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Is Decaf Coffee Bad For Diabetics

Who And Ada Promote 5 Cups Of Coffee To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes???

Who And Ada Promote 5 Cups Of Coffee To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes???

5 Cups of Coffee a Day for Type 2 Diabetes? By Steve McDermott on January 10th, 2017 (Steve McDermott is a person with type 2 diabetes who wrote this article for Diabetes Daily). “Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together. 5 cups is good? If WHO says so, there might be something to it. Right? However, new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for: • Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…) • Cancer (prostate, breast…) • Parkinsons disease • …And type 2 diabetes! According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine: (Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast) What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes). Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups! You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee): Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question When talking about coffee and diabetes, we’ve been talking a lot about caffeine and diabetes – which is not the same as ‘coffee and diabetes.’ Why? Because coffee is not just caffeine. Who doesn’t love a cup of coffee? The lates Continue reading >>

Is Coffee Bad Or Good For You?

Is Coffee Bad Or Good For You?

You’ll be happy to know that getting up and enjoying your favorite cup of coffee is fine, however that’s where it must end. The problem lies in reaching multiple times a day for that cup brimming with caffeine. Although one cup of coffee per day is not likely to cause any significant health problems, it is clear that excessive consumption of caffeinated beverages is dangerous. Coffee is known to contribute to heart disease by raising blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and homocysteine.1-4Furthermore, a seventeen-year study of over 40,000 people found that those who drank more than four cups of coffee per day were at an increased risk of death from any cause. Men under age 55 that drank that much coffee had a 56 percent increase in risk of death, and women more than doubled their risk.5 Coffee Interferes With Sleep The caffeine in coffee is a stimulant and as such gives you a false sense of increased energy, allowing you to get by with an inadequate amount of sleep. In addition to effecting the quantity of sleep, caffeine also reduces the depth of sleep. Inadequate sleep promotes disease and premature aging, and can fuel overeating behaviors. Sleep deprivation also results in higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol and interferes with glucose metabolism, leading to insulin resistance.6 This insulin resistance, and subsequent higher baseline glucose level, further promotes diabetes, heart disease and other problems. Coffee can lead to overeating People who drink caffeinated beverages are likely to eat more often than necessary because they mistake caffeine withdrawal symptoms—such as shakiness, headaches, lightheadedness, etc.—for hunger. These detoxification symptoms are easily mistaken for hunger because eating temporarily suppresses them. It is impossible to Continue reading >>

Prediabetes? The Coffee-health Connection

Prediabetes? The Coffee-health Connection

New research has shown—yet again—that drinking coffee can reduce your type 2 diabetes risk. The study, in nearly 1,500 Greek adults followed for a decade, found that people who downed the equivalent of 2.5 to 3 cups of brewed coffee daily had half the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. And people who drank about 1.5 cups of joe a day cut their risk by about 30%. “Apparently healthy individuals with no history of cardiovascular disease may benefit from daily consumption of this amount of coffee,” one of the study’s authors, Efi Koloverou, MmedSci, a clinical dietitian and doctoral candidate at Harokopio University in Athens, told DiabeticLifestyle in an e-mail interview. The findings were published July 1, 2015 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. There were too few decaf drinkers in the new study to draw conclusions about whether caffeine-free brew would have the same benefits. But there’s strong evidence from other research that decaf has similar protective effects, according to Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, the Flatt Professor in Foods and Nutrition at the University of Georgia in Athens and a national spokesperson for the American Society for Nutrition. Researchers suspect that a substance in the coffee bean itself is what helps to lower inflammation in the body. This in turn can reduce overall risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Johnson points to a 2014 meta-analysis (a study in which the results of several smaller studies are pooled and analyzed together) which included 28 studies and 1.1 million people and found both coffee and decaf coffee drinkers had a reduced likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. And the more a person drank, the lower their risk. Java drinkers got more good news earlier this year, when the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Continue reading >>

