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Is Diabetes A Leading Cause Of Death?

Diabetes: An Introduction To The 7th Leading Cause Of Death In The United States

Diabetes: An Introduction To The 7th Leading Cause Of Death In The United States

From 1980 to 2012 the number of persons diagnosed with diabetes has more than tripled from 5.6 million to 21.9 million and increasing rapidly every year. As a result of our American Diet and sedentary lifestyle, diabetes has become the 7th leading cause of death in the United States of America. Diabetes is a disease that impacts the regulation of glucose and insulin levels in the body. Glucose is a simple sugar that provides the body with its primary source of energy that comes from carbohydrate foods. Normal fasting blood glucose or sugar levels are typically 100 milligrams (mg) per deciliter (dl). Once food is ingested, it is broken down and absorbed into the bloodstream and within 1 to 2 hours after eating, normal blood glucose levels are typically less than 140 mg/dl. An individual with diabetes is inefficiently managing the use of glucose and insulin in the body; therefore fasting blood glucose levels are typically higher than 126 mg/dl and higher than 200mg/dl on a random check. Another blood test that is used in diagnosing diabetes is the Hemoglobin A1C levels. This is a blood test that estimates an individual’s average blood sugar levels from the past 2-3 months. According to the American Diabetes Association, a normal reading for a nondiabetic is below 5.7. Levels of 5.7 to 6.4 are considered to be prediabetic and above 6.5 are type 2 diabetics. Diabetes Can Be Prevented Diabetes takes a gradual approach to developing and can be prevented. This is the most common disorder of the endocrine system. About 79 million people over the age of 20 in the U.S. are diagnosed as prediabetics. Prediabetes is also known as impaired glucose tolerance and typically individuals with this disorder are asymptomatic. Once an individual develops diabetes, symptoms that may occur Continue reading >>

Diabetes 9th Leading Cause Of Death In Women

Diabetes 9th Leading Cause Of Death In Women

KARACHI - The Diabetic Association of Pakistan and WHO Collaborating Centre Karachi observed World Diabetes Day at a local hotel on Sunday. World Diabetes Day is celebrated every year on November 14, at global level. The scientific session in the morning was meant for the doctors. The session started with the welcome address by Professor A Samad Shera, Secretary General Diabetic Association of Pakistan, Honorary President International Diabetes Federation, Founder President Diabetes in Asia Study Group and Director WHO Collaborating Centre for Diabetes . He introduced the theme of the World Diabetes Day “Women and Diabetes”. He said diabetes is a chronic, debilitating and costly disease. World Diabetes Day provides the opportunity to improve care for the many millions living with diabetes and to encourage governments to do more to prevent diabetes in the many more at risk. He further said currently there are 415 million people living with diabetes worldwide. By 2040, the number will rise to 642 million. There are currently over 199 million women living with diabetes . This total is projected to increase 313 million by 2040. Diabetes is the 9th leading cause of death in women globally, causing 2.1 million deaths per year. Pakistan has also seen a sharp rise in the diabetes prevalence. These facts and figures reiterate the importance of urgent action. He further said Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented; a healthy lifestyle is an important part of effective management of the disease. 70 per cent of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented by healthy eating and regular physical activity (30 minutes brisk walk daily before meal). Discussing Insulin Therapy he said Type 1 diabetes is rare in Pakistan and it is diagnosed early. The only treatment is Insulin injection which should Continue reading >>

Why Is Diabetes So Low On The List Of Leading Causes Of Death?

Why Is Diabetes So Low On The List Of Leading Causes Of Death?

Diabetes — one of America’s most common ailments — is listed seventh among the leading causes of death behind heart disease, cancer, lower chronic respiratory disease, accidents, strokes and Alzheimer’s disease. The longstanding question has been, why so low on the list? More than 29 million people, or nearly 1 in every 10 Americans, have diabetes with numbers not only climbing but soaring. More than a quarter of people 65 and older already have diabetes with 86 million Americans 20 and older having pre-diabetes, a precursor to the full-fledged condition, the American Diabetes Association reports. And if this trend continues, 1 of every 3 Americans could have diabetes by 2050, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. But a study published Jan. 25, in PLOS One stands to characterize diabetes’ impact on death statistics more accurately and the news isn’t encouraging: it’s actually the third leading cause of death in the United States. Completed by the Boston University School of Public Health and the University of Pennsylvania, the study used two large health databases to show that diabetes has been hiding in the statistical weeds when it comes to its impact on mortality. The condition characterized by high blood sugar levels often isn’t the immediate cause of death but clearly is a contributing factor in many more deaths than previously thought — in fact, up to three times as many deaths. Directly listed as a cause of death in fewer than 4 percent of deaths, diabetes actually was an attributable cause of death for 11.5 percent of Americans, the study says. That would make it the third leading cause of death, behind heart disease and cancer, based on 2010 mortality data used in the study. The same would hold for 2014. The problem is, dia Continue reading >>

