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Is Clear Urine A Sign Of Diabetes

Recognizing Diabetes Symptoms

Recognizing Diabetes Symptoms

Q. My daughter is going to be two soon and I had her tested for sugar. The doctor was busy, so the nurse ran the tests and left it at telling us there was sugar in her urine. I was wondering if you could explain, as no one did. Melanie, NY A. Having sugar or glucose in your urine, or glucosuria, is one of the signs of diabetes. Diabetes Symptoms It could also have been a mistake, especially if she has no other symptoms of diabetes, which can typically include: urinating a lot (polyuria) drinking a lot (polydipsia) losing weight Other symptoms can also include excessive hunger, being tired a lot, and being irritable. Does she have any of these diabetes symptoms? You should likely call your doctor to discuss the results and see if he or she wants to do a retest or do further testing for diabetes, including a blood sugar test. Our screening quiz on symptoms of diabetes may also be helpful. Also keep in mind that some kidney problems can cause glucosuria. Recognizing Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes sometimes go unrecognized early on because parents think their children are urinating more simply because they are drinking more. Get your child evaluated by your pediatrician before you start restricting her fluid intake though, because if she does have diabetes and you don't let her drink, she will keep urinating and quickly get dehydrated. Or parents may think that the increased urination is normal, as many kids do go through stages of frequent urination, like if they have pollakiuria or frequent daytime urination syndrome. Unlike children with diabetes who frequently urinate large amounts of clear urine, children with pollakiuria just urinate very small amounts each time and they often don't wake up at night to urinate. They also don't lose weight, which is rarely normal in childr Continue reading >>

Why Is My Pee Cloudy? 7 Things Your Pee Might Be Trying To Tell You

Why Is My Pee Cloudy? 7 Things Your Pee Might Be Trying To Tell You

You pee more often in a day than you might eat — at least six to eight times, and maybe even more if you're drinking the right amount of water. It's no wonder that the study of urine, or urinalysis (no, I didn't make that word up), has been around for hundreds of years. According to Dr. Tomas Griebling, vice chair of the urology department at the University of Kansas, it's "one of the original windows into what's happening in the body." Doctors today still rely on pee to tell a true story about someone's health. Your kidneys are a complicated filtration system, and while you're busy milling about your day, not even thinking about them in the slightest, they're working hard to sift through 200 liters of your blood. That means no matter how much you try to hide what you ate or drank over the weekend, whatever comes out of those kidneys is a dead giveaway of what you've been up to. Since your urine is a compilation of the waste that's been swimming around in your body, it says a lot about what kind of health issues you're facing, whether it's a bacterial infection or early onset diabetes. So whether your urine is looking cloudy, bright yellow, or even red, don't ignore your pee; it could be the most reliable health guru you've ever had. Here are seven important things your urine can tell you about your health. 1. "You Have A Urinary Tract Infection" Giphy Anyone who has ever had a UTI knows all about the cruel stinging sensation (and may be haunted by it forever) — but that's not the only giveaway you have a UTI. The following also might indicate an unfriendly infection: having to go pronto all the time, yet only the tiniest bit trickles out; a pungent odor that reminds you a bit of ammonia; and pee that is gloomy-looking and cloudy. Out of all the warning signs, the m Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? New Drugs Can Help You Pee Out Excess Sugar

Have Diabetes? New Drugs Can Help You Pee Out Excess Sugar

An abnormally high level of sugar in your urine has traditionally been a sign of uncontrolled diabetes and something to be corrected. But that notion has been turned on its head by a new class of diabetes drugs that work by increasing how much sugar patients pass in their urine. New path to blood sugar control To date, two of these new drugs have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating type 2 diabetes. The first, canagliflozin (Invokana®), was cleared last March; the second, dapagliflozin (Farxiga®), was approved just this week. Both drugs are so-called SGLT2 inhibitors that act by blocking the kidneys’ reabsorption of sugar, or glucose. The result is that more glucose is released in the urine and the patient’s blood glucose level goes down — a major goal of diabetes treatment. Most other available drugs for diabetes work by targeting the liver, pancreas or gut to improve insulin sensitivity, reduce insulin resistance or stimulate insulin secretion. In contrast, SGLT2 inhibitors work completely independent of insulin. The two new medications, which are taken by mouth in pill form, are approved for use as stand-alone drug therapy, in addition to changes in diet and increased exercise, or in combination with other drugs for diabetes. Their approvals were based on multiple clinical studies — nine for canagliflozin and 16 for dapagliflozin — showing that they effectively lowered hemoglobin A1c, a measure of average blood sugar level over the previous three months. A surprise effect on the waistline An added benefit is that SGLT2 inhibitors are associated with modest weight loss. For instance, patients shed from 2.8 percent to 5.7 percent of body weight in clinical studies of canagliflozin. “The weight loss is an appealing side effec Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

