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Is Coffee Good For A Diabetic?

Effect Of Traditional Arabic Coffee Consumption On The Glycemic Index Of Khalas Dates Tested In Healthy And Diabetic Subjects.

Effect Of Traditional Arabic Coffee Consumption On The Glycemic Index Of Khalas Dates Tested In Healthy And Diabetic Subjects.

Abstract in English, Chinese The consumption of dates with coffee is common among Arabs and may affect postprandial hyperglycemia ex-cursion. The study aimed to determine the effect of coffee on the glycemic index of a common variety of dates (Khalas) tested in healthy and type 2 diabetes mellitus individuals. Study subjects were thirteen healthy volunteers (mean age: 40.2±6.7 years) and ten diabetic participants with a mean HbA1c of 6.6±(0.7%) and a mean age of 40.8±5.7 years. Each subject participated in five days of tests with 50 g of glucose and 50 g equivalent of available carbohydrates from the dates (with/without coffee). Capillary glucose was measured in the healthy subjects at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min, and for the diabetics at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min. Glycemic indices were determined as ratios of the incremental areas under the response curves for the interventions. Statistical analyses were performed using the independent samples and paired t-tests. Mean±SE glycemic indices of the Khalas dates for the healthy individuals were 55.1±7.7 and 52.7±6.2 without and with coffee consumption, respectively. Similar values were observed for those with diabetes (53.0±6.0 and 41.5±5.4). Differences between glycemic indices of Khalas with or without coffee were not significant (p=0.124). There were no significant differences in glycemic index between the diabetic and healthy subjects (p=0.834 and p=0.202 without and with coffee respectively). In conclusion, at least in the short term, coffee does not adversely affect capillary glucose levels following Khalas dates consumption in healthy and diabetic volunteers. Continue reading >>

Coffee May Reduce Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee May Reduce Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Need an excuse to drink yet another cup of coffee today? A new study suggests that increasing coffee consumption may decrease the risk for type 2 diabetes. The apparent relationship between coffee and type 2 diabetes is not new. Previous studies have found that drinking a few cups or more each day may lower your risk - with each subsequent cup nudging up the benefit. This most recent study, published in the journal Diabetologia, was more concerned with how changing coffee consumption - either increasing it or decreasing it over time - might affect your risk. The conclusion: People who upped their consumption by more than a cup per day had an 11% lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared with people whose consumption held steady. Decreasing coffee consumption by the same amount - more than a cup a day - was associated with a 17% increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The data is based on an analysis of more than 120,000 health professionals already being followed observationally long term. Researchers looked at the study participants' coffee drinking habits across four years to reach their conclusions. Just how much coffee each day provides a benefit? "For type 2 diabetes, up to six cups per day is associated with lower risk," said Shilpa Bhupathiraju, a research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health and lead study author, citing previous research. "As long as coffee doesn't give you tremors, doesn't make you jittery, it is associated with a lot of health benefits." In the case of diabetes, the reasons behind the supposed protection conferred by coffee are not clear, but there are theories based on animal research. One involves chemicals present in coffee - phenolic compounds and lignans - that may improve glucose metabolism, according to Bhupathiraju. She added that co Continue reading >>

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

A prospective cohort study in younger and middle-aged U.S. women Abstract OBJECTIVE—High habitual coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but data on lower levels of consumption and on different types of coffee are sparse. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This is a prospective cohort study including 88,259 U.S. women of the Nurses’ Health Study II aged 26–46 years without history of diabetes at baseline. Consumption of coffee and other caffeine-containing foods and drinks was assessed in 1991, 1995, and 1999. We documented 1,263 incident cases of confirmed type 2 diabetes between 1991 and 2001. RESULTS—After adjustment for potential confounders, the relative risk of type 2 diabetes was 0.87 (95% CI 0.73–1.03) for one cup per day, 0.58 (0.49–0.68) for two to three cups per day, and 0.53 (0.41–0.68) for four or more cups per day compared with nondrinkers (P for trend <0.0001). Associations were similar for caffeinated (0.87 [0.83–0.91] for a one-cup increment per day) and decaffeinated (0.81 [0.73–0.90]) coffee and for filtered (0.86 [0.82–0.90]) and instant (0.83 [0.74–0.93]) coffee. Tea consumption was not substantially associated with risk of type 2 diabetes (0.88 [0.64–1.23] for four or more versus no cups per day; P for trend = 0.81). CONCLUSIONS—These results suggest that moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may lower risk of type 2 diabetes in younger and middle-aged women. Coffee constituents other than caffeine may affect the development of type 2 diabetes. High coffee consumption has been associated with better glucose tolerance and a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes in diverse populations in Europe, the U.S., and Japan (1–3). However, it remains unclear what co Continue reading >>

