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Is Claritin D Safe For Diabetics

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

It is that time of year again and as a Pharmacist/Certified Diabetes Educator one of the most common questions over the fall, the holiday’s and winter months is “What do you have to treat my cold?” or simply “Can you make me feel better?” Well there is no cure and we cannot wave our “therapeutic” wand and make symptoms disappear but there are a variety of products to help with the symptoms of cough and cold. If the patient is relatively healthy it may be a bit of a hit or miss scenario but usually the product will ease the symptoms until the cold runs its course over 7 to 10 days. The picture becomes less clear when the patient is taking other medications, has medical conditions such as kidney disease, blood pressure, or they have diabetes. Assisting our patient choose an appropriate product that will not worsen their existing medical conditions, and lessen the symptoms that make them feel miserable is key. Diabetes is a condition that requires some adjusting to choose the right product. It is not always a “Sugar free”, “Natural”, or alternative product that is best, as active ingredients may have issues. These include raising blood sugars, raising blood pressure or stressing the kidneys (common issues with diabetes). Usually after a brief discussion to educate the patient, a product can be chosen to help both their symptoms and minimally impact their diabetes and blood sugars. The discussion that follows is a practical approach on how to decide what a person with diabetes can use so that they understand why we avoid certain classes of products due to a their existing medical conditions. Blood Sugars Can Rise when Ill It is important to realize that when a person with diabetes is “fighting” a cold it produces stresses on the body as a whole and Continue reading >>

What Is Claritin-d (loratadine And Pseudoephedrine)?

What Is Claritin-d (loratadine And Pseudoephedrine)?

Claritin-D is the brand name of a medicine that combines the antihistamine Claritin (loratadine) and a nasal decongestant (pseudoephedrine). Combined, loratadine and pseudoephedrine reduce symptoms such as a runny or stuffed nose, sinus pressure, itchy red eyes or skin, and the phlegm from a cough. Loratadine is a type of antihistamine that stops your body's H1 receptor from activation by histamines, a part of your self-protective immune system that expands blood vessels and causes nasal congestion and phlegm. Unlike other H1-blocking antihistamines, such as Benadryl (diphenhydramine), loratadine is less likely to make you drowsy. The decongestant pseudoephedrine reduces "congestion" by contracting blood vessels. The drug was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1994 (12-hour formula) and 1996 (24-hour formula). Claritin-D is usually available over-the-counter (OTC) as a pill in the United States without a prescription, although it is kept behind the pharmacy counter and you may be required to register your name when you ask for it. Since it contains pseudoephedrine (commonly known by the brand name Sudafed), which has been used illegally to make the drug methamphetamine ("meth"), restrictions on its sale vary in the United States. Some states have passed or are considering laws that require a doctor's prescription for Claritin-D and other pseudoephedrine drugs. Warnings for Claritin-D Before taking Claritin-D, you should tell your doctor if you have or have ever had: Glaucoma (an eye condition) Kidney disease Heart disease Diabetes A bladder obstruction or other urination issues (such as an enlarged prostrate) Call your physician if you have a cough, skin rash, or fever with a headache, or if your symptoms don't improve after seven days of taking Clari Continue reading >>

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Spring is really starting to burst out here in Massachusetts. The tulips are blooming and leaves and buds are popping out on the trees. As pretty and welcoming as this is, many of you (about 50 million!) are probably bracing yourself for all of the pollen that is soon to follow, and suffering through the misery that it can bring. Thanks to the mild winter that we had in the Northeast, plants are pollinating earlier than usual. As if that weren’t bad enough, having seasonal allergies can also affect your blood sugar control. Seasonal allergies: do you have them? Seasonal allergies are sometimes called hay fever or, more technically, seasonal allergic rhinitis. You might be wondering if your symptoms are due to a cold, flu, or allergies. While there can be some overlap, the following symptoms are usually indicative of allergies: • Itchy eyes • Watery eyes • Dark circles under the eyes • Sneezing • Runny nose • Stuffy nose • Sore throat You might also feel a little bit tired. You won’t get a fever from allergies, however. These symptoms can linger for weeks unless they’re treated. Treating allergies There are a number of remedies for seasonal allergies, including oral medications, nasal sprays, and eye drops. It’s important that you not only choose the right one for your symptoms, but that you also are aware of how these medicines might affect your blood sugars. The following types of allergy medicines may affect your blood glucose levels or how you manage them: Antihistamines. These medicines can reduce sneezing, runny nose, and itchy and watery eyes. Common antihistamines include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratidine (Alavert, Claritin), cetirizine (Zyrtec Allergy), and fexofenadine (Allegra Allergy). Antihistamines might be combined with a deconge Continue reading >>

