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Is Diabetes A Metabolic Disorder

Metabolic Disorders

Metabolic Disorders

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. There are different groups of disorders. Some affect the breakdown of amino acids, carbohydrates, or lipids. Another group, mitochondrial diseases, affects the parts of the cells that produce the energy. You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus (dm)

Diabetes Mellitus (dm)

Years of poorly controlled hyperglycemia lead to multiple, primarily vascular complications that affect small vessels (microvascular), large vessels (macrovascular), or both. (For additional detail, see Complications of Diabetes Mellitus.) Microvascular disease underlies 3 common and devastating manifestations of diabetes mellitus: Microvascular disease may also impair skin healing, so that even minor breaks in skin integrity can develop into deeper ulcers and easily become infected, particularly in the lower extremities. Intensive control of plasma glucose can prevent or delay many of these complications but may not reverse them once established. Macrovascular disease involves atherosclerosis of large vessels, which can lead to Immune dysfunction is another major complication and develops from the direct effects of hyperglycemia on cellular immunity. Patients with diabetes mellitus are particularly susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections. Continue reading >>

Profile Of Metabolic Abnormalities Seen In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Their First Degree Relatives With Metabolic Syndrome Seen In Benin City, Edo State Nigeria

Profile Of Metabolic Abnormalities Seen In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Their First Degree Relatives With Metabolic Syndrome Seen In Benin City, Edo State Nigeria

Abstract To determine the profile of metabolic abnormalities in T2DM persons with metabolic syndrome and their non-diabetic first-degree relatives who also had metabolic syndrome in Benin City. This was a cross sectional case controlled study in which convenience sampling technique was used to recruit 106 persons with T2DM, 96 people who are first degree relatives of type 2 diabetic persons and 96 controls using a interviewer administered questionnaire technique. The following were assessed: anthropometric indices, blood pressure, serum lipid profile, fasting blood sugar, proteinuria, and microalbuminuria. The data obtained were analyzed using the statistical software-Statistical package for social sciences [SPSS] version 16. A p-value of less than 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. The mean age (SD) of the study groups were: persons living with T2DM: 58.6 ± 11.2 years, control: 57.69 ± 60.8 years and FDR: 57.4 ± 10.6 years. No significant age and sex differences were observed in these groups. There were more females (59.7%) than males (40.3%) with T2DM. The prevalence of MS was 13.5%, 16.7%, and 87.1% in the control, FDR and T2DM patients respectively. For the T2DM group of subjects, impaired fasting glycaemia was the commonest metabolic abnormality followed by microalbuminuria, low HDL cholesterol, high LDL cholesterol, hypercholesterolaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia in decreasing frequency. For the FDR group, low HDL cholesterol was the commonest metabolic abnormality followed by hypertriglyceridaemia, impaired fasting glucose, high LDL cholesterol, hypertriglyceridaemia and microalbuminuria in decreasing frequency. Hypercholesterolemia and low HDL cholesterol were the commonest metabolic abnormalities in the control group. The prevalence of the MS in pe Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will typically experience polyuria (frequent urination), they will become increasingly thirsty (polydipsia) and hungry (polyphagia). Here are some key points about diabetes. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Diabetes is a long-term condition that causes high blood sugar levels. In 2013 it was estimated that over 382 million people throughout the world had diabetes (Williams textbook of endocrinology). Type 1 Diabetes - the body does not produce insulin. Approximately 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1. Type 2 Diabetes - the body does not produce enough insulin for proper function. Approximately 90% of all cases of diabetes worldwide are of this type. Gestational Diabetes - this type affects females during pregnancy. The most common diabetes symptoms include frequent urination, intense thirst and hunger, weight gain, unusual weight loss, fatigue, cuts and bruises that do not heal, male sexual dysfunction, numbness and tingling in hands and feet. If you have Type 1 and follow a healthy eating plan, do adequate exercise, and take insulin, you can lead a normal life. Type 2 patients need to eat healthily, be physically active, and test their blood glucose. They may also need to take oral medication, and/or insulin to control blood glucose levels. As the risk of cardiovascular disease is much higher for a diabetic, it is crucial that blood pressure and cholesterol levels are monitored regularly. As smoking might have a serious effect on c Continue reading >>

International Journal Of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders

