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Is Coke Life Ok For Diabetics

Can I Drink Coca‑cola If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Drink Coca‑cola If I Have Diabetes?

We recommend that anyone with diabetes who has questions about their diet contact their doctor. For people who want to reduce their sugar and calorie intake, including those with diabetes, we offer a variety of great-tasting drinks with reduced, low or no sugar and calories, like Diet Coke, Coca-Cola Zero Sugar, Fanta Zero and Sprite Zero. It’s also why we offer many of our drinks in small pack sizes. We provide information on how much sugar and how many calories are in our drinks, so people can choose what makes sense for them and their families For more information visit Diabetes UK. Continue reading >>

Coca-cola Life: Coke With Fewer Calories And Less Sugar To Tackle Obesity

Coca-cola Life: Coke With Fewer Calories And Less Sugar To Tackle Obesity

Coca-Cola Life: Coke with fewer calories and less sugar to tackle obesity Critics say the new drink still contains more than four teaspoons of sugar, one quarter of a child's recommended daily intake Rebecca Smithers , consumer affairs correspondent First published on Tue 10 Jun 2014 19.01EDT Coca-Cola is to launch a naturally sweetened drink in green cans as its response to an official anti-obesity drive. Photograph: Coca-Cola/PA Coca-Cola has announced plans to launch a new version of its bestselling soft drink with a third less sugar and a third fewer calories as part of government and industry efforts to tackle obesity. Coca-Cola Life, first piloted in Argentina and Chile last year, is sweetened from natural ingredients rather than artificial sweeteners and will launch in the UK in the autumn. It is the first new Coca-Cola to be launched in the UK since the arrival of Coca-Cola Zero in 2006, a low-calorie version targeted at men. The company said the new drink would help meet its pledges made under the UK government's voluntary anti-obesity drive the responsibility deal and would offer consumers a greater choice. But health campaigners said the company was misleading shoppers as the new product was still laden with sugar more than four teaspoons of sugar per 330ml can equivalent to one quarter of a child's daily recommended maximum intake. Sweetened with a blend of sugar and naturally sourced stevia leaf extract, a 330ml can of Coca-Cola Life contains 89 calories and will feature striking green branding that will contrast with the familiar red packaging. A can of standard Coca-Cola contains 139 calories. An extract from the stevia plant , which is native to South America, is already used in the company's Sprite and Glacau vitamin water, as well as by other manufact Continue reading >>

Coke Life: The Nutritionists' Opinion

Coke Life: The Nutritionists' Opinion

Packaged in a virtuous looking green bottle and fronted by picture of health, British supermodel Rosie Huntington Whiteley, the latest drink offering from Coca-Cola has us intrigued Coca-Cola Life the first UK launch in eight years is branded as a natural, healthy addition to the Coca-Cola family; a response to the recent anti-sugar media obsession and a comeback to growing concerns surrounding the artificial sweeteners found in zero calorie drinks such as Diet Coke. Confused by the marketing jargon and misleading labelling we decided to get an expert opinion on the nutritional value of Coca-Colas healthy alternative. We spoke with three GTG expert nutritionists: Vicki Edgson , Gabriela Peacock and Karen Cummings Palmer , and this is what we found out Coca-Cola Life is the newest low calorie version of Coke, sweetened with cane sugar and stevia leaf extract (a natural herb native to South America and previously used by Coca-Cola in Sprite and Glacau Vitamin Water). Although coming in at a respectable 89 calories per can (51 less calories than regular Coca-Cola) the drink contains the equivalent of a whopping four teaspoons of sugar - nearly half the daily allowance for women. As Gabriela confirms: It is still an artificially flavoured carbonated drink with no nutritional properties. Whilst Stevia might appear to be an improvement on the use of artificial sweeteners, 'it still behaves like a sugar in the digestive system', said Vicki. The nutritionists were all in agreement that Coca Cola Life is not a healthy alternative. Unfortunately sugar, even of the natural kind, is not good for your health. Gabriella confirms that 'sugar is implicated in a range of health related problems such as tooth decay and type 2 diabetes, so sweetened carbonated drinks should be drunk only Continue reading >>

