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Is Decaf Coffee Bad For Diabetics

Coffee Consumption And Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee Consumption And Type 2 Diabetes

Print this page Coffee and risk of type 2 diabetes Epidemiological studies suggest that drinking 3-4 cups of coffee per day is associated with an approximate 25% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared to consuming none or less than 2 cups per day1,2. Research also suggests a dose response relationship15-17. A systematic review with a meta-analysis of 457,922 individuals and 21,897 newly-diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes from eight different countries showed a statistically significant negative association between coffee consumption and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes2. The dose response analysis concluded that every additional cup of coffee, up to 6-8 cups per day, was associated with a 5-10% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Drinking 3-4 cups of coffee per day was associated with an approximate 25% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared to consuming none or less than 2 cups per day. Additional epidemiological studies and reviews from different countries have also confirmed the inverse association with coffee consumption3-13. Furthermore, a 10 year follow-up study from Greece highlighted the significance of long-term habitual coffee drinking against diabetes onset14. Further dose response studies have also been reported. A 2014 study concluded that participants who increased coffee intake by more than one cup per day over a 4 year period had an 11% lower risk of type 2 diabetes, whilst those who decreased coffee consumption by one cup per day had a 17% greater risk of type 2 diabetes15. A meta-analysis of prospective studies suggested a 12% reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes for every additional two cups of coffee per day, and a 14% reduction for every 200mg increment of caffeine per day. This review also suggested that the effect w Continue reading >>

Effects Of Caffeinated And Decaffeinated Coffee On Biological Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Effects Of Caffeinated And Decaffeinated Coffee On Biological Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Go to: Abstract Coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in prospective cohort studies, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of regular and decaffeinated coffee on biological risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Randomized parallel-arm intervention conducted in 45 healthy overweight volunteers who were nonsmokers and regular coffee consumers. Participants were assigned to consumption of 5 cups (177 mL each) per day of instant caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or no coffee (i.e., water) for 8 weeks. Average age was 40 years and body mass index was 29.5 kg/m2. Compared with consuming no coffee, consumption of caffeinated coffee increased adiponectin (difference in change from baseline 1.4 μg/mL; 95% CI: 0.2, 2.7) and interleukin-6 (difference: 60%; 95% CI: 8, 138) concentrations and consumption of decaffeinated coffee decreased fetuin-A concentrations (difference: -20%; 95% CI: -35, -1). For measures of glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion, no significant differences were found between treatment groups. Although no changes in glycemia and/or insulin sensitivity were observed after 8 weeks of coffee consumption, improvements in adipocyte and liver function as indicated by changes in adiponectin and fetuin-A concentrations may contribute to beneficial metabolic effects of long-term coffee consumption. Go to: Introduction Coffee consumption has been associated with a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in prospective cohort studies in the United States (US), Europe, and Asia [1,2]. Paradoxically, caffeine intake acutely reduced insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in short-term trials [3]. Data on the effects of coffee inta Continue reading >>

Drinks And Gestational Diabetes

Drinks And Gestational Diabetes

Staying well hydrated is very important during pregnancy and even more so if you have diabetes whilst pregnant. Drinking water doesn't directly lower blood sugar levels, but it does flush excess sugar out of your system and so staying hydrated will help control and stabilise blood sugar levels. Ideally you should be drinking around 3 litres (10 -12 glasses) at least, a day. You will need to drink even more during warmer weather or if you are exercising. We recommend drinking a glass of water with AND in between every meal and snack during the day. Tea, coffee and fizzy drinks containing caffeine should not be included as part of your recommended daily fluid intake as they are diuretics. Diuretics make you urinate more frequently, causing you to lose water. If you don’t like the taste of water then you could try carbonated water with lemon and lime added to it, or some sugar free squash. Be careful when choosing drinking squash which has ‘no added sugar’, it means exactly that, no ADDED sugar, but will still contain natural sugars. Check labels for the lowest total carbs for the best choices. Drinks suitable for a GD diet Water, carbonated or still. Beware of flavoured waters that may contain sugar. Tea & coffee, decaffeinated or remember to include within your recommended daily intake Diet/Zero/No added sugar carbonated drinks No added sugar diluting squash (watch out for high juice or squashes with natural or concentrate fruit juices added) Raspberry leaf tea As a treat - Highlights, Options or Choc Shot hot chocolate with added whipped cream! Diet, no added sugar and zero carbonated drinks There are many alternatives to well loved, original full sugar drinks such as the following: Dr Pepper > Dr Pepper Zero Coke > Diet Coke or Coke Zero (please note that Coke Li Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes

Coffee And Diabetes

Tweet The effect of coffee on diabetes, when presented in the media can often be confusing. News stories can in the same week tout the benefits coffee can have on diabetes and shoot down coffee as being unhelpful for blood sugar levels. This doesn’t mean the articles are contradictory though. Put slightly more simply, coffee contains different chemicals, some of which have beneficial effects whereas others can have a less beneficial effect, such as caffeine which can impair insulin in the short term. Caffeine and blood sugar levels Regular high caffeine consumption, over a 4 week period, has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. [20] Whilst the researchers found a relationship between higher coffee consumption and lower sensitivity to insulin, they recognised that the rapid transition to having more coffee may have produced an atypical or emphasised response by the body. Benefits of coffee Coffee has been shown to lower risks of the following conditions: Coffee contains polyphenols, which are a molecule that anti-oxidant properties which are widely believed to help prevent inflammatory illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes, and anticarcinogenic (anti-cancer) properties. As well as polyphenols, coffee contains the mineral magnesium and chromium. Greater magnesium intake has been linked with lower rates of type 2 diabetes. The blend of these nutrients can be helpful for improving insulin sensitivity, which may help to offset the opposite effects of caffeine. Coffee and prevention of diabetes Coffee and its effect on risks of developing type 2 diabetes have been studied a number of times and has indicated a notably lower risk of type 2 diabetes being associated with coffee drinkers. A 2009 study of 40,000 participants noted that consumptio Continue reading >>

Got Pre-diabetes? Here's Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Got Pre-diabetes? Here's Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Diabetes Prevention Programs Studies around the world, including Finland, China and the US have shown diabetes prevention programs prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes. When people eat more healthily, drop their body weight by 5-10% and walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, they lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by about 58% over two years. We recently gave 101 men with pre-diabetes a self-directed diabetes prevention program over six months. We found they were able to reduce their portion size of potato and meat and improve their variety of health foods. They were able to reduce the proportion of energy coming from junk food by 7.6% more than the group who didn't change their diet and got a four-point increase in their scores from the Healthy Eating Quiz. These improved eating patterns were associated with an average weight loss of 5.5kg and better blood sugar regulation. This is great news for the 318 million adults around the world, including two million Australians, who have pre-diabetes. The original diabetes prevention studies started in the 1980s. Back then the advice was to reduce your total kilojoule intake by eating less fat, especially from take-away, processed and fried foods and to eat more foods rich in carbohydrate, such as vegetables, fruit and wholegrains. That advice worked because the world did not have the huge numbers of ultra-processed foods and drinks, many of which Continue reading >>

The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

Is coffee good or bad for diabetes? Some studies show that coffee is protective, while others say it’s harmful. Some say decaf is better; others say it’s worse. Let’s try to sort this out. For years, various studies have reported that coffee drinkers are less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. A recent UCLA study found that “women who drink at least four cups of coffee a day are less than half as likely to develop diabetes as non-coffee drinkers.” Lead scientist Simin Liu said that coffee may improve the body’s tolerance to glucose by increasing metabolism or lowering insulin resistance. In 2008, Diabetes Self-Management blogger Amy Campbell reported on several other studies showing benefits for coffee. A study published in Diabetes Care in 2006 followed about 900 adults, roughly 300 of whom had prediabetes, for eight years. The people who drank caffeinated coffee had a 60% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who didn’t drink coffee. Another Diabetes Care study published the same year looked at more than 88,000 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. It found that women who drank two or more cups of coffee daily had a lower risk (slightly more than half the risk) of getting diabetes than those who drank just one cup of coffee daily, or no coffee at all. And it didn’t matter whether the coffee was regular or decaf. So right there you have a disagreement about caffeine. Meanwhile, other studies have shown that coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, raises after-meal (postprandial) blood glucose levels up to 20% in people with diabetes. These studies have not been large but have received a lot of attention. In the most-reported study, from Duke University, ten subjects, all with diabetes, were tested — given either caffeine capsules or a placebo (inacti Continue reading >>

Diet Advice

Diet Advice

Diet advice made simple This page will give an overview to dietary advice in gestational diabetes. It is not intended to take the place of a registered dietician and people with pre-existing diabetes will likely be using much more advanced dietary techniques such as carbohydrate counting – such detailed exchange use and carbohydrate counting will not be covered here. This advice is culled from my experience, the nutrition advice notes from our local health authority (Alberta Health Services/Covenant Health) and diabetes in pregancy units I had the good fortune to visit including Joslin Diabetes Center, Cambridge University Hospitals UK, Auckland District Health Board and Adelaide,South Australia. Basics: If you take three meals a day and three snacks (mid morning, mid afternoon and bedtime) and avoid high fat foods, sweet foods and sugary drinks (drink water) you are well on the way to a healthy diet. If you measure your blood sugar after a meal you may find one particular type of food raises your blood sugar and thus might be best avoided. Foods fall into one of three primary groups: Carbohydrates – made up of starchs and sugars and these typically drive the rise in blood sugar after eating. Examples of carbohydrate foods include: bread, potato, pasta, rice, fruit, breakfast cereals, cookies. Some carbohydrate foods raise the blood sugar more readily (high glycemic index foods) and usually the more fibre in food the slower the glucose absorption. In general use whole grain foods – multigrain breads, whole-wheat flour foods, high fibre cereals, fruits (not fruit juice) and avoid processed foods, jams and syrups work the best in helping control blood sugar. Many people find the portion size critical, smaller is better. Protein – typically found in fish and meats. Continue reading >>

