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Is Diabetes A Service Connected Disability?

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Claim For Va Benefits

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Claim For Va Benefits

Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of conditions, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes, that affect how your body uses blood sugar, also known as glucose. Diabetes can affect many different organs, including the heart, eyes, and kidneys. Symptoms of diabetes can vary, but often include extreme thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, and blurred vision. Type 2 diabetes is more common than type 1 and is more common among people over 40. The cause of diabetes is only partially understood, but it is believed that genetic and environmental factors play a role. Being overweight is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Over 431,000 veterans receive disability benefits for diabetes, as of the 2015 fiscal year. It may seem difficult to prove that your diabetes is connected to your military service because the cause of this disease is not fully understood. However, there are some circumstances where a veteran will receive a presumptive service connection for diabetes. Presumptive Service-Connection for Diabetes Mellitus, type II If your type 2 diabetes became at least 10 percent disabling within one year of discharge from the military, you may be eligible for presumptive service-connection. You will only need to provide evidence that your condition manifested within one year of discharge and that it is at least 10 percent disabling. Veterans who were exposed to Agent Orangein Vietnam also receive a presumption service-connection for type 2 diabetes, along with many other diseases. The diabetes can manifest at any time, even years after discharge from military service. Diabetes does not qualify as a medically unexplained illness for Gulf War veterans, because the cause is partially understood. Diabetes will be assigned a rating based on the severity of symptoms, varying Continue reading >>

What Form Do I Need For A Va Disability Comp Claim For Diabetes

What Form Do I Need For A Va Disability Comp Claim For Diabetes

If you are filing your VA disability compensation claim using private health care options, you can use a DBQ form, Disability Benefits Questionnaire, to evaluate your disability. To file a VA disability compensation claim for diabetes mellitus you need to add claims for all applicable conditions associated with your diabetes mellitus. No matter how controlled, diabetes mellitus is a progressive disease. Diabetes Mellitus affects all systems, organs, and functions of the body and causes other conditions. You will need your Private Physician or Physicians to complete a DBQ’s for the diabetes mellitus and each related condition. The DBQ’s for diabetes mellitus and related conditions can be viewed, filled for printing, downloaded or printed for your Doctor at website: Or, VA DBQ Forms can be viewed, filled for printing, downloaded or printed for your Doctor at website: The following is a list of some of the DBQ Forms related to Diabetes Mellitus. If you have another condition related that is not listed, go to the websites above and obtain the VA DBQ form associated with your condition or conditions. VA-21-0960E-1 – Diabetes Mellitus VA-21-0960C-4 – Diabetic Sensory-Motor Peripheral Neuropathy VA-21-0960A-4 – Heart Conditions (diabetic heart disease) VA-21-0960A-3 – Hypertension VA-21-0960A-2 – Artery and Vein Conditions (diabetic vascular disease) VA-21-0960M-1 – Amputations (diabetic vascular disease) VA-21-0960G-1 – Esophageal Conditions (diabetic reflux) VA-21-0960G-7 – Stomach and Duodenal Conditions (diabetic changes) VA-21-0960J-1 – Kidney Conditions (diabetic kidney impairment) VA-21-0960M-6 – Foot Conditions (diabetic foot drop) VA-21-0960F-2 – Skin Conditions (diabetic dermatitis) VA-21-0960J-2 – Male Reproductive Organ Conditions (diabe Continue reading >>

Will I Qualify For Veteran’s Disability Benefits If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

Will I Qualify For Veteran’s Disability Benefits If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

If you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and believe that your condition was caused by or made worse by your service in the military, you could be eligible for veterans’ disability benefits. In fiscal year 2015 (the most recent year for which statistics are available), diabetes was the 9th most common disability among all veterans’ disability recipients. In that year, 431,166 veterans received benefits because of their type 2 diabetes. How They Qualified There is more than one way to qualify for veterans’ disability benefits if you have type 2 diabetes. Specifically, you may qualify for benefits if: You can prove that your diabetes was caused by your active duty in the military or by a condition that you suffered because of your active duty in the military. You served in Vietnam between January 9, 1962 and May 7, 1975. If you set foot on soil in Vietnam, the Department of Veterans Affairs presumes that you were exposed to Agent Orange, a toxic herbicide used during the Vietnam War that medical professionals have connected to a variety of illnesses, including type 2 diabetes. Vietnam veterans who can prove that they were not dishonorably discharged and that they have type 2 diabetes may qualify for disability compensation. When you apply for benefits, it is important to describe all of the conditions associated with your type 2 diabetes. For example, you should make sure that information about all related conditions is included with your applications, including: Vision problems Heart problems Stomach, gallbladder, or kidney problems Any other health impairments Don’t assume that you will get benefits simply because you are a veteran with type 2 diabetes. Instead, make sure that the Department of Veterans Affairs has all of the information it needs to make Continue reading >>