Are Coffee And Tea Healthy? They Could Extend Life For Diabetics, New Study Shows

Are Coffee And Tea Healthy? They Could Extend Life For Diabetics, New Study Shows

The wonders of coffee are varied. Your morning cup has been thought to lower risks of certain diseases like Parkinson’s and diabetes, in addition to boosting metabolism. Now, a new study indicates that drinking coffee could also keep you living longer—if you’re a diabetic woman. Scientists in Portugal presented this new research at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal, held September 11–15. The observational study included more than 3,000 people, all of whom had diabetes and used a diary to track coffee, tea and soft drink consumption, according to a release. Related: Diabetes Vaccine Entering Human Testing Could Also Prevent The Common Cold The findings revealed that females with diabetes who regularly drank caffeine, either from tea or coffee, lived longer than those who abstained from caffeinated beverages. Unfortunately for men, the study didn’t indicate any difference in their life span. Women benefited from consuming caffeine regardless of the source of their buzz, but the type of health benefits varied depending on the beverage. Ladies who drank about one cup of coffee daily (roughly 100 mg) were 51 percent less likely to die from any cause compared to noncaffeinated participants. While moderation usually is key, that wasn’t the case in this study. When consumption was boosted to between 100 and 200 mg of coffee per day, women had a 57 percent lower chance of death. Drinking two cups of coffee daily lowered the risk to 66 percent. Caffeinated tea drinkers had a reduced risk of dying from cancer, the study found. Females who drank the most tea reduced cancer-related deaths by 80 percent, compared to non–tea drinkers. However, the study authors warn that the sample of tea drinkers was very small and tha Continue reading >>

A Guide To Coffee For People With Diabetes

A Guide To Coffee For People With Diabetes

Jewels Doskicz is a registered nurse, freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. She and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes. For many, coffee is a lovely part of their morning ritual. The puttering sound of a coffee pot as it brews up a favorite blend; the smell wafting around the house; the familiar warm cup in hand; a welcome to the new day. With the average adult consuming two eight-ounce cups of coffee per day, our reliance on this beverage is strong. But what happens when you add diabetes to the mix? Caffeine and your blood sugar Caffeine may affect the action of the insulin you take, resulting in high or low blood sugars, according to Joslin Diabetes Center. I personally notice a blood sugar raising effect in the morning, on occasion, if I drink coffee prior to eating and taking my insulin. And while it’s up for debate whether caffeine is an addicting substance, it can be a dehydrating one. Blood sugars are related to how much liquid you currently have in your body. If your tank is running on the empty side, your blood sugar will be more concentrated—resulting in a higher number. The latest research on coffee Research has emerged with differing conclusions on coffee consumption, making it too easy for consumers to grasp onto whatever they want to hear. How much you consume makes a difference, which holds true with other dietary habits as well. Moderate coffee drinking may produce cardiac benefits, according to research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard School of Public Health. However, that magic bullet is found in two small eight-ounce servings per day. The habitual consumption of coffee could “reduce one’s risk of developing diabetes,” according to some published studies. But as m Continue reading >>

Can A Type 2 Diabetic Drink Coffee?

Can A Type 2 Diabetic Drink Coffee?