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

It's that time of year again. Stuffy noses, scratchy throats, upset tummies, and splitting headaches can send even the most stoic among us to the local drugstore for a magic pill to take away the pain. The fluorescent aisles of brightly colored bottles promising fast relief can seem daunting. Are all over-the-counter cold and flu meds safe for people with diabetes? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Most experts agree that most people with diabetes can feel free to select whatever over-the-counter (OTC) product works best for them, so long as the medication is taken as directed. At the same time, everyone is different so it's important to shop smartly to ensure a quick and safe recovery from this season's infections. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Ask the Pharmacist Don't just wander around the drugstore dazed and confused. "When making these choices, this is a time to utilize a pharmacist…This is what they are trained for…Tell the pharmacist all your symptoms, what other medicines you are taking,” says Jerry Meece, RPh, FACA, CDE, director of clinical services at the Plaza Pharmacy and Wellness Center in Gainesville, Texas." Meter/Monitor Accuracy There's been concern that certain OTC medications can cause false blood glucose readings. "Ten years ago, as companies were changing the process by which they mon Continue reading >>

Claritin-d And Metformin Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Claritin-d And Metformin Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences. Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Take Claritin

Can A Diabetic Take Claritin

HI XXXXXXX Page (age 79) I am pre diabetic (managing with diet) and taking Ramipril & Amlodipine . I also have a post nasal drip the I have also been managing with diet. However I did take a Claritin ... , cholelethiasis and more. I take donepezil, Aspirin, trazodone, low doze Naltrexone,claritine. I am 75 years old ...), not diabetic. Can I take Atorvastatin 10 mg, I prescribed recently if I had blood in my urine? I have chronic ... I'm type 1 diabetic. I use Novolog fast acting insulin ... Does it hurt me to take Claritin D for my allergies? ... Can i take a sleeping aid while i just took claritin pill ... that is supposed to stay dry and in place for a week. I have my granddaughters chewable Claritin in house....but also take trazadone 50mg at bedtime. Can I take both? ... on the floor after a party). If so, why would a person want to take them (enhanced effedta, hallucinations, etc.)? My inclination is, it would be used after someone is high to help them go to sleep since taking ... and gave her a dose of Claritin for kids about an hour and a half ago before we noticed the fever. Since we noticed the fever we figure it s not allergies. Can she take anything else? ... but this medicine causes drowsiness. Now I know Claritin has non drowsy drug. Up until now I can not find side effects about this medication. Can you please tell me whether it is absolutely safe to take it. ... the sneezing and now I have a bad case of laryngitis. Should I take a claritin or Allegra before work ... At allergy Drs. suggestion, I am taking the generic brand of Claritin in the morning, Singular in the evening and now dermatologist suggested taking Zyrtec at noon. Do these all do different things? What ... What are the side effects of Generic Claritin? my father s now taking the generic fo Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

What Allergy Medicines Can I Safely Take If I Have Heart Disease Or High Blood Pressure?

What Allergy Medicines Can I Safely Take If I Have Heart Disease Or High Blood Pressure?

What allergy medicines can I safely take if I have heart disease or high blood pressure? What allergy medicines can I safely take if I have heart disease or high blood pressure? Oklahoma Heart Institute Director of Interventional Laboratories, Dr. Wayne Leimbach, shares insights on allergies, heart disease and high blood pressure on our blog today. Springtime brings not only beautiful weather and beautiful flowers, but it also brings high pollen counts and suffering to people with allergies. Many people often ask what allergy medicines can I safely take if I have heart disease or high blood pressure. Many allergy medications include decongestants that can raise blood pressure, create palpitations and interfere with some other heart medications. Medications that often can be safely used by people with significant allergies include nasal corticosteroids. In addition, antihistamines are very effective. The antihistamines include fexofenadine (Allegra), cetirizine (Zyrtec), loratadine (Claritin) and diphenhydramine (Benadryl). Often manufactures will include a decongestant with the antihistamines in order to provide additional control of the runny nose often seen with allergies. Manufacturers will often indicate which of the antihistamines also contain a decongestant by adding the letter D to the name of the medicine. These decongestants can be phenylephrine or pseudoephedrine or oxymetazoline. For patients who have high blood pressure, rhythm problems (palpitations), or who have severe blockages in their blood vessels to their heart, these decongestants have the potential to cause problems. Decongestants can raise blood pressure or stimulate fast heart rhythms. Anyone with heart conditions or high blood pressure, before taking medications that include phenylephrine or pse Continue reading >>

