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Is Coffee Good For A Diabetic?

Diabetes News: Coffee Could Help Stop Diabetes - But Only If You Avoid This

Diabetes News: Coffee Could Help Stop Diabetes - But Only If You Avoid This

Drinking three to four cups of coffee a day has been shown to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by 25 per cent compared to those who drank one cup or less. It had been thought caffeine was responsible but this was later discounted as decaffeinated coffee had the same effect. Now Danish scientists found one of these previously untested compounds cafestol appears to improve cell function and insulin sensitivity in mice. The discovery could lead to new drugs to treat or even prevent the disease which affects around 3.6 million Britons. Coffee contains a large number of bioactive substances that can be categorised as alkaloids. Previous studies involved filter coffee but the cellulose filter papers trap cafestol so levels are low containing only 0.1 mg. Instead a cup of Scandinavian boiled coffee contained 6.2 mg, Turkish coffee 4.2 mg, and cafetiere 2.6 mg. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. Dr Fredrik Brustad Mellbye of Aarhus University Hospital said: "Coffee contains a large number of bioactive substances that can be categorised as alkaloids. "The main stimulant in coffee, caffeine, has attracted major interest. "However, since decaffeinated coffee displays the same inverse association with type 2 diabetes development as caffeinated coffee, it is less likely that all the beneficial effects of coffee are merely or mainly attributed to caffeine." In a previous study, Dr Mellbye and colleagues found cafestol increased insulin secretion in pancreatic cells when they were exposed to glucose. It also increased glucose uptake in muscle cells just as effectively as a commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug. In the new study, the researchers wanted to see if cafestol would help prevent or delay the onset of Type Continue reading >>

Is Coffee Bad Or Good For You?

Is Coffee Bad Or Good For You?

You’ll be happy to know that getting up and enjoying your favorite cup of coffee is fine, however that’s where it must end. The problem lies in reaching multiple times a day for that cup brimming with caffeine. Although one cup of coffee per day is not likely to cause any significant health problems, it is clear that excessive consumption of caffeinated beverages is dangerous. Coffee is known to contribute to heart disease by raising blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and homocysteine.1-4Furthermore, a seventeen-year study of over 40,000 people found that those who drank more than four cups of coffee per day were at an increased risk of death from any cause. Men under age 55 that drank that much coffee had a 56 percent increase in risk of death, and women more than doubled their risk.5 Coffee Interferes With Sleep The caffeine in coffee is a stimulant and as such gives you a false sense of increased energy, allowing you to get by with an inadequate amount of sleep. In addition to effecting the quantity of sleep, caffeine also reduces the depth of sleep. Inadequate sleep promotes disease and premature aging, and can fuel overeating behaviors. Sleep deprivation also results in higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol and interferes with glucose metabolism, leading to insulin resistance.6 This insulin resistance, and subsequent higher baseline glucose level, further promotes diabetes, heart disease and other problems. Coffee can lead to overeating People who drink caffeinated beverages are likely to eat more often than necessary because they mistake caffeine withdrawal symptoms—such as shakiness, headaches, lightheadedness, etc.—for hunger. These detoxification symptoms are easily mistaken for hunger because eating temporarily suppresses them. It is impossible to Continue reading >>

Coffee, Diabetes, And Weight Control1,2

Coffee, Diabetes, And Weight Control1,2

Abstract Several prospective epidemiologic studies over the past 4 y concluded that ingestion of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee can reduce the risk of diabetes. This finding is at odds with the results of trials in humans showing that glucose tolerance is reduced shortly after ingestion of caffeine or caffeinated coffee and suggesting that coffee consumption could increase the risk of diabetes. This review discusses epidemiologic and laboratory studies of the effects of coffee and its constituents, with a focus on diabetes risk. Weight loss may be an explanatory factor, because one prospective epidemiologic study found that consumption of coffee was followed by lower diabetes risk but only in participants who had lost weight. A second such study found that both caffeine and coffee intakes were modestly and inversely associated with weight gain. It is possible that caffeine and other constituents of coffee, such as chlorogenic acid and quinides, are involved in causing weight loss. Caffeine and caffeinated coffee have been shown to acutely increase blood pressure and thereby to pose a health threat to persons with cardiovascular disease risk. One short-term study found that ground decaffeinated coffee did not increase blood pressure. Decaffeinated coffee, therefore, may be the type of coffee that can safely help persons decrease diabetes risk. However, the ability of decaffeinated coffee to achieve these effects is based on a limited number of studies, and the underlying biological mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. INTRODUCTION Coffee consumption, which probably originated in northeast Africa, spread throughout the Middle East in the 15th century and thence to Europe (1). It is estimated that more than half of the US population now consumes coffee (2). Of the 2 Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating

