diabetestalk.net

Is Chocolate Good For A Diabetic?

Diabetes And Dessert

Diabetes And Dessert

Eating desserts with diabetes A popular misconception about diabetes is that it is caused by eating too many sugary foods. While sweets can and do affect your blood sugar, they do not cause you to develop diabetes. However, when you have diabetes, you must carefully monitor your carbohydrate intake. This is because carbohydrates are responsible for raising your blood sugar levels. While you can enjoy sugary foods when you have diabetes, it is important to do so in moderation and with some understanding of how it could impact your blood sugar. This includes sugars found in desserts. 10 Diabetes Diet Myths » When you have diabetes, your body is either not able to use insulin correctly or not able to make any or enough insulin. Some people with diabetes experience both of these issues. Problems with insulin can cause sugar to build up in your blood since insulin is responsible for helping sugar move from the blood and into the body’s cells. Foods that contain carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Carbohydrates need to be regulated when you have diabetes to help you manage your blood sugar. On nutrition labels, the term “carbohydrates” includes sugars, complex carbohydrates, and fiber. In desserts, a number of sweet-tasting ingredients can be added to enhance sweetness. While some foods, such as fruits, naturally contain sugars, most desserts have some type of sugar added to them. Many dessert labels will not list “sugar” as a key ingredient. Instead, they will list the ingredient as one or more of the following: dextrose fructose high-fructose corn syrup lactose malt syrup sucrose white granulated sugar honey agave nectar glucose maltodextrin These sugar sources are carbohydrates and will raise your blood sugar. They can be found in cookies, cakes, pies, puddings, ca Continue reading >>

Dark Chocolate And Type 2 Diabetes

Dark Chocolate And Type 2 Diabetes

Demystifying dark chocolate The allure of chocolate Why do you eat chocolate? If you ask this question the answer you receive may astonish you. The reasons are wide-ranging. People eat chocolate when they are happy or sad. They eat chocolate to celebrate and also to alleviate loneliness. Parents can attest that nothing beats chocolate as a bargaining chip. Simply put, it makes us feel good! It makes us smile and we momentarily forget our worries. Thinking about chocolate brings to mind a delicious, sweet flavour that never fails to appease. Not many can resist this tempting delicacy and many people do proudly attest to being chocoholics. What differentiates it from the competition? Chocolate comes in not only many flavours and shapes but its makeup determines whether a chocolate will be termed to be a white chocolate, a milk chocolate, powered cocoa or a dark chocolate. Each has a distinct aroma and taste. But the most profound difference lies in their differing nutritive values. The distinction is established by the presence or absence of cocoa solids which are all of the ingredients from a cocoa bean, including cocoa powder, cocoa butter, chocolate liquor and even ground cacao nib. White chocolate has the dubious honour of possessing the least nutritive value of the four mentioned types. It is made from cocoa butter from which cocoa solids have been removed. Cocoa butter is added to milk and sugar to make white chocolate. Bio-flavonoids which contribute to any healthy nutrition are found in cocoa solids. A lower quantity of cocoa solids and addition of milk and a large quantity of sugar hampers the overall nutritional profile of the white chocolate. For milk chocolates, the addition of fat through milk or cream as well as calories derived from sweeteners make its nutr Continue reading >>

