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Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes 2?

Buy Cinnamon Extract, Multi-vit Rx Or Diet Rx

Buy Cinnamon Extract, Multi-vit Rx Or Diet Rx

Cinnamon for diabetes, supplement herb for blood sugar, diabetes, dosage, benefit and side effects Ray Sahelian, M.D. Cinnamon is aromatic and one of the best tasting spices. In recent years scientists have discovered that cinnamon extract has strong antioxidant activity and has the potential to help maintain healthy blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Patients with diabetes may find cinnamon to be a healthful addition to their diet. Research studies with the use of cinnamon in blood sugar control have yielded conflicting results and it is not clear at this time whether taking a cinnamon supplement would reduce blood sugar levels with long term use. Cinnamon benefit review Cinnamon, at about 3 to 6 grams a day, seems to have a moderate effect in reducing fasting plasma glucose concentrations in type 2 diabetic patients with poor blood sugar control. Cinnamon supplement may not be very effective in lowering blood sugar in those with type 1 diabetes. However, by itself, it is not likely to have a major influence but could be combined with other natural medications for better blood sugar control. One of the oldest remedies used in traditional Chinese herbalism for digestive support, recent studies have shown cinnamon (Cinnamomum aromaticum or Cinnamomum cassia) may support healthy blood sugar levels, when used as part of your diet, by activating insulin and glucose transport and improving glucose metabolism. Diet Rx with cinnamon for better weight management If you would like to eat less, consider a product called Diet Rx. This natural appetite suppressant works without stimulants. Diet Rx has no added caffeine, ephedra, ephedrine alkaloids, synephrine, hormones, guarana, ginseng, or stimulating amino acids. When you eat less, there is a better likelihood that your blood s Continue reading >>

Effectiveness Of Cinnamon For Lowering Hemoglobin A1c In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

Effectiveness Of Cinnamon For Lowering Hemoglobin A1c In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

Abstract Purpose: Multiple trials in the past have shown conflicting results of whether cinnamon lowers glucose or hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C). The purpose of this study was to determine whether cinnamon lowers HbA1C in patients with type 2 diabetes. I performed a randomized, controlled trial to evaluate whether daily cinnamon plus usual care versus usual care alone lowers HbA1c. Methods: I randomized 109 type 2 diabetics (HbA1C >7.0) from 3 primary care clinics caring for pediatric, adult, and geriatric patients at a United States military base. Participants were randomly allocated to either usual care with management changes by their primary care physician or usual care with management changes plus cinnamon capsules, 1g daily for 90 days. HbA1c was drawn at baseline and 90 days and compared with intention-to-treat analysis. This study was approved by an institutional review board. Results: Cinnamon lowered HbA1C 0.83% (95% CI, 0.46–1.20) compared with usual care alone lowering HbA1C 0.37% (95% CI, 0.15–0.59). Conclusions: Taking cinnamon could be useful for lowering serum HbA1C in type 2 diabetics with HbA1C >7.0 in addition to usual care. As the worldwide incidence of diabetes increases, the search for dietary adjuncts to treat this life-altering disease has become far ranging. Cinnamon is purported to be a natural insulin sensitizer, with adverse events of perioral dermatitis and stomatitis reported uncommonly with high intake.1 Both in vitro and in vivo animal studies have shown that cinnamon is an insulin sensitizer.2,3 Kim et al3 showed that intestinal glucosidase activity in rats was increased by cinnamon. Polyphenols within cinnamon have been identified as upregulators of mouse adipocyte insulin receptors.4 Peng et al5 found that polyphenols from cinnamon inhibi Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes Control

Cinnamon For Diabetes Control

Ads by Google Cinnamon for diabetes can control glucose level by nourishing digestive system and effectively support glucose metabolism. Cinnamon is best suitable for obesity-related diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Cinnamon (Cinnamomun zeylanicum) is a spice obtained from the inner bark of the tree of genus Cinnamomum, which is in use for both sweet and savory foods. Cinnamon trees are native to South-East Asia. Traditionally used for blood sugar & cholesterol control and relieve digestive problems or improve appetite. Other names of cinnamon are Cassia, Cassia Cinnamon, Chinese Cinnamon, Rou Gui (Mandarin). Cinnamon lower blood-sugar level Cinnamon contains biologically active substances that have demonstrated insulin-mimetic properties. Cinnamon improves insulin-mediated glucose metabolism, enhances insulin signaling in skeletal muscle and helps glucose to glycogen conversion. Thus, cinnamon is considering as an anti-diabetic herb. Cinnamon lower heart diseases and strokes risks Cinnamon lowers blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure levels. Cinnamon lowers LDL cholesterol responsible for the plaque formation. Additionally, Cinnamon has antioxidant property, which helps prevent the LDL cholesterol oxidation, thus prevent inflammation of arteries and further plaque formation. 15 Medicinal Uses of Cinnamon Cinnamon help maintains both healthy blood sugar and cholesterol levels. It remains a warming circulatory tonic, as well as a digestive aid to soothe upset stomach, gas, bloating and occasional indigestion. Studies show cinnamon is useful for obesity-related diabetes as well as to hyperlipidemia control. Lower Blood Sugar - Lower insulin resistance by improving insulin sensitivity. Cinnamon lower blood sugar by interfering with digestive enzymes and slows the breakd Continue reading >>

