D is believed to help improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin – the hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels – and thus reduce the risk of insulin resistance, which is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Vitamin D Deficiency Occurs In Early Stage

Type 1 Diabetes: Vitamin D Deficiency Occurs In Early Stage

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Type 1 diabetes: Vitamin D deficiency occurs in early stage Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health Low levels of vitamin D are commonly found in people with type 1 diabetes. But even children who have multiple positive islet autoantibodies without manifest type 1 diabetes have lower levels of vitamin D in their blood. This does not appear, however, to influence the progression of the disease from pre-diabetes to diabetes, according to scientists. "Vitamin D deficiency precedes the onset of type 1 diabetes. This may be a consequence of an immune response," one author says. "In the case of prediabetic children, we must therefore be mindful of the risk of vitamin D deficiency and consider recommending vitamin D supplementation at an early stage of type 1 diabetes." Vitamin D is known as a major regulator of calcium levels and bone metabolism. Furthermore, it also influences the immune system. Previous studies have shown that patients with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes have significantly lower vitamin D levels. Scientists from the Institute of Diabetes Research (IDF) and the Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen, a member of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), as well as from the Diabetes Research Group at the Technische Universitt Mnchen (TUM) examined whether a vitamin D deficiency occurs during an early stage of type 1 diabetes, defined by the presence of multiple diabetes-specific islet autoantibodies. Furthermore they also determined whether vitamin D deficiency influences the progression to type 1 diabetes in children with multiple islet autoantibodies. Vitamin D deficiency already exists in prediabetes Children who had not yet developed clinical type Continue reading >>

Vitamin Deficiencies And Diabetes

Vitamin Deficiencies And Diabetes

Most Americans take one or more dietary supplements. If you want to prevent diabetes or manage it better, you may be wondering if certain supplements can help. According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, there’s no reason to pop that pill. There isn’t enough evidence to suggest dietary supplements make a difference regarding type 2 diabetes. Yet studies continue to roll in suggesting that a lack of certain nutrients in your diet may affect how diabetes develops. How much have you been getting of these three? Vitamin A An animal study published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry in 2015 found that a lack of vitamin A may play a role in how type 2 diabetes develops. Vitamin A supports your immune system and cell growth and promotes good vision. The animal research showed that having plenty of vitamin A on board may also prevent the loss of beta cells, which are cells in the pancreas that make insulin. The study suggests getting enough vitamin A may help your pancreas produce more insulin and normalize blood sugar levels, two factors that may prevent type 2 diabetes. Find it in food: Good sources of vitamin A include apricots, cantaloupe, carrots, liver, mangoes, peppers, pumpkin pie, spinach, and sweet potatoes. Vitamin B12 A recent study in the Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders found it’s common for people with type 1 and 2 diabetes to be low in vitamin B 12. Men and women need 2.4 mcg a day, or 2.6 mcg or 2.8 mcg if you’re pregnant or lactating. The vitamin helps form red blood cells and fosters a healthy nervous system, among other duties. Being low in vitamin B 12 can lead to problems such as impaired memory and nerve problems in your hands and feet. Vitamin B 12 deficiency is especially a concern among people who t Continue reading >>

Vitamin Deficiencies In People With Diabetes: The Supplements You Need

Vitamin Deficiencies In People With Diabetes: The Supplements You Need

As an orthopedic surgeon, I have many patients with diabetes who tell me, “I can’t have surgery because I won’t heal.” That is certainly not the case, however. Diabetes does affect the small blood vessels and the function of immune cells when blood sugar is high, but with proper nutrition and blood sugar management, people with diabetes are very safe to undergo knee replacements, abdominal surgery, and many elective procedures. It is critical, of course, that people with diabetes who undergo elective or traumatic surgery work closely with their doctor to manage their blood sugar, but supplementation is also a vital part of recovery. Diabetes frequently causes nutritional deficiencies, often initiated by changes in diet or medications. As a result, people with diabetes must use supplements. Helping my patients identify their nutritional deficiencies and educating them on the importance of essential vitamins has made an overwhelming difference in their recovery from surgery and their overall daily health. The following essential vitamins are often deficient in people with diabetes. Vitamin B12 Vitamin B12 is bound to protein in food. The activity of hydrochloric acid and gastric protease in the stomach releases vitamin B12 from its protein. Once it is released, vitamin B12 begins to work quickly. It is important for the formation of red blood cells, neurological function, and DNA synthesis. It also supports the digestive system in keeping glucose levels stable. A simple blood test can determine the level of B12 in the body. Adults who have a value below 170 to 250 pg/mL are considered deficient in the vitamin. An elevated blood homocysteine level or elevated methylmalconic acid level may also suggest a B12 deficiency. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency are megalob Continue reading >>