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Part 1 of 8 Highlights For people without diabetes, coffee may help reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Caffeine has been shown in the short term to increase both glucose and insulin levels. Because of this, people with diabetes should be cautious when consuming coffee. Once sweetener is added to coffee, it removes the benefits of diabetes prevention. It can actually increase your risk of developing diabetes. Coffee was once condemned as being bad for your health. However, there’s growing evidence that it may protect against certain kinds of cancers, liver disease, depression, and Parkinson’s disease. There’s also compelling research that increasing your coffee intake may actually lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. This is good news for those of us who can’t face the day until we get in our cup of java. However, for those who already have type 2 diabetes, coffee could have adverse effects. Whether you’re trying to lower your risk, you have diabetes, or you just can’t go without your cup of joe, learn about coffee’s effects on diabetes. Part 2 of 8 According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is a disease (or group of diseases) that affects how your body processes blood glucose (sugar). Blood glucose is important because it is what fuels your brain and gives energy to your muscles and tissues. If you have diabetes, that means that you have too much blood glucose circulating in your body and it can cause serious health concerns. There are a number of different factors that can cause diabetes. Chronic diabetes types are type 1 and type 2. Other types include gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but tends to go away after birth. Another is prediabetes, which means your blood glucose levels are higher than usual but not as high as woul Continue reading >>

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

With diabetes, diet is of the utmost concern. What people with diabetes eat and drink directly affects their blood glucose levels. We often concentrate on food, but what people drink is just as important. For many people, the only way to get the day started is with a cup of coffee. Thankfully, recent studies have shown that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk of getting diabetes. But what about for those who already have diabetes? Is coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, a problem for those with diabetes? Two 8-ounce cups of coffee contain about 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young healthy adults, caffeine does not seem to make blood sugar levels higher. Even consuming up to 400 milligrams per day appears to be safe for most people. This article will take a closer look at caffeine and some of the research that has been done in this area. Diabetes and caffeine According to the American Diabetes Association in 2012, 29.1 million Americans or 9.3 percent of the population had diabetes. About 8.1 million of the 29.1 million were undiagnosed. The World Health Organization reported that the number of people with diabetes worldwide in 2014 was 422 million. Diabetes affects how the body uses sugar (glucose). The body needs glucose because it is an important energy source for certain cells and is the brain's main source of fuel. Glucose in the body comes from food and drink as well as being made by the liver. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone in the body and helps the body to absorb glucose. People who have diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, which can cause serious health problems. Diabetes can occur due to either the pancreas not producing no or not enough insulin or the body being unable to use insulin effectively. Type 2 is the most common type Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Navigating what you can and cannot eat and drink when you have type 2 diabetes can be tricky. Of course, there’s the obvious stuff you know is good to cut out or limit in your diet, like processed sweets and other refined carbohydrates, which can cause blood sugar levels to soar when eaten in excess. But what about those murkier diet staples, which seem to straddle the line between healthy and indulgent, but are ingrained in so many of our everyday rituals? For millions of people in various cultures around the world, caffeinated drinks are likely the sort of thing that comes to mind when we talk about food or drinks in a healthy diabetes diet that aren’t so cut-and-dried. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for a while and are seeking better blood sugar control, the subject of caffeine in a diabetes diet is a fair concern. Caffeinated Drinks for Diabetes: Are They Safe? “For people already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, studies have shown caffeine consumption decreases insulin sensitivity and raises blood sugar levels,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, who is based in Hilton Head, South Carolina. According to a review published in April 2017 in Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews, five out of seven trials studied found that caffeine increases blood glucose and keeps levels higher longer. That doesn’t sound good, but if you’re accustomed to having your morning java, don’t skip out on the drink just yet. Some studies suggest that other components of caffeinated coffee may offer some benefits for people with diabetes. In a study published in March 2016 in the International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, researchers looked at coffee consumption in adults with and w Continue reading >>