The American Diabetes Association identifies coffee as an acceptable beverage for people with diabetes. However, coffee's impact on blood sugars can vary. According to a review published in the February 2014 issue of "Diabetes Care," the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) decreases with coffee consumption. However coffee and the additives in coffee drinks can influence blood sugar control in those who already have diabetes. Testing blood sugars may be the best way to learn the body's response to these beverages. Video of the Day A small study published in the May 2011 issue of "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" reviewed the blood glucose effects of coffee when consumed with a meal, and found that caffeinated coffee caused more insulin resistance and higher post-meal blood sugars compared to decaffeinated coffee. An individual with insulin resistance will require more insulin to lower blood sugar compared to someone whose body uses insulin efficiently. Duke University research published in the February 2008 issue of "Diabetes Care" studied habitual coffee drinkers who had T2DM, testing their glucose levels after ingestion of caffeine supplements equivalent to four cups of coffee. Compared to a placebo, the caffeine supplements caused higher post-meal blood sugars. While the mechanism was unclear, the researchers suggested caffeine may worsen insulin resistance or affect glucose by increasing the production of stress hormones. Decaffeinated coffee may also have an impact on blood sugar levels. Researchers who studied these effects on a small group of healthy young men published their findings in the February 2010 issue of "Diabetes Care." Within 60 minutes of consumption, decaffeinated coffee raised blood glucose more than a placebo, but less than caffeinated Continue reading >>

Prevent Diabetes

Prevent Diabetes

The statistics speak for themselves: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 26 million Americans suffer from diabetes, and 7 million are unaware that they're afflicted. At the current rate, half of the adult U.S. population will develop prediabetes or diabetes by 2020. Of that total, the more-preventable type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all cases. The good news: If you've received test results showing you have prediabetes, or you're concerned that you're at risk for diabetes, making lifestyle changes now can prevent or greatly delay the onset of diabetes. Studies have shown that such changes reduced the development of type 2 diabetes by as much as 71 percent in adults 60 years and older. The key is preventing your blood glucose level from rising higher. Fasting blood glucose below 100 mg/dl is considered normal; if your fasting blood glucose is between 100 and 125 mg/dl, you have prediabetes. (If your blood sugar rises above 125 mg/dl, you're among the one in ten adults in North America who have type 2 diabetes.) Prediabetes doesn't have to turn into diabetes. With early intervention, some people with prediabetes can actually turn back the clock and return elevated blood glucose levels to the normal range. Others can delay the onset of diabetes by 10 years or more. But once it sets in, diabetes is a lifelong disease. So now's the time to take steps to prevent diabetes from progressing. Here's what to do. 1. Peel off the pounds. Getting to or maintaining a healthy weight is the number-one way to prevent the onset of diabetes, since extra weight makes it harder for the body to use insulin to control blood sugar. According to the expert panel of the American Diabetes Association, for those at high risk for diabetes and who are o Continue reading >>

Low-carb Coffee & Tea Drink Recipes

Low-carb Coffee & Tea Drink Recipes

Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Continue reading >>

Is Coffee Bad Or Good For You?

Is Coffee Bad Or Good For You?

You’ll be happy to know that getting up and enjoying your favorite cup of coffee is fine, however that’s where it must end. The problem lies in reaching multiple times a day for that cup brimming with caffeine. Although one cup of coffee per day is not likely to cause any significant health problems, it is clear that excessive consumption of caffeinated beverages is dangerous. Coffee is known to contribute to heart disease by raising blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and homocysteine.1-4Furthermore, a seventeen-year study of over 40,000 people found that those who drank more than four cups of coffee per day were at an increased risk of death from any cause. Men under age 55 that drank that much coffee had a 56 percent increase in risk of death, and women more than doubled their risk.5 Coffee Interferes With Sleep The caffeine in coffee is a stimulant and as such gives you a false sense of increased energy, allowing you to get by with an inadequate amount of sleep. In addition to effecting the quantity of sleep, caffeine also reduces the depth of sleep. Inadequate sleep promotes disease and premature aging, and can fuel overeating behaviors. Sleep deprivation also results in higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol and interferes with glucose metabolism, leading to insulin resistance.6 This insulin resistance, and subsequent higher baseline glucose level, further promotes diabetes, heart disease and other problems. Coffee can lead to overeating People who drink caffeinated beverages are likely to eat more often than necessary because they mistake caffeine withdrawal symptoms—such as shakiness, headaches, lightheadedness, etc.—for hunger. These detoxification symptoms are easily mistaken for hunger because eating temporarily suppresses them. It is impossible to Continue reading >>