A Rose By Any Other Name: The Low-down On Healthycoke

A Rose By Any Other Name: The Low-down On Healthycoke

Coca-Cola has announced it will launch its newest soft drink in the Australian market in April 2015 . Strongly promoted as healthy Coke elsewhere, Coca-Cola Life may do more to improve the companys finances than the health of its consumers. The product was piloted in parts of South America, and launched in the United Kingdom and the United States in September. An analysis of social media conversations in the UK reported the jury is out on whether consumers like the taste of the new product. Like its forthcoming competitor Pepsi True , Coca-Cola Life is packaged in a green can. Both adults and children are known to perceive food with green packaging, or green nutrition labels, as being healthier than identical food packaged in other colours. While many are surprised by The Coca-Cola Companys move away from its iconic red labelling, there may be an even more subtle reason for it than the (marketing) goodness of green. A recent European study found people drink less soft drink from a red-labelled cup than a blue-labelled cup. At a subconscious level, the colour red operates as a stop signal. The new product is said to contain considerably less sugar than regular Coke (because its sweetened with a plant extract), but doesnt compare favourably with the two existing products in the companys line-up. A can of Coca-Cola Life contains 22 grams of sugar compared to 35 grams in regular Coke and none in the two diet offerings. It has 89 calories per can compared to 139 for regular Coke but substantially more than either of the low-calorie offerings. Diet Coke , introduced in Australia in 1983, contains a calorie and a half. Coke Zero , introduced in Australia in 2006, contains only 1.1 calories per can. Diet Coke and Coke Zero are sweetened with a combination of acesulfame potassi Continue reading >>

4 Answers - Is Coca-cola Life Okay For Diabetics?

4 Answers - Is Coca-cola Life Okay For Diabetics?

I think this would be a better question for your doctor than Quora. Without fully knowing about diabetes, I would guess the answer is no - the non-sugar sweetners will not be metabolised the same as sugar, meaning the pancreas does not get what it needs to produce insulin. Coca-Cola Life is a reduced calorie soda. HOWEVER, it is only reduced about 40%; a 12 ounce can still has 90 calories! It still contains a significant amount of sugar. So, a diabetic person should plan accordingly. Side note, I think Life is absolutely delicious, more so than even original Coke. Everything is okay, within reasonable limits. Coke Life has about 2/3rds of the sugar of Coke. If you intend to drink 1, relax. If youre planning to drink it by the gallon, no. Generally speaking, sugar is a no no for diabetics. If you are diabetic, drinking sugar filled beverages is going to undermine your blood sugar. Thats not what you want. Artificial sweeteners are not the answer, either, as they carry serious health risks which make sugar look better. I am diabetic. I never drink diet soda because my father developed cancer in his kidneys that way. I focus on drinking water before I allow myself the *treat* of a soda or sweet tea. Moderation is the best method, rather than playing one brand off another. Asking is this brand or that variety of thing-you-should-be-avoiding isnt a healthy outlook. And in the end, its going to cause you more pain than just taking charge of your diet, rather than playing the game of if I do X, I can have Y based on consuming something you know is bad for you. Drinking diet soda doesnt give you the go ahead to stuff yourself with junk food. It adds to the problem. Would you tell an alcoholic that they can have beer because its not as alcoholic as tequila? No. You wouldnt do t Continue reading >>

The Problem With New Green 'healthy' Coke - Expert

The Problem With New Green 'healthy' Coke - Expert

The problem with new green 'healthy' Coke - expert The new stevia sweetened Coca-Cola Life will be released in NZ next year. Photo / Coca-Cola Coca-Cola has announced it will launch its newest soft drink in the Australian and New Zealand market next year. Strongly promoted as "healthy" Coke elsewhere, Coca-Cola Life may do more to improve the company's finances than the health of its consumers. The product was piloted in parts of South America, and launched in the United Kingdom and the United States in September. An analysis of social media conversations in the UK reported the jury is out on whether consumers like the taste of the new product. Read more: Blind tasting the new green Coke Life New green Coke Life launched to fight obesity Coke labels will warn of sugar content Like its forthcoming competitor Pepsi True , Coca-Cola Life is packaged in a green can. Both adults and children are known to perceive food with green packaging, or green nutrition labels, as being healthier than identical food packaged in other colours. While many are surprised by The Coca-Cola Company's move away from its iconic red labelling, there may be an even more subtle reason for it than the (marketing) goodness of green. A recent European study found people drink less soft drink from a red-labelled cup than a blue-labelled cup. At a subconscious level, the colour red operates as a stop signal. The new product is said to contain considerably less sugar than regular Coke (because it's sweetened with a plant extract), but doesn't compare favourably with the two existing products in the company's line-up. A can of Coca-Cola Life contains 22 grams of sugar - compared to 35 grams in regular Coke and none in the two "diet" offerings. It has 89 calories per can - compared to 139 for regular Coke Continue reading >>

