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Is Coffee Good For A Diabetic?

Diet Advice

Diet Advice

Diet advice made simple This page will give an overview to dietary advice in gestational diabetes. It is not intended to take the place of a registered dietician and people with pre-existing diabetes will likely be using much more advanced dietary techniques such as carbohydrate counting – such detailed exchange use and carbohydrate counting will not be covered here. This advice is culled from my experience, the nutrition advice notes from our local health authority (Alberta Health Services/Covenant Health) and diabetes in pregancy units I had the good fortune to visit including Joslin Diabetes Center, Cambridge University Hospitals UK, Auckland District Health Board and Adelaide,South Australia. Basics: If you take three meals a day and three snacks (mid morning, mid afternoon and bedtime) and avoid high fat foods, sweet foods and sugary drinks (drink water) you are well on the way to a healthy diet. If you measure your blood sugar after a meal you may find one particular type of food raises your blood sugar and thus might be best avoided. Foods fall into one of three primary groups: Carbohydrates – made up of starchs and sugars and these typically drive the rise in blood sugar after eating. Examples of carbohydrate foods include: bread, potato, pasta, rice, fruit, breakfast cereals, cookies. Some carbohydrate foods raise the blood sugar more readily (high glycemic index foods) and usually the more fibre in food the slower the glucose absorption. In general use whole grain foods – multigrain breads, whole-wheat flour foods, high fibre cereals, fruits (not fruit juice) and avoid processed foods, jams and syrups work the best in helping control blood sugar. Many people find the portion size critical, smaller is better. Protein – typically found in fish and meats. Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

The average U.S. adult consumes about two 8-ounce cups (474 milliliters) of coffee a day, which can contain around 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young, healthy adults, caffeine doesn't appear to noticeably affect blood sugar (glucose) levels, and consumption up to 400 milligrams a day appears to be safe. Some studies suggest that drinking coffee, caffeinated and decaffeinated, may actually reduce your risk of developing diabetes. If you already have diabetes, however, the impact of caffeine on insulin action may be associated with higher or lower blood sugar levels. For some people with diabetes, about 200 milligrams of caffeine — or the equivalent of one to two 8-ounce cups (237 to 474 milliliters) of plain, brewed coffee — may cause this effect. Caffeine affects every person differently. If you have diabetes or you're struggling to control your blood sugar levels, limiting the amount of caffeine in your diet may provide a benefit. Continue reading >>

Coffee May Reduce Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee May Reduce Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Need an excuse to drink yet another cup of coffee today? A new study suggests that increasing coffee consumption may decrease the risk for type 2 diabetes. The apparent relationship between coffee and type 2 diabetes is not new. Previous studies have found that drinking a few cups or more each day may lower your risk - with each subsequent cup nudging up the benefit. This most recent study, published in the journal Diabetologia, was more concerned with how changing coffee consumption - either increasing it or decreasing it over time - might affect your risk. The conclusion: People who upped their consumption by more than a cup per day had an 11% lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared with people whose consumption held steady. Decreasing coffee consumption by the same amount - more than a cup a day - was associated with a 17% increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The data is based on an analysis of more than 120,000 health professionals already being followed observationally long term. Researchers looked at the study participants' coffee drinking habits across four years to reach their conclusions. Just how much coffee each day provides a benefit? "For type 2 diabetes, up to six cups per day is associated with lower risk," said Shilpa Bhupathiraju, a research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health and lead study author, citing previous research. "As long as coffee doesn't give you tremors, doesn't make you jittery, it is associated with a lot of health benefits." In the case of diabetes, the reasons behind the supposed protection conferred by coffee are not clear, but there are theories based on animal research. One involves chemicals present in coffee - phenolic compounds and lignans - that may improve glucose metabolism, according to Bhupathiraju. She added that co Continue reading >>