Effects Of Coffee And Tea On Diabetes

Effects Of Coffee And Tea On Diabetes

A January 2004 study of coffee and diabetes shows that men who drank 6 cups of coffee a day reduced their chances of developing type-2 diabetes by half, and women who drank the same amount cut their risk by 30 percent. 126,000 people filled out questionnaires over the previous 12-18 years with information about their coffee intake and other health questions. In earlier studies, Dutch researchers discovered that there are compounds in coffee that aid the body's metabolism of sugar. Their study involved 17,000 men and women in the Netherlands. The results were published in November 2002, in the journal Lancet. According to their study, people who drank 7 cups a day (or more) were 50% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Drinking less coffee had less of an impact on diabetes onset. Researchers are still looking at the connection between coffee and diabetes, and caution people that 7 cups of coffee per day is enough to create other health problems. A number of older studies have shown that caffeine may increase your risk of developing diabetes. The theory is that the beneficial chemicals are able to offset the damage done by the caffeine. So drinking decaffeinated coffee would be the best bet if you are thinking of drinking coffee to prevent diabetes. Tea also has an effect on diabetes. Drinking tea can improve insulin activity up to 15 times, and it can be black, green or oolong. Herbal teas don't have any effect. The active compounds don't last long in the body, so you would have to drink a cup or more of tea every few hours to maintain the benefit. The catch is that you should drink it without milk (even soy milk), because milk seems to interact with the necessary chemicals and render them unavailable to your body. Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Have you ever noticed a difference in your blood sugar after drinking a big cup of coffee or tea? According to the Mayo Clinic, caffeine can indeed have an affect on your blood glucose levels causing lower or higher fluctuations, so limited consumption is recommended for better control. Another study published by the ADA (2005) suggests that people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes can reduce their risk of hypoglycemia during the night by having a small to moderate amount of caffeine before bed. Some people also claim that symptoms of hypoglycemia become more noticeable when incorporating caffeine into their diet. The effects of caffeine on each person are varied though with the added factor of tolerance to the stimulant can build up as quantity increases. While some people claim that they see a noticeable difference in their BG levels when they drink caffeine, others say that they don’t have any issues incorporating caffeine with food. Let’s explore some variables that could contribute to the shift in BG levels in relation to caffeine consumption. Side effects Certain common side effects of caffeine consumption may often explain shifts in BG levels. Lack of sleep Not enough sleep has proven to contribute to insulin resistance in the body for people with Type 1. Too much caffeine could certainly contribute to insomnia, especially since caffeine tolerance decreases as we grow older. Elevated heart rate / “the jitters” Two common effects if too much caffeine is in the system, or if the body is not accustomed to it. These are also symptoms of hypoglycemia, which might cause someone with Type 1 to check their BG levels more frequently if mistaking the symptoms for a low. Heartburn / Upset stomach / Dehydration Some people are less tolerant to coffee and other caffeinat Continue reading >>

Why Coffee May Reduce Diabetes Risk

Why Coffee May Reduce Diabetes Risk

Coffee drinking has been linked with a reduced risk of diabetes, and now Chinese researchers think they may know why. Three compounds found in coffee seem to block the toxic accumulation of a protein linked with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. ''We found three major coffee compounds can reverse this toxic process and may explain why coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes," says researcher Kun Huang, PhD, a professor of biological pharmacy at the Huazhong University of Science & Technology. Previous studies have found that people who drink four or more cups of coffee a day have a 50% lower risk of getting type 2 diabetes. The new study is published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Coffee and Diabetes Risk: Explaining Why It May Work Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. In those who have it, the body does not have enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. The hormone insulin, made by the pancreas, is crucial to move glucose to the cells for energy. Other researchers have linked the ''misfolding'' of a protein called hIAPP (human islet amyloid polypeptide) with an increased risk of diabetes. HIAPP is similar to the amyloid protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease, Huang says. When these HIAPP deposits accumulate, they can lead to the death of cells in the pancreas, Huang tells WebMD. The Chinese researchers looked at three major active compounds in coffee and their effect on stopping the toxic accumulation of the protein: "We exposed hIAPP to coffee extracts, and found caffeine, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid all inhibited the formation of toxic hIAPP amyloid and protected the pancreatic cells," Huang tells WebMD. All three had an effect. However, caffeic acid was best. Caffeine was the least good of the th Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Navigating what you can and cannot eat and drink when you have type 2 diabetes can be tricky. Of course, there’s the obvious stuff you know is good to cut out or limit in your diet, like processed sweets and other refined carbohydrates, which can cause blood sugar levels to soar when eaten in excess. But what about those murkier diet staples, which seem to straddle the line between healthy and indulgent, but are ingrained in so many of our everyday rituals? For millions of people in various cultures around the world, caffeinated drinks are likely the sort of thing that comes to mind when we talk about food or drinks in a healthy diabetes diet that aren’t so cut-and-dried. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for a while and are seeking better blood sugar control, the subject of caffeine in a diabetes diet is a fair concern. Caffeinated Drinks for Diabetes: Are They Safe? “For people already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, studies have shown caffeine consumption decreases insulin sensitivity and raises blood sugar levels,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, who is based in Hilton Head, South Carolina. According to a review published in April 2017 in Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews, five out of seven trials studied found that caffeine increases blood glucose and keeps levels higher longer. That doesn’t sound good, but if you’re accustomed to having your morning java, don’t skip out on the drink just yet. Some studies suggest that other components of caffeinated coffee may offer some benefits for people with diabetes. In a study published in March 2016 in the International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, researchers looked at coffee consumption in adults with and w Continue reading >>