Curing Diabetes And Cinnamon Benefits

Curing Diabetes And Cinnamon Benefits

In the following paragraphs, you will have the answers to your questions related to cinnamon and its usage in diabetes. Is it true that cinnamon can be used to control diabetes? It is true that there are certain cinnamon’s components that can lower your sugar blood level. Thus, the real key role of cinnamon stands inside its components: In fact, there exists a water-soluble polyphenol inside cinnamon, called MHCP, which is very alike to insulin, and mimics its actions. Start Download - View PDF Ad Convert From Doc to PDF, PDF to Doc Simply With The Free Online App! FromDocToPDF Learn more Basically, there are three ways through which might lower your blood sugar level as following: 1. It can stimulate insulin production from the pancreas (this is the organ responsible for its production and secretion). 2. Due to its active component MHCP, it helps in increasing the effectiveness of insulin receptors. This component is very alike to insulin, and can mimic its actions when it is connected with the insulin receptors in the body tissues. Therefore, there will be an increased effect when MHCP works together with insulin. The result could be "LOWER BLOOD GLUCOSE LEVELS". 3. It can slow down the emptiness of the stomach after each meal. That means, that when your stomach empties quickly, your sugar blood level can raise up very quickly and reaching high levels. While, with cinnamon, the stomach can be emptied slower, and in this way, your blood sugar levels cannot reach the highest and dangerous peak. How can you take cinnamon for everyday use? What is the right cinnamon dosage in diabetes? You can add cinnamon powder in everything you eat or drink, like coffee, tea, juices. Or, you can prepare cinnamon tea by putting a stick of cinnamon into a cup of boiled water (I have sh Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Honey? The Research Will Surprise You

Can Diabetics Eat Honey? The Research Will Surprise You

Honey is an all-natural food nicknamed Nature’s Sweetener. Humans have likely been eating it for tens, if not hundreds of thousands of years. And not only for its sweet flavour, but for its medicinal properties too. Sounds like something we should be eating more of right? Yet when you break it right down, honey is essentially sugar. We know that a high sugar diet is bad for you, which is why many consider honey unhealthy. So is honey good for us or not? Perhaps more importantly… Can diabetics eat honey? Honey vs Sugar: How does it compare? Honey is made in the bee-hive from flower nectar. The process is a collective effort that requires honey bees to consume, digest and regurgitate nectar repeatedly. For this reason the nutritional properties of honey depend on the nectar available around the hive. A typical batch of honey compared with sugar looks like this (1): You can see honey contains water and many trace vitamins and minerals that sugar doesn’t. That’s why honey is only 82% sugar by weight, while sugar is 99.9%… And that’s also why honey contains fewer calories than sugar. It’s hard to argue the winner here. Honey is also reported to contain at nearly 200 different substances, especially antioxidants. Antioxidants are thought to protect against many forms of disease (2). The Glycemic Index (GI) ranges considerably depending on the type of honey, but the entire GI concept itself is unpredictable anyway. Summary: Honey is not pure sugar. It also contains water and small amounts of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, which vary depending on the type of honey. Honey vs Sugar: Effects on blood sugar and insulin The impact of honey consumption on blood sugar levels tends to be slightly better than regular sugar. One small experimental study on healthy sub Continue reading >>