Got Pre-diabetes? Here's Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Got Pre-diabetes? Here's Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Diabetes Prevention Programs Studies around the world, including Finland, China and the US have shown diabetes prevention programs prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes. When people eat more healthily, drop their body weight by 5-10% and walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, they lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by about 58% over two years. We recently gave 101 men with pre-diabetes a self-directed diabetes prevention program over six months. We found they were able to reduce their portion size of potato and meat and improve their variety of health foods. They were able to reduce the proportion of energy coming from junk food by 7.6% more than the group who didn't change their diet and got a four-point increase in their scores from the Healthy Eating Quiz. These improved eating patterns were associated with an average weight loss of 5.5kg and better blood sugar regulation. This is great news for the 318 million adults around the world, including two million Australians, who have pre-diabetes. The original diabetes prevention studies started in the 1980s. Back then the advice was to reduce your total kilojoule intake by eating less fat, especially from take-away, processed and fried foods and to eat more foods rich in carbohydrate, such as vegetables, fruit and wholegrains. That advice worked because the world did not have the huge numbers of ultra-processed foods and drinks, many of which Continue reading >>

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Caffeine Blocks Insulin A survey reported in JAMA showed that drinking coffee reduces risk for developing type II diabetes, but other studies suggest that once you have diabetes, drinking coffee may be unwise. A report from the Netherlands showed that caffeine in coffee raises blood sugar levels. Diabetics suffer blindness, deafness, heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure, burning foot syndrome and many other serious side effects, and all are caused by a high-rise in blood sugar after meals. Anything that raises blood sugar levels too high increases cell damage in diabetics. This study shows that caffeine raises blood sugar levels by causing the body to put out large amounts of adrenalin that makes cells less responsive to insulin. When caffeine was removed from the coffee, blood sugar levels did not rise higher than normal. On the basis of this study, diabetics should drink decaffeinated coffee, rather than one with caffeine, in addition to severely restricting sugar-added foods, bakery products, pastas, fruit juices and they should eat root vegetables and fruits only with meals. Canadian researchers writing in Diabetes Care showed that caffeine significantly reduced insulin sensitivity. In another study in the same journal, scientists from Duke University Medical Center reported that drinking coffee could upset a diabetic’s ability to metabolize sugar. Blood sugar levels are supposed to rise after you eat. To keep your blood sugar levels from rising too high, your pancreas releases insulin. The researchers found that taking caffeine causes blood sugar and insulin levels to rise even higher after meals. If your blood sugar rises too high, sugar sticks to cells. Once sugar is stuck on a cell membrane, it cannot be released and is converted to a poison called sorbitol Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

The average U.S. adult consumes about two 8-ounce cups (474 milliliters) of coffee a day, which can contain around 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young, healthy adults, caffeine doesn't appear to noticeably affect blood sugar (glucose) levels, and consumption up to 400 milligrams a day appears to be safe. Some studies suggest that drinking coffee, caffeinated and decaffeinated, may actually reduce your risk of developing diabetes. If you already have diabetes, however, the impact of caffeine on insulin action may be associated with higher or lower blood sugar levels. For some people with diabetes, about 200 milligrams of caffeine — or the equivalent of one to two 8-ounce cups (237 to 474 milliliters) of plain, brewed coffee — may cause this effect. Caffeine affects every person differently. If you have diabetes or you're struggling to control your blood sugar levels, limiting the amount of caffeine in your diet may provide a benefit. Continue reading >>

Tea, Coffee And Diabetes

Tea, Coffee And Diabetes

“Tea and coffee drinkers have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes,” reported the BBC, adding that the protection may not be down to caffeine since decaffeinated coffee has the greatest effect. This story is based on a systematic review and meta-analysis that pooled data from studies of the association between tea and coffee consumption and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It found the more tea, coffee or decaffeinated coffee was drunk, the lower the risk of developing diabetes. People should not drink more tea or coffee on the strength of this evidence. The review did not account for diet, exercise and lifestyle, and the studies included were varied. The results do, however, suggest that further research is warranted. Maintaining a healthy weight, choosing a sensible diet and participating in physical activity remain the best ways to protect against type 2 diabetes. Where did the story come from? This research was carried out by Dr Rachel Huxley and colleagues from the University of Sydney. It was funded by the National Heart Foundation of Australia. The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Archives of Internal Medicine . The newspapers highlighted the benefits of tea and coffee based on this research, but generally also reported that other factors such as diet and exercise also play a role. What kind of research was this? This was a systematic review and meta-analysis of a number of studies. The researchers say it has been suggested that coffee may be able to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. To investigate this, they searched scientific databases to look for prospective studies on coffee, decaffeinated coffee and tea that estimated the effect of these drinks on diabetes over time. What did the research involve? The re Continue reading >>