Who Should Not Take Claritin-d?

Who Should Not Take Claritin-d?

Claritin-D (12-hour or 24-hour) should not be taken by people with kidney disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, glaucoma, enlarged prostate, thyroid problems, urination problems or heart disease, without first discussing it with your doctor. Do not use this medication without letting your doctor know that you use an MAOI (monoamine oxidase inhibitor), since the combination can have life-threatening results. People with following medical conditions should not use Claritin-D: Central nervous system stimulation with convulsions or cardiovascular failure may occur. Children under two years of age should not be given this medication. Chemical Toxins Relationship Abuse Diabetes Complications Body Contouring Your Lifestyle The Five Senses Stages Of Colon Cancer Patient Education For Improving Rx Drug Adherence Your Mind Male Reproductive System Parts Parenting Teens Morning Sickness & Pregnancy Mental Health Therapies Sharecare Bladder Cancer Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Digestive Diseases Schizophrenia Hydrocephalus Conception Achieved (Pregnancy) Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. treating lung conditions and lung diseases such as allergies, asthma, bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, lung disease, smoking cessation. Continue reading >>

Do Allergy Medications And Diabetes Medications Interact?

Do Allergy Medications And Diabetes Medications Interact?

I heard people with diabetes need to be careful with allergy medications. Are there allergy medications I cannot take with my diabetes medication? Zyrtec® (cetirizine), Claritin® (loratadine), Allegra® (fexofenadine), and Benadryl® (diphenhydramine) are all allergy medications that should not affect your blood sugar when used by themselves. However, these antihistamines are often paired with pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine. Pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine are both decongestants. These two medications can cause an increase in blood sugar when taken with diabetes medication and should be avoided, if possible, in people with diabetes. Be sure to read labels on cold and allergy medications, and be careful when the letter D is added to a medication name, such as Zyrtec-D or Claritin-D. This means that it contains pseudoephedrine. Continue reading >>

Choosing A Antihistamine For Diabetics

Choosing A Antihistamine For Diabetics

Choosing the Right Antihistamine as a Diabetic written by: AngelicaMD edited by: Diana Cooper updated: 5/6/2011 Diabetics who suffer from allergies, flu, colds and cough sometimes take over-the-counter (OTC) drugs such as antihistamines. Choosing the right antihistamine as a diabetic is important because many OTC drugs may affect blood sugar levels and cause other undesired side effects. Many diabetic people who experience symptoms of flu, colds, cough and allergies are often not sure if they are suffering from infection or allergies. The symptoms may be similar and so people often buy over-the-counter drugs (OTC) that contain combinations of ingredients which target these symptoms all at once. These symptoms may include headache, fever, runny nose and weakness, for which OTC drugs combining pain relievers, antihistamines, nasal decongestants, cough suppressants and other ingredients are sold. Antihistamines block the action of histamines which are produced by normal cells in reaction to allergens, thus preventing symptoms like runny nose, excessive tearing, itchiness and other allergic reactions. OTC antihistamines are usually combined with other drugs such as nasal decongestants, cough suppressants, expectorants, pain relievers, etc to relieve cough, colds and other flu symptoms. First generation or older preparations of antihistamines often cause drowsiness. Examples of these are diphenhydramine (Benadryl) and chlorpheniramine (Chlortrimeton). These are usually taken when one is expected to rest in bed and contraindicated for persons who are driving vehicles or heavy equipment. Second generation antihistamines are the newer class of drugs which are non-sedating and are taken by people who work or go to school. They include certirizine (Zyrtec) and loratadine (Clarit Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Loratadine - Oral, Claritin