Essential Oils For Diabetes: 6 Ways For Better Management

Essential Oils For Diabetes: 6 Ways For Better Management

Although there isn't a defined cure, diabetes can be managed with diet and lifestyle and, often, medication. One way to boost its management is with essential oils for diabetes, used in various ways to improve insulin sensitivity, manage body composition, and improve overall digestive wellness. Diabetes is one of the more widespread metabolic, chronic illnesses of our time. It's estimated that around 10% of the population is diagnosed with diabetes, while another 8 million people likely have it without being diagnosed. (1) In this article, you'll learn about: Essential Oils for Diabetes and the Body Aromatherapy and Essential Oils for Diabetes 6 Ways to Use Essential Oils for Diabetes Management Essential Oils for Diabetes and the Body For a refresher on what diabetes is and how it works in the body, we can look to the American Diabetes Association for their summary of the more common variation of diabetes, type 2: If you have type 2 diabetes your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time it isn't able to keep up and can't make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. (2) On the other hand, type 1 diabetes is genetic and behaves differently: In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The body breaks down the sugars and starches you eat into a simple sugar called glucose, which it uses for energy. Insulin is a hormone that the body needs to get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body. (3) It's important to have an understanding of the disease itself before we adjust our habits and supplemental efforts in response. For example, if you are using an essential oil with the goal of improving insulin sensitivity for type 2 di Continue reading >>

Can Cinnamon Help Fight Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Cinnamon Help Fight Type 2 Diabetes?

Share it: More than a cherished spice, cinnamon has been widely used for thousands of years as a natural remedy for a variety of ailments, including the silent killer — diabetes. In 2012, diabetes was the eighth leading cause of death in the world. In 2014, diabetes affected 422 million people worldwide — and half didn’t even know they had it. In honor of National Diabetes Awareness Month this November, we’re taking a look at the science behind cinnamon and whether or not it helps with Type 2 diabetes. THE LINK BETWEEN CINNAMON AND DIABETES Cinnamon compounds have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that may play a role in reducing insulin resistance. This is primarily helpful for Type 2 diabetics who are insulin resistant but not for Type 1 diabetics who cannot produce enough insulin. (Cinnamon could become helpful for Type 1 diabetics if they become insulin resistant.) For this reason, we’re going to focus on Type 2 diabetes. QUICK REVIEW: TYPE 2 DIABETES Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly use glucose (aka sugar). If not managed properly, this can cause a buildup of glucose in the blood and lead to serious health problems down the line. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas — the organ that regulates blood sugar — produces a lot of insulin, but the body doesn’t respond to it. The cells become insulin resistant. Think of insulin as a gatekeeper. After you eat a slice of bread, the carbohydrates are digested into glucose (and other nutrients), which are then sent into the bloodstream so that tissues can use these nutrients. Glucose needs insulin as a helper hormone to open cell walls, allowing it to pass through into the cell, where the glucose is burned for energy or stored. When our body can’t use insulin, Continue reading >>

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together. However, a new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for: Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…) Cancer (prostate, breast…) Parkinsons disease According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine: (Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast) What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes). Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups! You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee): Let me pour myself another cup of coffee right now (and according to the coffee and diabetes research, you should grab a coffee yourself) because we’re going to see: Why is coffee good for us? What does other research about coffee and diabetes suggest How much sugar and milk I personally add to my coffee? I’ll reveal my own easy recipe for diabetes-friendly coffee – I’m drinking one right now! In short, do coffee and diabetes go hand in hand together? Let’s find out: Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question I don’t really know anybody that wouldn’t l Continue reading >>

Chromium And Cinnamon Supplements For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: How Strong Is The Evidence?

Chromium And Cinnamon Supplements For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: How Strong Is The Evidence?

Q: What types of chromium supplements are available? A: Chromium is an essential trace element that is found in foods such as whole grain, broccoli, nuts, green beans, wine, and beer.1 Severe chromium deficiency is rare,1 but chromium has become a commonly sold supplement accounting for $85 million in sales in 2002.2 There are different forms available, including chromium chloride, chromium nicotinate, and chromium picolinate. Chromium picolinate is designed to be better absorbed than the others.1 Q: How does chromium affect patients with type 2 diabetes? A: The relationship between chromium and diabetes was first noted in the 1950s when diabetes developed in chromium-deficient rats as a result of insulin resistance, which was reversed by chromium supplementation.1 It is proposed that chromium decreases insulin resistance, which is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. Q: Does chromium supplementation make a difference? A: Chromium likely is needed to maintain normal carbohydrate metabolism. Deficiency is rare, and the question is whether giving additional chromium to patients with sufficient chromium levels results in any improvement in insulin resistance and control of diabetes. Trials conducted in patients with prediabetes have not shown any benefit.1,2 Studies of chromium supplementation in patients with type 2 diabetes have been performed for the past 40 years, and the results remain conflicting. Some studies show promise but have been small and poor in quality. When the results of several studies are combined, there has been some suggestion that chromium may lower fasting blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels; however, larger, better-quality studies are needed.3 Q: What types of cinnamon supplements are available? A: Cinnamon is Continue reading >>