Coca-cola Life Is Green, Natural, And Not Good For You

Coca-cola Life Is Green, Natural, And Not Good For You

Coca-Cola Life Is Green, Natural, and Not Good for You Diet Coke loyalists across the pond will now have an alternative way to feel like they're healthy while chugging sugar water: introducing Coca Cola Life , orCoke Life. This article is from the archive of our partner Diet Coke loyalists across the pond will now have an alternative way to feel like they're healthy while chugging sugar water: introducing Coca-Cola Life , orCoke Life. The new beverage is made with stevia, rather than aspartame (Diet Coke), corn syrup (regular Coke), or cane sugar (Mexican Coke.) It will be sold in Great Britain starting in the fall, but was first introduced in Argentina and Chile last year.It also comes in green packaging, because apparently, green means healthy. While I am a Diet Coke purist, I take issue with any soda product boasting as "healthy" or "natural." I understand the product I am drinking is doing probably irreversible damage, and I don't need a green can to try to convince me otherwise. Stevia, the sugar substitute used to make Coke Life, is being pushed as the "natural" ingredient. Still, a natural sugar water is still sugar water. And in this particular case, it is quite sugary water to the tune of four teaspoons of sugar per can .That is 25 percent of the daily recommended sugar intake for children. On the bright side, Coke Life will have only 89 calories , rather than the standards 139 in regular Coke. Diet Coke has "zero" calories, but is jam packed with chemicals. So, pick your poison. Having taste tested all the options, I can say Coke Life is a fine soda, but I am going to stick with Diet Coke. I don't need my sugar water masquerading as anything except what it is: terrible for my health, really delicious, and keeping me very, very awake. This article is from the Continue reading >>

The Truth About 'healthy' Coca-cola Life | Health - Babamail

The Truth About 'healthy' Coca-cola Life | Health - Babamail

This Joke Starts With a Woman At the Pearly Gates Though an eight-fluid ounce of Coca-Cola Life contains just 60 calories, its eyebrow-raising 17 grams of sugar means it only has a third less sugar than a regular Coca-Cola drink. If you recall how important a role soft drinks like Coca-Cola have played in the last few decades upsurge in obesity ( see here for more details ), then youll be wondering whats so good about Lifes sugar and calorie count. Yet its not only the amount of sugar in Cokes new health drink thats worrying, there are also other chemical factors that make other soft drinks potentially dangerous to our health. Otherwise known as sulfite ammonia caramel, Caramel E-150d is used to color all Coca-Cola drinks, and this does include Coca-Cola Life. The chemical is made through controlled heat treatment of sugar with ammonia (a highly toxic substance used in household cleaners). For foods that contain more than 30 micrograms of this coloring, the State of California now requires cancer-warning labels and for good reason too. Michael Jacobson , Executive Director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest has said: Were asking the FDA to ban the use of caramel coloring thats used in colas and certain other soft drinks and a variety of other foods. The reason is that several years ago, a government agency, the National Toxicology program, tested a contaminant in the coloring and found that it caused cancer in mice and possibly rats. This should give you more than pause for thought the next time you look longingly at a refreshing glass of coke! Another of Coca-Cola Lifes claims to be healthy derives from its use of stevia, a sweetener that occurs naturally, contains fewer calories than sugar, and none of the chemicals that characterize the controversial a Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Coca Cola Life And The Stevia Plant : Diabetes

Coca Cola Life And The Stevia Plant : Diabetes

Last month, I encountered a new variant of Coca cola, Coca cola life. Since I was diagnosed, I cut on most of the carbonated drinks, except for carbonated water, with the occasional light variant. So seeing a new carb low, but still sweet, drink being introduced(6,7g/100g), it did grabbed my interests For those unfamiliar with Coca cola life, it's another drink from Coca Cola(big surprise, I know)where they are using the stevia plant extracts to sweeten the drink, instead of artificial sugars(Light)or just plain sugary sweetness. They advertise it being natural origin, and low on calories. It seems to be quite a hit in the UK, and hit the shelves here in the Netherlands last month. Doing a bit of research, I found out that the sweetness comes from the Stevia plant, and to be more exact, Steviol glycoside. A substance said to be a few hundred times as sweet as sugar - with a bitter aftertaste. Steviol glycoside does not initiate the glycemic response from the body, so that is quite nice. To fight the bitter aftertaste, Maltodextrine is used, which is a carbohydrate though. It is a bigger one - which takes longer for the body to convert. As for the taste. It tastes like regular coke. No tangy taste or whatsoever. And - if it's really true about what they are saying, it's not half as bad to have one of these in a while, without having to feel too bad about yourself. At least, that's just me as far as I've seen. So what do you guys think about it? Everything around the Steviol substance seems legit. And with the taste being almost authentic, it seems almost too good to be true! Could it be something we can enjoy every now and then? Or should we better steer clear from this substance, until it enjoys worldwide use? And did any of you tried this already? Any opinions about i Continue reading >>