Vitamin A Deficiency May Be Involved In Type 2 Diabetes, Researchers Say

Vitamin A Deficiency May Be Involved In Type 2 Diabetes, Researchers Say

Investigators have long sought the answer to a vexing question: What are the biological mechanisms involved in the development of type 2 diabetes? A recent study from Weill Cornell Medical College researchers suggests that the culprit may be a lack of vitamin A, which helps give rise to the cells, called beta cells, in the pancreas that produce the blood sugar-regulating hormone insulin. Vitamin A-deficient mice develop hyperglycemia (upper left) and reductions in insulin (upper middle) due to destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas (upper right). Treatment of the vitamin A-deficient mice with vitamin A subsequently reduces hyperglycemia and restores insulin producing beta cells. Images: Compared to normal control mice given adequate vitamin A (left panel), pancreas images from vitamin A-deficient mice (middle) have high numbers of dying beta cells (green) and lower insulin (red). Vitamin A-deficient mice given back vitamin A consequently have restored beta cells and fewer dying beta cells (right). The researchers found in mice models that a lack of vitamin A spurred the death of beta cells, stunting the production of insulin, which is tasked with metabolizing sugars that come from food. These findings, published Dec. 1 in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, may offer new clues into the cause of type 2 diabetes, which is characterized by insulin-resistance, and in advanced cases, inadequate numbers of insulin-producing beta cells. When the investigators removed vitamin A from the rodents’ diet, they found that the mice began to experience massive losses of beta cells, which resulted in drops in insulin and a big increase in blood glucose. The researchers then reintroduced vitamin A into the animals’ diet and found that the number of beta cells s Continue reading >>

Could Lack Of Vitamin A Be A Cause Of Diabetes?

Could Lack Of Vitamin A Be A Cause Of Diabetes?

Could lack of vitamin A be a cause of diabetes? Researchers have found that blocking vitamin A receptors on the surface of pancreatic beta cells reduces insulin secretion. Researchers have found that vitamin A may be crucial to the insulin-secreting function of beta cells, a discovery that could open the door to new treatments for diabetes. Diabetes is estimated to affect more than 29 million people in the United States. Type 2 diabetes accounts for around 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases, and this arises when the beta cells of the pancreas fail to produce enough insulin - the hormone that regulates blood glucose - or when the body is no longer able to use insulin effectively. Type 1 diabetes , which accounts for the remaining 5 percent of cases, occurs when the immune system destroys beta cells, hampering insulin production. In a new study - recently reported in the Endocrine Journal - researchers from the United Kingdom and Sweden discovered that there are large quantities of vitamin A receptors on the surface of beta cells, called GPRC5C. "When we discovered that insulin cells have a cell surface expressed receptor for vitamin A, we thought it was important to find out why and what the purpose is of a cell surface receptor interacting with vitamin A mediating a rapid response to vitamin A," says study co-author Albert Salehi, of the University of Lund in Sweden. On partially blocking the vitamin A receptors in beta cells from mice - eliminating the ability of vitamin A to bind to these cells - the team found that their ability to secrete insulin was reduced in response to sugar. Vitamin A deficiency may destroy beta cells For their study, Salehi and colleagues also tested beta cells derived from humans with and without type 2 diabetes. Again, the researchers Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Renewed interest in vitamin D, the so-called “sunshine vitamin,” has occurred recently because it has been linked to everything from cancer and heart disease to diabetes.1 Research studies continue to pour into the literature stating that vitamin D is a superstar when it comes to health. However, most of the research is based on observational, epidemiological studies, which are important for generating hypotheses but do not prove causality. A PubMed search in 2011 using the term “vitamin D” and selecting articles published in the past 2 years resulted in more than 2,864 hits. The following diseases and conditions have been researched to assess their relationship with vitamin D status: osteomalacia/osteoporosis,2–5 muscle function and falls,6–8 cancer,9–14 multiple sclerosis,15 hypertension,16 type 1 diabetes,17 rheumatoid arthritis,18 tuberculosis,19,20 mental health,21 cardiovascular events,22,23 infection,24,25 seasonal affective disorder,26 obesity,27 aging,28 and overall mortality.23 The challenge for health care providers and nutrition researchers is to determine whether vitamin D deficiency actually causes or increases the incidence of certain diseases or whether, instead, low levels of vitamin D are simply coincidental given that the majority of the general population, regardless of disease, is likely to have insufficient levels of vitamin D. In other words, do people who develop disease states just happen to be deficient in vitamin D, or do low levels of vitamin D cause the disease? Will supplementation with vitamin D prevent diseases, and can it be used to treat diseases such as diabetes? The purpose of this article is to summarize the latest information related to diabetes and vitamin D. For readers who desire further information, Holick29 has wr Continue reading >>