The Va’s Ratings For Diabetes – Explained

The Va’s Ratings For Diabetes – Explained

Diabetes Mellitus is a condition that runs rampant among the veteran population. Of those particularly affected is the Vietnam Era community. As these veterans approach the years of wisdom, so too does diabetes creep alongside them. There is no shortage of medical literature on the connection between type 2 diabetes and veterans who were exposed to Agent Orange in Vietnam, Korea and Thailand. Indeed, the VA’s 2015 Annual Benefits Report noted diabetes mellitus as the 9th most prevalent service-connected disability of all compensation recipients, with an estimated 431,166 claims awarded. In 2015, there were 1,347,883 compensation recipients of the Vietnam Era, constituting 32% of the veteran population receiving benefits. Do the math and you find that almost 32% of the Vietnam veterans receiving compensation have diabetes mellitus. Interestingly, 411,698 of those individuals are males. Of course, these statistics are only reflective the veterans receiving compensation. Imagine what the statistics would be if they included non-service connected veterans as well! If you are a veteran who is pursuing a compensation claim for type 2 diabetes, or are already receiving compensation for diabetes, you may find it difficult to understand how the VA’s rating system works for diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this post is walk you through the VA’s rating schedule so you know what to look for and what to expect in terms of compensation. Once the VA has ascertained that a veteran’s diabetes mellitus condition is service connected, the raters refer to the rating schedule to determine the level at which the veteran will be paid for that condition. The rating schedule for diabetes is Diagnostic Code (DC) 7913, which breaks down the ratings for diabetes into five levels. Level 1 Continue reading >>

Service Connected Presumptive Conditions

Service Connected Presumptive Conditions

Contact Us About MVAA FAQs Policies Find a Benefits Counselor Site Map { "sidebar" : "The VA presumes that specific conditions diagnosed in certain veterans were caused by their military service. The VA does this because of the unique circumstances of their military service. If one of these conditions is diagnosed in a veteran in one of these groups, the VA presumes that the circumstances of his/her service caused the condition, and disability compensation can be awarded. This list can change and MVAA will make every effort to make updates as they arise.\n ", "sections" : [ { "type" : "", "subsections" : [ { "image" : "", "headline" : "", "contentImage" : null, "content" : "Veterans within one year after release from active duty diagnosed with chronic diseases (such as arthritis, diabetes or hypertension) are encouraged to apply for disability compensation. Veterans diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Lou Gehrig's disease at any time after discharge or release from qualifying active service may be eligible for compensation if they served a minimum of 90 consecutive days of active service.\nRead more about disability compensation within one-year post-service" } ], "headline" : "Recently separated/discharged" }, { "type" : "", "subsections" : [ { "image" : "", "headline" : "", "contentImage" : null, "content" : "If a former POW, regardless of the amount of time they were held in captivity, has any of the following conditions, the VA will presume that the condition was caused by their captivity if they become at least 10 percent disabled anytime after military service:\n

Va Won't Recognize Diabetes As Service Connected Unless There Is Evidence That Military Service Caused It | Stateside Legal

Va Won't Recognize Diabetes As Service Connected Unless There Is Evidence That Military Service Caused It | Stateside Legal

VA won't recognize diabetes as service connected unless there is evidence that military service caused it Question: My husband retired in 1996 and since has developed Diabetes, there is not a family history. How can we tell if this is service connected or not? He served in the USCG from 1974 to 1996. Also is there any connection with asthma and Trichloroethylene? The only diabetes that is automatically (presumptively) service connected is for Vietnam veterans who served with boots on the ground and were exposed to agent orange. There are some limited cases elsewhere, such as in Korea. If diabetes is diagnosed on active duty or within the first year after ETS, that may also be service connected. Adult onset diabetes is a very common disease in America that affects many men as they get older. VA won't recognize it as service connected unless there is evidence that military service caused it. To prove that any health condition is service connected requires evidence of that fact. For example, to try to show that asthma is caused by TCE would require an expert (usually a physician) to write a nexus letter that clearly says that the asthma is "more likely than not" caused by exposure to TCE. Even before you can do that though, the veteran must prove he was exposed to TCE and document when, where and how much. Vets can't simple tell VA that they were exposed, they have to prove it. Of course, we were all exposed to TCE. I used the stuff all through my time in the Army. If I had to prove that today, I don't know how I would do it. But...there are many successful claims for TCE and many diseases. Those claims are usually finalized at the BVA. You can research successful claims here Choose a year to query and then enter key words like and review the cases tha Continue reading >>

