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Is Cornstarch Bad For Diabetics

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

Is there a way to reverse diabetes? Specifically, type 2 diabetes? You might be surprised to discover there are three unbelievable natural remedies that I don’t believe the medical establishment—or, more specifically, the pharmaceutical companies—want you to know about. Why would they not want you to know about this stuff? It’s because the pharmaceutical industry is a gigantic machine which has to sustain itself. The diabetic industry alone is massive, owing to the fact that over 300 million people in the world have type 2 diabetes. The treatments and medication used to treat diabetes are big business, so why would these companies be at all interested in truly reversing diabetes? How would that benefit them financially? Unfortunately, a lot of diabetes drugs don’t actually work, or work with limited success and a lot of potential side effects. Science has shown that—in terms of diabetic management—these drugs are more dangerous than anything. Drugs used in the 1950s, for the most part, have all been taken off the market because they were shown to increase the risk of heart disease. This has even happened recently with drugs like Avandia. It was the world’s most popular Type 2 diabetes drug until it was revealed to have side effects that caused serious heart problems. New drugs haven’t proven to be much better. With that in mind, I’m going to share with you 3 amazing, all-natural solutions to reverse diabetes. Even if you don’t have type 2 diabetes, these solutions can help you prevent it. Here’s something I want you to realize; please never forget this: If you have type two diabetes, it’s not a life sentence. It’s actually one of the easiest—and I don’t say that in a condescending way; I say it in an optimistic way—diseases to completel Continue reading >>

No Starches, No Sugars — Then What?

No Starches, No Sugars — Then What?

People around the world are eating low-carbohydrate diets to treat their diabetes. But all plant foods, other than seeds, are carbs. So what can you eat? Is it all animal products, or are there other options? We know the arguments against eating carbs. Other than fiber, carbs are either sugars or starches that break down into sugars. Since people with diabetes have little to no effective insulin, which is necessary for handling sugars (glucose), they probably shouldn’t eat them. But is this argument totally true? Perhaps not. Vegans and vegetarians tend to eat a lot of carbs, and many of them seem to do quite well with diabetes. Many people in poor countries who cannot afford meat also have relatively low rates of diabetes. So what’s their secret? What are they eating? It seems clear that the successful ones eat very low amounts of refined sugars and simple starches. They may have small amounts of truly whole grains (not stuff that is marketed as “whole grain” but is actually highly processed). They eat small amounts of fruits and starchy vegetables. (Diabetic low-carb guru Dr. Richard Bernstein says he hasn’t eaten a piece of fruit in decades.) What’s left? Well, from a carb standpoint, you can eat as much animal food, like meat and eggs, as you want. They don’t have any carbs (although dairy products do). You can vary that with sea animals — they don’t contain carbs either. There are probably a few health risks from eating so much meat. Your toxic load will be higher, unless you consistently eat organic free-range meat and wild-caught, small fish. You might get too much fat if you overdo it, but advocates like Bernstein have found no problems for themselves or their patients. However, from the standpoint of your wallet, the animals, and the planet, e Continue reading >>

Is Cornstarch Bad For Me?

Is Cornstarch Bad For Me?

Corn starch is one of those ingredients in recipes that usually deters me from making it. Maybe its the notion of what it does to water or the fact that I had never really thought about what it actually was. Either way, its always kind of weirded me out. I got an email from a reader a couple of weeks ago about cornstarch. Im trying to make an effort to eat better and cut out as many processed foods from my diet as possible. Since then, Ive gotten interested in reading ingredient labels and noticed my yogurt had modified corn starch listed in the top 5 ingredients. Would you consider cornstarch unhealthy? Apparently Im not the only one weirded out by cornstarch. This question got me interested in figuring out what exactly corn starch is and how it might contribute nutritionally to foods we buy or recipes we make. It seems simple enough. Cornstarch is starch thats derived from corn. Its made from the tiny white endosperm at the heart of a corn kernel. To get to the endosperm, the kernels are processed so all of the outside shells removed. The endosperms are ground up into the fine white, gritty powder we know as cornstarch. The key word here is processed. Thickener: Cornstarch is used frequently as a thickener when cooking in things likes sauces, gravies and even yogurt. It thickens almost twice as much as flour and thickens clear in liquids rather than opaque. Baked goods: Cornstarch is also gluten free and is frequently used in baked goods to give structure to give them more fullness and moisture. Fried foods: Its occasionally added to batters to give fried foods a light and crispy texture. Cornstarch is essentially a highly processed carbohydrate. It packs about 30 calories or 7 grams of carbohydrate per tablespoon. Theres no protein, fat, vitamins, minerals or fiber. Continue reading >>

