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Is Corn Bad For Diabetes?

Are Cornflakes Good For Diabetes?

Are Cornflakes Good For Diabetes?

Are you a diabetic patient? If so, then, you must be very much careful about what you eat. Lately, a fad for eating packaged foods offering high nutrition and vitamins sans any calories is on the rise. And one of the most popular packaged breakfast options is cornflakes. But then, is cornflakes the right food for diabetics? Does it help in the treatment of diabetes? This post has the answers. Read on to know more! Are Cornflakes A Health Food? Breakfast is necessary for everyone as it provides the required amount of energy necessary to sail comfortably through the day. Mornings are tough and hectic, and hence, many households opt for instant fix breakfast. But using milk and cornflakes as a healthy breakfast cereal is a bad choice because cornflakes are not exactly a health food. Cornflakes are made up of corn, malt flavoring, sugar and high fructose corn syrup. Most of the cornflakes brands in the market have high Glycemic index (GI), which increases the risk of diabetes (1). Diabetes And Glycemic Index: To understand the negative effect of cornflakes on diabetics, it is very important to know about Glycemic index. The GI is used to measure how a carbohydrate rich food increases the level of glucose in the blood (2). It means, food with high GI raises the blood glucose levels more than a food having low or medium GI. Hence, diabetic patients need to choose foods that have medium or low GI and plan their meals accordingly (3). In case you are eating a high GI food in your meal in the morning, you must balance it by eating low GI food in the evening. Cornflakes, as mentioned earlier, are rich in carbohydrates. Hence, they have high GI, which means they are not good for diabetes patients. Low Protein Food – Cornflakes: Cornflakes are a low protein food, which although m Continue reading >>

6 Facts About Popcorn And Diabetes (#good Or Bad ?)

6 Facts About Popcorn And Diabetes (#good Or Bad ?)

Researches report that popcorn is rich of fitonutrient. It also contains polyphenol twice more than a portion of fruit. If we eat popcorn only during cinema time, it means we miss one of the healthiest seeds. We can eat 3 cups of popcorn for gaining 99 calorie and 4 gram fiber. Sponsors Link 6 Connections between Popcorn and Diabetes Patients: 1. Whole Grain. Inside of these whole seeds, there are parts called germ, bran and endosperm. The germ contains healthy oil, vitamin E, protein, a lot of vitamin B, and mineral. Meanwhile, the bran contains a lot of fiber, vitamin B, mineral, protein, and antioxidant. And in endosperm we can find flour content that is rich of protein and fiber. As popcorn is made of corn seeds. People who eat popcorn automatically consume 250% more whole seeds than people who do not eat popcorn. 2. Rich of Fiber. In popcorn contains 4 gram of diet fiber. These 4 gram of diet fiber can be gained in 4 cups of popcorn. Most popcorn is consumed more than 4 cups so that it can meet the 25 gram fiber intake in women and 38 gram fiber intake in men. The regular intake of fiber can decrease the risk of cardiovascular or heart disease. It also levels down the cholesterol in our blood and decrease the risk of suffering diabetes type 2 because it flows our blood flow well. 3. Polyphenols. There is high antioxidant found in popcorn. It is indeed higher than expected. The antioxidant in popcorn is in the form of polyphenols. It is in the corn skin that is not peeled when popcorn is cooked. Peeling skin corn when it is cooked becomes popcorn will reduce the benefit of polyphenols. The sufficient intake of polyphenols is beneficial to prevent our body from heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Polyphenols is powerful to prevent us from free radicals and reduce th Continue reading >>