The Disease That May Be A Leading Cause Of Death

The Disease That May Be A Leading Cause Of Death

Survey estimates that diabetes accounts for many more deaths in the United States than are being reported on death certificates — and that diabetes is actually the third leading cause of death. So when a patient dies from a heart attack, stroke or heart disease that is caused by diabetes or when a patient dies from kidney failure, or if a patient dies 6 months after an amputation, the death certificate does not say that the death was caused by diabetes. About 12% of deaths in 30- to 84-year-olds from 1997 to 2011 could be attributed to diabetes, the latest data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate. But during that time, only 3.3% of death certificates listed diabetes as the underlying cause of death. The prevalence of diabetes has been rising rapidly throughout the world. Global age-standardized diabetes prevalence increased from an estimated 4.3% in 1980 to 9.0% in 2014 in men, and from 5.0% to 7.9% in women. The United States is no exception to this trend. Using combined criteria of self-reported diagnosis, fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c, the prevalence of diabetes among adults aged 20+ rose from 8.4% in 1988–94 to 12.1% in 2005–10. Trends are similar when HbA1c is the sole criterion. Diabetes is associated with many diseases and disabilities, including ischemic heart disease, renal disease, visual impairment, peripheral arterial disease, peripheral neuropathy, and cognitive impairment. And it can increase the risk for many other diseases, even cancer. It is also associated with mortality. In 2010, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. It was listed as the underlying cause of death on 69,091 death certificates (2.8% of total deaths) a Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes The Third-leading Cause Of Death?

Is Diabetes The Third-leading Cause Of Death?

The Centers for Disease Control lists diabetes as the seventh-leading cause of death in the U.S. at 76,488 people per year. However, a new study done by researchers at Boston University School of Public Health found that almost four times as many Americans die of diabetes than as reported on death certificates. Without clear guidelines for which conditions to cite as the cause of death and with the U.S.’s fragmented health care system, it can be hard for current treating physicians to know all of the relevant information about a patient to make that decision. “We argue diabetes is responsible for 12 percent of deaths in the U.S., rather than 3.3 percent that death certificates indicate,” Andrew Stokes, assistant professor of global health at the Boston University School of Public Health and lead study author, said in an interview. What is diabetes? In type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, making the body unable to produce enough insulin to process sugar. There is no clear cause for type 1 diabetes, and those with it are usually diagnosed before 40—most commonly in children. Type 2 diabetes, caused by genetics and lifestyle factors, occurs when the body can’t use the insulin it produces. Type 2 is by far the most common, affecting 95 percent of those with the disease. Prediabetes, while less serious, is also dangerous. In people with prediabetes, their blood sugar is higher than normal, and without any lifestyle changes, they are likely to develop diabetes. Though these conditions collectively affect 1 in 3 people, most don’t know they have it. In fact, 25 percent of people with diabetes go undiagnosed, and that number jumps to 90 percent for prediabetes. Prevention is the best cure There is no cure for diabetes, Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes

What Is Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, or when the body cannot make good use of the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, that acts like a key to let glucose from the food we eat pass from the blood stream into the cells in the body to produce energy. All carbohydrate foods are broken down into glucose in the blood. Insulin helps glucose get into the cells. Not being able to produce insulin or use it effectively leads to raised glucose levels in the blood (known as hyperglycaemia). Over the long-term high glucose levels are associated with damage to the body and failure of various organs and tissues. Continue reading >>

Top 10 Causes Of Death In Men

Top 10 Causes Of Death In Men

Men have shorter life expectancies than women. While we will all die eventually, there are things we can do to live longer and healthier lives, which improves the overall quality of our lives and our families lives. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2003 just over one million American men died of heart disease or one of the nine other leading causes of death. That represents 80 percent of all deaths by men that year. Men are more likely than women to die from most of these causes. Luckily, because many of these causes can be prevented, men can take steps to avoid them by knowing the symptoms, by having regular checkups by a doctor or health care provider and by taking steps to live a healthier life. Heart Disease Cancer Unintentional Injuries Stroke Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (LungDiseases) Diabetes Influenza and Pneumonia Suicide Kidney Disease Alzheimer’s Disease Heart disease is a term that includes many specific heart conditions. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), coronary artery disease (CAD), which can lead to heart attacks, is the most common heart disease in the United States. Other heart conditions include chest pain known as angina, heart failure and irregular heart beats known as arrhythmias. About Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) CAD develops when arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle become hardened and narrowed from plaque buildup. Because buildup reduces blood flow, and therefore oxygen, to the heart it can lead to a heart attack. Statistics Because men usually develop heart disease 10 to 15 years earlier than women, men are more likely to die of it in the prime of life. (American Heart Association) Heart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and w Continue reading >>