Nine Reasons Your Blood Sugar Can Go Up

Nine Reasons Your Blood Sugar Can Go Up

Diet is the primary way diabetics control the level of sugar in our blood. Doing so, however, is not simple. Here are 9 reasons why blood glucose levels can increase. In order to prevent type 2 diabetes destroying our bodies, we diabetics need to control the glucose floating around in our bloodstream. Many of us are succeeding in doing so by the diets we eat. Sometimes however our diets do not work very well and our blood sugar readings rise for reasons we cannot fathom easily. This may be because of a lack of knowledge of how certain foods or other things can affect the level of glucose in our blood. Here are 9 typical reasons why our blood sugar can rise unexpectedly: caffeine sugar-free food fat-heavy food bagels sports drinks dried fruits a bad cold or flu stress steroids and diuretics Caffeine Drinking coffee, black tea, green tea, and energy drinks, all containing caffeine, has been associated with a small, but detectable rise in blood sugar levels, particularly after meals. This can happen, even if you drink black coffee with zero calories. Two to three cups a day (250mg of caffeine) can have this effect. In one experiment conducted on 10 people with type 2 diabetes, the subjects were given capsules of caffeine (the equivalent of four cups), rather than coffee. This increased their blood glucose levels by up to 8%. But how caffeine raises blood sugar has not been figured out yet. The irony is that coffee, both caffeinated and decaffeinated, has other components that reduce blood glucose, and coffee has been associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Each person reacts differently to drinks containing caffeine, so it’s best to track your own responses to this little kicker and figure out for yourself whether the effect of caffeine on your bloo Continue reading >>

How Does Decaf Coffee Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes?

How Does Decaf Coffee Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes?

A recent clinical trial published in the British Journal of Nutrition examines how decaf coffee might be able to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Coffee, brewed from roasted coffee beans, is a popular drink that has purported health benefits. There have been studies that suggested that the consumption of coffee is correlated to better protection against multiple different diseases, which range from neurological disorders to cardiovascular disease, and even cancer. A number of recent studies looked at how high coffee consumption, such as more than three cups a day, reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes. Lack of studies investigating the mechanics of how coffee may reduce diabetes risk Many different nutrients are found in coffee, but there is a lack of studies that investigated the mechanisms by which coffee components can contribute to the reduced risk of diabetes. Although studies have examined both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and observed a protective effect regardless of the caffeine content, it isnt clear whether caffeine has an effect. Accordingly, a Brazilian group of scientists sought to determine whether regular and decaffeinated coffee improves insulin sensitivity. They were also interested in how the sugar in coffee influences glucose and insulin levels in the blood of coffee drinkers. The results were recently published in the British Journal of Nutrition. The participants for this study were recruited by advertisements and then screened for certain exclusion criteria, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and smoking. After the exclusion of participants, there were 17 subjects who completed the study. All of the subjects were male, between 18 and 40 years of age, and habitual coffee consumers. Over a period of six weeks, the men each particip Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Coffee

Diabetes And Coffee

Should people with type 2 diabetes avoid that cup o’ joe, or is it safe to drink? Q: Is it safe for people with diabetes to drink coffee? A: Many studies have linked moderate coffee drinking with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A large review published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that people who drank four to six cups of coffee per day were 28 percent less likely to develop diabetes than individuals who drank zero to two cups. Caffeinated or decaffeinated, filtered or instant, all types seem to be protective. However, for people who already have diabetes, the picture gets a bit cloudier. That’s because some studies show that the caffeine in coffee reduces insulin sensitivity, which means insulin and blood sugar levels may in fact increase. If you have diabetes and you’re having a tough time keeping your blood sugar down, I recommend switching to decaf for a week or two to see if your blood sugar readings improve. If they do, decaf is clearly the way to go. Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Diabetes; 6 Important Facts