Is Corn Good For Diabetics

Is Corn Good For Diabetics

Well-meaning family and friends may have advised you away from corns as a carb-rich, starchy food you can’t eat. And it is basically processed food. But for diabetics, corn is beneficial because of nutrients like Vitamin B5, C and B3 and it is also rich in antioxidants. It can help your body develop better blood sugar control. Anyway, with controlled blood sugar, only a little corn is allowed. The trick to including corns in your meal plan is to well balance it with sources of fat and proteins that will mitigate the effect of carb-rich foods on the blood sugar levels. Corn is categorized as starch, a type of carb, so it is only allowed in small portions for people with type 2 diabetes. It means that as a diabetic you don’t need to forgo corn completely. Corn is also high in fiber as well as is considered a greatly whole-grain food. It also has plenty of healthy nutrients, such as selenium, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, folate, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamins B-6 and A and iron. You can properly include it in your diabetic diet, just eat it along with foods including fat and protein and also cut down on the amount of foods you eat. Limit your consumption to one-half cut of the kernels or one ear of corn at any given meal. Anyway, you should not just eat corn and stop medication without checking with your doctor. The High Fructose Corn Syrup mainly use corn as its ingredient. HFCS is also added to lots of packaged and preserved food. Badly the syrup surely is responsible for big unnatural sugar spikes. With certain strategy, you can help prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. HFC2 is on the list for lots of chronic conditions, like obesity, cardiovascular, diabetes and some other lifestyle related conditions. If you really enjoy eating corn, you should b Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Eating Corn & Being Diabetic

The Effects Of Eating Corn & Being Diabetic

While corn is a staple vegetable for many people, some may worry about the effects of eating corn and being diabetic. Fortunately for people with diabetes, corn is a nutrient-rich food classified as a starch on the Diabetes Food Pyramid, along with grains, potatoes, peas and beans. With a glycemic index (GI) of 42, corn is also classified as a low-GI food, meaning that corn raises blood sugar by a relatively small amount. The healthy effects of eating corn may be negated, however, by consuming the wrong type of corn products. Improved Metabolism One of the most important links between corn and diabetes is the high level of pantothenic acid found in corn. A B vitamin used in processing carbohydrates and protein, pantothenic acid is important for helping people with diabetes maintain a healthy weight through improved metabolic function and for managing blood sugar levels. Improved Heart Health Another one of the major healthy effects of eating corn is a decreased risk of heart disease, heart attack and stroke associated with folate, another nutrient found in corn. A cup of corn contains 19 percent of the recommended daily value for folate intake. Improved Digestive Health Fiber in corn and other starches is an important part of nutrition and overall digestive health for people with diabetes. The high levels of folate found in corn that make corn a heart-healthy food also contribute to digestive health as well, with folate offering a lower risk of colon cancer as one of the benefits of eating corn. High Levels of Sodium and Fat Eating canned corn with salt added, or adding table salt and butter to fresh corn, can cause people with diabetes to unconsciously consume unhealthy amounts of sodium and fat when eating corn with a meal. Butter and other fats should be eaten sparin Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet is one of the most important treatments in managing diabetes and kidney disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease as a result of diabetes, you’ll need to work with a dietitian to create an eating plan that’s right for you. This plan will help manage your blood glucose levels and reduce the amount of waste and fluid your kidneys process. Which nutrients do I need to regulate? Your dietitian will give you nutritional guidelines that tell you how much protein, fat and carbohydrate you can eat, as well as how much potassium, phosphorus and sodium you can have each day. Because your diet needs to be lower in these minerals, you’ll limit or avoid certain foods, while planning your meals. Portion control is also important. Talk to your dietitian regarding tips for accurately measuring a serving size. What may be measured as one serving on a regular diet may count as three servings on the kidney diet. Your doctor and dietitian will also recommend you eat meals and snacks of the same size and calorie/carbohydrate content at certain times of the day to keep your blood glucose at an even level. .It’s important to check blood glucose levels often and share the results with your doctor. What can I eat? Below is an example of food choices that are usually recommended on a typical renal diabetic diet. This list is based on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and high sugar content of foods included. Ask your dietitian if you can have any of these listed foods and make sure you know what the recommended serving size should be. Carbohydrate Foods Milk and nondairy Recommended Avoid Skim or fat-free milk, non-dairy creamer, plain yogurt, sugar-free yogurt, sugar-free pudding, sugar-free ice cream, sugar-free nondairy frozen desserts* *Portions of dairy products are o Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Chips

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Chips

Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living W Continue reading >>