Could Your Morning Cup Of Coffee Help Heal Diabetes?

Could Your Morning Cup Of Coffee Help Heal Diabetes?

Most people already think coffee is amazing, but we’re about to give you a whole new reason to love it… coffee can positively impact blood sugar and diabetes! Most coffee beans can be divided into two types: Arabica and Robusta. Arabica beans are usually much fruitier and sweeter tasting than Robusta beans, making them the usual choice for the majority of brewed coffees. Robusta beans are for those who love strong coffee; they have more of a bitter flavor, and contain double the amount of caffeine in Arabica beans. One 8 oz cup of coffee contains 75-100 mg of caffeine on average. According to the Mayo Clinic, up to 400 milligrams of caffeine per day appears to be safe for healthy adults. That’s no more than 4-5 cups of coffee per day. If we consume more than 400 mg of caffeine daily, symptoms can range from insomnia to irritability. Upset stomach, muscle tremors, and elevated heart rate can also occur. Some people are genetically primed to handle caffeine better than others. For example, an espresso after dinner is common practice in many European countries before sleeping soundly all night. Others have a cup of coffee first thing in the morning and their “perk” lasts well into the afternoon. For the most part, people are already consuming the amount of coffee they can handle. If you’ve had too much coffee, you know it. If you haven’t had enough coffee, you know it. If you are currently enjoying the amount of coffee that’s best for you (even if that’s none at all) we don’t suggest increasing your consumption simply to increase the health benefits. In moderation, there are several health benefits to drinking coffee. One researcher in particular has examined how coffee fits into the link between diet and diabetes risk. According to Marilyn Cornelis, Ph Continue reading >>

List Of 9 Best Healthy Drinks For Diabetics

List Of 9 Best Healthy Drinks For Diabetics

Overview Diabetes brings about many restrictions in a person’s the life affected by it. In the case of diet, the restrictions are more severe. The meals for diabetes, breakfast for diabetics, and snacks for diabetics, all have to be prepared and planned to keep the health restrictions and requirements in mind. Diabetic patients just can consume 1 can of soda or 1 glass of chilled soft drink since these are high in sugar and calorie that promote weight gain and increase blood glucose level – that is extremely harmful to type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. But this doesn’t mean that diabetic patients should avoid all refreshing beverages. Delicious herbal teas, infused water, milkshakes and green tea are best healthy drinks for diabetics that are low in calories and rich in antioxidants. In this article, we at VKool.com will show you top 9 healthy drinks for diabetics. Read on and include them in your diet. 9 Best Healthy Drinks For Diabetics You Should Know I. Best Drinks For Diabetics 1. Drinks For Diabetics – Coffee According to a 2006 study, moderate consumption of both decaffeinated and caffeinated coffee may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in middle-aged and younger women [1]. However, overconsumption of coffee can raise blood sugar level. Coffee contains the compound Chlorogenic acid, which helps to delay the glucose absorption into the bloodstream and curb type 2 diabetes. Along with that, coffee has no carbohydrates and calorie, which make it become one of the best drinks for diabetics. Thus, you should enjoy 1-2 cups of coffee a day without sugar and milk. This is because adding sugar, milk or cream to coffee may increase the overall calorie count and affect the levels of blood sugar. Read also: Home remedies for diabetes in men and women 2. Drinks F Continue reading >>

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