Top 5 Diabetic Chocolate Picks

Top 5 Diabetic Chocolate Picks

Are you a chocolate lover? And more importantly are you a diabetic on the lookout for your best chocolate options? I tend to make my own chocolate (and we have quite a few recipes for that), but I know most people aren't as motivated as me and prefer to buy something prepackaged. So to save you time and energy I went on a search for some ‘healthy' diabetic chocolate brands, ones I thought stood out of the crowd. When I did my search I was looking for ones low in carbs and preferably sugar free and made with stevia (my preferred natural sweetener). So I came up with a few good contenders for you to choose from and have gathered all the info below so you can make your own comparisons. 1. Dante's Confection This brand is a very popular top seller on Amazon, and I like it because it only contains 3 ingredients! Any ‘product' that has 5 or less ingredients, with ingredients we can recognize, gets the T2DT seal of approval It's also low in carbs and is excellent value for money. Another reason this one is the chocolate of choice is because it is the lowest in total carbs as well. Ingredients: Organic Fair-Trade Cocoa, Stevia, Natural Vanilla. Nutrition – Serving size: 45 g (1 bar) Calories: 260 Fat: 24 g Carbs: 12 g Fiber: 7 g Sugars: 0 g Net carbs: 5 g Protein: 7 g Cost: $16.99 for 4 x 45 g (1.5 oz) bars and many people say that eating just half a bar is all you need to feel satisfied. Check Out Dante's Confection on Amazon Here 2. Lily's Sweets Lily's Sweets has a variety of chocolate blends to choose from, dark chocolate, dark chocolate almond, milk chocolate, milk chocolate almond and more. These are sweetened with stevia and erythritol and have lots of good reviews on Amazon. They do contain a few more ingredients but some of their flavors might be worth exploring. Continue reading >>

Good News For Chocolate Fans

Good News For Chocolate Fans

"It seems like anything that tastes good isn’t good for you." This was a lament I heard more times than I can remember from patients who were bemoaning what they thought was the loss of their favorite foods. While this isn’t 100% true, it can certainly seem that way, especially for people who are newly diagnosed with diabetes or who find out they have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, for example. However, there’s good news for chocolate lovers: Chocolate can actually be good for you! But don’t rush out and load up on Hershey Kisses just yet—read on to learn how and why chocolate may actually be more friend than foe. Chocolate is made from cacao beans that are roasted and then cracked. The insides of the beans, or the “nibs,” are crushed into a paste called chocolate liquor (which contains no alcohol). Chocolate liquor can be made into cocoa powder if the fat (cocoa butter) is removed. But to make chocolate, sugar, chocolate liquor, cocoa butter, vanilla, and milk (in the case of milk chocolate) are combined. The chocolate then goes through various refining processes to give it a smooth, silky texture. Dark chocolate contains more cocoa than milk chocolate, contains no milk, and also is lower in sugar. Why is chocolate considered healthy, then? Well, it’s really the dark chocolate that carries the health benefits (sorry, all you milk chocolate lovers). You may recall from previous posts and other reading you’ve done that some foods contain phytonutrients called flavonoids, which are a type of antioxidant. Cocoa, or cacao, beans are rich in flavonoids. Researchers have been learning more and more about flavonoids in foods such as fruits, vegetables, and tea. Now they’ve added chocolate to their list. So, then, what health benefits does dark cho Continue reading >>

Chocolate And Diabetes

Chocolate And Diabetes

Easter is a time for family, friends, new beginnings and, of course, chocolate… If you – or a child in the family – has diabetes, you might be wondering if it’s OK to eat chocolate and other sweet treats. How could eating chocolate affect your diabetes? Is ‘diabetic’ chocolate a good choice? We’re here to answer all your chocolate questions, plus there are eight top tips on how to eat chocolate in moderation and and some chocolate recipes. Can you eat chocolate if you have diabetes? When you have diabetes it’s important to eat a healthy, balanced diet and only include sugary, high-fat foods occasionally as a treat. That said, Easter only comes once a year, so don’t worry about the odd one or two indulgences as these will not affect your long-term blood diabetes management. It’s a myth that you can’t eat chocolate if you have diabetes, just eat it in moderation, rather than using it to satisfy hunger, and don’t eat a lot in one go as it affects your blood sugar levels. Should I buy ‘diabetic’ chocolate? In a word, no! Here’s why: Chocolate labelled ‘diabetic’contains a type of sweetener, such as fructose or sorbitol, which can affect blood sugar levels. It also tends to contain just as much fat as ordinary chocolate – and is often high in the really bad type of fats – saturated and trans fat. It usually has as many calories, if not more, than normal chocolate. It can a laxative effect and make you need the loo more often. It is also more expensive. Children and chocolate Easter is a fun time for children. There are Easter eggs to be eaten and Easter egg hunts they’ll want to be part of, so it’s important that they don’t feel that their diabetes excludes them from any of this. They’ll also want to enjoy a chocolate treat like Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of Chocolate For Diabetes