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

If you have type 2 diabetes — the most common form of diabetes — eating a healthy, well-balanced diet is critical to controlling your weight, blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol. By enriching your diet and creating a meal plan tailored to your personal preferences and lifestyle, you'll be able to enjoy the foods you love while minimizing complications and reducing further risk. Although there isn’t any research that directly supports individual dietary choices in the fight against type 2 diabetes, it doesn’t hurt to maintain a balanced diet. More often than not, the average diet is lacking in these key nutrients: calcium magnesium fiber potassium vitamins A, C, D, and E vitamin B-12 for those on metformin Adding foods rich in these nutrients is often a great first step in diabetes management. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the following are considered to be diabetes superfoods: Fat-free milk and yogurt are both a good source of vitamin D, which promotes strong bones and teeth. Whole grains containing germ and bran are often rich in magnesium, chromium, and folate. Regardless of the type, berries are an excellent source of antioxidants and fiber. Citrus fruits, such as oranges, lemons, and limes, are high in vitamin C. Not only are beans high in fiber, they’re a solid source of potassium and magnesium. Omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce your risk of heart disease, so don’t shy away from salmon dishes. In addition to providing magnesium and fiber, nuts can help with hunger management. Some nuts and seeds also contain omega-3s. Tomatoes contain crucial nutrients such as vitamins C and E. Swap regular potatoes for sweet potatoes, which are chock-full of potassium and vitamin A. Dark green leafy vegetables like collards and kale a Continue reading >>

Vegetables To The Rescue

Vegetables To The Rescue

Many experts say that people with diabetes shouldn’t eat much flour or sugar. I agree. But other nutritional authorities don’t want you to eat saturated fats, either. So what CAN you eat? My answer: Try vegetables! For 30 years I’ve been preaching to people to eat more vegetables. I even wrote songs about them. Nobody listened. Until now. All of a sudden, vegetables are becoming trendy. Michelle Obama says cover half your plate with fruits and vegetables. Holistic doctor Terry Wahls, MD, says eat three full plates of them a day. As a vegetable advocate, I’m in heaven. But why should you eat vegetables? Which ones are best, and why aren’t you eating them yet? Types of Vegetables Few Americans grew up eating many green things, and most don’t know anything about them. Did you know there are multiple different categories of vegetables, each with different nutrients and flavors? Here are some types, courtesy of Wikipedia and the excellent Nutrition Data Web site. • Flower buds. These include broccoli, cauliflower, and artichokes. Broccoli is very high in vitamins A, C, E, and K; cooked broccoli has a glycemic load (GL) of 3 (a GL of 10 or under is considered low), is considered anti-inflammatory, and contains proteins and lots of fiber. • Seeds. Includes sweet corn, peas, and beans. Green peas are high in B vitamins and many minerals. They have a GL of 7, but are considered mildly pro-inflammatory, unlike most other vegetables. • Leaves. Leafy greens are my favorite, and include kale, collard greens, spinach, arugula, beet greens, bok choy, chard, and many others. Kale, in particular has become the rock star of vegetables. I see it featured in supermarkets all the time. Boiled kale has an almost non-existent GL of 3 and a sky-high anti-inflammatory score of Continue reading >>

Top 5 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Top 5 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

When it comes to type 2 diabetes there are foods you want to avoid and you most likely know that most of these foods are the types of foods that are high in carbohydrates. That’s because when it comes to type 2 diabetes, counting carbs is important to regulate blood sugar. But there are some foods that can be a trap when it comes to choices. So here is a list of the top 5 foods to avoid with diabetes and why! 1. Fruit Juice When I talk to people there seems to be a VERY common belief that fruit juice is “healthy” for us. If we drink a glass of orange juice, we are doing ourselves a favor right? Wrong! Fruit juice is NOT a healthy option. This is a common misconception because fruit juice is VERY high in sugar and in particular fructose. This is problematic for anyone, let alone someone that has diabetes. It’s perfectly fine to eat a piece of fruit. Fruit is designed by nature to contain lots of soluble fiber, so when we eat the fruit whole it slows down the digestion of the sugar and fructose. The whole fruit is also full of vitamins and minerals we need as well. But when we juice the fruit, all the fiber is stripped out of the fruit, the sugar content increases, and the vitamin and mineral level decreases. We also tend to have more than one piece of fruit in a beverage. For example, it’s easy to squeeze 3 oranges to make a glass of juice but we probably wouldn’t eat 3 oranges at one sitting. It’s easy to make the mistake of drinking fruit juice as a healthy option but it won’t help you regulate your blood sugar, so stick to eating the whole fruit. 2. Breakfast Cereals I always say that the cardboard box has more nutrition than the cereal itself, and while that is not completely true I think it states the obvious. Breakfast cereals are NOT a good choice Continue reading >>

Are Foods High In Corn Syrup Bad For Diabetics?

