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Is Diabetes A Critical Illness?

Type 2 Diabetes Life Insurance Related News

Type 2 Diabetes Life Insurance Related News

We're the experts so let us do the hard work Making life insurance and travel insurance People with Type 2 Diabetes wanting Life Insurance, Critical Illness Cover or Income Protection will usually find significant differences in underwriting from one insurance provider to another. Type 2 Diabetes life insurance is dependent on a number of health and medical factors to determine your level of risk. Our Type 2 Diabetes life insurance page looks at how your application will be assessed and what it means to the premiums you might pay. If you have been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes and are looking for life insurance, your application will be assessed based on a number of factors, such as: The Insurance Surgery is a leading life insurance expert for Type 2 Diabetes and other pre-existing medical conditions. Our highly skilled team of expert advisors will help to guide you to the best insurance providers to suit your medical circumstances to protect your loved family or your business. Can I get Life Insurance for Type 2 Diabetes? In most cases is it very possible to get covered for life insurance if you have been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. Some of the main reasons why you may find it difficult to get life insurance with Type 2 Diabetes are: Poor control (High Hba1c, Blood pressure or Cholesterol) Diabetes related issues (e.g. Retinopathy, Neuropathy or Nephropathy) Type 2 Diabetes life insurance underwriting is constantly evolving and has become much more lenient with lower premiums in recent years. Will I pay more for Type 2 Diabetes Life Insurance? Generally there will be a loading applied to your life insurance premiums for Type 2 Diabetes because of the additional lifestyle and health risks. Life insurance premium loadings for life insurance will range from +50% (x1 Continue reading >>

Critical Illness-induced Dysglycaemia: Diabetes And Beyond

Critical Illness-induced Dysglycaemia: Diabetes And Beyond

Critical illness-induced dysglycaemia: diabetes and beyond 1Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain, University of Warwick, Heart of England NHS Trust, Health Sciences Research Institute, Room A-102, Clinical Trial Unit, Warwick Medical School, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK 2Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 3126 Centennial Building, 1685 Highland Ave, Madison, WI 53705, USA 4Department of Anesthesiology and Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, B6/319 UW CSC, Madison, WI 53792-3272, USA 1Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain, University of Warwick, Heart of England NHS Trust, Health Sciences Research Institute, Room A-102, Clinical Trial Unit, Warwick Medical School, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK 2Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 3126 Centennial Building, 1685 Highland Ave, Madison, WI 53705, USA 3Department of Intensive Care, Erasmus University, Route de Lennik 808-B-1070, Brussels, Belgium 4Department of Anesthesiology and Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, B6/319 UW CSC, Madison, WI 53792-3272, USA This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in many parts of the world. The disease is projected to continue to increase and double within the foreseeable future. Dysglycaemia develops in the form of hyperglycaemia, hypoglycaemia and marked glucose variability in critically ill adults whether they are known to have premorbid diabetes or not. Patients with such glucose dysregulation have increased morbidity and mortality. Whether this is secondary to cause and effect from dysglycaemia or is just related to critical illness remains unde Continue reading >>

Getting Quality Risk Cover For Your Diabetic Client

Getting Quality Risk Cover For Your Diabetic Client

Getting quality risk cover for your diabetic client Hayley Taylor, managing underwriter at specialist long-term risk cover provider Altrisk. Currently, around 382 million people live with diabetes worldwide, a further 316 million with impaired glucose tolerance are at high risk from the disease and by 2035, it is estimated that without concerted action to prevent diabetes, 592 million people will be living with this chronic disease. (International Diabetes Federation 2013 Atlas). South Africa has joined the ranks of nations with a high and rapidly growing prevalence of diabetes. In Africa, 76% of deaths due to diabetes were in people under the age of 60, and in terms of prevalence, South Africa clocks in at number two with 2.6 million diagnosed, after Nigeria which has the highest prevalence in Africa of 3.9 million diagnosed diabetics. It is estimated that another five million South Africans have pre-diabetes, a condition where insulin resistance causes blood glucose levels to be higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be type 2 diabetes. The highest prevalence of diabetes is among the Indian population in South Africa (11-13%) as this group has a strong genetic predisposition for diabetes. This is followed by 8-10% in the coloured community, 5-8% among blacks and 4% among whites. (Source: Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology in Johannesburg.) What does this all mean for your clients financial planning? If you have clients who are diabetic, it is important to discuss how their condition will impact on their cover. Hayley Taylor, managing underwriter at specialist long-term risk cover provider Altrisk, says the financial consequences and economic impact of living with a serious illness such as diabetes are often overlooked. Heart disease, stroke, blindness, amp Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Critical Illness Cover The Bad News And The Good News