Loratadine - Oral, Claritin

loratadine - oral, Claritin GENERIC NAME: LORATADINE - ORAL (lor-AT-a-deen) BRAND NAME(S): Claritin USES: This medication is an antihistamine that treats symptoms such as itching, runny nose, watery eyes, and sneezing from "hay fever" and other allergies. It is also used to relieve itching from hives.Loratadine does not prevent hives or prevent/treat a serious allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis). Therefore, if your doctor has prescribed epinephrine to treat allergic reactions, always carry your epinephrine injector with you. Do not use loratadine in place of your epinephrine.If you are self-treating with this medication, it is important to read the manufacturer's package instructions carefully so you know when to consult your doctor or pharmacist. (See also Precautions section.)Do not use this medication in children younger than 6 years unless directed by the doctor. If you are using the chewable tablets, do not use in children younger than 2 years unless directed by your doctor. Bad Bugs: Identify Bug Bites From Mosquitos, Spiders and More HOW TO USE: If you are using the over-the-counter product to self-treat, read all the directions on the product package before taking this medication. If your doctor has prescribed this medication, follow your doctor's directions and the instructions on your prescription label. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist.Take this medication by mouth with or without food, usually once a day or as directed by your doctor or the product package. If you are using the chewable tablets, chew each tablet well and swallow. Dosage is based on your age, condition, and response to treatment. Do not increase your dose or take this drug more often than directed. Do not take more of this medication than recommended for your age Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sick Days: What Meds Are Ok

Diabetes And Sick Days: What Meds Are Ok

In the midst of cold and flu season, you may wonder what medications are safe to take without greatly impacting blood glucose levels when you have diabetes. Overall, it's the sickness that increases blood glucose in people with diabetes, not the medication used to treat it. However, some medications should be used with caution. Stacey O'Donnell, R.N., B.S., C.D.E., nurse manager, at Joslin Diabetes Center, goes over different types of medications and how they could impact your diabetes. Examples: Tylenol, Aspirin Effect on diabetes: No effect. Use cautiously if you have renal disease. Anti-inflammatory Examples: Ibuprofen, such as Advil, Motrin, Nuprin Effect on diabetes: No effect. Also should be used carefully if you have renal disease. Examples: Allegra, Bumex Effect on diabetes: Caution should be used in patients who have diabetes with renal disease, cardiac disease and high blood pressure. General guidelines for taking medications for people with diabetes are to avoid products containing sugar, such as sucrose, dextrose, fructose, lactose and honey, O'Donnell says. Also, choose products with little or no alcohol. A suggested list of sugar-free cough and cold medicines includes: Chlor-Trometon tablets Dimetapp Elixir Scot-Tussin DM Liquid Cerose-DM Liquid Continue reading >>

Allergy Tips For People With Diabetes

Allergy Tips For People With Diabetes

Aaachoooo! It's that time of year again: spring allergy season. For about 1 in 5 people, warm weather brings not only blooming flowers and trees but also the telltale symptoms of hay fever (seasonal allergies) -- sneezing, coughing, runny or stuffy nose, scratchy throat, and itchy eyes. For those with type 2 diabetes, spring allergies don't directly affect blood sugar, but there are things you need to watch out for, says Gerald Bernstein, MD, FACP. HE's the director of the Diabetes Management Program at the Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. For relief from itching, sneezing, and runny nose, you might reach for an over-the-counter (OTC) medication such as an antihistamine, which millions have used safely, Bernstein says. "But when you're throwing something like issues around blood sugar into the mix, you need to be a little more aware of the potential things that can occur." One in five people who use antihistamines become drowsy, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA). "So if you take a nap and miss a meal, you can wake up with low blood sugar," Bernstein says. Look for newer antihistamines with less of a sedative effect or talk with a pharmacist about the side effects of various medications. To unclog a stuffy nose, you might choose an OTC or prescription nasal spray, but you might not know that some contain steroids. "Steroids stimulate the liver to make more glucose [blood sugar], so now your liver is beginning to make more sugar," Bernstein says. "And if you're not aware of this, you might be surprised and ask, ‘Why are my numbers high?'" Ask your doctor or pharmacist about nasal sprays without steroids. You have two choices: an OTC decongestant nasal spray or an OTC antihistamine nasal spray. If you cho Continue reading >>

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