Prevent Diabetes

Prevent Diabetes

The statistics speak for themselves: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 26 million Americans suffer from diabetes, and 7 million are unaware that they're afflicted. At the current rate, half of the adult U.S. population will develop prediabetes or diabetes by 2020. Of that total, the more-preventable type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all cases. The good news: If you've received test results showing you have prediabetes, or you're concerned that you're at risk for diabetes, making lifestyle changes now can prevent or greatly delay the onset of diabetes. Studies have shown that such changes reduced the development of type 2 diabetes by as much as 71 percent in adults 60 years and older. The key is preventing your blood glucose level from rising higher. Fasting blood glucose below 100 mg/dl is considered normal; if your fasting blood glucose is between 100 and 125 mg/dl, you have prediabetes. (If your blood sugar rises above 125 mg/dl, you're among the one in ten adults in North America who have type 2 diabetes.) Prediabetes doesn't have to turn into diabetes. With early intervention, some people with prediabetes can actually turn back the clock and return elevated blood glucose levels to the normal range. Others can delay the onset of diabetes by 10 years or more. But once it sets in, diabetes is a lifelong disease. So now's the time to take steps to prevent diabetes from progressing. Here's what to do. 1. Peel off the pounds. Getting to or maintaining a healthy weight is the number-one way to prevent the onset of diabetes, since extra weight makes it harder for the body to use insulin to control blood sugar. According to the expert panel of the American Diabetes Association, for those at high risk for diabetes and who are o Continue reading >>

Effect Of Traditional Arabic Coffee Consumption On The Glycemic Index Of Khalas Dates Tested In Healthy And Diabetic Subjects.

Effect Of Traditional Arabic Coffee Consumption On The Glycemic Index Of Khalas Dates Tested In Healthy And Diabetic Subjects.

Abstract in English, Chinese The consumption of dates with coffee is common among Arabs and may affect postprandial hyperglycemia ex-cursion. The study aimed to determine the effect of coffee on the glycemic index of a common variety of dates (Khalas) tested in healthy and type 2 diabetes mellitus individuals. Study subjects were thirteen healthy volunteers (mean age: 40.2±6.7 years) and ten diabetic participants with a mean HbA1c of 6.6±(0.7%) and a mean age of 40.8±5.7 years. Each subject participated in five days of tests with 50 g of glucose and 50 g equivalent of available carbohydrates from the dates (with/without coffee). Capillary glucose was measured in the healthy subjects at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min, and for the diabetics at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min. Glycemic indices were determined as ratios of the incremental areas under the response curves for the interventions. Statistical analyses were performed using the independent samples and paired t-tests. Mean±SE glycemic indices of the Khalas dates for the healthy individuals were 55.1±7.7 and 52.7±6.2 without and with coffee consumption, respectively. Similar values were observed for those with diabetes (53.0±6.0 and 41.5±5.4). Differences between glycemic indices of Khalas with or without coffee were not significant (p=0.124). There were no significant differences in glycemic index between the diabetic and healthy subjects (p=0.834 and p=0.202 without and with coffee respectively). In conclusion, at least in the short term, coffee does not adversely affect capillary glucose levels following Khalas dates consumption in healthy and diabetic volunteers. Continue reading >>

Low-carb Coffee & Tea Drink Recipes

Low-carb Coffee & Tea Drink Recipes

Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Coffeehouse drinks can pour on unwanted calories and carbs. Be your own barista and opt for homemade beverages to eliminate the mystery. Our easy, café-worthy coffee and tea recipes are low in carbs and calories, allowing you to get your morning caffeine fix or afternoon refresher without jolting your healthy eating plan. Continue reading >>