Thickener For Use In Diabetic Meals?

Thickener For Use In Diabetic Meals?

If I make something like stew or Beef Stroganoff, is there a better thickener to use than flour, for diabetic eaters? I hate to advocate for another website, but I will, anyway! :) Low Carb Friends has a recipe section--try that. I am recently diagnosed with 'prediabetes' (kinda like being 'a little bit pregnant', I think) and am working hard at reducing carbs in my diet. Lowcarb Friends has lots of good info, but be careful--there are some fanatics on there advocating things that don't have a lot of science behind them. I just made my beanless chili yesterday and used some quinoa to thicken it.Yummy and a nice texture. I use flax alot for thickening or just to add some fibre and added nutrition. A great friend of mine was diagnosed with Diabetes last Summer and has lost an awful lot of weight. I'm trying to get a handle on what to cook for him so that he'll have some meals in the freezer. What he really needs is a woman to take care of him, , but until then, I'm going to try to feed him up a bit. Back to thickening... How about arrowroot or cornstarch? Perhaps my first question should have been...Does it matter that much to the carbs etc, which thickener you use? I see some recipes with flour and bread crumbs in them, but I certainly got the impression that white flour and bread was a huge no-no. As you can see, I'm a real newbie at this. I wonder if there is an "exchange" or substitution list anywhere from regular recipes to diabetic-friendly recipes? My dad is a diabetic and my mom is an excellent cook who always thickened sauces or gravies with flour or corn starch. The amount you get per serving is minimal. My dad has an insulin pump now and has to program in his carbs after eating and doesn't count those because they are so small in the overall meal. I agree with Continue reading >>

Cornstarch Bar To Help Diabetics

Cornstarch Bar To Help Diabetics

A medical food product containing uncooked cornstarch could help type 2 diabetics manage their blood glucose levels and decrease the incidence of nighttime and morning hyperglycemia, new research A medical food product containing uncooked cornstarch could help type 2 diabetics manage their blood glucose levels and decrease the incidence of nighttime and morning hyperglycemia, new research suggests. The study, conducted by researchers in Ventura, California., compared the blood glucose levels of individuals with type 2 diabetes at specific time intervals following the ingestion of an ExtendBar or placebo bar on three consecutive evenings. Study participants who ate the ExtendBar experienced no episodes of hyperglycemia and had significantly lower blood glucose levels at midnight and before breakfast the next morning than those who ate the placebo bar. Copyright - Unless otherwise stated all contents of this web site are 2018 - William Reed Business Media Ltd - All Rights Reserved - Full details for the use of materials on this site can be found in the Terms & Conditions Continue reading >>

