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Is Decaf Coffee Bad For Diabetics

Pregnancy And Diabetes

Pregnancy And Diabetes

Is coffee inherently a dangerous substance, and should caffeine be stripped from our diets? There are some who say yes, and others who ignore all that. We are true coffee addicts and would be hard-pressed to give it up, but we are always interested in new data on caffeine. So we couldn't avoid the two health alerts in the last week about coffee. The first is about diabetes and the other is a warning to pregnant women. UK researchers announced results of a study that shows coffee may raise blood sugar in diabetics. The effect that they found was especially pronounced in the evenings. The key element of course is the caffeine; does cutting caffeine help control blood sugar levels? The researchers feel that more research is necessary to say conclusively, but there may be a correlation. In other caffeine-related news, a study was released a week ago that ties increased rates of miscarriage and pregnancy issues to caffeine consumption. It is fairly standard in the West for pregnant women to completely go off caffeine, or to stick to decaf coffee, which has a small amount of caffeine. This study bolsters that accepted wisdom. Even though the data is not completely unambiguous, it supports again that in coffee and caffeine, like most other things, moderation is key. We're not giving up our coffee any time soon, but we did switch from 2 or 3 cups of drip brew coffee to one small, rich cup of French press in the mornings. Continue reading >>

Coffee May Reduce Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee May Reduce Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Need an excuse to drink yet another cup of coffee today? A new study suggests that increasing coffee consumption may decrease the risk for type 2 diabetes. The apparent relationship between coffee and type 2 diabetes is not new. Previous studies have found that drinking a few cups or more each day may lower your risk - with each subsequent cup nudging up the benefit. This most recent study, published in the journal Diabetologia, was more concerned with how changing coffee consumption - either increasing it or decreasing it over time - might affect your risk. The conclusion: People who upped their consumption by more than a cup per day had an 11% lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared with people whose consumption held steady. Decreasing coffee consumption by the same amount - more than a cup a day - was associated with a 17% increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The data is based on an analysis of more than 120,000 health professionals already being followed observationally long term. Researchers looked at the study participants' coffee drinking habits across four years to reach their conclusions. Just how much coffee each day provides a benefit? "For type 2 diabetes, up to six cups per day is associated with lower risk," said Shilpa Bhupathiraju, a research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health and lead study author, citing previous research. "As long as coffee doesn't give you tremors, doesn't make you jittery, it is associated with a lot of health benefits." In the case of diabetes, the reasons behind the supposed protection conferred by coffee are not clear, but there are theories based on animal research. One involves chemicals present in coffee - phenolic compounds and lignans - that may improve glucose metabolism, according to Bhupathiraju. She added that co Continue reading >>

Effects Of Coffee And Tea On Diabetes

Effects Of Coffee And Tea On Diabetes

A January 2004 study of coffee and diabetes shows that men who drank 6 cups of coffee a day reduced their chances of developing type-2 diabetes by half, and women who drank the same amount cut their risk by 30 percent. 126,000 people filled out questionnaires over the previous 12-18 years with information about their coffee intake and other health questions. In earlier studies, Dutch researchers discovered that there are compounds in coffee that aid the body's metabolism of sugar. Their study involved 17,000 men and women in the Netherlands. The results were published in November 2002, in the journal Lancet. According to their study, people who drank 7 cups a day (or more) were 50% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Drinking less coffee had less of an impact on diabetes onset. Researchers are still looking at the connection between coffee and diabetes, and caution people that 7 cups of coffee per day is enough to create other health problems. A number of older studies have shown that caffeine may increase your risk of developing diabetes. The theory is that the beneficial chemicals are able to offset the damage done by the caffeine. So drinking decaffeinated coffee would be the best bet if you are thinking of drinking coffee to prevent diabetes. Tea also has an effect on diabetes. Drinking tea can improve insulin activity up to 15 times, and it can be black, green or oolong. Herbal teas don't have any effect. The active compounds don't last long in the body, so you would have to drink a cup or more of tea every few hours to maintain the benefit. The catch is that you should drink it without milk (even soy milk), because milk seems to interact with the necessary chemicals and render them unavailable to your body. Continue reading >>

What Type Of Influence Does The Coffee (americano) Cause To Diabetes?