Healthy Eating

A healthy eating plan will help in managing your blood glucose levels and meeting the nutritional needs for you and your baby. It will also assist in achieving suitable weight changes. In all pregnancies, calcium, protein, iron,and folate are all important nutrients. In pregnancies affected by gestational diabetes, carbohydrates play a very important role. Your dietitian or health professional will discuss a personalised healthy eating plan with you. Carbohydrates Carbohydrates are nutrients that come from certain foods. They are broken down into glucose in the body. This glucose is then used as the body's main source of energy. Foods containing carbohydrates include: pasta, rice, noodles, breads and breakfast cereals, crisp breads, potato, sweet potato, corn, legumes, for example baked beans, red kidney beans, lentils, fruits, milk, yoghurt, custard. These foods are a good source of energy, vitamins, minerals and fibre. They need to be included in a healthy eating plan. Carbohydrates are also found in regular soft drinks, cordials, fruit juices, and lollies. These foods are high in carbohydrate and provide little nutritional value. They should be restricted, as they will raise blood glucose levels very high and very quickly. Carbohydrates are also found in biscuits, cakes and processed foods such as chips, pizza and burgers. These foods are high in fat and should be limited. It is important to spread carbohydrate foods over 3 small meals and 2–3 snacks per day. Types of carbohydrates Different types of carbohydrates will increase blood glucose levels at different rates. The Glycaemic Index (GI) is a measure of how quickly a carbohydrate food breaks down to glucose and the effect it will have on your blood glucose levels. That is: Foods that have a high GI produce a f Continue reading >>

Low-carb Coffee & Tea Drink Recipes

Low-carb Coffee & Tea Drink Recipes

Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Have you ever noticed a difference in your blood sugar after drinking a big cup of coffee or tea? According to the Mayo Clinic, caffeine can indeed have an affect on your blood glucose levels causing lower or higher fluctuations, so limited consumption is recommended for better control. Another study published by the ADA (2005) suggests that people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes can reduce their risk of hypoglycemia during the night by having a small to moderate amount of caffeine before bed. Some people also claim that symptoms of hypoglycemia become more noticeable when incorporating caffeine into their diet. The effects of caffeine on each person are varied though with the added factor of tolerance to the stimulant can build up as quantity increases. While some people claim that they see a noticeable difference in their BG levels when they drink caffeine, others say that they don’t have any issues incorporating caffeine with food. Let’s explore some variables that could contribute to the shift in BG levels in relation to caffeine consumption. Side effects Certain common side effects of caffeine consumption may often explain shifts in BG levels. Lack of sleep Not enough sleep has proven to contribute to insulin resistance in the body for people with Type 1. Too much caffeine could certainly contribute to insomnia, especially since caffeine tolerance decreases as we grow older. Elevated heart rate / “the jitters” Two common effects if too much caffeine is in the system, or if the body is not accustomed to it. These are also symptoms of hypoglycemia, which might cause someone with Type 1 to check their BG levels more frequently if mistaking the symptoms for a low. Heartburn / Upset stomach / Dehydration Some people are less tolerant to coffee and other caffeinat Continue reading >>