Is Coffee Good For You? Diabetic Update

Is Coffee Good For You? Diabetic Update

I am from a family of coffee drinkers. The Allison side of my family loves coffee. I love both the smell and the taste of coffee. It is one of the “foods” I never worry my head about because I know I must have my morning drink and I am often heard saying that I will do so at all cost. This way of thinking can be dangerously irresponsible and could result in complications and so I made a decision to do the research and to present the findings to my readers. The views on coffee are varied. This means that there are people who are of the opinion that coffee is good for diabetics and could actually result in lower blood sugar and others say that over time coffee could cause a spike in blood glucose. We will take a look at both views so that we (diabetics) can give an informed response to the question, “is coffee good for you?” Could it be an Addiction? By now you probably assumed that I am happier with the result which indicates that drinking coffee could reduce your risk of becoming diabetic. According to one research¹, this could be reduced by as much as 50%. According to the same paper, having a cup per day could reduce that risk by 4 to 8%. I am a little slow in doing my experiment with the coffee/diabetes connection and I am sure you understand the reason. The truth is, I have been writing this article for almost two weeks now. Yes, I would rather sing to the tune which says, drink all the coffee you can, it is good for you. Yes, I would love to hear that coffee is the new super-food. But, that is not the reality. I would love to drink one cup after another, but that would be an addiction on the rise and it would certainly prove me to be a hypocrite when I encourage moderation. I needed my readers to understand that there is a real person with issues writing t Continue reading >>

4 Surprising Coffee Cures

4 Surprising Coffee Cures

If the mere smell of a freshly brewed cup of coffee is more satisfying than realizing your husband cleaned the entire house, you're officially a java fiend. And that's not a bad thing: A few cups a day might reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. The association between coffee and diabetes isn’t new—we’ve covered it before in 12 Ways To Never Get Diabetes—but research presented at the 7th World Congress on Prevention of Diabetes and its Complications, held in Spain, offers further evidence that coffee can curb your risk of the disease. “Drinking 3 to 4 cups of coffee daily helps lower the risk of type 2 diabetes because of the combination of chemicals contained in coffee beans that are involved in metabolism,” Jaakko Tuomilehto, MD, PhD, and co-director of the Congress, says in a press release. One such chemical, chlorogenic acid, may actually help lower blood glucose levels. Of course, these latest findings still fall short of establishing a causal relationship between java and diabetes. But this isn't the only potential health benefit linked to a cup of joe. We've got a few extra reasons for you to sip up: Coffee boosts your memory Researchers at the University of South Florida found that caffeinated coffee increases the levels of a hormone that helps produce new neurons, which may reduce your risk of Alzheimer's. (Combine coffee with these Smart New Strategies To Ward Off Dementia.) A cup of java promotes heart health A study published in Circulation: Heart Failure found that moderate coffee consumption—approximately two 8-ounce cups a day—was associated with a lower risk of heart failure. (Also nosh on these 9 Superfoods For Your Heart for even more ticker protection.) The brew reduces your risk of skin cancer Caffeinated coffee can reduce your risk of Continue reading >>

Tea, Coffee And Diabetes

Tea, Coffee And Diabetes

“Tea and coffee drinkers have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes,” reported the BBC, adding that the protection may not be down to caffeine since decaffeinated coffee has the greatest effect. This story is based on a systematic review and meta-analysis that pooled data from studies of the association between tea and coffee consumption and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It found the more tea, coffee or decaffeinated coffee was drunk, the lower the risk of developing diabetes. People should not drink more tea or coffee on the strength of this evidence. The review did not account for diet, exercise and lifestyle, and the studies included were varied. The results do, however, suggest that further research is warranted. Maintaining a healthy weight, choosing a sensible diet and participating in physical activity remain the best ways to protect against type 2 diabetes. Where did the story come from? This research was carried out by Dr Rachel Huxley and colleagues from the University of Sydney. It was funded by the National Heart Foundation of Australia. The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Archives of Internal Medicine . The newspapers highlighted the benefits of tea and coffee based on this research, but generally also reported that other factors such as diet and exercise also play a role. What kind of research was this? This was a systematic review and meta-analysis of a number of studies. The researchers say it has been suggested that coffee may be able to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. To investigate this, they searched scientific databases to look for prospective studies on coffee, decaffeinated coffee and tea that estimated the effect of these drinks on diabetes over time. What did the research involve? The re Continue reading >>

Are Coffee And Tea Healthy? They Could Extend Life For Diabetics, New Study Shows