MORE Diabetes is a condition characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels, and Type 2 diabetes is the most common form. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease, and left untreated, it can cause serious health complications. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes (the majority of which are Type 2), but 8 million don't know they have it, according to a 2014 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And about 86 million U.S. adults have prediabetes, or blood sugar levels that are abnormally high, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. Causes A hormone called insulin helps sugar get inside cells, which can then be used for energy. When the body's cells fail to respond properly to insulin, sugar builds up in the bloodstream, eventually leading to Type 2 diabetes. Exactly why the body fails to respond to insulin, a phenomenon called insulin resistance, is not known, but risk factors include being overweight, inactive or older than 45. It is thought that increases in body fat makes it harder for the body to use insulin. In contrast to Type 2 diabetes, Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas makes little or no insulin. Symptoms According to the National Institutes of Health, early symptoms of Type 2 diabetes include increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, fatigue and more frequent or slow to heal infections, such as bladder, kidney and skin infections. Some people with the condition do not experience symptoms for many years. Unexplained weight loss can also be a symptom of Type 2 diabetes, said Dr. Minisha Sood, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. This symptom can sometimes be confusing to patients, because diabetes is associated with obesity and too much weight gain, Sood said. Although this is true, Type 2 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs: Symptoms & Treatments

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs: Symptoms & Treatments

Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus are two different types of diabetes in dogs, and both can be serious if left untreated. Diabetes insipidus is also known as “water diabetes” and is the more rare form. It affects water metabolism and prevents the body from conserving water, which results in increased urination and diluted, almost clear urine. It is not related to diabetes mellitus in canines, which is also known as “sugar diabetes.” Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas that affects the body’s ability to convert food into fuel. Here is what you should know about the symptoms and treatments for diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Symptoms Of Diabetes In Dogs Diabetes insipidus comes in two forms in canines, and both are related to the pituitary gland and result in similar symptoms. Central diabetes insipidus happens when the pituitary doesn’t release enough of a hormone called vassopressin, an anti-diuretic. This can be caused by birth defect, head injury, or tumor. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is the other form. It happens when the kidneys don’t respond to the vassopressin that the pituitary produces. It can be caused by birth defect, exposure to drugs, metabolic disorders, or renal failure. Both types will result in the following symptoms in dogs. Excessive urination Excessive drinking and thirst Weight loss Decreased urination due to dehydration Poor coat health Accidents in the house Diabetes mellitus is a pancreatic condition that also comes in two forms in canines. Insulin-deficiency diabetes mellitus is when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin, a hormone that tells the body’s cells to take glucose, a type of sugar, from the bloodstream to use as fuel. Insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus happens when the body produces e Continue reading >>

Sweet-smelling Urine

Sweet-smelling Urine

Why does my urine smell sweet? If you notice a sweet or fruity aroma after urinating, it may be a sign of a more serious medical condition. There are a variety of reasons why your pee smells sweet. The smell is affected because your body is expelling chemicals into your urine. These may be bacteria, glucose, or amino acids. If you notice a sudden onset of sweet-smelling urine, you should contact your doctor immediately. 1. UTI Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are very common infections of the urinary system. For an infection to occur, bacteria must travel up the urethra. The urethra is the tube through which urine flows from your bladder to outside your body. Because of the female anatomy, women are more likely to get UTIs. One of the first signs of an UTI is strong- or sweet-smelling urine. This is because bacteria is dispelled into the urine. Other symptoms are an ongoing urge to pee and a burning sensation when you go. Your doctor can diagnose a UTI using urinalysis. You can purchase pain relievers over the counter that can help with the pain, but only a doctor can prescribe antibiotics that will treat the infection. 2. Hyperglycemia and diabetes Hyperglycemia occurs when you have abnormally high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar is a tell-tale sign of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, you may notice your pee smells sweet or fruity. This is because the body is trying to get rid of the excess blood sugar and is disposing of glucose through your urine. For people who haven’t been diagnosed with diabetes, this symptom can be one of the first signs they have the disease. Diabetes can be diagnosed with urinalysis and blood tests. For those with a diagnosis, it can be a sign they’re mismanaging the condition. Treatment for diabetes depends on the Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dwarf Hamsters