10 Bad Foods For Diabetes And Some Good Alternatives

10 Bad Foods For Diabetes And Some Good Alternatives

Some people argue there is no such thing as bad foods and good foods, but when you have a condition like diabetes that is largely dictated by what you eat, these labels carry significant meaning. With that in mind, any discussion of bad foods for diabetes should include some good alternatives so you will not feel deprived or left out. Bad foods and good foods for diabetes Asian food: Oftentimes people believe all Asian food is healthy and low in fat, but the trouble often lies in the preparation methods. Therefore, stay away from deep-fried entrees (including anything labeled tempura) and spring rolls, sauces thickened with cornstarch, and breaded foods. Instead, choose entrees that include lots of steamed or lightly stir-fried veggies, plain fish or chicken, and thin sauces (on the side if possible). Choose steamed brown rice (one-third cup) rather than white, and low-sodium soy sauce. Candy: This category of bad foods is no surprise, but it can be one of the hardest ones to handle if you have a sweet tooth. Candy in the form of chocolate, hard candies, caramels, and others can send your blood sugar levels soaring while filling you with empty calories. Yes, you could choose artificially sweetened diabetic candies, but research has shown again and again that use of artificial sweeteners actually increases a person’s cravings for sweets. Therefore, good food alternatives to candy include fresh fruit, frozen fruit pops made with real fruit, and frozen grapes or bananas. Coffee drinks: Yes, coffee has been shown to be beneficial for diabetes, but the line is drawn when it comes to the high-calorie, high-carb coffee drinks you buy at cafes and specialty coffee shops. Save yourself calories and money while keeping your blood sugar levels in line by adding a dash of cinnamo Continue reading >>

A Simple List Of Foods Prediabetics Should Avoid

A Simple List Of Foods Prediabetics Should Avoid

If your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, your body is telling you to adjust your diet. When you’re prediabetic, you can bring those numbers down through a diet of fresh, whole foods. Steer clear of processed foods, which often contain high levels of ingredients that aren’t your friends, and rethink your protein choices. Sweetened beverages may be the biggest culprits in increasing your diabetes risk, according to multiple studies cited by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. When you’re prediabetic, avoid sugary drinks such as: For the best beverage choices, choose water or club soda flavored with slices of citrus fruit or cucumber, plain coffee, unsweetened tea and unflavored sports drinks. The American Heart Association advises against alcoholic drinks, but if you occasionally indulge, opt for a mixer like club soda or tonic. Foods with Added Sugar Manufacturers add sugar to most processed foods to improve flavor and shelf life. The Nutrition Facts label tells you the grams of sugar in a serving. If sugar tops the ingredients list – or words like “syrup” or anything ending in “-ose” – chances are the product contains too much of the added sweet stuff. Some examples of commercially manufactured products that prediabetics should use sparingly or avoid completely include: baked goods, like cookies, cakes and pies cereal granola bars frozen desserts tomato sauce and ketchup salad dressings, barbecue sauce and marinades fruit-flavored yogurt jams and jellies Refined Grains White rice, white pasta and white flour products like bread are examples of refined grains that can spike your glucose levels. Switch out these foods for whole grains like brown rice, oats and oat bran, whole wheat, quinoa, millet and corn. Trans Fats While olive o Continue reading >>

Top 5 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Top 5 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

When it comes to type 2 diabetes there are foods you want to avoid and you most likely know that most of these foods are the types of foods that are high in carbohydrates. That’s because when it comes to type 2 diabetes, counting carbs is important to regulate blood sugar. But there are some foods that can be a trap when it comes to choices. So here is a list of the top 5 foods to avoid with diabetes and why! 1. Fruit Juice When I talk to people there seems to be a VERY common belief that fruit juice is “healthy” for us. If we drink a glass of orange juice, we are doing ourselves a favor right? Wrong! Fruit juice is NOT a healthy option. This is a common misconception because fruit juice is VERY high in sugar and in particular fructose. This is problematic for anyone, let alone someone that has diabetes. It’s perfectly fine to eat a piece of fruit. Fruit is designed by nature to contain lots of soluble fiber, so when we eat the fruit whole it slows down the digestion of the sugar and fructose. The whole fruit is also full of vitamins and minerals we need as well. But when we juice the fruit, all the fiber is stripped out of the fruit, the sugar content increases, and the vitamin and mineral level decreases. We also tend to have more than one piece of fruit in a beverage. For example, it’s easy to squeeze 3 oranges to make a glass of juice but we probably wouldn’t eat 3 oranges at one sitting. It’s easy to make the mistake of drinking fruit juice as a healthy option but it won’t help you regulate your blood sugar, so stick to eating the whole fruit. 2. Breakfast Cereals I always say that the cardboard box has more nutrition than the cereal itself, and while that is not completely true I think it states the obvious. Breakfast cereals are NOT a good choice Continue reading >>

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

Certain foods can send your blood sugar level on a roller coaster, with insulin rushing to keep up. The good news is, while there are some surprises, most of these foods fall under the same category: processed food, such as white flour and sugar. "Refined flours and sugar cause huge spikes in insulin and get absorbed quickly, which causes problems," says Mark Hyman,… Continue reading >>

Is Corn A Bad Food To Eat With Diabetes?