Are Coffee And Tea Healthy? They Could Extend Life For Diabetics, New Study Shows

The wonders of coffee are varied. Your morning cup has been thought to lower risks of certain diseases like Parkinson’s and diabetes, in addition to boosting metabolism. Now, a new study indicates that drinking coffee could also keep you living longer—if you’re a diabetic woman. Scientists in Portugal presented this new research at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal, held September 11–15. The observational study included more than 3,000 people, all of whom had diabetes and used a diary to track coffee, tea and soft drink consumption, according to a release. Related: Diabetes Vaccine Entering Human Testing Could Also Prevent The Common Cold The findings revealed that females with diabetes who regularly drank caffeine, either from tea or coffee, lived longer than those who abstained from caffeinated beverages. Unfortunately for men, the study didn’t indicate any difference in their life span. Women benefited from consuming caffeine regardless of the source of their buzz, but the type of health benefits varied depending on the beverage. Ladies who drank about one cup of coffee daily (roughly 100 mg) were 51 percent less likely to die from any cause compared to noncaffeinated participants. While moderation usually is key, that wasn’t the case in this study. When consumption was boosted to between 100 and 200 mg of coffee per day, women had a 57 percent lower chance of death. Drinking two cups of coffee daily lowered the risk to 66 percent. Caffeinated tea drinkers had a reduced risk of dying from cancer, the study found. Females who drank the most tea reduced cancer-related deaths by 80 percent, compared to non–tea drinkers. However, the study authors warn that the sample of tea drinkers was very small and tha Continue reading >>

Diabetes News: Coffee Could Help Stop Diabetes - But Only If You Avoid This

Diabetes News: Coffee Could Help Stop Diabetes - But Only If You Avoid This

Drinking three to four cups of coffee a day has been shown to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by 25 per cent compared to those who drank one cup or less. It had been thought caffeine was responsible but this was later discounted as decaffeinated coffee had the same effect. Now Danish scientists found one of these previously untested compounds cafestol appears to improve cell function and insulin sensitivity in mice. The discovery could lead to new drugs to treat or even prevent the disease which affects around 3.6 million Britons. Coffee contains a large number of bioactive substances that can be categorised as alkaloids. Previous studies involved filter coffee but the cellulose filter papers trap cafestol so levels are low containing only 0.1 mg. Instead a cup of Scandinavian boiled coffee contained 6.2 mg, Turkish coffee 4.2 mg, and cafetiere 2.6 mg. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. Dr Fredrik Brustad Mellbye of Aarhus University Hospital said: "Coffee contains a large number of bioactive substances that can be categorised as alkaloids. "The main stimulant in coffee, caffeine, has attracted major interest. "However, since decaffeinated coffee displays the same inverse association with type 2 diabetes development as caffeinated coffee, it is less likely that all the beneficial effects of coffee are merely or mainly attributed to caffeine." In a previous study, Dr Mellbye and colleagues found cafestol increased insulin secretion in pancreatic cells when they were exposed to glucose. It also increased glucose uptake in muscle cells just as effectively as a commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug. In the new study, the researchers wanted to see if cafestol would help prevent or delay the onset of Type Continue reading >>

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

A prospective cohort study in younger and middle-aged U.S. women Abstract OBJECTIVE—High habitual coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but data on lower levels of consumption and on different types of coffee are sparse. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This is a prospective cohort study including 88,259 U.S. women of the Nurses’ Health Study II aged 26–46 years without history of diabetes at baseline. Consumption of coffee and other caffeine-containing foods and drinks was assessed in 1991, 1995, and 1999. We documented 1,263 incident cases of confirmed type 2 diabetes between 1991 and 2001. RESULTS—After adjustment for potential confounders, the relative risk of type 2 diabetes was 0.87 (95% CI 0.73–1.03) for one cup per day, 0.58 (0.49–0.68) for two to three cups per day, and 0.53 (0.41–0.68) for four or more cups per day compared with nondrinkers (P for trend <0.0001). Associations were similar for caffeinated (0.87 [0.83–0.91] for a one-cup increment per day) and decaffeinated (0.81 [0.73–0.90]) coffee and for filtered (0.86 [0.82–0.90]) and instant (0.83 [0.74–0.93]) coffee. Tea consumption was not substantially associated with risk of type 2 diabetes (0.88 [0.64–1.23] for four or more versus no cups per day; P for trend = 0.81). CONCLUSIONS—These results suggest that moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may lower risk of type 2 diabetes in younger and middle-aged women. Coffee constituents other than caffeine may affect the development of type 2 diabetes. High coffee consumption has been associated with better glucose tolerance and a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes in diverse populations in Europe, the U.S., and Japan (1–3). However, it remains unclear what co Continue reading >>