Erectile Dysfunction And Va Disability Diabetes And Other Causes

Erectile Dysfunction And Va Disability Diabetes And Other Causes

No, as long as your meds are being taken for a service-connected condition, the law allows ED to be secondarily service-connected based on the side effects of the meds. Good luck! Mistakes On Social Media Can Destroy Your Disability Claim Can I Sue If The Insurance Company Cuts Off My Benefits? What Should I Do After My Long Term Disability Claim Was Denied? Do I Need To Hire An Attorney If My Benefits Were Denied? Insurance Companies Spy On You To Avoid Paying Your Benefits Insurance Companies Use a Clause to Limit Your Benefits The First Steps Toward Filing a Long Term Disability Claim 7 Tips For Talking To The Insurance Company About Your Claim Insurance Companies Cherry-Pick To Deny Claims Five Mistakes That Can Ruin Your Long Term Disability Claim The Importance of Understanding the Language of Your Insurance Policy How To Start Your Social Security Disability Claim Hire an Attorney if Veterans Affairs Denies Your Claim Can The Insurance Company Subtract SSD from What They Pay Me? What To Do If Your Insurance Company Hires a Representative You Need More Than Medical Records to Prove Your Disability Do I Need A Lawyer To Apply for Long Term Disability? How Do I Know If I Have a Good Long Term Disability Case? What Do I Need To Do To Prove My Disability Case? Im a retired Marine. I got so tired of dealing with the VA and my DAV rep. I contacted John to help me.---> READ MORE From the moment I met Mr. Tucker (January 2015) I knew I was in good hands. I believe its important to obtain an attorney who believes your story.--> READ MORE John was my attorney for a disability claim against UNUM and he handled my SSD claim. Another attorney referred me to him because he is known as one of the top ERISA lawyers --> READ MORE I hired Mr. Tucker to help me after CIGNA denied m Continue reading >>

Va Is Changing Diabetes Care For Veterans

Va Is Changing Diabetes Care For Veterans

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Happy Memorial Day Monday. We're still in a military mindset here at the 'Mine, with a look today at what's happening with diabetes benefits for the men and women who've served our country. To hear the Veterans Administration (VA) tell it, they're the global leader in diabetes care. Uh... wait a minute... is this the same VA that's been the lightning rod for the ire of American veterans for generations? Yep. It's the same VA, but today's VA is a far cry from the one your grandfather went to. They've now got a cutting-edge diabetes playbook that's proving itself with real-world results that are outpacing the rest of American healthcare. The organizations that represent vets are happy, and so too, it seems, are the vets themselves. Is this a healthcare paradise? Not quite, but you could say that things are better with a capital B... Forget about aging multi-story 400-bed hospitals. The new face of the VA is the community clinic. 1,400 of them, so far. Following a major revamping between 1995 and 2000, the VA changed its focus to "universal primary care." It's paying attention to a wide variety of health conditions, and has been an early adopter of electronic medical records (EMR), which many other clinics and hospitals have struggled to implement. And you think your family is big? The VA provides health benefits to 1.45 million vets who have diabetes (!). This number has risen sharply over the last decade, more than doubling since the year 2000. That means the VA is responsible for the healthcare of around 6% of Persons With Diabetes (PWDs) in the United States more than their fair share. The prevalence of diabetes amongs Continue reading >>

The Endocrine System

The Endocrine System

Topics: Diabetes Thyroid Conditions Parathyroid Conditions Pituitary Conditions Adrenal Conditions Multiple-Gland Conditions Cancer and Tumors of the Endocrine System Other Endocrine Conditions DBQs for Endocrine Conditions Principles that Apply --The VA changed the codes and ratings for Endocrine Conditions on December 10, 2017. See the Historic VASRDs page for all codes and ratings from before this date. Not all codes were changed, so if the code cannot be found on the Historic VASRDs page, the ratings did not change.-- Reminder: The VA will give a Military Disability Rating for each service-connected condition a service member has, but the DoD will only rate service-connected conditions that make a service member Unfit for Duty. The endocrine system is a network of glands that create hormones to help regulate the body. These hormones control the growth of new cells and metabolism. Some organs, like the kidney, also help in producing hormones. The endocrine system is made up of the hypothalamus, thymus, pituitary gland, thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, adrenal glands, pineal gland, reproductive glands (ovaries or testes), and the pancreas. All these parts work together to keep the body in balance. Diabetes Code 7913: Diabetes mellitus is the condition that most of us think of as just diabetes. It occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (Type 1), or when the cells do not respond properly to insulin (Type 2). Type 3 diabetes can occur during pregnancy, but this condition resolves after the birth and is not ratable. Diabetes can affect many different organs including the heart, eyes, and kidneys. It can cause strokes, loss of blood flow to the arms and legs, and nerve dysfunction. It usually takes 10 to 20 years for these secondary conditions to Continue reading >>