Are Foods High In Corn Syrup Bad For Diabetics?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Top 3 Diabetes Myths, Busted: Fruit, Starchy Vegetables, And Blood Glucose

Top 3 Diabetes Myths, Busted: Fruit, Starchy Vegetables, And Blood Glucose

Almost 10 percent of Americans have diabetes and that number is growing. Unfortunately, the myths surrounding diabetes are as widespread as the disorder itself. Here we debunk the most common diabetes myths. For the past 50 years, people diagnosed with all forms of diabetes have been advised to eat low-carb diets high in fat and protein, and to avoid eating high-carbohydrate foods like fruits, potatoes, squash, corn, beans, lentils, and whole grains. Despite this popular opinion, more than 85 years of scientific research clearly demonstrates that a low-fat, plant-based whole foods diet is the single most effective dietary approach for managing type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This means that a low-fat diet—not a low-carb diet—has been shown across the board to minimize oral medication and insulin use, stabilize blood glucose, and dramatically reduce long-term disease risk in people with diabetes. Myth #1: You Develop Type 2 Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar Eating sweets is not a direct cause of type 2 diabetes. People develop type 2 diabetes over time by slowly developing a resistance to insulin, the hormone that escorts glucose out of your blood and into tissues like your muscle and liver. I like to think of type 2 diabetes as a very advanced form of insulin resistance in which glucose remains trapped in your blood because your body cannot use insulin properly. In this way, elevated blood glucose is a symptom of diabetes, and NOT the root cause. The real cause of insulin resistance is dietary fat. We discussed it at length in this article. People with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are told to eat foods that are low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein simply because they don’t create an immediate need for insulin. But in the hours and days after a meal hi Continue reading >>

> Carbohydrates And Diabetes

> Carbohydrates And Diabetes

Keeping your blood sugar levels on track means watching what you eat, plus taking medicines like insulin if you need to. Your doctor may also have mentioned that you should keep track of how many carbohydrates (carbs) you eat. But what exactly are carbohydrates and how do they affect your blood sugar? The foods we eat contain nutrients that provide energy and other things the body needs, and one of these is carbohydrates. The two main forms of carbohydrates are: sugars such as fructose, glucose, and lactose starches, which are found in foods such as starchy vegetables (like potatoes or corn), grains, rice, breads, and cereals The body breaks down or converts most carbohydrates into the sugar glucose. Glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream, and with the help of a hormone called insulin it travels into the cells of the body where it can be used for energy. People with diabetes have problems with insulin that can cause blood sugar levels to rise. For people with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas loses the ability to make insulin. For people with type 2 diabetes, the body can't respond normally to the insulin that is made. Because the body turns carbohydrates into glucose, eating carbohydrates makes blood sugar levels rise. But that doesn't mean you should avoid carbohydrates if you have diabetes. Carbohydrates are a healthy and important part of a nutritious diet. Some carbohydrates have more health benefits than others, though. For example, whole-grain foods and fruits are healthier choices than candy and soda because they provide fiber, vitamins, and other nutrients. Fiber is important because it helps you feel full and keeps your digestive system working properly. In fact, eating lots of fiber can even help to slow the body's absorption of sugar when eaten together with s Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Popcorn is one of life's little snacking pleasures -- after all, who could imagine going to see a flick without stopping by the snack counter for a small bucket? While people with diabetes should try to avoid the highly salted and buttery versions, popcorn can still be safely incorporated into the diabetic diet. Popcorn has high fiber and a low glycemic load compared to many other snack foods, so as long as it is consumed in moderation it makes a healthy addition to the diabetic diet. Nutritional Content of Popcorn Like any whole grain source of carbohydrate, air-popped and unprocessed popcorn is an excellent source of nutrients for individuals with diabetes. Most "light" popcorns contain 80 to 100 calories and 3 grams of fiber per serving. Because it is made from corn, which is a whole grain, popcorn does not impact blood sugar levels as dramatically as other sugary snack foods. In fact, one serving of popcorn has a glycemic load that is 2 to 4 times lower than other snack foods, such as raisins, graham crackers, or potato chips. The Diabetic Portion Size of Popcorn According to the American Diabetes Association, one diabetic portion size of popcorn equals 3 cups of popped popcorn, or approximately 15 grams of carbohydrates. Because individuals with diabetes can consume between 15 and 30 grams of carbohydrate for snacks, no more than two servings or 6 cups of popcorn should be consumed at one time. Most individual, 1 ounce bags of microwave popcorn bags contain approximately 21 grams of carbohydrate, making these portions perfect for individuals with diabetes. Choosing the Right Popcorn Individuals with diabetes must be mindful of the type of popcorn they consume because many versions have added fats, sugars and salts. When selecting popcorn at the grocery store, indiv Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet - Gestational