Why Coffee May Reduce Diabetes Risk

Why Coffee May Reduce Diabetes Risk

Coffee drinking has been linked with a reduced risk of diabetes, and now Chinese researchers think they may know why. Three compounds found in coffee seem to block the toxic accumulation of a protein linked with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. ''We found three major coffee compounds can reverse this toxic process and may explain why coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes," says researcher Kun Huang, PhD, a professor of biological pharmacy at the Huazhong University of Science & Technology. Previous studies have found that people who drink four or more cups of coffee a day have a 50% lower risk of getting type 2 diabetes. The new study is published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Coffee and Diabetes Risk: Explaining Why It May Work Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. In those who have it, the body does not have enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. The hormone insulin, made by the pancreas, is crucial to move glucose to the cells for energy. Other researchers have linked the ''misfolding'' of a protein called hIAPP (human islet amyloid polypeptide) with an increased risk of diabetes. HIAPP is similar to the amyloid protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease, Huang says. When these HIAPP deposits accumulate, they can lead to the death of cells in the pancreas, Huang tells WebMD. The Chinese researchers looked at three major active compounds in coffee and their effect on stopping the toxic accumulation of the protein: "We exposed hIAPP to coffee extracts, and found caffeine, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid all inhibited the formation of toxic hIAPP amyloid and protected the pancreatic cells," Huang tells WebMD. All three had an effect. However, caffeic acid was best. Caffeine was the least good of the th Continue reading >>

13 Hot Diabetic Drinks To Enjoy All Year Round

13 Hot Diabetic Drinks To Enjoy All Year Round

If you're trying to control blood sugar levels it may seem as though there are limited diabetic drinks available. But in truth there are a wide range of safe options you can thoroughly enjoy. Recently we covered 11+ cold diabetic drink options. And today we're delving into some warming drinks that are low in sugar, and some that are rich in healthy fats and proteins to help stabilize your blood sugar levels. #1: Coffee There's something about the rich aroma of freshly made coffee that you either love or you don't. But if you do, you'll be pleased to learn that you can still enjoy your favorite blend. But just be aware that some people can be more sensitive to coffee, whereby their glucose levels increase. If that's you, then coffee is obviously not the best choice for you. I love drinking my coffee strong and black. But if you want a coffee creamer, use cream, milk, coconut milk or unsweetened almond or soy milk. #2: Coconutty Mocha If you are a coffee lover, adding a twist of coconutty chocolate for a deliciously warming mocha, may be just what you need on a fresh, crispy morning. Ingredients: Half a cup of brewed coffee 2/3 cup unsweetened almond or coconut milk 2 teaspoons cacao or cocoa powder (unsweetened) 1 tablespoon coconut butter or 1/8 teaspoon coconut extract Your choice of sweetener (sweeten to taste) Combine all the ingredients in a pan and heat over medium heat until you reach your desired temperature. Serve in mugs and sip away! Just be wary not to let it boil rapidly or you'll ruin your mix. #3: Classic Hot Chocolate I don't know about you but the thought of hot chocolate always brings back childhood memories – it's a warming drink that's sweet, creamy, and oh-so-satisfying! This simple recipe proves that you don’t have to ditch all your favorite dri Continue reading >>

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