Nine Reasons Your Blood Sugar Can Go Up

Nine Reasons Your Blood Sugar Can Go Up

Diet is the primary way diabetics control the level of sugar in our blood. Doing so, however, is not simple. Here are 9 reasons why blood glucose levels can increase. In order to prevent type 2 diabetes destroying our bodies, we diabetics need to control the glucose floating around in our bloodstream. Many of us are succeeding in doing so by the diets we eat. Sometimes however our diets do not work very well and our blood sugar readings rise for reasons we cannot fathom easily. This may be because of a lack of knowledge of how certain foods or other things can affect the level of glucose in our blood. Here are 9 typical reasons why our blood sugar can rise unexpectedly: caffeine sugar-free food fat-heavy food bagels sports drinks dried fruits a bad cold or flu stress steroids and diuretics Caffeine Drinking coffee, black tea, green tea, and energy drinks, all containing caffeine, has been associated with a small, but detectable rise in blood sugar levels, particularly after meals. This can happen, even if you drink black coffee with zero calories. Two to three cups a day (250mg of caffeine) can have this effect. In one experiment conducted on 10 people with type 2 diabetes, the subjects were given capsules of caffeine (the equivalent of four cups), rather than coffee. This increased their blood glucose levels by up to 8%. But how caffeine raises blood sugar has not been figured out yet. The irony is that coffee, both caffeinated and decaffeinated, has other components that reduce blood glucose, and coffee has been associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Each person reacts differently to drinks containing caffeine, so it’s best to track your own responses to this little kicker and figure out for yourself whether the effect of caffeine on your bloo Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes

Coffee And Diabetes

WHAT we eat and drink affects our health. The relevance of the association is even more significant among those who have pre-diabetes and those who actually have diabetes. Soft drinks, diet or decaf, cola or uncola, or regular, are all harmful, toxic to the body of adults and children. Soft drinks increase the risk for metabolic syndrome. Processed fruit juices are likewise unhealthy. Eating the fresh fruits (or drinking fruit juice you extracted yourself without any additives) is the healthier option. How about coffee, a popular day-starter and afternoon break beverage, one of the most popular drinks in the world? Recent clinical studies have concluded that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk for the development of diabetes. But how about coffee for those who already have pre-diabetes or diabetes? Does it affect the glucose (blood sugar) and A1c levels? A cup of 8 ounce coffee contains 140 milligrams of caffeine. Taking two cups a day, or even consuming up to 400 milligrams of caffeine, appears to be safe for most healthy adults. They did not jack up the blood sugar level significantly when a teaspoon or two of sugar is used. Adding more sugar, creamer, flavoring (which are carbohydrates) to coffee will obviously increase the glucose level to a higher degree among diabetics, unless included in the prescribed daily calorie count. Coffee consumption Worldwide, about 1.4 billion cups of coffee is consumed each day, 45 percent of it (400 million cups) in the United States, according to the International Coffee Organization. But the per capita consumption globally shows that the United States is number 22, drinking 4 kilograms of coffee per person a year, with Scandinavian countries topping it (Finland, 11 kilogram of coffee per person per year; Norway, just below Continue reading >>

