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Is Diabetes A Risk Factor For High Blood Pressure?

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure (hypertension) can lead to many complications of diabetes, including diabetic eye disease and kidney disease, or make them worse. Most people with diabetes will eventually have high blood pressure, along with other heart and circulation problems. Diabetes damages arteries and makes them targets for hardening, called atherosclerosis. That can cause high blood pressure, which if not treated, can lead to trouble including blood vessel damage, heart attack, and kidney failure. Compared to those with normal blood pressure readings, people with hypertension more often have: Peripheral vascular disease, hardening of the arteries in the legs and feet Even blood pressure that's at the higher end of normal (120/80 to 129/80), called elevated, impacts your health. Studies show that you have a two to three times greater chance of getting heart disease over 10 years. Readings vary, but most people with diabetes should have a blood pressure of no more than 130/80. The first, or top, number is the "systolic pressure," or the pressure in your arteries when your heart squeezes and fills the vessels with blood. The second, or bottom, number is the "diastolic pressure," or the pressure in your arteries when your heart rests between beats, filling itself with blood for the next contraction. When it comes to preventing diabetes complications, normal blood pressure is as important as good control of your blood sugar levels. Usually, high blood pressure has no symptoms. That's why you need to check your blood pressure regularly. Your doctor will probably measure it at every visit, and you may need to check it at home, too. Many of the things you do for your diabetes will also help with high blood pressure: Control your blood sugar. Don't drink a lot of alcohol. Limit how m Continue reading >>

Major Kidney Disease Risk Factors: Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Major Kidney Disease Risk Factors: Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Kidney disease makes it impossible for your kidneys to function properly, which can lead to a host of serious medical problems. In the worst cases, having kidney disease can even put your life in danger. Thus, it is important to minimize your risk of kidney disease as much as possible. Below is a discussion of two serious risk factors for this condition: diabetes and high blood pressure. Kidney Disease and Diabetes Two different types of diabetes exist: Type I and Type II. Type I Diabetes occurs when your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to regulate the sugar in your blood. In Type II Diabetes, an adequate amount of insulin is produced, but the body doesn’t use it properly. Both of these types of diabetes can damage your kidneys over time. In either case, the small blood vessels in your kidneys can be damaged by the condition, which inhibits the kidneys’ ability to clean the blood. Diabetes may also damage the nerves near your bladder, causing you to hold urine longer than you should. This will cause further injury to the kidneys and increase your risk of infection. Kidney Disease and High Blood Pressure High blood pressure, which may also be referred to as “hypertension,” can damage the blood vessels in the kidneys as well. Eventually, the kidneys become unable to filter your blood properly, leading to water retention, increased urinary frequency and other symptoms of kidney disease. If the disease continues to progress, dialysis or kidney transplantation will be required. What Can You Do? If you know that you already have either diabetes or high blood pressure, or if you suspect that you may have one of these conditions, you can reduce the chances of kidney disease by being proactive. For example, if you suspect that you are already suffering from diabete Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure 'increases Risk Of Diabetes By 60%'

High Blood Pressure 'increases Risk Of Diabetes By 60%'

INDYPULSE High blood pressure 'increases risk of diabetes by 60%' Having high blood pressure raises your risk of developing diabetes by 60 per cent, a major global study has confirmed. Although a well-known risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the links between high blood pressure and diabetes had been less certain. Now a team of researchers have confirmed the connection following a trawl through more than four million patient records. The study does not show that high blood pressure causes diabetes, but the researchers said that conclusive evidence of the link between the two was a possible “game-changer” which could lead to better treatment. High blood pressure is often linked to obesity, which is one of the main risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Professor Kazem Rahimi, deputy director of the George Institute for Global Health, who led the research, said people with diabetes were also more likely to suffer from heart attacks, stroke and heart failure. “Confirming this connection reliably provides new hope for those people and new avenues for research,” he said. “Understanding the link will help us better communicate risks to patients and can provide another motivation for patients and doctors to aim for tight blood pressure control.” The study is published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. High blood pressure can be prevented by eating healthily, watching our weight, getting exercise, not drinking too much alcohol and not smoking. Rates of diabetes in the UK have soared by nearly 60 per cent in the past decade, according to the charity Diabetes UK and treating the condition and its many potential complications costs the NHS an estimated £10bn a year. The increase is thought to be a consequence of growing rates of overweight and ob Continue reading >>