Diabetes In Dwarf Hamsters

Disclaimer: This is simply based on my opinion and experience treating diabetic dwarf hamsters. My sample size is small and I do not pretend to be a medical professional. If your hamster has diabetes then the best thing you can do is to see a veterinarian immediately! Let’s start with the basics. So, What is diabetes? So, here’s a greatly simplified answer. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar levels in the body. It’s supposed to work like this: when you eat your body turns food into sugars, or glucose. Then, your pancreas is supposed to produce insulin to allow your cells to use those sugars. Insulin essentially works like a key that opens your cells to allow glucose to enter so that your body can use that glucose for energy. However, for some people, and some hamsters, that system does not work. There are two primary types of diabetes in humans: Type 1 and Type 2. In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas does not produce insulin and therefore the body is unable to use the glucose from the food you eat. When this happens the glucose builds up in the blood causing high blood sugar. If that high blood sugar isn’t treated it can damage eyes, kidneys, nerves, the heart, and even lead to death. Generally Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an autoimmune disease where the body attacks its own insulin producing cells. This is often strongly linked to genetics, but sometimes can be triggered by other causes. In Type 2 diabetes people generally are able to produce at least some of their own insulin. However, their pancreas may not be able to produce enough insulin or their body may be insulin resistant. This means that their body will not be able to efficiently use the glucose in their blood and therefore will end up with high blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

7 Sneaky Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

7 Sneaky Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

Here’s a scary stat: More than 15 million men in the U.S. have diabetes—a condition that occurs when your blood sugar is too high—but around a quarter of them don’t even know it, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That’s bad news. When left unchecked, the condition can lead to serious complications like heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage, and vision loss. One of the reasons why so many people end up going untreated is because the symptoms caused by high blood sugar are sneaky. They tend to develop gradually, so you might not realize that you’re sick, says Joel Fuhrman, M.D., author of The End of Diabetes. And even when you notice something is off, the signs can be vague, so you might not make the connection to diabetes. That’s why it’s important to know what to watch for. Here are 7 unexpected signs that your blood sugar levels might be too high. How many do you have? Increased urination is telltale sign that your blood sugar could be out of control. When you have too much glucose—or sugar—in your bloodstream, your kidneys try to flush out the extra through your urine, explains Dr. Fuhrman. As a result, you end up having to pee more often than usual, including in the middle of the night. Since you’re losing so much fluid, you’ll probably feel extra thirsty and your mouth will be dry, too, he says. (For more health news delivered right to your inbox, sign up for our Daily Dose newsletter.) Related: Eat Less Of This So You Won't Have to Wake Up At Night to Pee Peeing more often means that your body is getting rid of more water than usual, which puts you at risk for dehydration, says Dr. Furhman. That can leave you feeling thirsty and cotton-mouthed, even if it seems like you’re drinking the same a Continue reading >>

What You Can Learn About Your Health By Analyzing The Color And Smell Of Your Urine

What You Can Learn About Your Health By Analyzing The Color And Smell Of Your Urine

By Dr. Mercola Urine can reveal important information about your body's waste elimination process, providing clues about your overall health status. Your kidneys serve to filter excess water and water-soluble wastes out of your blood, getting rid of toxins and things that would otherwise build up and cause you to become ill. Many things — from excess protein and sugar to bacteria and yeast — may make their way into your urine. Instead of ignoring your urine and dashing back to whatever important activity having to pee interrupted, take this golden opportunity to become familiar with your "normal." If you notice changes in the way your urine looks or smells, the cause might be something as benign as what you had for dinner last night, such as beets or asparagus. Or, your astuteness may potentially alert you to a serious condition. If you suspect you have a urinary tract problem, you should consult your physician. One of the first things he or she is likely to do is a urine test. Urine tests have been around for more than 6,000 years1 and are easy, noninvasive tools for quickly assessing your health status2. Minding Your Pees and Cues In your lifetime, your kidneys filter more than one million gallons of water, enough to fill a small lake. Amazingly, one kidney can handle the task perfectly well. In fact, if you lose a kidney, your remaining kidney can increase in size by 50 percent within two months, to take over the job of both.3 Urine is 95 percent water and five percent urea, uric acid, minerals, salts, enzymes, and various substances that would cause problems if allowed to accumulate in your body4. Normal urine is clear and has a straw yellow color, caused by a bile pigment called urobilin. As with your stool, your urine changes color depending on what foods you Continue reading >>