Less Sugar Naturally

Less Sugar Naturally

Why Pepsi Next and Coke Life are bad for you & what happened when I consumed one. Look at how you've grown. You've become so popular, and now you're hanging around Coke and Pepsi. Please stop changing. I love you just the way you are. I remember when stevia was just a dork like myself. It was a supplement. I had to buy it in the health food store. Now it's a "sweetener" available everywhere, including in Coke and Pepsi. How did this happen? In 2013, Pepsi CEO Indra Nooyi stated that diet soda sales were down because consumers wanted healthier alternatives. Pepsi said it would explore more natural, low-calorie sweeteners. Wait! Is Pepsi admitting that artificial sweeteners were not so healthy after all? And just how long was this 'healthier" pop in the planning? Would you be surprised, if I told you a stevia sweetened Coke and Pepsi had been in the making for close to a decade... possibly more? I'm not sure exactly when they took notice of the humble stevia plant, but both Coke and Pepsi had stevia products READY for FDA approval by 2008. Pepsi was teamed up with Merisant (makers of Equal/Aspertame). CocaCola was partnered with food giant Cargill. After lots of lobbying, the FDA approved their extracts as 'Generally Regarded As Safe'. These stevia extracts were released as Purevia and TruVia and marketed as stevia sweeteners. What they really are though is a blend of sweeteners (including erythritol and isomaltulose). Both companies slowly introduced these blends in various Coke and Pepsi products, in various markets, all over the world. In 2012, Pepsi launched Pepsi NEXT. The Canadian formula contained 30% less sugar than regular Pepsi. It continues to be sweetened with sugar and Reb-A. The US formula had 60% less sugar but it contains high fructose corn syrup and "a b Continue reading >>

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Managing blood sugar levels is an everyday goal for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While eating sugar doesn’t cause either type of diabetes, keeping tabs on carbohydrate and sugar intake is an important part of managing both types of diabetes. Eating healthfully can also reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. In fact, obesity is one of the leading causes of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of American adults are considered obese. Obesity puts you at risk for diabetes, as well as other troublesome conditions. Eating processed foods that are high in sugar, unhealthy fats, and empty calories increases your risk of gaining too much weight. Drinking sugary drinks is also a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. If you are working to keep your blood sugar in check or manage your weight, you might choose diet soda. Low in calories and sugar, diet sodas appear to be a good alternative to sugary drinks. Diet coke and A&W’s diet root beer, for example, claim to be entirely sugar-free. Unfortunately, even though they contain no actual sugar, they are loaded with artificial sweeteners and other unhealthy additives. At one time, there was much debate over the safety of artificial sweeteners. Many feared that these sweeteners caused certain types of cancer. Studies performed in the 1970s suggested that the artificial sweetener saccharin was linked to bladder cancer. Since that time, however, saccharin has been deemed safe. Both the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) consider the sweetener nontoxic. Aspartame, another common yet controversial sweetener, has also gained clearance fo Continue reading >>