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes mellitus, usually called diabetes, is a disease in which your body does not make enough insulin or cannot use normal amounts of insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in your blood. A high blood sugar level can cause problems in many parts of your body. The most common ones are Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children. It is also called juvenile onset diabetes mellitus or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this type, your pancreas does not make enough insulin and you have to take insulin injections for the rest of your life. Type 2 diabetes, which is more common, usually occurs in people over 40 and is called adult onset diabetes mellitus. It is also called non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In Type 2, your pancreas makes insulin, but your body does not use it properly. The high blood sugar level often can be controlled by following a diet and/or taking medication, although some patients must take insulin. Type 2 diabetes is particularly prevalent among African Americans, American Indians, Latin Americans and Asian Americans. With diabetes, the small blood vessels in the body are injured. When the blood vessels in the kidneys are injured, your kidneys cannot clean your blood properly. Your body will retain more water and salt than it should, which can result in weight gain and ankle swelling. You may have protein in your urine. Also, waste materials will build up in your blood. Diabetes also may cause damage to nerves in your body. This can cause difficulty in emptying your bladder. The pressure resulting from your full bladder can back up and injure the kidneys. Also, if urine remains in your bladder for a long time, you can develop an infection from the rapid growth of bacteria in urine that h Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure & Diabetes

High Blood Pressure & Diabetes

High blood pressure affects 34% of the population. Certain factors such as a family history of high blood pressure, being overweight or obese, a lack of physical exercise or even simply your age, gender or race could put you at risk for developing high blood pressure. Known as the ‘Silent Killer,’ high blood pressure doesn’t cause any symptoms … so it’s important that you check your blood pressure on a regular basis to avoid heart attacks, strokes, kidney disease and other complications. You develop type 2 diabetes when your body doesn’t use insulin properly. When this happens, the glucose (sugar) in your body builds up in your blood, causing high blood sugar. This buildup of sugar in your blood prevents your cells from getting the energy they need. High blood sugar can do damage to your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Although there’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, you can control it with medication and lifestyle changes. The following risk factors can increase your chances of developing one or both of these conditions: You can lower your risk of developing both of these conditions by eating a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables and whole grains, like oatmeal, brown rice and whole wheat breads. In addition, you should be sure to get regular exercise, watch your weight, quit smoking, limit the amount of alcohol you drink, and take medications as prescribed by your healthcare provider. In addition, it’s best to have your blood pressure checked every year or as recommended by your healthcare provider. Our team of board-certified nurse practitioners and registered nurses provides expert care for non-insulin dependent type 2 diabetics and patients who wish to take control of your blood pressure and live a healthy, active life. Our services include: Screening A Continue reading >>

​​high Blood Pressure: Dangers, Causes And Risk Factors

​​high Blood Pressure: Dangers, Causes And Risk Factors

National Heart Centre Singapore explains why high blood pressure can lead to heart problems, diabetes, stroke and other health complications.  High blood pressure High blood pressure in Singapore High blood pressure, or hypertension, refers to a condition in which the blood is pumped around the body at a higher pressure. According to the 2004 Singapore National Health Survey, 24.9% of Singapore residents between the ages of 30 and 69 years suffer from high blood pressure. Among the women surveyed who fell in this age group, 20.4% had the condition. High blood pressure is present when a person’s blood pressure is persistently above 140/90mmHg. It is one of the major risk factors for coronary artery disease and bleeding in the brain. Why high blood pressure is dangerous Untreated high blood pressure can often lead to the damage of various body organs in the long-term, in particular the heart and blood vessels, leading to stroke, heart attack or renal failure. If you have diabetes or kidney disease, you must strive to maintain your blood pressure at around 130/80mmHg, as even marginally higher blood pressure will increase your risk of developing complications. Causes of high blood pressure Most of the time, the cause of high blood pressure is not known. Although high blood pressure usually cannot be cured, it can be prevented and controlled in most cases. In general, your blood pressure will increase if: ​Your blood volume is increased by too much salt intake, which retains more water in the body. ​Your blood vessels become more rigid due to atherosclerosis, a process where fatty substances are deposited in the blood vessel walls.​ Risk factors for high blood pressure 1. Age Older people are at a higher risk of developing hypertension. 2. Pre-existing medical co Continue reading >>

The Risk Factors For High Blood Pressure.

The Risk Factors For High Blood Pressure.

High Blood Pressure: The Link That Often Leads to Heart Disease and Stroke One in three Americans has high blood pressure, also known as hypertension, and 48 percent of those who have it do not have it under control. In fact, 36.2 percent of people with high blood pressure are unaware they even have the condition. With no visible symptoms, it is known as “The Silent Killer.” And certain populations, such as African Americans, are at higher risk than Caucasian or Hispanic populations. Women are as likely as men to develop high blood pressure during their lifetime. However, for those under the age of 45, the condition affects more men than women. For people age 65 and older, high blood pressure affects more women than men. You might think undiagnosed hypertension occurs more frequently in uninsured populations, but the opposite is true: 81.8 percent of those with hypertension have health insurance, 82.5 percent have a usual source of care, and 61.7 percent received care at least twice in the last year. Learn about high blood pressure, its causes, and what you can do to prevent or treat it. Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Pressure Symptoms