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Part 1 of 8 Highlights For people without diabetes, coffee may help reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Caffeine has been shown in the short term to increase both glucose and insulin levels. Because of this, people with diabetes should be cautious when consuming coffee. Once sweetener is added to coffee, it removes the benefits of diabetes prevention. It can actually increase your risk of developing diabetes. Coffee was once condemned as being bad for your health. However, there’s growing evidence that it may protect against certain kinds of cancers, liver disease, depression, and Parkinson’s disease. There’s also compelling research that increasing your coffee intake may actually lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. This is good news for those of us who can’t face the day until we get in our cup of java. However, for those who already have type 2 diabetes, coffee could have adverse effects. Whether you’re trying to lower your risk, you have diabetes, or you just can’t go without your cup of joe, learn about coffee’s effects on diabetes. Part 2 of 8 According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is a disease (or group of diseases) that affects how your body processes blood glucose (sugar). Blood glucose is important because it is what fuels your brain and gives energy to your muscles and tissues. If you have diabetes, that means that you have too much blood glucose circulating in your body and it can cause serious health concerns. There are a number of different factors that can cause diabetes. Chronic diabetes types are type 1 and type 2. Other types include gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but tends to go away after birth. Another is prediabetes, which means your blood glucose levels are higher than usual but not as high as woul Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Navigating what you can and cannot eat and drink when you have type 2 diabetes can be tricky. Of course, there’s the obvious stuff you know is good to cut out or limit in your diet, like processed sweets and other refined carbohydrates, which can cause blood sugar levels to soar when eaten in excess. But what about those murkier diet staples, which seem to straddle the line between healthy and indulgent, but are ingrained in so many of our everyday rituals? For millions of people in various cultures around the world, caffeinated drinks are likely the sort of thing that comes to mind when we talk about food or drinks in a healthy diabetes diet that aren’t so cut-and-dried. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for a while and are seeking better blood sugar control, the subject of caffeine in a diabetes diet is a fair concern. Caffeinated Drinks for Diabetes: Are They Safe? “For people already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, studies have shown caffeine consumption decreases insulin sensitivity and raises blood sugar levels,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, who is based in Hilton Head, South Carolina. According to a review published in April 2017 in Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews, five out of seven trials studied found that caffeine increases blood glucose and keeps levels higher longer. That doesn’t sound good, but if you’re accustomed to having your morning java, don’t skip out on the drink just yet. Some studies suggest that other components of caffeinated coffee may offer some benefits for people with diabetes. In a study published in March 2016 in the International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, researchers looked at coffee consumption in adults with and w Continue reading >>

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together. However, a new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for: Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…) Cancer (prostate, breast…) Parkinsons disease According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine: (Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast) What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes). Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups! You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee): Let me pour myself another cup of coffee right now (and according to the coffee and diabetes research, you should grab a coffee yourself) because we’re going to see: Why is coffee good for us? What does other research about coffee and diabetes suggest How much sugar and milk I personally add to my coffee? I’ll reveal my own easy recipe for diabetes-friendly coffee – I’m drinking one right now! In short, do coffee and diabetes go hand in hand together? Let’s find out: Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question I don’t really know anybody that wouldn’t l Continue reading >>

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

A prospective cohort study in younger and middle-aged U.S. women Abstract OBJECTIVE—High habitual coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but data on lower levels of consumption and on different types of coffee are sparse. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This is a prospective cohort study including 88,259 U.S. women of the Nurses’ Health Study II aged 26–46 years without history of diabetes at baseline. Consumption of coffee and other caffeine-containing foods and drinks was assessed in 1991, 1995, and 1999. We documented 1,263 incident cases of confirmed type 2 diabetes between 1991 and 2001. RESULTS—After adjustment for potential confounders, the relative risk of type 2 diabetes was 0.87 (95% CI 0.73–1.03) for one cup per day, 0.58 (0.49–0.68) for two to three cups per day, and 0.53 (0.41–0.68) for four or more cups per day compared with nondrinkers (P for trend <0.0001). Associations were similar for caffeinated (0.87 [0.83–0.91] for a one-cup increment per day) and decaffeinated (0.81 [0.73–0.90]) coffee and for filtered (0.86 [0.82–0.90]) and instant (0.83 [0.74–0.93]) coffee. Tea consumption was not substantially associated with risk of type 2 diabetes (0.88 [0.64–1.23] for four or more versus no cups per day; P for trend = 0.81). CONCLUSIONS—These results suggest that moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may lower risk of type 2 diabetes in younger and middle-aged women. Coffee constituents other than caffeine may affect the development of type 2 diabetes. High coffee consumption has been associated with better glucose tolerance and a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes in diverse populations in Europe, the U.S., and Japan (1–3). However, it remains unclear what co Continue reading >>