Diabetes Diet - Gestational

For a balanced diet, you need to eat a variety of healthy foods. Reading food labels can help you make healthy choices when you shop. If you are a vegetarian or on a special diet, talk with your health care provider to make sure you're getting a balanced diet. In general, you should eat: Plenty of whole fruits and vegetables Moderate amounts of lean proteins and healthy fats Moderate amounts of whole grains, such as bread, cereal, pasta, and rice, plus starchy vegetables, such as corn and peas Fewer foods that have a lot of sugar, such as soft drinks, fruit juices, and pastries You should eat three small- to moderate-sized meals and one or more snacks each day. Do not skip meals and snacks. Keep the amount and types of food (carbohydrates, fats, and proteins) the same from day to day. This can help you keep your blood sugar stable. CARBOHYDRATES Less than half the calories you eat should come from carbohydrates. Most carbohydrates are found in starchy or sugary foods. They include bread, rice, pasta, cereal, potatoes, peas, corn, fruit, fruit juice, milk, yogurt, cookies, candy, soda, and other sweets. High-fiber, whole-grain carbohydrates are healthy choices. Vegetables are good for your health and your blood sugar. Enjoy lots of them. Carbohydrates in food are measured in grams. You can learn to count the amount of carbohydrates in the foods that you eat. GRAINS, BEANS, AND STARCHY VEGETABLES Eat 6 or more servings a day. One serving equals: 1 slice bread 1 ounce (28 grams) ready-to-eat cereal 1/2 cup (105 grams) cooked rice or pasta 1 English muffin Choose foods loaded with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and healthy carbohydrates. They include: Whole-grain breads and crackers Whole grain cereals Whole grains, such as barley or oats Beans Brown or wild rice Whole-wheat pa Continue reading >>

The Glycemic Index

The Glycemic Index

The Glycemic Index (GI) is a scale that ranks carbohydrate-rich foods by how much they raise blood glucose (sugar) levels compared to a standard food. The standard food is glucose or white bread. Why should I eat foods with a low Glycemic Index? Eating foods with a low Glycemic Index may help you to: Control your blood glucose (sugar) level Control your cholesterol level Control your appetite Lower your risk of developing heart disease Lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes Meal planning ideas Use these meal planning ideas to include the Glycemic Index as part of healthy eating. Enjoy vegetables, most fruits and low-fat milk products with your meals. These are carbohydrate-rich foods that, in general, have low glycemic index. Plan your meals with foods in the low and medium Glycemic Index starch choices on the list that follows. Try foods such as barley, bulgar, or lentils, which have a low Glycemic Index. Consult a registered dietitian for help with choosing low GI foods, adapting recipes, and other ways to incorporate low GI foods in your meal plan. If I eat foods with a low Glycemic Index can I eat as much as I want? No. Using the Glycemic Index to choose foods is only one part of healthy eating. Healthy eating also means: Eating at regular times Choosing a variety of foods from all food groups Limiting sugars and sweets Reducing the amount of fat you eat Including foods high in fibre Limiting salt Remember that checking your blood glucose (sugar) before and two hours after a meal is the best way to know how your body handles the meal. A lot of starchy foods have a high Glycemic Index (GI). Choose medium and low GI foods more often. LOW GI (55 or less)*† Choose most often MEDIUM GI (56-69)*† Choose more often HIGH GI (70 or more)*† Choose less often BREA Continue reading >>

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