Diabetes Could Cause Up To 12% Of Us Deaths

Diabetes Could Cause Up To 12% Of Us Deaths

The proportion of deaths attributable to diabetes in the US is as high as 12 percent—three times higher than estimates based on death certificates suggest—a new analysis shows. For a new study, published in PLOS ONE, researchers used two large datasets that included more than 300,000 people to estimate the fraction of deaths attributable to diabetes among people ages 30 to 84 between 1997 and 2011. To come up with the estimates, researchers calculated the prevalence of diabetes in the population, as well as excess mortality risk among people with diabetes over five years of follow up. The proportion of deaths attributable to diabetes was estimated to be 11.5 percent using one dataset—the National Health Interview Study (NHIS)—and 11.7 percent using the other—the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Among the subgroups examined, the attributable fraction was highest among individuals with obesity (19.4 percent). The proportion of deaths overall was significantly higher than the 3.3 to 3.7 percent of deaths in which diabetes is identified on death certificates as the underlying cause. “The frequency with which diabetes is listed as the underlying cause of death is not a reliable indicator of its actual contribution to the national mortality profile,” writes Andrew Stokes, assistant professor of global health at Boston University School of Public Health, and Samuel Preston, professor of sociology and a researcher with the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania. They say their analysis indicates that diabetes was the third leading cause of death in the US in 2010, after diseases of the heart and malignant neoplasms. Diabetes is associated with a number of diseases and disabilities, including ischemic heart disease, re Continue reading >>

Leading Causes Of Death In The U.s. | Apr 19, 2017

Leading Causes Of Death In The U.s. | Apr 19, 2017

A 2015 study compiled by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Center for Health Statistics found that there were around 2.6 million deaths registered in 2014. In their research, these organizations examined the leading causes for fatalities and found the top 10. Let’s take a closer look: Heart disease Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of both men and women in the U.S., leading to the deaths of around 615,000 people in 2014 alone. According to The Heart Foundation, someone has a heart attack every 34 seconds in this country. It’s important to note that heart disease affects men and women differently, especially in terms of symptoms, causes and outcomes. This is an ongoing topic of research and discussion among medical professionals and public health officials alike, but there are major distinctions to take into consideration. For example, men’s heart troubles tend to stem from plaque build-up in the major coronary arteries, while women experience problems with smaller blood vessels that cease to constrict and dilate properly, according to Cedars Sinai. A history of irregular menstrual cycles, estrogen deficiencies and polycystic ovary syndrome are also specific causes of heart disease in female patients. Cancer While heart disease is a concentrated illness, cancer’s ability to grow and spread lands it as the second highest cause of death in the U.S. Around 1.7 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed in 2017 with the most common types projected to be breast, lung and prostate cancers, according to the American Cancer Society. Researchers continue to look into cures for this disease and the federal government is taking an assistive role as well. The 21st Continue reading >>