Veterans Disability Compensation: Five Ways To Establish Service-connection

Veterans Disability Compensation: Five Ways To Establish Service-connection

Veterans Disability Compensation: Five Ways to Establish Service-Connection When a military service veteran files a claim for disability compensation with the VA for an illness or disability that resulted from military service, one of the first things a veteran has to establish is that the current illness or disability is connected to the veteran's military service. This is called "establishing service connection." Here are the five methods of establishing service connection for a current disability, disease, or illness. Direct Service Connection. While a direct service connection can be established in any number of ways, it generally means there is clear evidence of an incident that occurred while the veteran was in service as well as evidence of linkage between the incident and the lasting disability. Here is an example: A veteran is paralyzed from the waist down. In military service, the veteran suffered an injury in Airborne School, breaking his back during a parachute landing. In this example, the veteran's paralysis is clearly connected to his military service. Presumed Service Connection. Certain conditions or diseases are "presumed" to be service-connected. The VA has lists of conditions that are presumed to be related to service and their presumptive periods. For example, any veterans who were exposed to Agent Orange during their military service and who now have Parkinson's disease are presumed to have a service connection. Veterans do not have to prove that their current medical condition is related to their military service -- the law presumes it. Diseases that have a presumed service connection include chronic illnesses, tropical illnesses, tuberculosis, multiple sclerosis, and Hansen's disease, provided that they cause the veteran to be 10% disabled or mo Continue reading >>

Service-connected

Service-connected

Both the VA and the DoD will only give Military Disability Ratings for conditions that are service-connected. Service-connected basically means that the condition was directly caused by military service, occurred while in the military (but not necessarily on duty, i.e. a car accident at night), was aggravated by military service, or was caused by conditions that are themselves service-connected. All exceptions to this rule can be found on our Conditions That Are Not Ratable page, and can include genetic or hereditary conditions, or conditions that existed prior to service ( EPTS ). For a condition to be considered service-connected, its connection to service MUST be clearly documented in an official record, like a medical record, while the service member is still in the military (except, of course, Conditions Caused by Service-Connected Conditions ), or it will not be eligible to receive Military Disability . The goal of Military Disability is to compensate all veterans for any conditions that they incurred because of military service. The laws in place define these conditions as ones incurred in combat, on duty, and in training. This is expanded further, however, to include any and every condition that occurs or is diagnosed during a service members time in the military, even when off duty. So if Beth breaks her ankle during training, strains her back while playing basketball with her friends on the weekend, or is diagnosed with cancer, all while she is an active duty military member, each of these conditions will be considered service-connected. Conditions Aggravated by Military Service In the following discussion, think of service-aggravated as service-connected in that each service-aggravated condition can also be given a Military Disability Rating . Usually, condi Continue reading >>

The Va Diabetes Claim: How Many Ways To Service Connect?

The Va Diabetes Claim: How Many Ways To Service Connect?

In a VA Diabetes Claim, how many ways can the Veteran show that his/her diabetes is related to military service? There are several, and which one you use will be driven largely by how your Diabetes presents itself in your unique medical picture. Let’s start from the top. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a metabolic disease. For diabetics, the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches, and other food into energy needed for daily living. Diabetes is not – as commonly believed – something that only fat people get. Common Problems in the VA Diabetes Claim. Veterans seeking disability compensation benefits in a VA diabetes claim are likely to see the same “canned” responses from the VA Regional Office. Typically, RO will conclude that diabetes — or symptoms of diabetes — did not appear to a compensable degree within one year of discharge from the military. Another common error occurs when the VA Rater – or the BVA – relies solely on a medical opinion from a VA Medical Center Doctor who concludes that it would be pure speculation whether the present diagnosis of diabetes was caused by or connected to military service. Service Connection in the VA Diabetes Claim. For Veterans who are trying to establish service connection for Diabetes, there are at many ways to skin the proverbial cat. Here are 4: #1: Direct Service Connection. The most common way to Direct Service Connection. service connect diabetes to military service is to use “chronicity” and “continuity of symptomatology”: 1) Get a copy of your C-File: I can’t stress this enough. Without a copy of your C-File, you are battling the VA with blindfolds on. 2) Locate all references to the early symptomatology of diabetes in the milit Continue reading >>