What Causes Colorless Urine

What Causes Colorless Urine

The normal color of the urine varies from pale yellow to straw-yellow. If there is something wrong with your body, urine may be present dark yellow, orange, pink, red, green, blue, brown and even black. Sometimes you may notice the urine is colorless. What are the causes of colorless urine? ● Cause If your urine is clear or very pale, you may be drinking a lot of liquids or drinking fluids with a high content of diuretics such as caffeine. 2. Diuretics Medications, containing diuretics, may make your urine colorless, because they force the body to get rid of extra water. 3. Kidney disease Colorless urine can be an indicator of kidney disease, if you do not drink a lot of water. Normally, blood flows into the kidney through renal artery and then filtered by kidneys. During this process, wastes like creatinine and urobilins are discharged with excess fluids, so our urine appears yellow color. However, when kidney function is affected, these wastes will be failed to be excreted, which can lead to colorless urine directly. 4. Diabetes insipidus In diabetes insipidus the body does not produce enough antidiuretic hormone, which is also called vasopressin, or does not respond to the hormone properly. Vasopressin stimulates the kidneys to send water back into the tissues and bloodstream so that it will not be excreted in the urine. Without the hormone, too much urine is produced, and the person is constantly thirsty. Diabetes insipidus is sometimes called “water diabetes.” ● What to do You may want to cut down on your fluid and caffeine intake. But if your clear urine is not due to too much fluid intake or medication, you need to take further tests to find out if you have a kidney problem. Our online experts will be very glad to give you some suggestions to treat this c Continue reading >>

Is It A Good Sign If Your Urine Is Clear?

Is It A Good Sign If Your Urine Is Clear?

As Yuriko wrote so well, clear urine is neither a "good sign" or a bad sign. It depends mainly on what your body thinks it should do in your given situation. If your body wants to get rid of water (e.g. you're drinking a lot more water than you absolutely need, or you ingest diuretics - stuff that forces you to excrete more water, like caffeine, alcohol, or some medicines) then your body flushes water out in your urine, making it look "clear" because it dilutes out the colored ingredients. If your body has less water (e.g. you're dehydrated after a long run on a hot day), it will try to hang on to water, meaning the urine is more concentrated, appears darker and not as "clean." In both situations, it is not a matter of "good" or "bad" but rather that your body is doing its job making sure you are not too wet or dry. After all, the amount of pigment in your urine stays the same, whether the urine is clear or concentrated. Like any system in the body, there can also be dysfunction or disease, but probably the only situations where the gross appearance of your urine can indicate either are: - if there is blood in the urine (you better get this checked out) - you pass a kidney stone (well ... you will know that's happening because it will hurt like heck!) - a rare condition called porphyria where the urine has the color of port wine (how rare? ~1:100,000) Beware that certain foods can affect urine color (especially if your metabolism is prone to it): pink: beets, blackberries, rhubarb light orange: carrots, winter squash light green: asparagus And finally - please be aware that the idea of "drinking a lot of water because ... it is healthy" has no scientific foundation. This topic has been reviewed by experts twice in recent years, and the conclusions have been the same. Th Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Urination: What’s Your Urine Color Tells You?

Diabetes & Urination: What’s Your Urine Color Tells You?

Out of all the things in the world, and you pick up urine to write about. Is that what you’re thinking about? It may sound strange and bizarre to listen or read about urine, but boy it’s important down to every line. Urine is one thing that can offer great insight into the diabetic condition of the patient. We here would look into the correlation between diabetes and urine as part of our informative series. Perio Protect Treatment Non-surgical, Painless, Easy Method Using an FDA- Cleared Medical Device perioprotect.com Let’s head down and have a look as to how your urine says a lot about your health condition. Diabetes & Urine, A strange yet important relation It has long been practices that the urine color, consistency, and smell has been a benchmark for seeking the status of diabetes within the patient’s body. Up until the recent development of sophisticated machines that help gauge blood glucose levels, urine helped in finding the answers that one sought. But nonetheless, urine still hasn’t lost its place in today’s time of medical practices. Frequent Urination and Diabetes One of the major symptoms of diabetes is increased urination in the patient. The situation in which our body tends to urinate more than the normal is also known as polyuria. When a patient suffers from any type of diabetes, type 1 or type 2, the major symptom of the condition is the excessive passage of urine. In other words, you not only want to urinate more frequently but the volume also increases each time you urinate. In a healthy person, the volume of urine that passes is somewhere around 1-2 liters. However, in the case of diabetes, the patient passes around 3-4 liters of urine each day. Why Does Diabetes Cause Frequent Urination? We know understand the reasons as to why diabetes Continue reading >>