What Type Of Influence Does The Coffee (americano) Cause To Diabetes?

There's good news and bad news. Bad news first Regular high caffeine consumption, over a 4 week period, has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. [20] Whilst the researchers found a relationship between higher coffee consumption and lower sensitivity to insulin, they recognized that the rapid transition to having more coffee may have produced an atypical or emphasized response by the body. Good news! Coffee and its effect on risks of developing type 2 diabetes have been studied a number of times and has indicated a notably lower risk of type 2 diabetes being associated with coffee drinkers. A 2009 study of 40,000 participants noted that consumption of 3 cups of tea or coffee a day lead to a 40% lower risk of type 2 diabetes developing. [21] A study of healthcare professionals in the US and UK, published in 2014, showed that those that increased their consumption of coffee experienced an 11% decrease in risk of type 2 diabetes over the next 4 years. Continue reading >>

The Good And Bad News About Coffee And Your Health

The Good And Bad News About Coffee And Your Health

Health research on coffee swings back and forth between good and bad news more frequently than almost any other topic. When you hear about one study claiming health benefits while another harps on a list of negatives, it’s easy to get jaded and stop paying attention. To bring some focus, here’s a summary of both good and bad findings from a selection of coffee studies, with some perspective about why these findings are worth the time. The good news: Coffee seems to help prevent an early demise. Let’s start with the big one: the latest round of research suggests that drinking a few cups of coffee a day is associated with a decreased chance of early death from several causes. Important to note, none of these studies prove that coffee extends life. These are observational studies that found correlations between drinking between two-to-four cups a day and lower mortality. The reasons why are debatable. It could be coffee’s high concentration of antioxidants providing cells protection from oxidative stress and inflammation, or it could be reasons that haven’t been uncovered yet. Whatever the reasons, enough of these studies have found similar enough results that they’re worth the attention. The bad news: Coffee can cause insomnia. Another health topic that gets a fair amount of press is sleep, and when it comes to sleeping well, caffeinated coffee isn’t our friend. At least not if you’re drinking it later in the day. The rule of thumb is to avoid anything with caffeine after about 2 pm, because it’s a deceptively enduring chemical. The half life of caffeine is about 6 hours, which means it takes 6 hours to eliminate about half of the chemical from your system. Hence, drinking coffee later in the day is strongly linked to insomnia, which is in turn linked to Continue reading >>

Coffee Consumption And Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee Consumption And Type 2 Diabetes

Print this page Coffee and risk of type 2 diabetes Epidemiological studies suggest that drinking 3-4 cups of coffee per day is associated with an approximate 25% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared to consuming none or less than 2 cups per day1,2. Research also suggests a dose response relationship15-17. A systematic review with a meta-analysis of 457,922 individuals and 21,897 newly-diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes from eight different countries showed a statistically significant negative association between coffee consumption and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes2. The dose response analysis concluded that every additional cup of coffee, up to 6-8 cups per day, was associated with a 5-10% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Drinking 3-4 cups of coffee per day was associated with an approximate 25% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared to consuming none or less than 2 cups per day. Additional epidemiological studies and reviews from different countries have also confirmed the inverse association with coffee consumption3-13. Furthermore, a 10 year follow-up study from Greece highlighted the significance of long-term habitual coffee drinking against diabetes onset14. Further dose response studies have also been reported. A 2014 study concluded that participants who increased coffee intake by more than one cup per day over a 4 year period had an 11% lower risk of type 2 diabetes, whilst those who decreased coffee consumption by one cup per day had a 17% greater risk of type 2 diabetes15. A meta-analysis of prospective studies suggested a 12% reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes for every additional two cups of coffee per day, and a 14% reduction for every 200mg increment of caffeine per day. This review also suggested that the effect w Continue reading >>