Caffeine And Diabetes; 6 Important Facts

Share: Morning coffee-it is the only way to get the day started for many people all over the world. Recently many articles about coffee have been released in the news. Many people are asking, what’s the story-is coffee a good choice for people trying to prevent diabetes? Is there information about the effects of caffeine and coffee if one has diabetes? We’ll discuss six interesting studies and facts about coffee and caffeine. Fact 1: Caffeine and memory - A recent small study carried and published in 2014 at Johns Hopkins University with 73 subjects concluded that as little as 200 milligrams of caffeine enhances a special type of memory called pattern separation for up to 24 hours. When a person distinguishes the differences between two similar items that are not identical, they are exercising pattern discrimination. (1,2,3) The Mayo Clinic has an interesting graph depicting the amounts of caffeine in many popular drinks. Fact 2: Preventing type 2 diabetes - In both men and women, increased caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption is strongly associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Researchers at The Harvard School of Public Health just released an evaluation (in 2014) of twenty-eight studies from around the world. The risk of developing diabetes with drinking no coffee or coffee at different amounts was reviewed. Studies took place with a total of 1,109,272 subjects with outcome risk for diabetes type 2 of which there were 45,335 cases of diabetes. The studies followed the participants from 10 months to 20 years. There was a 33 percent drop in associated risk of developing type 2 diabetes when six cups of coffee (caffeinated or decaffeinated) was consumed per day. The researchers did not find significance between the relative risks of Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Diabetes

Pregnancy And Diabetes

Is coffee inherently a dangerous substance, and should caffeine be stripped from our diets? There are some who say yes, and others who ignore all that. We are true coffee addicts and would be hard-pressed to give it up, but we are always interested in new data on caffeine. So we couldn't avoid the two health alerts in the last week about coffee. The first is about diabetes and the other is a warning to pregnant women. UK researchers announced results of a study that shows coffee may raise blood sugar in diabetics. The effect that they found was especially pronounced in the evenings. The key element of course is the caffeine; does cutting caffeine help control blood sugar levels? The researchers feel that more research is necessary to say conclusively, but there may be a correlation. In other caffeine-related news, a study was released a week ago that ties increased rates of miscarriage and pregnancy issues to caffeine consumption. It is fairly standard in the West for pregnant women to completely go off caffeine, or to stick to decaf coffee, which has a small amount of caffeine. This study bolsters that accepted wisdom. Even though the data is not completely unambiguous, it supports again that in coffee and caffeine, like most other things, moderation is key. We're not giving up our coffee any time soon, but we did switch from 2 or 3 cups of drip brew coffee to one small, rich cup of French press in the mornings. Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes

Coffee And Diabetes

WHAT we eat and drink affects our health. The relevance of this association is even more significant among those who have pre-diabetes and those who actually have diabetes. Soft drinks—diet or regular—are all harmful, toxic to the body of adults and children. Soft drinks increase the risk for metabolic syndrome. Processed fruits juices are likewise unhealthy. Eating the fresh fruits or drinking fruit juice that you extracted yourself without any additives are the healthier options. How about coffee, a popular day-starter and afternoon break beverage, one of the most popular drinks in the world? Recent clinical studies have concluded that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk for the development of diabetes. But how about coffee for those who already have pre-diabetes or diabetes? Does it affect the glucose (blood sugar) and A1c levels? A cup of 8-ounce coffee contains 140 milligrams of caffeine. Taking two cups a day, or even consuming up to 400 milligrams of caffeine, appears to be safe for most healthy adults. They do not jack up the blood sugar level significantly when a teaspoon or two of sugar is used. Adding more sugar, creamer, flavoring (which are carbohydrates) to coffee will obviously increase the glucose level to a higher degree among diabetics, unless included in the prescribed daily calorie count. Coffee consumption Worldwide, about 1.4 billion cups of coffee are consumed each day; 45 percent (400 million cups) of which are in the United States, according to the International Coffee Organization. But the per capita consumption globally shows that the United States is number 22, drinking four kilograms of coffee per person a year. Scandinavian countries top the list: Finland, 11 kilograms of coffee per person per year; Norway, just below 11; and S Continue reading >>

Decaffeinated Coffee And Tea And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Decaffeinated Coffee And Tea And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Print this page As with caffeinated coffee, the majority of published studies that have evaluated the relationship between decaffeinated coffee and risk of type 2 diabetes have reported similar inverse associations2,5,17. A 2014 meta-analysis of prospective studies concluded that in addition to an effect with caffeinated coffee, an 11% reduction for every 2 additional cups of decaffeinated coffee a day was also observed16. A French study5 and a large US study with African-American women7, also looked at the association for decaffeinated coffee. One of the two studies confirmed an association5; the other did not see a correlation7. A multiethnic cohort study suggested that caffeinated (but not decaffeinated) coffee consumption was much more protective against diabetes in women of all ethnic groups than in men, where the effect was smaller24. This information is intended for Healthcare professional audiences. Please consider the environment before printing. Continue reading >>

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