Symptoms And Detection Of Ketoacidosis

Symptoms And Detection Of Ketoacidosis

Symptoms These symptoms are due to the ketone poisoning and should never be ignored. As soon as a person begins to vomit or has difficulty breathing, immediate treatment in an emergency room is required to prevent coma and possible death. Early Signs, Symptoms: Late Signs, Symptoms: very tired and sleepy weakness great thirst frequent urination dry skin and tongue leg cramps fruity odor to the breath* upset stomach* nausea* vomiting* shortness of breath sunken eyeballs very high blood sugars rapid pulse rapid breathing low blood pressure unresponsiveness, coma * these are more specific for ketoacidosis than hyperosmolar syndrome Everyone with diabetes needs to know how to recognize and treat ketoacidosis. Ketones travel from the blood into the urine and can be detected in the urine with ketone test strips available at any pharmacy. Ketone strips should always be kept on hand, but stored in a dry area and replaced as soon as they become outdated. Measurement of Ketones in the urine is very important for diabetics with infections or on insulin pump therapy due to the fact it gives more information than glucose tests alone. Check the urine for ketones whenever a blood sugar reading is 300 mg/dl or higher, if a fruity odor is detected in the breath, if abdominal pain is present, if nausea or vomiting is occurring, or if you are breathing rapidly and short of breath. If a moderate or large amount of ketones are detected on the test strip, ketoacidosis is present and immediate treatment is required. Symptoms for hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome are linked to dehydration rather than acidosis, so a fruity odor to the breath and stomach upset are less likely. How To Detect Ketones During any illness, especially when it is severe and any time the stomach becomes upset, ketone Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

Diabetes mellitus is a common illness in dogs. It is caused by either a decreased production of insulin or decreased functioning of the insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps glucose move from the blood stream into the cells of the body where it can be used for energy. What causes diabetes in dogs? There appear to be many factors that can contribute to the development of diabetes in dogs. Genetics plays a role. Some diabetes may be immune-mediated. This means the dog's immune system works against the pancreas as it tries to produce insulin. What dogs are most at risk of developing diabetes? Dogs of any age can develop diabetes, but most are between 7 and 9 years old. Females appear to be at increased risk. Certain breeds appear to be more at risk, including Samoyeds, Australian terriers, miniature schnauzers, pugs, and miniature and toy poodles. Dogs who have had multiple episodes of pancreatitis also appear to be more likely to develop diabetes mellitus. What are the signs and symptoms of diabetes in dogs? Most dogs with diabetes will have increased thirst and urination. Although the appetite is usually good or increased, there is often weight loss. Some dogs, however, may become obese. In some cases, blindness due to cataracts may be the first indication to an owner that there is a problem. Cataracts would appear as cloudy eyes with vision loss. Several diseases often occur in conjunction with diabetes mellitus, including Cushing's disease (hyperadrenocorticism), urinary tract infections, hypothyroidism, acute pancreatitis and cancer. The presence of these diseases can complicate the diagnosis and effective treatment of diabetes. Dogs may develop a serious complication of diabetes known as ketoacidosis. In this emergency condition, the blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus, disorder of carbohydrate metabolism characterized by impaired ability of the body to produce or respond to insulin and thereby maintain proper levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Diabetes is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, though these outcomes are not due to the immediate effects of the disorder. They are instead related to the diseases that develop as a result of chronic diabetes mellitus. These include diseases of large blood vessels (macrovascular disease, including coronary heart disease and peripheral arterial disease) and small blood vessels (microvascular disease, including retinal and renal vascular disease), as well as diseases of the nerves. Causes and types Insulin is a hormone secreted by beta cells, which are located within clusters of cells in the pancreas called the islets of Langerhans. Insulin’s role in the body is to trigger cells to take up glucose so that the cells can use this energy-yielding sugar. Patients with diabetes may have dysfunctional beta cells, resulting in decreased insulin secretion, or their muscle and adipose cells may be resistant to the effects of insulin, resulting in a decreased ability of these cells to take up and metabolize glucose. In both cases, the levels of glucose in the blood increase, causing hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). As glucose accumulates in the blood, excess levels of this sugar are excreted in the urine. Because of greater amounts of glucose in the urine, more water is excreted with it, causing an increase in urinary volume and frequency of urination as well as thirst. (The name diabetes mellitus refers to these symptoms: diabetes, from the Greek diabainein, meaning “to pass through,” describes the copious urination, and mellitus, from the Latin meaning “sweetened wi Continue reading >>

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