Proportion Of Deaths For The 10 Leading Causes Of Death Is Declining

Proportion Of Deaths For The 10 Leading Causes Of Death Is Declining

Start of text box End of text box The relative burden of the 10 leading causes of death has been declining since 2000, while the proportion of deaths attributable to all other causes has increased. In 2013, the 10 leading causes of death were responsible for 188,804 deaths, representing 75% of all deaths in Canada, compared to 80% in 2000 (Table 1). The ranking of the 10 leading causes of death was fairly consistent from 2000 to 2013, with the exception of 2010 and 2012, where accidents (unintentional injuries) moved into fourth position, ahead of chronic lower respiratory disease, and 2013, where influenza and pneumonia moved into seventh position, ahead of Alzheimer’s disease. Table 1 Ranking, number and percentage of death for the 10 leading causes of death, Canada, 2000, 2012 and 2013 Table summary This table displays the results of Ranking. The information is grouped by Cause of death (appearing as row headers), 2013, 2012 and 2000, calculated using rank, number and % units of measure (appearing as column headers). Cause of death 2013 2012 2000 rank number % rank number % rank number % All causes of death Note ...: not applicable 252,338 100.0 Note ...: not applicable 246,596 100.0 Note ...: not applicable 218,062 100.0 Total, 10 leading causes of death Note ...: not applicable 188,804 74.8 Note ...: not applicable 184,869 75.0 Note ...: not applicable 175,149 80.3 Malignant neoplasms (cancer) 1 75,112 29.8 1 74,361 30.2 1 62,672 28.7 Diseases of heart (heart disease) 2 49,891 19.8 2 48,681 19.7 2 55,070 25.3 Cerebrovascular diseases (stroke) 3 13,400 5.3 3 13,174 5.3 3 15,576 7.1 Chronic lower respiratory diseases 4 11,976 4.7 5 11,130 4.5 4 9,813 4.5 Accidents (unintentional injuries) 5 11,452 4.5 4 11,290 4.6 5 8,589 3.9 Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) 6 7,045 2. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Third-leading Cause Of Death In The Us, Researchers Warn

Diabetes Is Third-leading Cause Of Death In The Us, Researchers Warn

CGM use drives better type 1 diabetes treatment in people on multiple daily injections Diabetes leads to more deaths in the US than was previously believed, according to new research. Scientists have suggested that diabetes is the third-leading cause of death in the US and accounts for 12 per cent of mortalities. Previous research reported that diabetes accounted for just four per cent of deaths in the US. While the findings are indeed concerning, there is no reason why people with diabetes can't go on to live long, healthy lives by keeping good control of their blood sugar levels, eating healthily and getting regular exercise. The research was based upon health records of people on the National Health Interview Survey and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The team looked at health trends and mortality rates in the population. They found that complications from diabetes can mask a single reason for a fatality, resulting in diabetes not being listed as the underlying cause of death as frequently as it should be. Diabetes is currently listed as the seventh most common reason for death by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), but the researchers are calling for changes to be made at a national level to counteract the growing effect diabetes is having in the US. "In the case of diabetes, the burden is potentially obscured because of underreporting," said co-lead author Samuel Preston, a professor of sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. "Our work aims to reveal that diabetes is a much more important cause than is appreciated." The researchers added that their findings "reinforce the need for robust population-level interventions aimed at diabetes prevention and care." The findings appear online in the PLOS ONE journal. Tweet Type Continue reading >>

Tb, Diabetes Leading Causes Of Natural Deaths In 2015 - Stats Sa

Tb, Diabetes Leading Causes Of Natural Deaths In 2015 - Stats Sa

Johannesburg - The leading underlying natural causes of death among South Africans in 2015 were tuberculosis and diabetes, Statistics South Africa said on Tuesday. Tuberculosis was responsible for 8.3% of deaths among males, while among women diabetes was the leading underlying natural cause of death responsible for 7.1% of their deaths, StatsSA said in a statement. The institution analysed 10 leading underlying natural causes of death, and results showed that six of the top ten causes were non-communicable diseases, while the other four were communicable diseases. Tuberculosis was the leading underlying natural cause of death in 2015, accounting for 7.2% of deaths. It was followed by diabetes which accounted for 5.4% of the deaths. "Although tuberculosis has maintained its position as the number one leading underlying natural cause of death, the proportions over time have been declining, whilst proportions for diabetes mellitus, hypertensive diseases, other viral diseases and chronic lower respiratory diseases have been increasing," it said. 460 236 deaths in 2015 Notably, influenza and pneumonia moved from second place in 2013 to sixth in 2015, while diabetes climbed from fifth position in 2013 to second position in 2015, it said. The rise in non-communicable diseases was notable in males and females aged 65 and above. According to data collected, non-communicable diseases accounted for 62.5% of the top 10 leading causes of death among females aged 65 and above, whereas among males in the same age group the diseases constituted 48.0%. There were 460 236 deaths in 2015, with the highest number of deaths recorded among those aged 60–64 years at 7.8%. The lowest number of deaths was among those aged 5–9 and 10–14 years. There were also more male deaths than female Continue reading >>