International Journal Of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders

International Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders is a peer-reviewed, open access journal that publishes research articles, review articles, as well as clinical studies in all aspects of diabetes research. In addition to general articles on clinical aspects of diabetes mellitus, International Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders also presents articles on basic research in all areas of diabetes and its related syndromes. This is extremely encouraging for the authors and readers to share important scientific information comprehensively on the relevant topics in the form of original articles, review articles, case reports, short communication, etc. International Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders publishes articles on all aspects of diabetes including Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) or juvenile diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus), Gestational Diabetes, Endocrinology, Diabetes Therapy, Diabetic Drugs, Genetics of Diabetes, obesity with relation to diabetes, risk factors, associated metabolic disorders etc. Submit manuscript at or send as an e-mail attachment to the Editorial Office at [email protected] Continue reading >>

What Percentage Of The Us Population Has Proven And/or Suspected Metabolic Disorders?

What Percentage Of The Us Population Has Proven And/or Suspected Metabolic Disorders?

The answer really depends on your definition of a metabolic disorder: The World Health Organization recognizes it differently from the International Diabetes Federation, is different from The American Heart Association. No one really seems to agree on what it is. Definition of Metabolic Syndrome: Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/American Heart Association Conference on Scientific Issues Related to Definition The fact that there is no formal definition for what a metabolic disorder actually is, means that it's really hard to get any kind of formal statistics on it. The stats change depending on what definition you use. Plus as much as we'd like to believe we understand it in great detail, we're really only at the tip of the iceberg. Honestly, the term is a bit of a garbage term until it's defined. Garbage term meaning that people love to throw it around loosely like it means something serious, but it doesn't really mean anything and can be used to reference a ton of vague circumstances depending on who you talk to. On one hand you can say that anyone with diabetes has a metabolic disorder. That's 10% of the US population, and about 25% of the population over 65 according to the American Diabetes Association. Considerably more if you also include how many people are 'pre-diabetic.' On the other hand, obesity often gets thrown into this realm as well, which we know seems to affect about 50% of the US population, give or take. Anyone with Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) could also be considered a metabolic disorder. So all the people with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD), Hypertension (high blood pressure), High Cholesterol (or unbalance cholesterol), etc...etc... This is about another 10-12% of the US population. Anyone with a messed up hormonal or blood Continue reading >>

Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome, sometimes known by other names, is a clustering of at least three of the five following medical conditions (giving a total of 16 possible combinations giving the syndrome): abdominal (central) obesity (cf. TOFI) high blood pressure high blood sugar high serum triglycerides low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels Metabolic syndrome is associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.[1][2] In the USA, about a quarter of the adult population have metabolic syndrome, and the prevalence increases with age, with racial and ethnic minorities being particularly affected.[3][4] Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and prediabetes are closely related to one another and have overlapping aspects. The syndrome is thought to be caused by an underlying disorder of energy utilization and storage. The cause of the syndrome is an area of ongoing medical research. Signs and symptoms[edit] The main sign of metabolic syndrome is central obesity (also known as visceral, male-pattern or apple-shaped adiposity), overweight with adipose tissue accumulation particularly around the waist and trunk.[5] Other signs of metabolic syndrome include high blood pressure, decreased fasting serum HDL cholesterol, elevated fasting serum triglyceride level (VLDL triglyceride), impaired fasting glucose, insulin resistance, or prediabetes. Associated conditions include hyperuricemia, fatty liver (especially in concurrent obesity) progressing to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovarian syndrome (in women), erectile dysfunction (in men), and acanthosis nigricans. Cause[edit] The exact mechanisms of the complex pathways of metabolic syndrome are under investigation. The pathophysiology is very complex and has been only partially elucidated. Mo Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: From A Metabolic Disorder To An Inflammatory Condition

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: From A Metabolic Disorder To An Inflammatory Condition

Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus, a life style disease affecting 8.3% of the adult population of the world and increasing at an alarming rate, is one of the most common non-communicable diseases of current era[1]. The burden of this disease is immense owing to transition in lifestyle and dietary habits, ageing of the population and urbanization in the setting of a genetically predisposed environment[2]. The fact that the number of subjects with diabetes mellitus has doubled over the past three decades has made this disease a global challenge[3]. The number of diabetes mellitus patients is projected to increase from 382 million in 2013 to 592 million by 2035, denoting a net increase of 55%[1]. The predominant form is type 2 diabetes (T2D) which accounts for nearly 90% of all diabetes cases. Diabetes mellitus-not so sweet T2D is a metabolic disorder characterized by insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction as a consequence of unsettled hyperglycemia[4,5]. In response to nutrient spill over in the setting of insulin resistance and eventual β-cell dysfunction, the general fuel homoeostasis of body is altered[2]. Insulin resistance in target tissues and a relative deficiency of insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells are the major features of T2D. β-cell hyperplasia and hyperinsulinaemia in response to insulin resistance occur in the preclinical period of disease. Relative insulin deficiency as a consequence of failure of β-cells to compensate for insulin resistance, progresses into overt T2D[6]. Metabolic alterations associated with T2D are well characterised by epidemiological and research based studies. The pathogenesis and progression of T2D is ascribed to four mechanisms; increased advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation, increased polyol Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Communicable By Blood?

Is Diabetes Communicable By Blood?

Toll of diabetes affected has been increasing at an exponential rate. Diabetes is spread by deregulated processes within the body, and is not contagious in any case. Individuals in Type 1 diabetic condition are unable to produce any insulin in their bodies, whereas Type 2 diabetes patients have resistance for its utilization within the body. Untreated insulin resistance leads to diabetes. The likelihood of getting diabetes becomes more when some of the organs respond slowly or stop responding due to damaged blood vessels. This leads to hardening of the arteries, which increases chances of a heart attack and stroke besides restricting streamlined circulation of blood within brain as well as heart. Pregnant women with high blood sugar levels during pregnancy are at the risk of gestational diabetes. Hormonal imbalance in placenta is believed to be the cause of gestational diabetes, wherein mother is unable to use insulin when it is most required. The glucose keeps on building up in the blood, which causes high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Diabetes Spread: Diabetes is not a contagious disease. Unhealthy lifestyle encompassing irregular diet, fatty foods, obesity, sedentary living, family history and lack of physical activities spreads diabetes. Toll of diabetes affected has been increasing at an exponential rate. Diabetes is spread by deregulated processes within the body, and is not contagious in any case. Individuals in Type 1 diabetic condition are unable to produce any insulin in their bodies, whereas Type 2 diabetes patients have resistance for its utilization within the body. Untreated insulin resistance leads to diabetes. The likelihood of getting diabetes becomes more when some of the organs respond slowly or stop responding due to damaged blood ve Continue reading >>

Journal Of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders

Journal Of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders

Aims and scope Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders is an open access, peer reviewed journal which publishes original clinical and translational articles and reviews in the field of endocrinology and provides a forum of debate of the highest quality on these issues. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, diabetes, lipid disorders, metabolic disorders, osteoporosis, interdisciplinary practices in endocrinology, cardiovascular and metabolic risk, aging research, obesity, traditional medicine, pychosomatic research, behavioral medicine, ethics and evidence-based practices. Open access All articles published by Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders are made freely and permanently accessible online immediately upon publication, without subscription charges or registration barriers. Further information about open access can be found here. As authors of articles published in Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders you are the copyright holders of your article and have granted to any third party, in advance and in perpetuity, the right to use, reproduce or disseminate your article, according to the BioMed Central license agreement. For those of you who are US government employees or are prevented from being copyright holders for similar reasons, BioMed Central can accommodate non-standard copyright lines. Please contact us if further information is needed. Article-processing charges Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders is supported by Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The article-processing charge (APC) that is payable upon editorial acceptance of an article is €850. If the corresponding author's institution participates in our open access membership program, some or all of the publication cost may be covered (more details available on the me Continue reading >>

Why Is Diabetes Mellitus Referred To As Metabolic Disorder?

Why Is Diabetes Mellitus Referred To As Metabolic Disorder?

Diabetes Mellitus means the complications caused by deficiency of a hormone(chemicals that helps to maintain balance in our body systems) named “insulin” which is produced by pancreas. Insulin decreases glucose level in our blood, by storing excess of glucose in liver and muscles as well as helping muscles and other tissues to utilize more glucose. Talking about “glucose”, glucose is the main energy for all the cells and tissues. All the metabolism that happens in our body needs energy, and glucose provides those energy by a series of a reaction. So in diabetes either “insulin” production is decreased due to several reasons or the cells of our body stops responding to insulin. In either case, the glucose utilization by cells are hampered and many metabolic activity cannot take place. So it is called a metabolic disorder. :) Continue reading >>

How Effective Is Penicillin For Treating Diabetes?