Prevent Diabetes

Prevent Diabetes

The statistics speak for themselves: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 26 million Americans suffer from diabetes, and 7 million are unaware that they're afflicted. At the current rate, half of the adult U.S. population will develop prediabetes or diabetes by 2020. Of that total, the more-preventable type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all cases. The good news: If you've received test results showing you have prediabetes, or you're concerned that you're at risk for diabetes, making lifestyle changes now can prevent or greatly delay the onset of diabetes. Studies have shown that such changes reduced the development of type 2 diabetes by as much as 71 percent in adults 60 years and older. The key is preventing your blood glucose level from rising higher. Fasting blood glucose below 100 mg/dl is considered normal; if your fasting blood glucose is between 100 and 125 mg/dl, you have prediabetes. (If your blood sugar rises above 125 mg/dl, you're among the one in ten adults in North America who have type 2 diabetes.) Prediabetes doesn't have to turn into diabetes. With early intervention, some people with prediabetes can actually turn back the clock and return elevated blood glucose levels to the normal range. Others can delay the onset of diabetes by 10 years or more. But once it sets in, diabetes is a lifelong disease. So now's the time to take steps to prevent diabetes from progressing. Here's what to do. 1. Peel off the pounds. Getting to or maintaining a healthy weight is the number-one way to prevent the onset of diabetes, since extra weight makes it harder for the body to use insulin to control blood sugar. According to the expert panel of the American Diabetes Association, for those at high risk for diabetes and who are o Continue reading >>

A Guide To Coffee For People With Diabetes

A Guide To Coffee For People With Diabetes

Jewels Doskicz is a registered nurse, freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. She and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes. For many, coffee is a lovely part of their morning ritual. The puttering sound of a coffee pot as it brews up a favorite blend; the smell wafting around the house; the familiar warm cup in hand; a welcome to the new day. With the average adult consuming two eight-ounce cups of coffee per day, our reliance on this beverage is strong. But what happens when you add diabetes to the mix? Caffeine and your blood sugar Caffeine may affect the action of the insulin you take, resulting in high or low blood sugars, according to Joslin Diabetes Center. I personally notice a blood sugar raising effect in the morning, on occasion, if I drink coffee prior to eating and taking my insulin. And while it’s up for debate whether caffeine is an addicting substance, it can be a dehydrating one. Blood sugars are related to how much liquid you currently have in your body. If your tank is running on the empty side, your blood sugar will be more concentrated—resulting in a higher number. The latest research on coffee Research has emerged with differing conclusions on coffee consumption, making it too easy for consumers to grasp onto whatever they want to hear. How much you consume makes a difference, which holds true with other dietary habits as well. Moderate coffee drinking may produce cardiac benefits, according to research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard School of Public Health. However, that magic bullet is found in two small eight-ounce servings per day. The habitual consumption of coffee could “reduce one’s risk of developing diabetes,” according to some published studies. But as m Continue reading >>