Is Vitamin D Deficiency Linked With Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Is Vitamin D Deficiency Linked With Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Some research suggests avoiding vitamin D deficiency may help reduce your risk for heart disease, which people with diabetes are more likely to develop. Youve likely heard of the power of vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin. You can either get vitamin D through the suns rays, which signal your body to make vitamin D, or through certain foods or supplements. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble, rather than water-soluble, vitamin so when you get it through your diet, youll best absorb it alongside a fat-containing food, such as almonds, peanut butter, or avocado. The vitamin is important for your health: Research suggests that it may help with everything from athletic performance to heart disease, and may even help protect against type 2 diabetes . What Does Vitamin D Do for Our Bodies and Our Health? Vitamin D plays many important roles in the body, and helps you maintain healthy bones, joints, and teeth, as well as a well-functioning immune system. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium in the body to promote bone growth, notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE , author of The 2-Day Diabetes Diet: Just 2 Days a Week and Dodge Type 2 Diabetes , who is in private practice in Franklin, New Jersey. Some observational studies suggest vitamin D may also play a role in the prevention of certain diseases and disorders, such as diabetes. The sunshine vitamin may also help keep your ticker healthy: A review published in January 2014 in the journalCirculation Research suggested that vitamin D deficiency is detrimental for heart health. This is important to note because people with type 2 diabetes are at a greater risk for heart problems. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes people with diabetes are two times more likely to die from heart disease tha Continue reading >>

This Vitamin Deficiency May Be Causing A Diabetes Epidemic

This Vitamin Deficiency May Be Causing A Diabetes Epidemic

This Vitamin Deficiency May Be Causing a Diabetes Epidemic By Jenny Hills, Medical Writer and Researcher Health , News Diabetes is a chronic illness where the bodys ability to metabolize sugars malfunctions. It afflicts millions of peopleboth adults and childrenworldwide. A groundbreaking study performed by researchers from New Yorks Weill Cornell Medical College, has unlocked the secret to vitamin As role in diabetes. Vitamin A deficiency is more common than you think. According to Jennifer Brett , N.D. vitamin A deficiency is common in the United States among low-income groups. In addition, people who eat very-low-fat diets and who limit their consumption of liver, dairy foods and dark green vegetables, and those who experience fat malabsorption from conditions like celiac disease or infectious hepatitis can also become deficient in vitamin A. Diabetes has Reached Epidemic Proportions According to data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 29 million people in the U.S. alone suffer from diabetes, and a quarter of those dont even know they have it (you can get familiar with these 13 early warning signs of diabetes you shouldnt ignore ). Diabetes may be type 1, once called juvenile diabetes, or type 2, also known as adult-onset diabetes. However, in recent years more younger people have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and a recent study may have the key to answering the burning question: Why? In a groundbreaking rodent study performed by researchers from New Yorks Weill Cornell Medical College, scientists unlocked the secret to vitamin As role in diabetes. The data, published in the December 2014 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, showed that vitamin A plays a pivotal role in maintaining proper function of beta cells in t Continue reading >>

Can Vitamin D Deficiency Cause Diabetes And Cardiovascular Diseases? Present Evidence And Future Perspectives - Sciencedirect

Can Vitamin D Deficiency Cause Diabetes And Cardiovascular Diseases? Present Evidence And Future Perspectives - Sciencedirect