The Truth About Coffee

The Truth About Coffee

Many people get caught in the sugar, nicotine, caffeine trap, thinking this combination is good for energy. But in fact this combination feeds increasing fatigue, anxiety and weight gain. In my own research we surveyed over 55,000 people and found the two foods that most predict fatigue and stress are caffeinated drinks and sugary foods, both addictive substances. Many people become hooked on caffeine and sugar to keep going, gaining weight and losing health as a result. But what are the long-term consequences? Do coffee drinkers live longer or die young? A study following the fate of almost 400,000 people found that, overall, coffee drinkers are more likely to die younger.(1) But is that a result of the coffee or associated habits? When the researchers adjusted for smoking, the risk of death actually reversed. Coffee drinkers tended to have a slightly lower risk of death, although the decreased risk didn’t consistently become greater the more coffee was drunk. Slightly less risk was observed for deaths due to heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, and infections, but not for deaths due to cancer. Coffee, diabetes and weight However, as far as diabetes is concerned you may be pleased to know that there is now enough evidence to show that coffee actually decreases risk. In fact there have been eighteen studies involving almost half a million people that show overall that coffee, decaffeinated coffee and tea do slightly reduce risk of diabetes.(2) There are various theories as to why this might be since having a lot of caffeine itself isn’t good for your health. Both tea and coffee are high in antioxidants, which is a potential benefit. Two recent studies have shown that coffee doesn’t cause the release of insulin, and may even reduce insulin resistan Continue reading >>

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Caffeine Blocks Insulin A survey reported in JAMA showed that drinking coffee reduces risk for developing type II diabetes, but other studies suggest that once you have diabetes, drinking coffee may be unwise. A report from the Netherlands showed that caffeine in coffee raises blood sugar levels. Diabetics suffer blindness, deafness, heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure, burning foot syndrome and many other serious side effects, and all are caused by a high-rise in blood sugar after meals. Anything that raises blood sugar levels too high increases cell damage in diabetics. This study shows that caffeine raises blood sugar levels by causing the body to put out large amounts of adrenalin that makes cells less responsive to insulin. When caffeine was removed from the coffee, blood sugar levels did not rise higher than normal. On the basis of this study, diabetics should drink decaffeinated coffee, rather than one with caffeine, in addition to severely restricting sugar-added foods, bakery products, pastas, fruit juices and they should eat root vegetables and fruits only with meals. Canadian researchers writing in Diabetes Care showed that caffeine significantly reduced insulin sensitivity. In another study in the same journal, scientists from Duke University Medical Center reported that drinking coffee could upset a diabetic’s ability to metabolize sugar. Blood sugar levels are supposed to rise after you eat. To keep your blood sugar levels from rising too high, your pancreas releases insulin. The researchers found that taking caffeine causes blood sugar and insulin levels to rise even higher after meals. If your blood sugar rises too high, sugar sticks to cells. Once sugar is stuck on a cell membrane, it cannot be released and is converted to a poison called sorbitol Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes

Coffee And Diabetes

WHAT we eat and drink affects our health. The relevance of this association is even more significant among those who have pre-diabetes and those who actually have diabetes. Soft drinks—diet or regular—are all harmful, toxic to the body of adults and children. Soft drinks increase the risk for metabolic syndrome. Processed fruits juices are likewise unhealthy. Eating the fresh fruits or drinking fruit juice that you extracted yourself without any additives are the healthier options. How about coffee, a popular day-starter and afternoon break beverage, one of the most popular drinks in the world? Recent clinical studies have concluded that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk for the development of diabetes. But how about coffee for those who already have pre-diabetes or diabetes? Does it affect the glucose (blood sugar) and A1c levels? A cup of 8-ounce coffee contains 140 milligrams of caffeine. Taking two cups a day, or even consuming up to 400 milligrams of caffeine, appears to be safe for most healthy adults. They do not jack up the blood sugar level significantly when a teaspoon or two of sugar is used. Adding more sugar, creamer, flavoring (which are carbohydrates) to coffee will obviously increase the glucose level to a higher degree among diabetics, unless included in the prescribed daily calorie count. Coffee consumption Worldwide, about 1.4 billion cups of coffee are consumed each day; 45 percent (400 million cups) of which are in the United States, according to the International Coffee Organization. But the per capita consumption globally shows that the United States is number 22, drinking four kilograms of coffee per person a year. Scandinavian countries top the list: Finland, 11 kilograms of coffee per person per year; Norway, just below 11; and S Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Coffee