The Benefits Of Chocolate For Diabetes

Ohhhhhhhhhh….Chocolate! Chocolate! How many times have you just had that sometimes nearly overwhelming urge to have some chocolate—in any form! You can have a chocolate bar, chocolate milk, chocolate cake, brownies, a chocolate ice cream sundae or a cup of hot cocoa just to list a few forms of chocolate. Oh wait—you can have dark chocolate, milk chocolate, orange, mint or raspberry-flavored chocolate or white chocolate….so much to choose from! But….should you? And if you should, just how much is enough and how much is overdoing it? Are there “healthier” forms of chocolate? Many of us sure as shootin’ hope there is! The “Dark” History of Chocolate Chocolate comes from the fruit and seeds of the cacao tree and is native to the Amazon forest. Botanically, the cacao tree is known as Theobroma cacao – this tree has three major varieties; the Forastero, the Trinitario and the Criollo. The Forastero is the most commonly used variety while the rarest and most prized for its aroma and its delicate taste is the Criollo variety. Christopher Columbus is credited with being the first European to come in contact with the cacao bean—he and his crew found—and stole, apparently—a canoe filled with various food items, including baskets of cacao beans. The cacao beans were actually used as local currency, but their chocolate quality was missed for another twenty years until Hernando Cortez brought 3 chests of cacao beans, this time stolen from the Aztecs, back to the court of the Spanish king—and the popularity of cacao and chocolate took off![1] The history of chocolate though, actually appears to be much older, going back to at least the Mayan civilization and possibly the Olmec civilization that predates the Mayan civilization. The traditional chocolate be Continue reading >>

News From Hershey’s: Diabetics Can Eat Sugar!

News From Hershey’s: Diabetics Can Eat Sugar!

To be fair, there’s a lot of useful information on this website from Hershey’s (as in the candy company) about diabetes and sugar. It points out that diabetics can eat sugar in small quantities — provided that they manage it appropriately with insulin or exercise — and explains some of the different kinds of sugar substitutes and how they’re digested. Hell, it even provides a hotline number for the ADA and some baking tips — though somehow I doubt too many people are going to permanently start using baby food as a sweetener in their Toll House cookies. But there’s still a “fox-guarding-the-henhouse” aspect to a candy company advising diabetics — let alone giving advice to doctors and nurses on how to, as the website states, “educate people on how to manage their diabetes and live healthy lives while enjoying one of life’s most evocative and symbolic pleasures: chocolate.” Speaking as someone who’s tried the apple-sauce-in-baked-goods trick (the dirty secret: it’s just not that good), I feel like I should add my own advice on how to manage this particular evocative and symbolic pleasure: eat it in small quantities. Also, don’t eat Hershey’s — it’s way too sweet, and doesn’t hold a candle to the real stuff. Instead, acquire a taste for dark chocolate, the more expensive the better — money has an amazing way of encouraging self-restraint. (Sure, I’ll eat something that eventually could make me go blind — but if it’s $7 a bar? Forget about it!) For a long time I was eating Scharffen-Berger 70% cacao; these days my favorite is Green & Black, also 70%. I have a small piece after lunch or dinner and, I’ll admit it, I don’t feel guilty at all. The chocolate’s dark enough (and the quantity I eat small enough) that it doesn’ Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