Under Nafta, Diabetes Became Leading Cause Of Death In Mexico

Under Nafta, Diabetes Became Leading Cause Of Death In Mexico

WHO claim diabetes rates in Mexico began surging just over two decades ago, around the time NAFTA came into force. Diabetes has become the leading cause of death in Mexico, according to a new study released by the World Health Organization, WHO. The United Nations agency claims diabetes rates in the Latin American country began surging just over two decades ago, around the time the North American Free Trade Agreement, NAFTA, came into force. An estimated 80,000 people die each year in Mexico from diabetes, WHO also reports, adding that nearly 14 percent of adults there suffer from the disease. “Diabetes is one of the biggest problems in the health system in Mexico,” Dr. Carlos Aguilar Salinas told NPR during a recent interview. “It’s the first cause of death. It's the first cause of disability. It's the main cost for the health system.” Why has diabetes become such an issue in Mexico after NAFTA? The answer is simple: cheap imported junk food. play-rounded-fill play-rounded-outline play-sharp-fill play-sharp-outline pause-sharp-outline pause-sharp-fill pause-rounded-outline pause-rounded-fill 00:00 ShareEmbed pause-sharp-outline pause-sharp-fill pause-rounded-outline pause-rounded-fill 0:00 0:00 Since its 1994 inception, NAFTA has allowed U.S. and Canadian restaurants and processed food manufacturers to sell products at rates much lower than their Mexican counterparts. This creates a situation where fastfood chains like McDonald's and processed food brands like Nabisco are able to dominate the country’s market, given that their products are more financially accessible. And in a country with rising poverty, inequality and food insecurity, cheap imported junk food is often the only nutritional option. In 2015, WHO reported that Mexico is the leading consumer o Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Be A Major, Overlooked Reason Americans Are Now Dying Earlier

Diabetes May Be A Major, Overlooked Reason Americans Are Now Dying Earlier

ballyscanlon/getty In 2015, a blockbuster study came to a shocking conclusion: Middle-age white Americans are dying at younger ages for the first time in decades, despite our advances in medical technology and the positive trends in other wealthy countries. The research, by Princeton’s Anne Case and Angus Deaton, highlighted the links between economic struggles, suicides, and alcohol and drug overdoses. Since then, researchers have been scrambling to fully explain the trend, which now seems to be affecting the entire population. The efforts have suggested it’s not just “deaths of despair”— from opioids, alcohol, and suicides — that account for the dip in life expectancy, but that violence and cardiovascular disease seem to be major contributors, too. Now, a new study provides another clue about what’s behind the backward sliding of American mortality: the hidden toll of diabetes. Diabetes’ prevalence has exploded in the US over the past 20 years. Nearly 30 million Americans live with the disease today — more than three times the number in the early 1990s. And researchers have long known that diabetes is an underreported cause of death on death certificates, the primary data source for determining life expectancy trends. That’s because people with diabetes often have multiple health conditions, or “comorbidities,” such as cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, and even cancer. When both diabetes and heart disease are listed on a death certificate, the decision to list diabetes as the primary cause of death is “highly variable,” said Andrew Stokes, assistant professor of global health at Boston University’s School of Public Health. “Often times, the [death certificate] certifier will code the death as being Continue reading >>

Deaths Attributable To Diabetes In The United States: Comparison Of Data Sources And Estimation Approaches

Deaths Attributable To Diabetes In The United States: Comparison Of Data Sources And Estimation Approaches

Abstract The goal of this research was to identify the fraction of deaths attributable to diabetes in the United States. We estimated population attributable fractions (PAF) for cohorts aged 30–84 who were surveyed in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) between 1997 and 2009 (N = 282,322) and in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between 1999 and 2010 (N = 21,814). Cohort members were followed prospectively for mortality through 2011. We identified diabetes status using self-reported diagnoses in both NHIS and NHANES and using HbA1c in NHANES. Hazard ratios associated with diabetes were estimated using Cox model adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, and smoking status. We found a high degree of consistency between data sets and definitions of diabetes in the hazard ratios, estimates of diabetes prevalence, and estimates of the proportion of deaths attributable to diabetes. The proportion of deaths attributable to diabetes was estimated to be 11.5% using self-reports in NHIS, 11.7% using self-reports in NHANES, and 11.8% using HbA1c in NHANES. Among the sub-groups that we examined, the PAF was highest among obese persons at 19.4%. The proportion of deaths in which diabetes was assigned as the underlying cause of death (3.3–3.7%) severely understated the contribution of diabetes to mortality in the United States. Diabetes may represent a more prominent factor in American mortality than is commonly appreciated, reinforcing the need for robust population-level interventions aimed at diabetes prevention and care. Figures Citation: Stokes A, Preston SH (2017) Deaths Attributable to Diabetes in the United States: Comparison of Data Sources and Estimation Approaches. PLoS ONE 12(1): e0170219. Editor: C. Mary School Continue reading >>

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