Diabetes And Critical Illness Cover The Bad News And The Good News

Diabetes and Critical Illness Cover The Bad News and the Good News We recently had an interesting case concerning diabetes and critical illness cover where we acheived an unusual outcome (more of which below).But its worthlooking firstatthe general current landscape for critical illness cover and diabetes in the UK protection market. Is diabetes a critical illness for insurance purposes? Can you get critical illness cover if you already have diabetes? Diabetes is a progressive and life changing illness that can lead to some potentially very serious outcomes. So doesdiabetes count as a critical illness? Does it appear on the list of critical illnesses generally covered on most insurance company critical illness plans?The answeris mostlyno. One exception to this is late onset type 1diabetes which is included as a critical illness condition by at least one major insurer. Late onsettype 1 is relatively unusual so the chances ofmaking a claim for this are very small. But it can anddoes happen. We know a lady whofell ill on holiday last year and was found to havean Hba1c reading of 27 in her late forties she was diagnosed type 1 immediately and also then had to face her life long phobia of needles. But forthe vast majority of critical illness policy holders, the diagnosis of diabetes Type 1 or Type 2 will not provide them with a valid condition on which directlyto make a claim. But the story doesnt end there. As2.4 million UKdiagnosed diabetics know one of the key issues for them is their increased risk of cardiovascular complications. Indeed this is whymany diabetics are put onto preventative medications for blood pressure and/or cholesterol in order to try and prevent the development of additional cardiovascular risks. So here is some good news. Even though the diagnosis o Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Effect On Life Insurance, Critical Illness & Income Protection

Diabetes - Effect On Life Insurance, Critical Illness & Income Protection

Prices vary depending on the age of the applicant, the sum assured, the level of control in relation to the diabetes as well as any other illnesses or complications. We have carried out some research for a non-smoker, looking for life cover , who has Diabetes but no other complications: A 50 year old looking for 100,000 of cover to end at age 75 would pay 36.02 per month. A 60 year old looking for 100,000 of cover to end at age 75 would pay 70.50 per month. A 70 year old looking for 100,000 of cover to end at age 75 would pay 99.22 per month. A 50 year old looking for 100,000 of cover to end at age 75 would pay 48.06 per month. A 60 year old looking for 100,000 of cover to end at age 75 would pay 94.28 per month. A 70 year old looking for 100,000 of cover to end at age 75 would pay 132.87 per month. Unfortunately insurers do not currently offer critical illness cover for most people with Diabetes. If you are over 55, diagnosed after age 50, a non-smoker and have the condition very well controlled, then you can expect: A 60 year old looking for 30,000 of cover to end at age 70 would pay around 150 per month. Prices vary depending on the age of the applicant, the monthly benefit needed, the level of control in relation to the diabetes as well as any other illnesses or complications. We have carried out some research for a non-smoker looking for cover, who has Diabetes but no other complications: A 50 year old looking for 1,000 a month benefit, after a deferred period of 3 months, would pay 132 per month for a full income protection plan or 41.60 for a less comprehensive policy. With income protection cover, it is vitally important to obtain some advice due to the many variables and different products available. During the application process, the insurer will generally a Continue reading >>

Critical Illness Risk For Type 2 Diabetes.

Critical Illness Risk For Type 2 Diabetes.

Critical illness risk for type 2 diabetes. Cathcart J(1), Baillargeon A, Pokorski R. (1)Gen Re LifeHealth, 695 East Main Street, Stamford, CT 06901, USA. [email protected] BACKGROUND: Applicants with diabetes mellitus are at higher risk for many of the events covered by critical illness insurance. The relative risk of cardiovasculardisease has not been quantified from an insurance perspective.METHODS: A literature search is done to determine the relative risk ofcardiovascular disease, followed by an actuarial analysis to estimate themorbidity ratio for newly diagnosed diabetics compared to nondiabetics.RESULTS: Morbidity ratios are relatively similar in different studies, especiallyfor ages 50 and older. Morbidity ratios are highest for ages 30-39 (300% to500%), high for ages 40-49 (200% to 400%), and taper to 200% for older ages.CONCLUSION: Morbidity ratios would be high in newly diagnosed diabetics whoapplied for critical illness insurance, ranging from a high of approximately 300%to 500% at ages 30-39 to a low of 200% at older ages. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Archives Critical Illness Insurance News Critical Illness Insurance News