Charlotte, Nc: Diabetes Claims For Veterans: Disability Benefits | Piemonte Law Firm

Charlotte, Nc: Diabetes Claims For Veterans: Disability Benefits | Piemonte Law Firm

In addition to cancer, Agent Orange exposure during military service is presumed to be a causal factor in Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Almost all Vietnam veterans are presumed to have been exposed to Agent Orange. Now, many Vietnam veterans are arriving at an age where they are more likely to contract Type 2 diabetes, or an earlier case of diabetes may be growing steadily worse. The Veterans Administration explains, "The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) concluded in its 2000, 2002, and 2004 updates on the Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam that there is limited/suggestive evidence of an association between exposure to herbicides and Type 2 diabetes." If you currently have diabetes that disables you and keeps you from working, talk to an attorney from the Piemonte Law Firm, even if you are already receiving some benefits. Quite possibly, you are eligible for a higher disability rating and a benefit increase. We can take steps towards adjusting your rating upwards, resulting in a superior benefits package for you. All our initial consultations are free. If we win your case, the VA will automatically deduct 20% of your retroactive benefits as our fee. From that point on, 100% of your benefit funds are yours. We represent disabled civilians and veterans in a wide range of injury and disability-related cases, including Social Security Disability (SSD) denial appeals. Pursue the Veterans Disability Benefits You Need and Deserve As we advise you on the best paths towards full disability compensation, our goal is to help you achieve the benefits package you deserve. To schedule a free consultation and preliminary case review by an experienced North Carolina veterans disability attorney, call The Piemonte Law Firm today. Stop by our office today to consult an attorney Continue reading >>

Understanding Va Disability Ratings For Diabetes

Understanding Va Disability Ratings For Diabetes

Understanding VA Disability Ratings for Diabetes Posted in Uncategorized on November 14, 2017 Diabetes mellitus also known as Type II or adult onset diabetes is a growing health issue among U.S. veterans. In fact, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) recently listed type II diabetes as the number 9 most-prevalent disability claim among compensation recipients, with more than 431,000 veterans receiving some level of disability support while suffering from the condition. Like other VA disabilities, to receive disability compensation, a veterans diabetes type II diagnosis must be proven to be connected to his or her service in the Armed Forces, via a letter or nexus from an expert or physician citing that the condition is more likely than not connected to military service. If the diabetes is diagnosed while on active duty, or within a year of his or her Expiration of Term of Service (ETS), it may be easier to make the connection. Personal records may be sufficient to determine the diagnosis of diabetes; otherwise, It may require a VA examination. It is important, when making a claim, that a veteran provide detailed records or evidence of the ongoing condition, symptoms, required treatments, hospitalizations and physical complications related to the diabetes. You will also be required to include dates and details on your service periods, as they relate to your diagnosis. The one major exception to having to prove that diabetes mellitus is service-connected is if the veteran served in Vietnam and was exposed to Agent Orange. In this case, the VA automatically presumes an existing connection between this service and the diagnosis. To be eligible for diabetes mellitus disability benefits in this situation, the veteran must have physically served or visited the Republi Continue reading >>

New Strict Standard For Va Diabetes Ratings | Veterans Disability Attorney Blog

New Strict Standard For Va Diabetes Ratings | Veterans Disability Attorney Blog

VA Diabetes Ratings: Under VA's rating code , a veteran is entitled to a 40% rating for diabetes "[r]equiring insulin, restricted diet, and regulation of activities." A 20% rating shall be assigned for diabetes "[r]equiring insulin and restricted diet, or; oral hypoglycemic agent and restricted diet." A new decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit clarifies that "insulin," as it is used in VA's rating code, means insulin administered exogenously, or from the outside of the body. In Middleton v. Shinseki, No. 2013-7014, slip op. 10-11 (Fed. Cir. Aug. 15, 2013), the Federal Circuit determined that a veteran could not receive a 40% disability rating for his diabetes where his diabetes required restricted diet, regulation of activities, and the use of a drug that produced insulin endogenously (meaning that the drug caused the body to produce insulin). The Federal Circuit also reiterated the longstanding rule that, to meet the requirement for a 40% disability rating, a veteran had to meet all three of the requirements listed in the rating code. One judge dissented. Circuit Judge Plager said that the rating code should be treated more of a guide and not as a hard and fast code. Circuit Judge Plager also highlighted that, where the veteran's disability more nearly approximates the higher disability rating than the lower rating, the higher disability rating should be awarded. If you or someone you care about is currently looking to file or appeal a claim for VA disability benefits including a claim filed on the basis of diabetes contact a veterans disability attorney from Bosley & Bratch to learn more about your case and how our firm can help. Continue reading >>

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