If you have diabetes, you can eat anything -- although possibly not in the quantities you'd like. That includes chocolate. Some types of chocolate, such as dark chocolate, might even have health benefits, in moderation. Portion control is the key to enjoying foods like chocolate if you have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association reports. Dark chocolate is rich in polyphenols, plant substances that act as antioxidants and that might also help prevent heart disease and lower blood glucose levels. Types of Chocolate All chocolate is not created equal in terms of health benefits. When it comes to foods high in simple sugars, less is better if you have diabetes. Dark chocolate contains more cocoa and less sugar than milk chocolate, so you can eat a little more of it if you're controlling your calories or sugar intake. With dark chocolate, the higher the cocoa percentage, the better it is for you. Look for dark chocolate with at least 70 percent cocoa, registered dietitian Mitzi Dulan recommends. White chocolate contains no cocoa and is higher in calories and saturated fat than dark or milk chocolate. Potential Benefits According to a study that appeared in the January, 2015 issue of ARYA Atherosclerosis, high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate lowers blood pressure and insulin resistance in patients with diabetes and high blood pressure. Insulin resistance restricts the uptake of glucose into cells, which causes blood glucose levels to rise. People who ate white chocolate did not experience a decrease in blood pressure or insulin resistance. In a British study published in the November 2010 issue of Diabetic Medicine, diabetics who consumed chocolate high in cocoa for 16 weeks experienced a decrease in total cholesterol and an increase in high-density lipoprotein, the so-c Continue reading >>

Can Cocoa Help In The Treatment Of Diabetes

Can Cocoa Help In The Treatment Of Diabetes

Can Cocoa help in the treatment of diabetes Can Cocoa help in the treatment of diabetes? Controlling your carbohydrate intake is one of the ways by which you can manage diabetes, sugary foods, starch, some starchy vegetables, dairy foods and some cereals account for most the sources of carbohydrates we ingest into the body. To keep your blood sugar at the recommended levels of 70 to 180mg/DL you need to consume not more than 60g of carbs per meal. Chocolate is a product of cocoa that can be incorporated into your diabetics management meal because it contains little amount of sugar. Unsweetened cocoa powder is one of the cocoa meals you can add to your diabetic management plan; it comes with less than 50g of carbs and sugar. Cocoa powder contains 0.g, 1.6g and 3.2g of sugar, fiber and carbohydrates respectively. Your available carbohydrate tracking will help you detect how much you are consuming rather than tracking the total carbohydrate you consume a day. A tablespoon of unsweetened cocoa powder contains 1.6g of carbs; you can add this with some fresh milk and warm water. Instead of adding sugar to your unsweetened cocoa powder, add some sucrose- it doesnt add any carbohydrates to your diet. Cocoa brown and dark chocolates have also been found to be useful in the fight against diabetes. Dark chocolate contains at least 70% cocoa, it also contains less carbs and sugar when compared to milk chocolate. A serving of dark chocolate will supply not more170g of calories to your diet, you will also get approximately 13. 8g and 3.3g of carbs and fiber respectively. Resent researches on mice fed with liquid diets contain polyphenols revealed that polyphenols can actually help in controlling sugar levels. Mice fed with liquid polyphenol supplements were found to have steady bloo Continue reading >>

Should Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

Should Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

If you have type 2 diabetes then fat is bad for you and you have to reduce your sugar intake as much as possible. Chocolate is full of fat and sugar. But can type 2 diabetics still eat chocolate? Strangely, the answer is ‘sort of’. Globally, more than five and a half million tonnes of chocolate are eaten each year in the form of chocolate bars or other confectionary. Much of this consumption takes place in Europe and North America, where a large middle-class population has higher disposable incomes than elsewhere. The Swiss are the most voracious eaters. In 2012 they consumed 11.9kg per capita. Considering that a regular bar of chocolate contains on average 42.5g of chocolate, this means that each Swiss person consumed the equivalent of 280 bars in one year, more than three-quarters of a bar every day. The Irish are the next biggest eaters with an average consumption of 9.9kg (232 bars) per person, followed by the UK at 9.5kg per head. People in other West European countries eat between 6 and 9kg per capita. In Canada, consumption is 6.4kg per person per annum. The USA, for once, is not first, with annual consumption of just 5.5kg (129 bars) per capita, less than half the Swiss. Outside the West and Russia (5.9kg per capita per annum), much less chocolate is eaten. In China, annual consumption is just 1.2kg per capita, while in India it is only 0.7kg per person. The annual global consumption of chocolate is increasing by an average of 3% a year. This trend looks set to continue. If eating too much chocolate is bad for health, a crisis is plainly looming. Types of chocolate Chocolate is made from the seeds of Theobroma cacao, a tropical tree that has been cultivated in Mexico and Central America for at least three thousand years. Today, however, the main growing area Continue reading >>