Volume 22, Issue 2 , February 2012, Pages 81-87 Can vitamin D deficiency cause diabetes and cardiovascular diseases? Present evidence and future perspectives Author links open overlay panel G.Muscogiuria Get rights and content Several studies have shown that vitamin D may play a role in many biochemical mechanisms in addition to bone and calcium metabolism. Recently, vitamin D has sparked widespread interest because of its involvement in the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. Hypovitaminosis D has been associated with obesity, related to trapping in adipose tissue due to its lipophilic structure. In addition, vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and this may be due to the relationship between low vitamin D levels and obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. However, although vitamin D has been identified as a potentially important marker of CVD, the mechanisms through which it might modulate cardiovascular risk are not fully understood. Given this background, in this work we summarise clinical retrospective and prospective observational studies linking vitamin D levels with cardio-metabolic risk factors and vascular outcome. Moreover, we review various randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of vitamin D supplementation on surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk. Considering the high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D among patients with high cardiovascular risk, vitamin D replacement therapy in this population may be warranted; however, further RCTs are urgently needed to establish when to begin vitamin D therapy, as well as to determine the dose and route and duration of administration. Continue reading >>

Top 10 Vitamin And Mineral Deficiencies | Ex-diabetic

Top 10 Vitamin And Mineral Deficiencies | Ex-diabetic

There are several key vitamin, mineral and nutrient deficiencies that either fuel Type 2 diabetes and other diseases or are the result of having Type 2 diabetes or some other disease. But, most people don't believe or are not aware that they have a vitamin, mineral or some other nutrient deficiency. Ironically, this is one of the reasons why nutrient deficiencies are on the rise! The other reason has to do with the testing. Since the blood test limit is set so low (usually based on RDA standards, which are out of date), most vitamin/mineraldeficiencies are overlooked. There are also several key strategies that you can use to effectively address these vitamin, mineral and nutrient deficiencies. But, first, let's take a look at the major vitamin, mineral and nutrient deficiencies and their associated symptoms. Top 10 Vitamin, Mineral and Nutrient Deficiencies There are at least10major nutrient deficiencies that have a dramatic effect on your health. Some of these nutrient deficiencies are caused by Type 2 diabetes or other diseases while Type 2 diabetes and other diseases can result in a nutrient deficiency. The key vitamin, mineral and nutrient deficiencies associated with Type 2 diabetes include the following: Vitamin A -- carotenes are not Vitamin A! Vitamin B12 -- not available within plants Vitamin C -- need for collagen production, avoidascorbic acid Vitamin E -- most people take asalpha-tocopherol Vitamin K2 -- take with Vitamin D to redirect calcium! CoQ10 -- needed for mitochondria energy, mostly synthetic Glutathione -- unable to get into cells, use authenticliposomal Omega-3 EFAs -- supplements may beoxidized! Probiotics -- necessary especially if taking antibiotics Amino Acids (proline, glycine) -- not synthesized as we age, not found inmost conventional prot Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Really A Vitamin Deficiency Disease | Care2 Healthy Living

Is Diabetes Really A Vitamin Deficiency Disease | Care2 Healthy Living

Is Diabetes Really a Vitamin Deficiency Disease? Ground-breaking new research offers hope for the millions of sufferers of diabetes around the world. While the exact cause of diabetes has eluded researchers and doctors for many years, exciting research shows that a vitamin deficiency may actually be at the cause (or one of the causes) for the debilitating, and frequently, life-threatening disease. The research, published in Endocrine Journal , shows that vitamin A is essential for the proper functioning of the beta cells of the pancreas. The beta cells are responsible for producing insulin, which in turn helps to regulate blood sugar levels. In type 2 diabetes, which makes up about 95 percent of the 29 million diabetics in the United States, the beta cells stop producing sufficient insulin or the body stops responding to it. In the remaining 5 percent of people, type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system destroys the beta cells, rendering them incapable of producing adequate insulin. In the new study, researchers found that there are many vitamin A receptors on the surface of beta cells. In an interview with Medical News Today , study co-author Albert Salehi of the University of Lund, Sweden, stated: When we discovered that insulin cells have a cell surface expressed receptor for vitamin A, we thought it was important to find out why and what the purpose is of a cell surface receptor interacting with vitamin A mediating a rapid response to vitamin A. When the researchers partially blocked the vitamin A receptors, thereby eliminating the ability of vitamin A to bind to the beta cells, they made the discovery that the beta cells were unable to adequately secrete insulin in response to sugar. They also found that a vitamin A deficiency prevented the beta cells from cop Continue reading >>

Diabetes And B12: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And B12: What You Need To Know