The 14 Best Foods To Control Type 2 Diabetes

The 14 Best Foods To Control Type 2 Diabetes

We all know that maintaining a healthy diet is vital in terms of type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment. Generally, the advice given to diabetics is relevant to the general population as well: consume adequate vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry and fish, and less industrial sweets and foods high in fat and salt. It is known that patients who use professional advice and expert dieticians and nutritional supervision have a much better chance to maintain balanced levels of sugar, and avoid the complications of the disease. Diabetics should also keep meals at regular times throughout the day to avoid sharp rises in blood sugar levels. So what are the best foods to control diabetes and add to the menu? There are 12 foods that can help balance blood sugar in your body. These are olive oil, cinnamon, green tea, pulses, green vegetables and oats. These common foods that are already in our kitchen help maintaining adequate blood sugar and prevent diabetes complications: 1. Olive oil Oil lacks carbohydrates, and therefore does not raise blood sugar levels. In addition, it slows the absorption of foods eaten along with the oil. Olive oil is rich Omega 9 and Omega 3 which help maintain the flexibility of blood vessels, allowing good blood flow. Also oil does not increase insulin levels, thus reducing the non-insulin tolerance that exists in many people and causes an increase in blood sugar levels. Find here more information about the great health benefits of olive oil. 2. Cinnamon Many studies show that consumption of one teaspoon cinnamon (2.5 g) to three teaspoons a day has a positive effect on reducing blood glucose levels. It was found that the cinnamon can make your cells more sensitive to insulin. Thus, the cells convert sugar into en Continue reading >>

Cinnamon May Not Be Best For Diabetes

Cinnamon May Not Be Best For Diabetes

Cinnamon has been talked about for years because of its supposed benefits for people with diabetes. The common spice is thought to lower both blood glucose and A1C levels. How? By improving your cells’ sensitivity to the hormone insulin, which controls blood glucose levels. That is why many people want to know if they can use cinnamon instead of their diabetes medicines. The research Studies looking into these claims about cinnamon have mostly involved small groups of 60-100 people, and have only lasted 5 to 16 weeks. On the other hand, studies that look at diabetes medicines can sometimes take years. For example, Metformin, the drug of choice for type 2 diabetes, has been studied in very large trials of thousands of patients over the course of many years. This level of study was able to show that not only does Metformin lower blood glucose and A1C, but it also increases lifespan and decreases complications of those who take it. Because of the low numbers of patients involved in cinnamon studies, in 2013, the Cochrane Library independent organization pooled together 10 cinnamon trials with 577 people. When the data from all the different trials were combined, it was found that taking cinnamon did not significantly lower blood glucose or A1C. In addition, none of the trials looked at the effectiveness of cinnamon in preventing diabetes complications. The common claim that cinnamon improves insulin sensitivity has not been proven in clinical trials, either. The takeaway If you enjoy cinnamon for its aroma and spicy sweetness, go ahead and enjoy it, but don’t count on it to control your diabetes. Looking for a natural and safe option is the smart way to go about caring for your health, but make sure you choose therapies that have been proven to work: Lose weight, or ma Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetic Pets

Cinnamon For Diabetic Pets

---"I want to add my praise for WiggleLegs Frog toy. My cat loves to play with WiggleLegs. No other toy will do. When I ask her to find WiggleLegs she goes right to it! I just ordered 3 more as I'm afraid you will stop making them and then I don't know what we will do!" ---"Once again, you have provided excellent service with an excellent product. Thanks for the extra - it was a hit! My cats are totally addicted to the WiggleLegs Frog, so please keep plenty in stock!" ---"I just wanted to let you know that my cat, Molly, is absolutely addicted to your FlyToys. I literally have to hide them from her so she will go to sleep at night, but as soon as morning arrives she is sitting right in front of their hiding place waiting for them to come out and play." Each MetPet FlyToy is handmade by skilled artisans with great attention to detail. They come in the form of bugs, amphibians, mammals and more in three very reasonable price points. ---"I can't believe how your company understands cats so well" Can this common spice help your diabetic dog or cat? MetPet.com Staff Writer An accidental discovery at the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) found that 1/2 teaspoon of powdered cinnamon a day can significantly reduce blood sugar levels in humans suffering from Type II Diabetes. The significant reduction also occurred when using a cinnamon stick as a stirrer and soaking it in tea. The researchers were surprised to find that apple pie, expected to aggravate blood sugar levels was found to decrease them due to the cinnamon commonly found in the recipe. The active ingredient is a polyphenol called MHCP which apparently mimics insulin and works with it to improve blood sugar regulation. In Type II diabetics, it is possible that cells' insulin receptors are activated making them more Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