Diabetes Archives Critical Illness Insurance News Critical Illness Insurance News

Number of Americans with Diabetes Rises to Nearly 26 Million Nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes, according to new estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In addition, an estimated 79 million U.S. adults have prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes raises a persons risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke explains Jesse Slome, executive director of the American Association for Critical Illness Insurance . Diabetes affects 8.3 percent of Americans of all ages, and 11.3 percent of adults aged 20 and older, according to the National Diabetes Fact Sheet for 2011. About 27 percent of those with diabetes7 million Americansdo not know they have the disease. Prediabetes affects 35 percent of adults aged 20 and older. In 2008, CDC estimated that 23.6 million Americans, or 7.8 percent of the population, had diabetes and another 57 million adults had prediabetes. The 2011 estimates have increased for several reasons: Many people are living longer with diabetes, which raises the total number of those with the disease. Better management of the disease is improving cardiovascular disease risk factors and reducing complications such as kidney failure and amputations. Hemoglobin A1c is now used as a diagnostic test, and was therefore incorporated into calculations of national prevalence for the first time. The test, also called glycated hemoglobin, measures levels of blood glucose (sugar) over a period of two to three months. Because of this change, estimates of populations with diabetes and prediabetes in the 2011 fact sheet are not directly comparable to estimates in previous fact sheets. In a study published last year, CDC projected that as m Continue reading >>

Does Critical Illness Pay Out For Diabetes?

Does Critical Illness Pay Out For Diabetes?

Revision by Alan Knowles on 21st November 2013 Since writing this article there have been a number of changes in the market. There are now a number of providers who will consider critical illness cover for clients with type 2 diabetes so long as the condition is well controlled and there are no other major risk factors. Additionally there are currently three providers who pay out for type 1 diabetes under their current critical illness contracts. This is of course subject to their definition of illness being met. The providers are: PruProtect*: PruProtect* now pay out for diagnosis of type 1 diabetes regardless of age (of specified severity), this condition is not covered under the children's section of cover. Please note this is a partial payment not a full payout and is only covered on their comprehensive plan not their primary cover. Friends Life: Friends Life pay out for diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (of specified severity) if diagnosed after age 40. This is a full payout. Ageas Protect: Ageas now pay out for diagnosis of type 1 diabetes regardless of age (so long as it results in permanent insulin injections), this condition is not covered under the children's section of cover. Please note this is a partial payment not a full payout. * Update: This product is now Vitality Life and not PruProtect. Does Critical Illness Pay out for Diabetes? First things first, Critical Illness policies do not typically payout on the diagnosis of diabetes. Additionally you cannot normally get critical illness cover if you are already diabetic. This guide covers what complications of diabetes can potentially be claimed on your existing critical illness policy. What if you do not have diabetes at the moment but have a familial tendency to Type 2 diabetes? Or you think that your lifestyl Continue reading >>

Critical Illness And Life Insurance Cover

Critical Illness And Life Insurance Cover

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Critical Illness and Life Insurance Cover Hi, has anyone else had difficulties trying to get a policy for critical illness cover? I can get covered for dying from a Diabetes related illness but if I have a heart attack or stroke and cannot work there is no one out there who will give me an insurance policy for this. I will need an income from somewhere should the worst happen, I suppose I would have to claim sickness benefit from the Government, that's not going to pay my mortgage. I personally cannot help you with your query. Try a p.m. to Dennis, one of the moderators. He has a wealth of knowledge about insurance. I suspect that the problem you are encountering is that the risk of CHD and stroke is seen as higher for people with diabetes than it is for the non-diabetic population. There are many mainstream insurers who are just not interested in that risk. However the good news is that there are several smaller specialist insurers who will provide the cover. I don't know how they compare for cost because, when the bigger insurers won't quote for critical illness, then there's nothing to compare against. But if my travel insurance is anything to go by, when Norwich Union decided they would no longer cover any pre-existing conditions but quoted me for a travel policy that would pay out for anything that wasn't diabetes related, I got quotes from smaller specialist firms and they were nearly all cheaper then the big insurers (and for much better cover). You could start here, from this forum's own parent site (critical illness is 4th one down) Alternatively I see that Diabetes UK (the charity, not this site) recommends Heath Lambert (an insurance broker Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Life Insurance