Diabetes And Coffee

Should people with type 2 diabetes avoid that cup o’ joe, or is it safe to drink? Q: Is it safe for people with diabetes to drink coffee? A: Many studies have linked moderate coffee drinking with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A large review published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that people who drank four to six cups of coffee per day were 28 percent less likely to develop diabetes than individuals who drank zero to two cups. Caffeinated or decaffeinated, filtered or instant, all types seem to be protective. However, for people who already have diabetes, the picture gets a bit cloudier. That’s because some studies show that the caffeine in coffee reduces insulin sensitivity, which means insulin and blood sugar levels may in fact increase. If you have diabetes and you’re having a tough time keeping your blood sugar down, I recommend switching to decaf for a week or two to see if your blood sugar readings improve. If they do, decaf is clearly the way to go. Continue reading >>

Coffee May Make Diabetes Worse

Coffee May Make Diabetes Worse

Daily consumption of caffeine in coffee, tea or soft drinks increases blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes, research suggests. Caffeine pills equivalent to four cups of coffee a day increased blood sugar levels by 8% over the day, US researchers report in Diabetes Care. Cutting caffeine out of the diet may help diabetics control their blood sugar levels, the team said. But UK experts said more research was needed before advice could be given. The ten people who took part in the study were monitored with a tiny glucose monitor embedded under the skin. The device meant that the researchers could track the effects of caffeine over 72-hours as the patients with type 2 diabetes went about their normal lives. Previous studies had shown that caffeine increases the body's resistance to insulin, the hormone responsible for managing the response to glucose levels in the blood. But in healthy people this is not really a problem, said study leader Dr James Lane from Duke University Medical School. In the diabetic patients, who took caffeine pills on one day and a placebo the next, caffeine caused blood sugar levels to rise. The effect was particularly strong after meals with a rise of 9% after breakfast, 15% after lunch and 26% after dinner. Quitting Dr Lane is planning to do another trial in larger number of patients to see if cutting caffeine from the diet can help patients control their blood sugar levels. He said there are two possible ways that caffeine produces the effect. It could be that caffeine interferes with the process that moves glucose from the blood and into muscle and other cells in the body. Caffeine could also trigger the release of adrenaline which can also boost sugar levels. "My advice would be, if patients are having trouble controlling their bl Continue reading >>

Is Coffee Bad Or Good For You?

Is Coffee Bad Or Good For You?

You’ll be happy to know that getting up and enjoying your favorite cup of coffee is fine, however that’s where it must end. The problem lies in reaching multiple times a day for that cup brimming with caffeine. Although one cup of coffee per day is not likely to cause any significant health problems, it is clear that excessive consumption of caffeinated beverages is dangerous. Coffee is known to contribute to heart disease by raising blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and homocysteine.1-4Furthermore, a seventeen-year study of over 40,000 people found that those who drank more than four cups of coffee per day were at an increased risk of death from any cause. Men under age 55 that drank that much coffee had a 56 percent increase in risk of death, and women more than doubled their risk.5 Coffee Interferes With Sleep The caffeine in coffee is a stimulant and as such gives you a false sense of increased energy, allowing you to get by with an inadequate amount of sleep. In addition to effecting the quantity of sleep, caffeine also reduces the depth of sleep. Inadequate sleep promotes disease and premature aging, and can fuel overeating behaviors. Sleep deprivation also results in higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol and interferes with glucose metabolism, leading to insulin resistance.6 This insulin resistance, and subsequent higher baseline glucose level, further promotes diabetes, heart disease and other problems. Coffee can lead to overeating People who drink caffeinated beverages are likely to eat more often than necessary because they mistake caffeine withdrawal symptoms—such as shakiness, headaches, lightheadedness, etc.—for hunger. These detoxification symptoms are easily mistaken for hunger because eating temporarily suppresses them. It is impossible to Continue reading >>

Is Coffee Good For You?