About nine years ago (way back in 2006), I wrote about cinnamon and diabetes. To this date, people still ask questions and post comments about this topic. Since then, more research is available that (hopefully) sheds more light on whether cinnamon lowers blood sugars and HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months) — or not. Let’s take a look at where things stand in 2015. Back then A study that I cited in 2006 was one published in the journal Diabetes Care back in 2003 by Khan et al. The researchers gave different doses (1, 3, or 6 grams) of cassia cinnamon to subjects with Type 2 diabetes for 40 days. All three groups of subjects had an improvement in their fasting blood sugar levels, as well as their lipid (blood fat) levels. As a result of this study, many people have jumped on the cinnamon bandwagon, so to speak, taking cinnamon supplements, adding cinnamon sticks to tea, and sprinkling cinnamon on their foods. In addition, much debate has occurred regarding the type of cinnamon that’s best to use for diabetes: cassia or ceylon. Where we are now Khan’s study certainly created a firestorm and has led to more research on the use of cinnamon for diabetes management. The tricky issues around studying cinnamon are that: • There are different types of cinnamon, primarily cassia and ceylon. • It’s difficult to assess the potency of any particular “batch” of cinnamon, no matter the type. • The active ingredient or ingredients in cinnamon that might have a glucose-lowering effect have yet to be identified. Without definitive answers to these issues, it’s hard to be certain of the role of cinnamon on glucose control. Much of the “evidence” is anecdotal: Someone reports that taking cinnamon helped to lower his blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Cinnamon has been used for its medicinal purposes since ancient times, apart from its use as a spice and as embalming and anointing oil. Research suggests that cinnamon might have anti-diabetic activity. A study concluded that low levels of cinnamon (1 to 6 grams per day) reduced glucose, triglycerides, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetic subjects. This study also stated that cinnamon could be used by the healthy population to protect themselves from, and prevent, elevated glucose levels and blood lipid levels. The chemicals present in cinnamon contain antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti-cancer and anti-diabetic activity, among others. Diabetics face more stress than most other folks due to a phenomenon called oxidative stress. The high levels of blood sugar in type 2 diabetes lead to the formation of certain harmful substances called Advanced Glycation End products (or AGE). This “oxidative stress” burden can lead to cellular damage. Epicatechin, catechin and procyanidin B2 in cinnamon show inhibitory activities on the formation of AGEs. Cinnamon has a compound that is called “Insulin Potentiating Factor” that is able to increase the activity of insulin. Around 1-3 grams (quarter to three quarters of a teaspoon) of cinnamon per day seems a good cinnamon and diabetes dosage. You can sprinkle cinnamon powder on your salads or use it to flavor a recipe. You can also take a good quality cinnamon supplement after consulting your physician. Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Improves Glucose And Lipids Of People With Type 2 Diabetes

Cinnamon Improves Glucose And Lipids Of People With Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract OBJECTIVE—The objective of this study was to determine whether cinnamon improves blood glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 60 people with type 2 diabetes, 30 men and 30 women aged 52.2 ± 6.32 years, were divided randomly into six groups. Groups 1, 2, and 3 consumed 1, 3, or 6 g of cinnamon daily, respectively, and groups 4, 5, and 6 were given placebo capsules corresponding to the number of capsules consumed for the three levels of cinnamon. The cinnamon was consumed for 40 days followed by a 20-day washout period. RESULTS—After 40 days, all three levels of cinnamon reduced the mean fasting serum glucose (18–29%), triglyceride (23–30%), LDL cholesterol (7–27%), and total cholesterol (12–26%) levels; no significant changes were noted in the placebo groups. Changes in HDL cholesterol were not significant. CONCLUSIONS—The results of this study demonstrate that intake of 1, 3, or 6 g of cinnamon per day reduces serum glucose, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol in people with type 2 diabetes and suggest that the inclusion of cinnamon in the diet of people with type 2 diabetes will reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The incidence of cardiovascular diseases is increased two- to fourfold in people with type 2 diabetes (1). Although the causes of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are multifactorial, diet definitely plays a role in the incidence and severity of these diseases. The dietary components beneficial in the prevention and treatment of these diseases have not been clearly defined, but it is postulated that spices may play a role. Spices such as cinnamon, cloves Continue reading >>

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