Tea And Health: Diabetes

Tea And Health: Diabetes

Tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world. It is also one of the healthiest, playing a role in the treatment of several ailments such as gastric, stress and blood pressure. Diabetes is another such disease that can be controlled by the consumption of tea. What is diabetes? Carbohydrates get transformed into sugar during digestions and the pancreas releases insulin to help the cell absorb glucose which can be used as fuel. When this process is hindered, it leads to diabetes. Those who have Type 2 diabetes are resistant to insulin, which renders it harder to control the levels of their blood sugar. Those who suffer from Type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin at all, as the insulin producing cell of the pancreas is attacked by the body’s immune system. Diabetics have difficulties in metabolizing sugar. In those suffering from Type 2 diabetes, insulin that comes to decrease sugar is not as effective, leading to an increase in blood sugar levels. How tea aid diabetics Green tea is considered to help sensitize the cells improving their capability in metabolizing sugar. Another way in which tea functions against the disease is by helping curb obesity. Tea contains the antioxidant polyphenols, which reduce stress and widens the arteries. This aids in reducing cholesterol and decreasing blood. Polyphenols also regulate glucose which controls diabetes. Black tea is also shown to prevent Type 2 diabetes. This highly fermented brew converts the simple flavonoid compounds to complex compounds. To gain the maximum advantage of tea, it is best to have it without additives such as milk or sugar. This will let you reap the maximum benefits from the drink. It is important to note that tea in itself is not a magical cure, those suffering from diabetes need to focus on physic Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes: Your Need To Know Facts

Coffee And Diabetes: Your Need To Know Facts

Whether you’re a coffee drinker or not, you’re surely aware of this very popular beverage enjoyed by millions of people around the globe. Produced by brewing coffee beans, this caffeinated beverage traces it’s roots back to at least the 15th century in Arabia. At present, it is one of the top traded and highly valued agricultural commodities. Here we're going to explore coffee and diabetes – if it's good for you to drink or not… What is Coffee? Coffee is produced by roasting beans, grinding them into a powder, and brewing the grounds through a filter via hot water. There are various ways of doing this including drip, percolated, and french press. The way you choose to brew it is really your preference as there is little difference in nutrition benefits regardless of the method brewed. While generally served hot, it is increasingly being served cold (referred to as “iced”) often with cream and/or sugar added – or in your case as a diabetic, a suitable sugar alternative. Instant coffee consists of dried soluble grounds, which can be dissolved in hot water mimicking the taste of fresh brewed coffee. Coffee Nutrition Facts Calories in coffee are trace – meaning, you won't be consuming many calories at all, that is, if you drink it black. Keep in mind anything you ADD to coffee might contain more calories – cream and sugar, for example. It terms of vitamins and minerals, coffee contains (per cup): 11% Recommended Daily Value (RDA) vitamin B12 and riboflavin 6% RDA vitamin B6 3% RDA manganese and potassium 2% RDA magnesium and vitamin B3 …which isn’t too bad for a zero calorie drink! One cup of coffee from standard grounds, using tap water, will contain about 40 mg caffeine but there is considerable variation depending on the bean, the brew and the con Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes: How That Morning Cup Could Save Your Life

Coffee And Diabetes: How That Morning Cup Could Save Your Life

There has been a recent storm brewing against coffee, saying that caffeine can affect your sugar levels and that it can give you diabetes. What does SuperFoodsRx think about the connection between coffee and diabetes? Like everything on this site, it’s science based. Studies have shown that caffeine causes a brief reduction in glucose tolerance shortly after consumption. Glucose tolerance is the body’s ability to control blood sugar levels after the ingestion of sugar. When you eat a meal with sugar, carbohydrates, or starch, the stomach breaks down these materials to glucose. Glucose is a simple sugar that can be absorbed and used by the body. After the sugar is absorbed it circulates in the bloodstream. High levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood can cause damage to blood vessels, so the sugar must be stored for later use. The hormone insulin is released by the pancreas to lower the sugar levels in the blood by storing it in the liver and fat cells. A reduction in glucose tolerance would mean the body was not responding appropriately to high sugar levels in the bloodstream. Diabetes is an extreme case of reduced glucose tolerance in which the body cannot lower sugar levels without medications or insulin shots. Many physicians, including myself, consider impaired glucose tolerance a form of pre-diabetes that may become diabetes. How does this tie to coffee? Once researchers saw that caffeine briefly reduced glucose tolerance, they tried to prove that coffee caused diabetes. What they found surprised everyone! Studies over the past five years have shown that drinking caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee can actually reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Some of the studies attributed the decreased risk of diabetes in participants to weight loss which occurred durin Continue reading >>

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