Is Coffee Good For You?

I never developed a taste for coffee and don’t get a buzz from caffeine, but I have been following the accumulating evidence on coffee’s effects on health. The most clear-cut findings about its benefits come from a 20-year study that followed some 84,000 women and 44,000 men. Published in the May 2, 2006, issue of Circulation, the study concluded that drinking coffee isn’t harmful to cardiovascular health and may even be somewhat beneficial. An even more recent study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition in August, 2006 followed 676 healthy, older men from Finland, the Netherlands, and Italy for 10 years and measured their cognitive function. Those who drank coffee had lower rates of age-related cognitive decline than those who didn’t, with maximum protection seen in men who drank three cups of coffee a day. But few other studies of coffee’s effects have been so unambiguously positive. For example, both coffee and decaf can raise your blood pressure temporarily, but we still don’t know whether this can lead to hypertension, a heart disease risk factor. Drinking three to six cups of decaf daily (but not regular coffee) can increase levels of blood fats that affect your LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. Coffee may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, another heart disease risk factor. This finding emerged from a review of nine studies published in the July 6, 2005, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, but it conflicts with earlier evidence suggesting that coffee can reduce insulin sensitivity, which would increase the risk of diabetes. To confuse matters further, a study published in the February 2006 issue of Diabetes Care found that decaf lowers the risk of diabetes, suggesting that something other than caffeine may be respon Continue reading >>

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

type 2 diabetes -- but it isn't caffeine. Caffeine makes it hard for people with diabetes to control their blood sugar, new studies suggest. In the latest of these studies, Duke University researcher James D. Lane, PhD, and colleagues put continuous blood-sugar monitors on 10 people with type 2 diabetes. All were regular coffee drinkers averaging four cups a day, but they stopped drinking coffee during the experiment. On one day, each patient took a 250 mg caffeine capsule at breakfast and another 250 mg caffeine capsule at lunch. That's roughly the same as having them drink two cups of coffee at each meal. On another day, the same people got placebo pills with no caffeine in them. The result: On the days the patients took caffeine, their blood-sugar levels were 8% higher. And after every meal -- including dinner -- their blood sugar spiked higher than it did on the day they had no caffeine. "These are clinically significant blood-sugar elevations due to caffeine," Lane tells WebMD. "Caffeine increases blood glucose by as much as oral diabetes medications decrease it. ... It seems the detrimental effects of caffeine are as bad as the beneficial effects of oral diabetes drugs are good." Lane warns against reading too much into this small, 10-patient study. But he says it does show that caffeine has real effects on the everyday lives of people with diabetes. "For people with diabetes, drinking coffee or consuming caffeine in other beverages may make it harder for them to control their glucose," he says. (If you have diabetes, how much caffeine do you consume on a regular basis? Talk with others on WebMD's Type 2 Diabetes Support Group message board.) Several studies have found that coffee drinkers -- especially those who drink a lot of coffee -- have a lower risk of diabe Continue reading >>

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together. However, a new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for: Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…) Cancer (prostate, breast…) Parkinsons disease According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine: (Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast) What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes). Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups! You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee): Let me pour myself another cup of coffee right now (and according to the coffee and diabetes research, you should grab a coffee yourself) because we’re going to see: Why is coffee good for us? What does other research about coffee and diabetes suggest How much sugar and milk I personally add to my coffee? I’ll reveal my own easy recipe for diabetes-friendly coffee – I’m drinking one right now! In short, do coffee and diabetes go hand in hand together? Let’s find out: Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question I don’t really know anybody that wouldn’t l Continue reading >>

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