Diabetes & Life Insurance

According to the NHS , There are 3.9 million people living with diabetes in the UK, thats one in 16 of us. While diabetes can be a very serious condition, if well managed most people are able to live full and normal lives. How does diabetes impact my Life Insurance policy? The types of diabetes and severities of some conditions means that it, in life insurance terms it is hard to categorise and can therefore have many different impacts on your cover. If you have diabetes and want to take out life insurance and Critical Illness Cover , the quote you get will be based on answers given throughout the application. This takes into account various habits and your lifestyle which will lead to a personalised quote confirming the cover we may be able to provide you. The higher cost of Life Insurance for diabetics might not necessarily always be a reality: by maintaining an otherwise healthy lifestyle you can help minimise the impact diabetes has on your premiums, the NHS suggests having a healthy and balanced diet, keeping active and not smoking. Read more about how you can save on your policy by reading our cheaper policy tips . It is possible to get cover with Beagle Street and the best way to find out if you can get cover is by doing a quick quote with us. Will I be asked to provide evidence to support my application? You need to answer the application honestly and factually, other than that we wont ask for any medical records or evidence. Diabetes is not amongst our covered critical illnesses. To read through the full list click here . What happens if I get diagnosed with diabetes during my policy term? If you are diagnosed with diabetes during your policy term then the good news is that you will be able to stick with your original policy conditions and your premiums will r Continue reading >>

Critical Illness Cover For Diabetics: How Does This Work?

Critical Illness Cover For Diabetics: How Does This Work?

Sad to say, it may not work at all. The fact is, that for those who have diabetes, it may be quite hard to get critical illness cover. You see, many of the serious illnesses such as kidney failure, blindness, heart disease and the need for organ transplant are complications caused by diabetes mellitus. A Background on Diabetes 2.6 million UK residents have diabetes, as of 2009. This translates to 4% of the population. There are still around 500,000 people who have diabetes but have not been diagnosed. Out of the people with diabetes, 10% have Type 1 diabetes and 90% have Type 2 diabetes. Diabetics are 48% more likely to have a heart attack. Diabetes mellitus refers to the condition where one’s body has difficulty controlling the increase of sugar levels since the body cannot produce enough insulin or, even though there is enough insulin, the cells don’t respond to the insulin the way they should. Don't miss: The three main types of diabetes are Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (or diabetes in pregnant women). Type 1 diabetes. The typical onset is before the age 40 and comprises 10% of all diabetics. If left untreated, this can have serious implications on one’s health. It can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, which can lead to a potentially fatal coma. Type 2 diabetes. The less severe kind of diabetes, the typical onset of this is over the age of 40. The body is still able to produce insulin but not enough or the body has already developed insulin resistance. Risk factors. One’s lifestyle is highly contributory to diabetes – this includes a smoking habit and a propensity to overeat. Other risk factors include ethnicity, genetics, obesity, physical inactivity and poor blood pressure control. Symptoms. Those with diabetes will notice the fo Continue reading >>

Can I Get Critical Illness Cover With Diabetes?

Can I Get Critical Illness Cover With Diabetes?

Can I get critical illness cover with diabetes? Ive recently got my first mortgage and have been advised to get critical illness cover bya friend, ive got diabetes. Would I be able to get this kind of insurance? Most of our insurers will only provide quotations to individuals between the ages of 18 and 65 years old. This warning message has appeared as the date of birth you have entered was either below the age of 18 or over the age of 65. Please try re-entering your correct date of birth. If you would like to discuss your options with one of our experts to ensure a suitable policy please do not hesitate to give us a call on 0208 432 7333 and we will be more than willing to help. Most of our insurers will only provide family quotations if the child you are including is below the age of 23 years old. This warning message has appeared as the date of birth you have entered for your child would result in our insurers unable to include them in your quotation. If you would like to discuss your options with one of our experts to ensure a suitable policy please do not hesitate to give us a call on 0208 432 7333 and we will be more than willing to help. Most of our insurers have a maximum policy cease age between 65 and 70 years old. We have had to adjust the age you requested the policy to end to age 70 to ensure we are able to provide you with quotations. If you would like to discuss your options with one of our experts to ensure a suitable length of cover please do not hesitate to give us a call on 0208 432 7333 and we will be more than willing to help. Most of our insurers have a minimum policy term of 5 years, given your current age we have had to adjust the age you requested the policy to end as it would not have produced any quotations. We have increased the policy cease Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Critical Illness: Spot The Difference