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

Your body is made up of nearly two-thirds water, so it makes sense to drink enough every day to stay hydrated and healthy. Water, tea, coffee, milk, fruit juices and smoothies all count. We also get fluid from the food we eat, especially from fruit and veg. Does it matter what we drink? Yes, particularly when it comes to fruit juices and sugary drinks – you can be having more calories and sugar than you mean to because you’re drinking them and not noticing. Five ways to stay hydrated… Water is the best all-round drink. If your family likes flavoured waters, make your own by adding a squeeze of lemon or lime, or strawberries. Children often need reminding to drink, so give them a colourful water bottle with a funky straw. Tea, coffee, chai and hot chocolate – cut back on sugar and use semi-skimmed or skimmed milk. Herbal teas can make a refreshing change and most are caffeine-free. Fruit juices (100 per cent juice) contain vitamins and minerals and 150ml provides one portion of our five a day – but remember, fruit juices only count as one portion, however much you drink. They can harm teeth, so for children, dilute with water and drink at meal times. Milk is one of the best drinks to have after sport. It’s hydrating and a good source of calcium, protein and carbohydrate. Choose skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. …and two drinks that are great for hypos Fizzy sugary drinks provide little else apart from a lot of sugar, so only use these to treat hypos. Otherwise, choose sugar-free alternatives Energy drinks – the only time when these drinks can be helpful in diabetes is when you need to get your blood glucose up quickly after a hypo. Energy drinks are high in sugar and calories. Quick quenchers Add slices of cucumber, lemon, or mint leaves to a glass of iced wa Continue reading >>

Drinks And Gestational Diabetes

Drinks And Gestational Diabetes

Staying well hydrated is very important during pregnancy and even more so if you have diabetes whilst pregnant. Drinking water doesn't directly lower blood sugar levels, but it does flush excess sugar out of your system and so staying hydrated will help control and stabilise blood sugar levels. Ideally you should be drinking around 3 litres (10 -12 glasses) at least, a day. You will need to drink even more during warmer weather or if you are exercising. We recommend drinking a glass of water with AND in between every meal and snack during the day. Tea, coffee and fizzy drinks containing caffeine should not be included as part of your recommended daily fluid intake as they are diuretics. Diuretics make you urinate more frequently, causing you to lose water. If you don’t like the taste of water then you could try carbonated water with lemon and lime added to it, or some sugar free squash. Be careful when choosing drinking squash which has ‘no added sugar’, it means exactly that, no ADDED sugar, but will still contain natural sugars. Check labels for the lowest total carbs for the best choices. Drinks suitable for a GD diet Water, carbonated or still. Beware of flavoured waters that may contain sugar. Tea & coffee, decaffeinated or remember to include within your recommended daily intake Diet/Zero/No added sugar carbonated drinks No added sugar diluting squash (watch out for high juice or squashes with natural or concentrate fruit juices added) Raspberry leaf tea As a treat - Highlights, Options or Choc Shot hot chocolate with added whipped cream! Diet, no added sugar and zero carbonated drinks There are many alternatives to well loved, original full sugar drinks such as the following: Dr Pepper > Dr Pepper Zero Coke > Diet Coke or Coke Zero (please note that Coke Li Continue reading >>

Caffeine Impairs Glucose Metabolism In Type 2 Diabetes

Caffeine Impairs Glucose Metabolism In Type 2 Diabetes

Caffeine is a widely used drug despite evidence that it has deleterious consequences for health, including diabetes (1). In 1967, a study reported that drinking two cups of instant coffee significantly impaired glucose tolerance in a small group of men with “maturity-onset diabetes” (2). Recent studies showed that caffeine acutely decreased insulin sensitivity in young, nondiabetic adults (3–5). This study tested how oral caffeine affects carbohydrate metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes, for whom decreases in insulin sensitivity might result in exaggerated hyperglycemic responses to glucose and other carbohydrates, which would aggravate the glycemic dysregulation found in the disease. We tested the effects of caffeine on fasting glucose and insulin levels and on glucose and insulin responses to a mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The research protocol, approved by the medical center’s Institutional Review Board, employed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. The study group comprised of 14 habitual coffee drinkers (11 men and 3 women, age 61 ± 9 years [means ± SD]), who had at least a 6-month history of type 2 diabetes. Based on self-reports, daily caffeine intake from all beverages averaged 526 ± 144 mg/day. Mean fasting plasma glucose was 7.5 ± 1.6 mmol/l. Three of the subjects managed diabetes with diet and exercise, and the remainder also used oral agents. None required exogenous insulin therapy. They were free of major medical disorders, were nonsmokers, and used no psychotropic medications known to affect glucose metabolism. The subjects completed informed consent before testing. Caffeine and placebo treatments. Caffeine and placebo treatments were administered in identical gelatin capsules containin Continue reading >>

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