How Effective Is Penicillin For Treating Diabetes?

Penicillin is an antibiotic and is meant to cure a bacterial infection. It has nothing to do with treating diabetes. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder and is NOT an acute disease that can be treated with a single medication. It is a dietary disorder that can be effectively reversed with a healthy, holistic diet and an active lifestyle, along with stress management techniques. Continue reading >>

Journal Of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders

Journal Of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders

Open access: freely and permanently available for everyone to read and reuse High visibility for you work: An average of over 45,000 article accesses per month Article-processing charges are supported in part by Tehran University of Medical Sciences Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders is an open-access, peer reviewed journal which publishes original clinical and translational articles and reviews in the field of diabetes and endocrinology, and provides a forum of debate of the highest quality on these issues. Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders is the official journal of the Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute, published on behalf of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. PubMedCentral, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, Academic OneFile, EBSCO Academic Search, EBSCO Discovery Service, EBSCO TOC Premier, Emerging Sources Citation Index, Health Reference Center Academic, OCLC, SCImago, Summon by ProQuest Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Metabolic Disorders

Diabetes Mellitus And Metabolic Disorders

Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders of carbohydrate metabolism characterized by high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) and usually resulting from insufficient production of the hormone insulin (type 1 diabetes) or an ineffective response of cells to insulin (type 2 diabetes). Secreted by the pancreas, insulin is required to transport blood glucose (sugar) into cells. Diabetes is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, as well as a leading cause of adult blindness. Other long-term complications include kidney failure, nerve damage, and lower limb amputation due to impaired circulation. Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes) can occur at any age but often begins in late childhood with the pancreas failing to secrete adequate amounts of insulin. Type 1 diabetes has a strong genetic link, but most cases are the result of an autoimmune disorder, possibly set off by a viral infection, foreign protein, or environmental toxin. Although elevated blood sugar is an important feature of diabetes, sugar or carbohydrate in the diet is not the cause of the disease. Type 1 diabetes is managed by injections of insulin, along with small, regularly spaced meals and snacks that spread glucose intake throughout the day and minimize fluctuations in blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes (formerly known as adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes) is the more common type of diabetes, constituting 90 to 95 percent of cases. With this condition, insulin resistance renders cells unable to admit glucose, which then accumulates in the blood. Although type 2 diabetes generally starts in middle age, it is increasingly reported in childhood, especially in obese children. Genetic susceptibility to this form of diabetes may not be e Continue reading >>

Metabolic Disorders

Metabolic Disorders

A metabolic [met-uh-BOL-ik] disorder is when something is wrong with the body's metabolism — the ability to turn food into energy and get rid of waste. The body has many different chemicals and processes that make metabolism work. There are many types of metabolic disorders because something can go wrong with any of these parts of the process. Sometimes the body doesn’t have the right enzyme to break down certain types of foods. For others, a process that turns food into energy may not be working properly, or the body may not be getting enough of a nutrient needed for metabolism. Or, one of the organs involved in metabolism could be diseased or damaged. Metabolism describes the body’s ability to convert food and drink into energy. It’s a complex process that uses many different chemicals, hormones, cells, and organs to work properly. A metabolic (met-uh-BOL-ik) disorder is when something disrupts this process. There are several different types of metabolic disorders. A disorder can be caused when: The body doesn’t have the right enzyme to break down certain types of foods, like fats, proteins, or carbohydrates. An enzyme is a substance that helps a chemical process happen — like breaking food down into something the body can use. A process that helps turns food into energy isn’t working properly. For example, sometimes the mitochondria of the cells can’t use sugars to make energy like they’re supposed to. The cells don’t get the energy they need and the sugars and oxygen build up and stay in the body. One of the organs involved in metabolism is diseased or damaged. It could be the pancreas, liver, endocrine glands (organs that release hormones), or another organ involved in metabolism. The body isn’t getting enough of a nutrient or mineral it needs Continue reading >>

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