Is Corn A Bad Food To Eat With Diabetes?

If you are diabetic, well-meaning friends or family might have warned you away from corn as a starchy, carbohydrate-rich food you shouldn't eat. But corn offers plenty of nutritional benefits that make it worth the extra effort to include it as part of a balanced diabetic diet. The trick to including corn in your eating plan is to balance it with sources of protein and fat that can mitigate the effect of carbohydrate-rich foods on blood glucose levels. Video of the Day People with diabetes can't properly process glucose and use it for energy. Instead, their production or use of insulin, the hormone responsible for converting glucose to fuel, is hampered, leading to episodes of extremely high blood sugar levels. A diagnosis of diabetes typically requires a blood glucose level of 200 mg/dL or more during a random test or one over 126 mg/dL after an eight-hour fast. Over 23 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. Carbohydrates can cause blood sugar to rise, so diabetics typically have to pay close attention to the carbohydrates in their diet. This can be done through counting carbohydrates and limiting the specific amount allowed per meal, by using an exchange system to swap out specific carbohydrate-containing foods with others or by using the glycemic index, a measure of blood sugar response to specific carbohydrate-containing foods. Corn is high in starch, a type of carbohydrate that can quickly raise blood sugar levels. This doesn't mean that as a diabetic you need to completely forgo corn, however. Corn contains plenty of healthy nutrients, including iron, vitamins A and B-6, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese and selenium. It also provides a high level of fiber and is c Continue reading >>

Cornstarch - Do You Use It?

Cornstarch - Do You Use It?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Is it really slow - does it raise your BG. I almost hate to ask that since it is a corn product. BUT, is it so slow it does not raise your BG. Cornstarch. Cornstarch does more than just thicken your gravy. Its a starch thats digested and absorbed slowly, so it helps maintain a stable amount of glucose in your bloodstream over a period of time. It can also head off trouble if you have insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes. Type I diabetics are particularly prone to low blood glucose levels overnight. Researchers discovered that uncooked cornstarch dissolved in a nonsugary drink, such as milk or sugar-free soda, helped control diabetics blood glucose levels overnight. But remember before trying this remedy, talk with your doctor. Look for new snack bars that contain sucrose, protein, and uncooked cornstarch. These three ingredients release glucose at different speeds, giving you both immediate and long-term help for hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. This infers there is not a huge spike with cornstarch. Larry King Arthur Flour sells a product called 5 in 1 flour, it is a corn starch that has 60% resistant starch. (the starch you are not able to digest in your small intestine.) I used this for coating chicken and fish when frying, had little trouble with it. It makes a very crispy fried food, delicious. I have also mixed 40 grams of this product in a glass of water, (resistant starch is not soluble in water) and let it sit over night in the frig. Poured off the water and the soluable starch, mixed it with 2 tblspn of ground flax seed and more water, drank it straight up. Taste a little corny. (no Continue reading >>