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

I used to say chocolate tasted great, but if you thought it was a health food, you were kidding yourself. But research shows that chocolate helps manage diabetes, prevents heart disease, and improves mood. Is this too good to be true? Next week, I’ll get back to toxic chemicals. This week, I felt like something tastier. According to nutritionist Amy Campbell, chocolate is made from cacao (cocoa) beans. The insides of the roasted beans, or the “nibs,” are crushed into a paste. So right there is a good start. We’ve written before about the diabetes benefits of beans, so chocolate has a good pedigree for health. Most of chocolate’s healing power seems to come from “flavonoids,” biological chemicals that Campbell says “are thought to help lower cholesterol and lower the risk of blood clots.” Other studies show chocolate can relax blood vessels; lower blood pressure, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and blood glucose; and improve insulin function. Unfortunately, pure chocolate is bitter. You have to add sugar to make it taste good. And pure chocolate is powdery and dry. You have to add an emulsifier, like fat, to give it an enjoyable texture. So authorities have long called chocolate harmful and told people, especially people with diabetes, to avoid it. Is there a way to get the benefits, minimize the harmful sugars and fats, and still have something you want to eat? The healing flavonoids and flavonols are in the dark part of the chocolate. About.com guide Elizabeth LaBau defines “dark chocolate” as “chocolate without milk solids added…The cocoa content of commercial dark chocolate bars can range from 30%… to 70%… or even above 80% for extremely dark bars. Common terms used to distinguish the cocoa content of dark chocolate bars [from bitterest to Continue reading >>

Daily Chocolate Intake Linked To Lower Risk Of Diabetes, Heart Disease

Daily Chocolate Intake Linked To Lower Risk Of Diabetes, Heart Disease

Daily chocolate intake linked to lower risk of diabetes, heart disease Could a doctor's visit one day result in a prescription for chocolate? According to a new study, it is possible. Researchers suggest that consuming a small amount of chocolate every day may lower the risk of diabetes and heart disease. Eating chocolate every day could lower the risk of diabetes and heart disease, say researchers. Study co-author Prof. Saverio Stranges - visiting academic of the University of Warwick Medical School, United Kingdom, and scientific director of the Department of Population Health at the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) - and colleagues publish their findings in the British Journal of Nutrition. Chocolate is often perceived as a treat that should only be enjoyed from time to time. Given its high fat and sugar content, this is no surprise; overconsumption can lead to health problems, such as tooth decay and obesity . However, studies are increasingly suggesting regular, moderate chocolate consumption may yield significant health benefits, particularly when it comes to dark chocolate. Dark chocolate has the highest cocoa content, which means it has the highest levels of antioxidants - specifically, flavonoids - which are molecules that can prevent some forms of cell damage . For their study, Prof. Stranges and colleagues analyzed the chocolate consumption of 1,153 people aged 18-69 who were part of the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk in Luxembourg (ORISCAV-LUX) study. Data on chocolate intake were gathered from participants' completion of a food frequency questionnaire. The team set out to investigate whether chocolate intake is associated with insulin resistance - where the body's cells do not effectively respond to insulin , raising the risk for type 2 diabetes an Continue reading >>