Here's The Difference Between Diet Coke, Coke Zero And Coke Zero Sugar

Here's The Difference Between Diet Coke, Coke Zero And Coke Zero Sugar

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 08/01/2017 06:01 am ETUpdatedAug 01, 2017 Here's The Difference Between Diet Coke, Coke Zero And Coke Zero Sugar You may be able to taste a difference, but do you know what's actually in it? The Coca-Cola Company recently announced that its going to discontinue Coke Zero and replace it with Coke Zero Sugar to give it an even better unique blend of flavors than what gave Coke Zero its real Coca-Cola taste. Even though the whole release seems more like a marketing move than an actual new product release, people were not too pleased with the news. (Ahem, they were livid .) We cant claim to know the motivation behind the new release, but one things for sure: Coca-Cola is getting in on the anti-sugar train right on time . This upset got us thinking: what is the actual difference between Diet Coke, Coke Zero and Coke Zero Sugar? If you look at the ingredients between the three, they arent actually all that different. And, in fact, Coke Zero and Coke Zero Sugar have exactly the same ingredient list. Heres the list of ingredients in Diet Coke : Carbonated water, caramel color, aspartame, phosphoric acid, potassium benzoate, natural flavors, citric acid, caffeine. Heres the list of ingredients in Coke Zero : Carbonated water, caramel color, phosphoric acid, aspartame, potassium benzoate, natural flavors, potassium citrate, acesulfame potassium, caffeine. And heres the list of ingredients in Coke Zero Sugar : Carbonated water, caramel color, phosphoric acid, aspartame, potassium benzoate, natural flavors, potassium citrate, acesulfame potassium, caffeine, Diet Coke is missing two ingredients that the other two sugar-free options have: potassium citrate and acesulfame potassium. Acesulfame potassium i Continue reading >>

Coke Adds Stevia, But Is It Really Any Healthier?

Coke Adds Stevia, But Is It Really Any Healthier?

Coke adds stevia, but is it really any healthier? Coke adds stevia, but is it really any healthier? Coca-Cola has announced it will bring its lower-calorie product Coca-Cola Life to Australia following successful launches overseas. Like Pepsi Next, the product is sweetened with a blend of stevia and sugar. So what is stevia and is it really healthier than sugar? Stevia: a natural alternative to sugar, but still highly refined. Stevia is a shrub native to South America and its leaves have been used for hundreds of years as a sweetener, often added to tea. It is about 200 times sweeter than natural sugar, has almost no kilojoules and does not raise blood sugar levels. Is it healthier than sugar, or more natural than other sweeteners? Dietitian Alan Barclay said stevia has benefits over sugar. It is a good option for people who want to reduce their kilojoule intake and avoid blood sugar spikes, he said, particularly people with diabetes or those at risk of developing the disease. "A lot of people want to avoid artificial sweeteners so this provides what many regard as a natural alternative but I must add that it is a highly refined extract," he said. A major downside was a "liquorice-y taste" that usually led to it being blended with another sweetener such as sugar. Dr Barclay said stevia does not provide "a licence to drink Coke in large quantities," and claims that stevia is a key ingredient in the fight against obesity are overblown. "It's not a panacea. This is definitely a better option but water is the best choice," he said. Why are soft-drink manufacturers going down this path? Obesity Policy Coalition spokeswoman Jane Martin said Coca-Cola Life was clearly an attempt to counter widespread concerns about sugary drinks, but she warned that diet cola still contains b Continue reading >>

What Everyone Must Know About Coke Zero And Diabetes

What Everyone Must Know About Coke Zero And Diabetes

If you have diabetes you may be thinking quitting your regular Coke and opting for Coke Zero is going to do you a big favor. After all, it's sugar free and therefore healthier, right? Wrong! Once you read this, you'll understand that the scientific research shows quite the opposite. What is Coke Zero? Coke Zero was launched in 2005 as a sugar free, low calorie alternative to regular coke. One thing that's quite funny is that while Diet Coke has been around since the 1980’s, many men thought the title “diet” sounded a little too feminine and they weren’t interested in buying it. So as a result, Coke Zero was born. It was marketed mostly towards men who wanted to enjoy the taste of a classic Coke with zero guilt. Coke Zero comes in several different flavors, including classic, vanilla, and cherry. You might be thinking that a sugar free soda sounds too good to be true. And you would be right! Unfortunately, Coke Zero and other sugar free sodas are not a soda lover’s dream come true. And you'll soon see why… Nutrition Facts You probably already know that regular soda has a ton of sugar in it, which means you should steer clear of it at all costs – diabetic or not. For example, a 12 ounce can of regular Coke contains 39 grams of sugar, all derived from high fructose corn syrup, which makes that a double no, no. That can of soda also packs 140 empty calories – meaning, you don’t get any nutrients from it. It’s easy to see why so many people were thrilled when diet sodas hit the market. After all, the promise of cutting down on sugar to lose weight, and reduce your risk of obesity and diabetes – that sounds like a good deal, right? Well, unfortunately those promises aren't all they're cracked up to be. The sweetener in Diet Coke is called ‘aspartame,' Continue reading >>

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