Vitamin B12 is necessary for a healthy nervous system and healthy blood cells. The best way to get vitamin B12 is through your diet. This important vitamin is found in meat, fish, poultry, and dairy products. If you don’t eat enough of these foods, it could leave you with a deficiency. Consuming enough vitamin B12 isn’t the only problem. Your body also needs to be able to absorb it efficiently. Some medications like Pepcid AC, Prevacid, Prilosec, and Zantac, as well as others used to treat acid reflux, peptic ulcer disease, and infection, may make it harder for your body to absorb B12. Another medication that may interfere with B12 absorption is metformin, a common type 2 diabetes treatment. Simply having diabetes may make you more prone to B12 deficiency. A 2009 study found that 22 percent of people with type 2 diabetes were low in B12. Read on to learn the symptoms of B12 deficiency, what it could mean for your overall health, and what you can do about it. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency may be mild at first, and not always obvious. If you’re slightly low on B12, you may not have any symptoms at all. Some of the more common early symptoms are: tiredness weakness loss of appetite weight loss constipation It may be easy to dismiss these as minor complaints, but over time, insufficient B12 can lead to bigger problems. Very low levels of B12 can result in serious complications. One of these is called pernicious anemia. Anemia means you don’t have enough healthy red blood cells. This deprives your cells of much-needed oxygen. According to a study in the Journal of Oral Pathology Medicine, less than 20 percent of those with a B12 deficiency experience pernicious anemia. Symptoms of anemia include: fatigue pale skin chest pain dizziness headache You may even lose Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nutrition, Nutrient Losses Complications

Diabetic Nutrition, Nutrient Losses Complications

Nutrient Losses Cause Diabetic Complications Nutrient Losses Cause Diabetic Complications Diabetes is a nutritional wasting disease. The elevated blood sugar levels that characterize diabetes cause excessive urination. The root words of diabetes mellitus come from the Greek meaningto pass throughandsweetorhoney. High blood sugar, whether its caused by insufficient insulin or insulin resistance (type 1 or type 2 diabetes, respectively), overwhelms the kidneys capacity to reabsorb glucose and all other water-soluble nutrients. Every time the blood sugar rises and urination increases, the diabetic patient loses water, magnesium, zinc, B12, B6, folic acid, and many other nutrients. Although water is replaced by drinking, nothing is done to replenish the water-soluble nutrients that are also swept out. The diabetic condition demands that these nutrients be replenishedand in large supplyto prevent the devastation that comes from nutritional deficiencies. Yet of the 15,000-plus patients with diabetes who have been treated at the Whitaker Wellness Institute sincewe opened in 1979, I do not recall a single one whose conventional physician had put him or her on a nutritional supplement regimen to counteract these inevitable losses. As a result of the continual nutritional losses that occur in people with diabetes, body parts simply fall off. Diabetes is our number one cause of blindness, amputation, and kidney failure, and it dramatically increases the risk of both heart attack and stroke . I submit that if you were to give a healthy person an osmotic diuretic every day and did not replace nutrients, you would produce the same complications suffered by diabetics. Lets examine some of these losses and their consequences. Magnesium. Excessive urination washes out magnesium. Low ma Continue reading >>

Vitamins And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Vitamins And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Vitamin A or Retinol The term vitamin A comprises various chemical components with a structural and functional similarity. The most active form is retinol, present in animal tissues, esterified with long chain fatty acids. Carotenes that are present in vegetable tissues are enzymatically hydrolyzed into retinal and converted to retinol in the enterocyte. Some xanthines are also converted into retinol. Vitamin A participates in multiple metabolic processes such as genetic expression, cellular differentiation and growth, having a very important role in the immune system, fetal development, sight, taste, hearing, appetite and spermatogenesis. Retinoids have a very important function as antioxidants, thus helping to maintain the organism’s homeostasis when subjected to various forms of stress [2]. It has also been postulated that retinoids may be involved in hepatic lipid metabolism, adipogenesis as well as pancreatic β-cell function. While retinol binding protein (RBP), a protein that transports retinoids has an important effect on insulin sensitivity, acting as an adipokine [2]. A mouse model that lacks the gene for retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1, (Raldh1a1), that participates in the generation of retinoic acid to be utilized in lipid metabolism, shows better lipid profiles than mice with adequate Raldh1a1 production [3]. Even though further research is needed to identify the precise mechanisms by which retinoids and their pathways effect carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in health and disease, it is clear that adequate vitamin A intake, concentrations reserves should be maintained in the normal healthy individual and particularly in those subjects with chronic diseases that involve carbohydrates and lipids. Very old age type 2 diabetic patients have lower plasma Continue reading >>

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