The Best Ways To Enjoy Dark Chocolate When You Have Diabetes

The Best Ways To Enjoy Dark Chocolate When You Have Diabetes

One of the most widely believed myths about living with type 2 diabetes is that all sweets are off-limits, and upon receiving a diabetes diagnosis, you may feel forced to say goodbye to all the after-dinner treats and 3 p.m. pick-me-ups you once loved. Fortunately, it’s actually true that some sweets are safe for people with diabetes — and in the case of dark chocolate, a moderate amount may even lead to some significant health benefits, including lower blood sugar. Among the possible perks of noshing on a square of the dark stuff are improved brain function, blood pressure, cholesterol, and heart health, according to the American Diabetes Association. Those benefits may seem like enough reason to race for the candy aisle, but not so fast. As with eating any food when you're managing diabetes, details are key. Follow this guide to enjoy dark chocolate safely without throwing your blood sugar out of whack. Why Dark Chocolate and Diabetes Make a Sweet Combination A plain square of high-cocoa dark chocolate is packed with good-for-you components that put that designer cupcake or gourmet chocolate-chip cookie to shame. “The antioxidants in chocolate help the body use its insulin more efficiently to help control blood sugar,” says Anna Simos, CDE, the diabetes education and prevention program manager at Stanford Health Care in Palo Alto, California. “This in turn helps lower blood sugar levels naturally and actually helps your body use your insulin. As a result, it helps decrease insulin resistance, which we see in type 2 diabetes.” According to an animal study published in the November 2017 issue of the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, it’s the compounds found in cocoa called cocoa flavanols that appear to enhance certain cells’ ability to secrete insuli Continue reading >>

Does Hot Chocolate Affect Diabetics?

Does Hot Chocolate Affect Diabetics?

Kristin Mortensen began writing newspaper articles in 1992 for The Sierra Vista Herald. She has also been a registered dietitian since 1991, and has worked for hospitals, clinics and Women, Infants and Children (WIC) programs. Mortensen has a bachelor of science in dietetics from Brigham Young University. A mug of hot chocolate with marshmallows.Photo Credit: Yulia_Davidovich/iStock/Getty Images When the weather cools with that frosty nip in the air, curling up with a good book and steamy cup of hot chocolate can be just the thing to make you feel cozy and warm. If you have diabetes, however, you might wonder if that tempting mug of chocolaty goodness is the best thing for your blood sugar or your overall health. Rest assured, you can enjoy your hot chocolate. You might even be surprised by its health benefits. Ask your dietitian or health care provider how to include hot cocoa in your meal plan. Researcher Lee Hooper and associates analyzed 42 different studies on the effect of cocoa and chocolate on insulin. Their findings were published in the March 2012 edition of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The studies found that chocolate and cocoa reduced serum insulin, thus improving insulin resistance. Improving insulin resistance helps you have better blood sugar control, which is critical for people with diabetes. Not all hot chocolate beverages are created equal. Some can be very high in sugar and carbohydrates, leading to spikes in your blood sugar, so use caution when choosing your cocoa. The beneficial part of chocolate comes from the cocoa bean. The more processed, including the addition of fat and sugar, the less beneficial your cup of hot cocoa and the more risk of raising your blood sugar. To avoid this, choose sugar-free types. If you use milk to mak Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chocolate

Diabetes And Chocolate

Tweet A diabetic eating chocolate may raise eyebrows amongst some people but within reason, chocolate needn’t be completely cut out of your diet. In most cases, chocolate will cause blood sugar levels to rise and in light of this it’s best to limit chocolate consumption to small amounts and to avoid eating when blood sugars are already higher than the recommended blood glucose levels. Is eating chocolate good or bad for you? Chocolate contains a number of beneficial nutrients, some of which called flavonoids are thought to guard against heart disease. However, it should be noted that larger quantities of chocolate can be disadvantageous to health in other ways. If a larger amount of chocolate is consumed, it will raise blood sugars which increases the risk of complications, of which cardiovascular problems is one. Secondly, the calorific content of chocolate is relatively high and therefore overconsumption of chocolate could lead to weight gain which also raises the risk of heart problems. How much chocolate should I eat? For most people with diabetes, chocolate is best restricted to a few squares to prevent too much of an increase in sugar levels. For people with diabetes without weight problems, chocolate can be appropriate to have before exercising. For more strenuous activity, however, even shorter acting carbohydrate may be required. Which chocolate is best for me? Chocolate with higher amounts of cocoa solids are best, as the sugar and fat content will often be lower as a result. For high cocoa solids content, dark chocolate is usually a good pick. Is diabetic chocolate better for my sugar levels? Generally speaking, diabetic chocolate is made by replacing some or all of the sugar content with an alternative source of sweetener, such as the polyols (sugar alco Continue reading >>

More in diabetes