Type 2 Diabetes And Critical Illness: Spot The Difference

Type 2 diabetes mellitus and stress hyperglycemia (excess glucose in the blood) during critical illness appear completely differently by several aspects, such as; the first is chronic, well defined and epidemic as a result of the way of life in industrialized countries, while the second is acute by definition and can encompass a broad range of conditions encountered everywhere. In spite of the differences, type 2 diabetes and critical illness also share some similarities, in terms of pathophysiology, treatment and outcomes, as described below. Insulin resistance Insulin resistance is the typical hallmark of type 2 diabetes, and results in chronic hyperglycemia, itself involved in most of the long-term complications of diabetes. In the critically ill, insulin resistance is also very frequent and is one of the key pathophysiological mechanisms of stress-related hyperglycemia. During the acute phase, the presence of insulin resistance is considered as an adaptive component of the stress response. However, after the resolution of the acute phase, prolonged insulin resistance is associated with poor outcome, via the toxicity of severe hyperglycemia. Recent data reported by independent investigators consistently suggest that the occurrence of stress hyperglycemia is a risk factor for the development of diabetes after the resolution of critical illness. Excess glucose The presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and stress hyperglycemia can be easily overlooked and considered as minor or transient complications. The lack of awareness and of standardization represents additional hurdles to the dissemination of knowledge. The presence of diabetes is most often based on medical records, where the type of diabetes, degree of control and treatment are undefined. The metrics used to rep Continue reading >>

The Realities Of Diabetes

The Realities Of Diabetes

Next week is Diabetes Awareness Week . We felt this was a good opportunity to highlight some of the common misconceptions surrounding the condition. Fiction: Only overweight people get Type 2 diabetes Fact: Although being overweight can significantly increase your chances of becoming diabetic, not everyone who is diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes is overweight. There are lots of factors which can increase the risk of becoming diabetic such as age, family history and exercise levels. Fiction: If you have raised sugar levels you have diabetes. Fact: Diabetes is diagnosed when blood sugar readings are over a certain level on at least two tests. In some cases, blood sugar levels are noted to be above a normal range, but are not high enough to diagnose diabetes. This would be considered pre diabetes changes to diet and lifestyle can be made at this stage which can reduce blood sugar levels to normal, and reduce the risk of a diagnosis of diabetes. Fiction: Diabetics cannot get life insurance Fact: Diabetes is one of the most common conditions we see when underwriting. Whether we accept someone and how much we charge for their cover depends on how long theyve had the condition, how well theyre controlling it and whether they have any complications. It is important to emphasise that AIG Life can only provide life insurance for people with diabetes and not critical illness cover or income protection. Fiction: You cannot make a claim on critical illness cover for diabetes Fact: Unlike most insurers, our critical illness covers allows policyholders to claim up to 25% of their sum assured if they are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes after the policy has been taken out. Regardless of the type of diabetes they have, our critical illness policyholders can also claim the full amount if th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Critical Illness Insurance The Insurance Surgery

Diabetes Critical Illness Insurance The Insurance Surgery

The Insurance Surgery are constantly working with providers on developing new products to improve the way that our clients are viewed by insurers. One of the major areas where we have been campaigning for more choice and developments is Critical Illness Cover for Diabetes. There have been no providers offering this products for Diabetes in recent times and we wanted to know why and get something done about it. Previous products have also been expensive and had a number of exclusions so we wanted to make sure that any terms offered were fair and reasonable. It has now come to light that several providers are offering Type 2 Diabetes Critical Illness Cover with more likely to join the market soon which is excellent news. As it says in the name, this product provides cover when an individual is diagnosed with a critical illness that is covered within the policy wording. The policy would pay out a tax free lump sum in the event of being diagnosed with an illness covered under the policy. Providers do vary in terms of the illness's that are covered so it is advisable to check the wording thoroughly before accepting any terms to make sure that they are right for you. In this instance, the cheapest policy is not necessarily the best and you do get what you pay for. A critical illness policy is designed to offer peace of mind and security for you and your loved ones should you become ill and possibly not able to work as a result of a critical illness or serious injury. The amount of cover is dependant on what you would want the cover for and can vary considerably based on your individual circumstances and requirements. It can also be based on affordability and simply how much you are willing to pay for the cover each month. Some important things to consider when applying for a Continue reading >>

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