High And Low Blood Pressure Symptoms

Tweet Blood pressure control is important whether you have diabetes or not. However, having high blood pressure is a key risk factor in developing heart disease, stroke and other complications of diabetes. Diabetes and high blood pressure are often associated, and many people with diabetes take medication to lower their blood pressure. What is blood pressure? Blood pressure means the pressure of blood in your arteries as it is being pumped by the heart. Targets for people with type 1 diabetes The targets for people with type 1 diabetes is to have a resting blood pressure level below 135/85 mmHg. If you have signs of kidney disease or metabolic syndrome your blood pressure level should be below 130/80 mmHg. Targets for people with type 2 diabetes The target blood pressure targets for type 2 diabetes: Below 140/80 mmHg Or below 130/80 mmHg if you have kidney disease, retinopathy or have cerebrovascular disease (including stroke) What are the symptoms of high blood pressure? Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sug Continue reading >>

Diabetes – Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion Division

Diabetes – Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion Division

While some risk factors are out of your control, such as family history of diabetes, age, or ethnicity, most diabetes risk factors are controllable. Risk factors are behaviors or conditions that increase your chances of developing diabetes. Overweight/Obesity The combination of physical inactivity and poor nutrition has led to an alarming increase in obesity in Hawaii. Overweight and obese individuals are at higher risk for developing diabetes and its risk factors, such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol. In Hawaii, over half (58%) of Hawaii adults are overweight or obese and 28% of Hawaii high school students are overweight or obese. A combination of regular exercise and a healthy diet that is low in fat and high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains is the best way to keep from getting overweight or obese. Be wary of fad diets that restrict certain nutrients and portion sizes that are too large. Physical Inactivity Physical activity can control blood pressure, reduce cholesterol levels, and help control and maintain weight. People who do not get enough physical activity risk developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and obesity. Almost one-half of Hawaii adults do not meet the recommendation for physical activity and 19% reported not getting any leisure time physical activity in the past month. Take simple steps to get more exercise – take a walk after dinner with your family or on your lunch break. Reduce television time to two hours or less with each day, and exercise during the commercials of your favorite shows. Aim for 30-60 minutes of physical activity most days of the week, and remember that it can be broken up throughout the day. The important thing is to keep moving! Children and adults should limit cholesterol, sodium, and fat, particula Continue reading >>

Heart Disease Risk Factors

Heart Disease Risk Factors

Many factors determine whether one has, or risks getting, coronary artery disease. Most are controllable, but several are not. By making lifestyle changes to avoid adding to risk factors you can lower the overall risk of coronary artery disease. Learn more below about the risk factors for heart disease and how to make heart healthy lifestyle choices. Risk factors beyond your control Heredity and family history The chance of developing heart disease is greater if family members have or have had heart disease. Age Heart disease can occur at any age; however, the incidence increases with age. Gender Men and women share the same risk factors for heart disease, but specific risks vary. For example, diabetes, high blood pressure and cigarette smoking are more powerful in contributing to heart disease in women than in men. Changes in lifestyle that reduce these risk factors have been shown to reduce risks equally in men and women. Men are more likely to develop heart disease earlier in life than women. However, women are at a higher risk for heart disease after menopause. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women and more women than men die from heart disease. Risk factors that can be controlled Tobacco People who smoke or use tobacco products are twice as likely to develop heart disease as non-smokers of the same age, sex and similar family history. Smoking just four cigarettes per day increases the risk of sudden cardiac death. Smoking leads to heart disease in a number of ways: It decreases the amount of oxygen in the blood and replaces it with carbon dioxide. Nicotine, a drug found in tobacco, causes the blood vessels in the heart and throughout the body to narrow. This may result in low blood flow or cause complete obstruction of an already narrow artery. Smok Continue reading >>

Hypertension / High Blood Pressure Causes & Risk Factors

Hypertension / High Blood Pressure Causes & Risk Factors

Hypertension / High Blood Pressure Causes & Risk Factors Hypertension, commonly known as high blood pressure, affects millions of Americans, from children to older adults. High blood pressure can be caused by many factors, but mostly notably are diabetes, obesity, and excessive alcohol consumption. High blood pressure happens when the pressure your blood exerts against the artery walls is too high, leading to life-threatening conditions, such as heart disease and stroke. Despite these severe health consequences, the vast majority of individuals have no symptoms. This is why hypertension is sometimes called a “silent” killer. Learn more about the causes and risk factors here. What is Hypertension? Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is the most common cardiovascular disease in the US. It is a condition where the pressure your blood puts on your artery walls is higher than normal ranges for a sustained period of time. Similar to the pressure needed to send air through a tube; your blood needs pressure to travel through your arteries. Just like too much pressure can damage a tire, high blood pressure can lead to a number of health conditions including potentially life-threatening conditions like stroke. Illnesses or medications that narrow the arteries increase high blood pressure. This is also why high blood pressure is so much more common with older adults. As we age, our arteries narrow meaning the same amount of pressure in a regular sized artery is equivalent to high blood pressure in a narrowed artery. Risk Factors for Hypertension There are two types of hypertension. Essential hypertension is where the underlying cause of the high blood pressure is unknown, which may be as many as 95% of cases in the US. Secondary hypertension is when the direct cause of the h Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure

High Blood Pressure

Blood pressure is a measurement of the force of your blood against the blood vessel walls. There are often no signs of high blood pressure. This means that you may have high blood pressure and not know it. The recommended target for people with diabetes is less than 130/80 mm Hg. The top number is the pressure when your heart contracts and pushes blood out (systolic). The bottom number is the pressure when the heart relaxes between beats (diastolic). Why is controlling blood pressure important for people with diabetes? When blood pressure is high, it puts stress on the body. This can cause damage to the heart, brain, kidneys, and eyes. High blood glucose levels are a risk factor for hypertension (high blood pressure) as it can lead to hardening of the arteries. Compared to people without diabetes, people with diabetes are much more likely to develop heart disease and/or experience a stroke at an earlier age. If you have diabetes, get your blood pressure checked every time you visit your health-care team. Am I doing all that I can to control my blood pressure? Do I have my blood pressure checked every time I visit my health-care team? Am I at a healthy weight? Do I follow a healthy diet that includes vegetables, fruits, low-fat dairy products, and is low in sodium and saturated and trans fats? Am I physically active on a regular basis? Am I a non-smoker? Do I manage stress in a healthy way? Do I limit my alcohol intake? Do I take my medication as prescribed? Strategies to lower blood pressure Try these healthy eating tips: Choose vegetables and fruits more often (fresh or frozen without added salt). Choose low-fat (one per cent or skim) dairy products. Choose legumes (dried beans, peas and lentils) more often. Rinse canned beans with water. Choose whole grains such as wh Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes is a condition in which the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood is too high because your body cannot use it properly. This happens because your body either cannot use or make a hormone called insulin, which is responsible for turning sugar into food for your body's cells. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1, where your body is unable to produce any insulin Type 2, where your body either does not produce enough insulin, or cannot use it. Symptoms of diabetes The main symptoms of diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequently needing to go to the toilet, especially at night Extreme tiredness Weight loss Blurred vision Genital itching Thrush If diabetes is not controlled, it can cause serious damage to your kidneys, eyes, nervous system, heart and blood vessels. Treatment for diabetes aims to avoid this by keeping blood sugar levels as near to normal as possible. Type 1 diabetes is usually treated by insulin injections, as well as healthy eating and being active. Type 2 diabetes is usually treated by healthy eating and being active alone, but sometimes tablets or insulin injections are also needed. Diabetes and high blood pressure About 25% of people with Type 1 diabetes and 80% of people with Type 2 diabetes have high blood pressure. Having diabetes raises your risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and other health problems. Having high blood pressure also raises this risk. If you have diabetes and high blood pressure together, this raises your risk of health problems even more. If you have diabetes, your doctor will want to be sure that your blood pressure is very well controlled. This means that they will probably want your blood pressure to be below 130 over 80. People with diabetes and high blood pressure are sometimes given the blood pressure Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure (hypertension)

High Blood Pressure (hypertension)

Print Overview High blood pressure is a common condition in which the long-term force of the blood against your artery walls is high enough that it may eventually cause health problems, such as heart disease. Blood pressure is determined both by the amount of blood your heart pumps and the amount of resistance to blood flow in your arteries. The more blood your heart pumps and the narrower your arteries, the higher your blood pressure. You can have high blood pressure (hypertension) for years without any symptoms. Even without symptoms, damage to blood vessels and your heart continues and can be detected. Uncontrolled high blood pressure increases your risk of serious health problems, including heart attack and stroke. High blood pressure generally develops over many years, and it affects nearly everyone eventually. Fortunately, high blood pressure can be easily detected. And once you know you have high blood pressure, you can work with your doctor to control it. Symptoms Most people with high blood pressure have no signs or symptoms, even if blood pressure readings reach dangerously high levels. A few people with high blood pressure may have headaches, shortness of breath or nosebleeds, but these signs and symptoms aren't specific and usually don't occur until high blood pressure has reached a severe or life-threatening stage. When to see a doctor You'll likely have your blood pressure taken as part of a routine doctor's appointment. Ask your doctor for a blood pressure reading at least every two years starting at age 18. If you're age 40 or older, or you're age 18-39 with a high risk of high blood pressure, ask your doctor for a blood pressure reading every year. Blood pressure generally should be checked in both arms to determine if there is a difference. It's import Continue reading >>

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