Why Resistant Starch Matters

Why Resistant Starch Matters

Would you believe me if I told you that potato starch can help drop your sugars and reduce your weight? Let me explain about an important nutrient that you can easily add to your diet. We know that ‘starch’ is bad for us, it converts into glucose and sends blood sugars sky high - so what makes this so different? Resistant starch is also known as the 3rd type of fibre. It is a substance that your body can’t digest but for the friendly bacteria in your digestive system it’s their food. It is resistant to your digestion. Many studies have demonstrated that there are lots of beneficial effects for our health. Research is constantly highlighting the important role that our gut bacteria play in our health. The bacteria in our digestive system outnumber our cells 10-1 and they weight 3 lbs - it makes sense that our health is intimately connected. The collective name for all the bacteria that live in our digestive system is microbiome and they are critical when it comes to our overall health and have a big role to play in diabetes and obesity too. Feed the bugs Feeding your microbiome (the good gut bacteria) – and the cells that line your intestines – seems to affect hormone levels in the body (GLP-1 etc.), which in turn has a positive effect on blood sugars and the body's sensitivity to insulin. Our ancestors had a diet rich in resistant starch, it is only as our diet has become more processed that resistant starch starting reducing in our diet. Resistant starch is the perfect food for your microbiome and the benefit for you is that they convert the starch into short chain fatty acids that help with bowel health and impact When the bacteria digest the resistant starch they produce a number of really important chemicals, one of which is called butyrate Butyrate is t Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Corn Starch And Glucose

The Relationship Between Corn Starch And Glucose

Glucose can come from corn starch.Photo Credit: tugbastock/iStock/Getty Images The Relationship Between Corn Starch and Glucose Kirstin Hendrickson is a writer, teacher, coach, athlete and author of the textbook "Chemistry In The World." She's been teaching and writing about health, wellness and nutrition for more than 10 years. She has a Bachelor of Science in zoology, a Bachelor of Science in psychology, a Master of Science in chemistry and a doctoral degree in bioorganic chemistry. There's so much information about carbohydrates and how they affect your body that you might wonder how they're all related to one another and where they come from. Glucose, a kind of sugar, can come from many places, but one common source of industrial glucose is corn starch, which comes from a specific part of the corn kernel. Corn kernels, like kernels of other grains, have many parts. They're surrounded by a tough outer coating that is high in fiber and protects the delicate contents inside. They also have a protein-rich germ, or portion of the corn that will sprout into a new plant. This is surrounded by a carbohydrate-rich mass called the endosperm. Corn starch comes from this endosperm. It consists of molecules of amylose, commonly called starch, explain Drs. Reginald Garrett and Charles Grisham in their book "Biochemistry." Because of the source, the amylose from corn is called corn starch, but it's chemically identical to starch from other plants. Glucose is a kind of sugar. Specifically, it's a monosaccharide, which means that it's a sugar in its own right but is also a building block of larger sugars and other carbohydrates, including fiber and starch. In fact, amylose is nothing more than long chains of glucose molecules chemically bonded to one another, explain Drs. Mary Camp Continue reading >>

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

When it comes to flours, making the right choice is very important to blood sugar control. So we've gathered some great info here for you to use in your kitchen and menu preparations. Are Grains & Flour Really Good For Fiber? We've often been told that eating whole grains is a great source of fiber. And while ‘whole grains' do provide some fiber they are not the only thing that provide us with our daily fiber needs, vegetables do too. For example: 1 slice of wholewheat bread has 1.9 g of fiber, while a carrot has 2.3 g. All grains and vegetables do range in fiber content, but vegetables are a great source of daily fiber and are also higher in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants than grains. So we don't have to eat grains in order to get adequate fiber. Changing A Grain Into A Flour Changes The Way It Affects Blood Sugar Often when we take a grain and make it into flour, it changes the carb and fiber content. So what tends to happen for you as a diabetic is that most types of flours will make your blood sugar spike like wild fire. At least that's what most people experience, which is why our meal plans contain virtually no grain flours at all. An example of this is buckwheat. Eaten whole it has a glycemic index (GI) of around 49, which is a low GI. But take it and turn it into bread and it changes to a GI of 67, meaning it affects your blood sugar more rapidly and more intensely than eating the whole grain itself. Here is another example using wheat. Whole wheat kernals are a very low GI of 30, but we don't tend to eat whole wheat kernals, we eat whole wheat flour and it has an average GI of around 74. Whole Grain Flours Are A Better Option It's true that whole grains are better as far as nutrition goes. As the Minnesota Department of Health explains, the whole grain Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

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