diabetestalk.net

Is Chicken Biryani Good For Diabetics

Can Diabetic People Eat Chicken And Mutton?

Can Diabetic People Eat Chicken And Mutton?

DIABETIC PATIENTS must exercise extreme caution in their carbohydrate (sugars) and fat consumption to bare minimal limits. They should increase their protein and fiber consumption beyond optimal limits. By doing so, diabetic patients will not only keep their blood sugar levels under control but may also be able to reverse their lifestyle disorders like Type-II Diabetes and other allied ailments. Now, I suggest some very healthy and beneficial non-vegetarian dishes for diabetic patients. These non-veg dishes will not only keep a check on carbohydrate and fat portion but will also give a boost up to healthy protein and fiber proportion and all of this can be achieved in one single dish. And I give below 5 such nutritious and delicious dishes. BOILED CHICKEN SALAD is any salad with chicken as a main ingredient. Other common ingredients may include mayonnaise, celery, onion, pepper, salt. Chicken salad consisting primarily of chopped chicken meat and a binder, such as mayonnaise or salad dressing. Like tuna salad and egg salad, it may be served on top of lettuce, tomato, avocado, or some combination of these. It may also refer to a garden salad with fried, grilled, or roasted chicken (usually cut up or diced) on top. BOILED CHICKEN SALAD BOILED EGG SALAD is part of a tradition of salads involving eggs mixed with seasonings in the form of herbs, spices, and other foods, and bound with mayonnaise. Egg salad is typically made of chopped hard-boiled eggs, mayonnaise, mustard, minced celery and onion, salt, black pepper, and paprika. It is also often used as a topping on green salad. 2. BOILED EGG SALAD 3. BOILED TUNA SALAD 4. BOILED LAMB MEAT SALAD 5. BOILED EGG CHICKEN TUNA & MUTTON SALAD Enjoy the dishes and shoo away your Diabetes…… Hope this helps………. Continue reading >>

Basmati Rice And Diabetes By Dr Sarah Schenker

Basmati Rice And Diabetes By Dr Sarah Schenker

Basmati rice, particularly wholegrain Basmati rice can and should be a regular addition to the diets of people who suffer from Type 2 diabetes. Basmati rice is a naturally low to medium energy food but as with all carbohydrate foods, it’s the portion size that is important: an average serving of boiled rice is 150-180g providing 207-248 calories; a small serving (100g) provides approximately 138 calories. By contrast a typical takeaway portion of fried rice is 300g providing 558 calories, so it’s important not to assume all rice types are the same. Wholegrain Basmati rice has the lowest GI (glycaemic index) of all rice types, which means once digested it releases its energy slowly keeping blood sugar levels more stable, which is a crucial part of diabetes management. On the other hand, sticky and risotto type rices have much higher GIs, so less suitable in a diabetic diet. The varying GIs of rice depends on the type of carbohydrate present in the grains. Basmati rice has the greatest amount of a type known as amylose which does not gelatinize during cooking and results in fluffy, separate grains. Whereas grains with more amylopectin burst on cooking resulting in sticky rice that can be eaten with chopsticks. The more intact the structure of a grain of rice the lower the GI because once consumed the particle size maintains intact for longer, slowing the digestive process. The higher quality brands of rice like Tilda have the technology to reject broken grains from their products, further guaranteeing the low GI of the rice. Steaming rice helps to better maintain the structure of the grain compared with boiled rice so generally steamed rice has a lower GI than boiled. Wholegrain Basmati rice is also a source of fibre which is important for gut health and improves bowe Continue reading >>

Health Alert: Biryani Causing Diabetes

Health Alert: Biryani Causing Diabetes

KARACHI: In the sub-continent, rice and especially Biryani is one of the favourite dishes of the people but it was causing diabetes as it was full of carbohydrates with little protein. This was the unanimous opinion of the health experts at an awareness seminar held on Friday at the first session of the three-day International Diabetes and Endocrine Congress (IDEC 2016), being organized by the Baqai Institute of Diabetology and Endocrinology (BIDE) of Baqai Medical University here at a local hotel. Foreign and local health experts, while urging the people to modify their lifestyle, highlighted that millions of Pakistanis were prone to diabetes or likely to have diabetes sooner or later in their lives but Could live a happy and healthy life by educating themselves, learning about their health condition and adopting a healthy lifestyle. Erin Little, a Type I diabetic and social mobilizer against diabetes, said since Chicken Biryani has rice and chicken and spices, therefore eating too much carbohydrates-rich dish could lead to diabetes. Biryani is popular throughout the subcontinent and is made with spices, rice, lentils, meat and vegetables. Although the origin of the dish is uncertain, however according to one theory, pulao was an army dish in Medieval India. The armies, unable to cook elaborate meals, would prepare a one-pot dish where they cooked rice with whichever meat was available. Over the time, the dish became Biryani due to different methods of cooking, with the distinction between pulao and biryani being arbitrary. Of all the popular and affordable foods available locally, Biryani continues to be a favourite dish among Pakistanis with different varieties such as Chicken Birynai, Beef Birani, White Biryani and Sindhi Biryani. Dr. Jamal Zafar, a professor of me Continue reading >>

I Have Taken Hyderabadi Biryani Yesterday Night So Fasting Sugar 170 & Post Sugar 245. Is This Normal And Non-diabetic?

I Have Taken Hyderabadi Biryani Yesterday Night So Fasting Sugar 170 & Post Sugar 245. Is This Normal And Non-diabetic?

I HAVE TAKEN HYDERABADI BIRYANI YESTERDAY NIGHT SO FASTING SUGAR 170 & POST SUGAR 245. IS THIS NORMAL AND NON-DIABETIC? Fasting glucose is ideally 90, post-prandial less than 180 and ideally less than 140. You will need to consult a health professional for a diagnosis. You can control the condition by keeping your carbohydrate intake between 10 and 14 portions per day (1 portion = 10g carbohydrate), ideally 3 meals x 4 carb portions. Follow this link uk.sitestat.com/diabetes/we... Eat low GI carbs, reducing intake of fructose too which glycosylates haemoglobin seven times as much as glucose. Follow this link glycemicindex.com/ Make up the balance of your meals with natural, additive-free, unprocessed protein and fat foods such as meat, poultry, fish, seafood, eggs, cheese, coconut oil, palm oil (not hydrogenated), olive oil, butter, duck fat, goose fat, and lard. No, It is diabetic but nothing to worry about it can easily be controlled hopefully by diet. It comes under type 2 diabetes. Cut down rice and check your level after a week. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Recipes - Indian Diet Recipe For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes Recipes - Indian Diet Recipe For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes recipes a list of the best recipes that may be suitable for women with gestational diabetes. For safety reasons, please consult your dietitian before you consume any of these foods. Iam also sharing an easy Veg Brown Rice Recipe for gestational diabetics in this post. Gestational diabetes is on an alarming rise in young Indian women, especially residing in the cities. I have been seeing countless number of women suffering from this condition during their pregnancies, some lead to complications and few can manage it very well with their diet. A good friend of mine is diagnosed with Gestational diabetes in her early months of pregnancy and is striving hard to be on a good diet that is gestational diabetic friendly. Tthe main focus is on the protein, as it is crucial for the development of the baby. She visits the dietician monthly to get a sketch of what she can eat. I could not see her suffering with lack of food ideas, as she is a foodie. We failed to find any Indian recipes that were specifically developed for GD. Based on what is considered to be the best for diabetics, I have developed few recipes for her so that she can have a hearty and contented meal during these crucial days. I tried all these recipes at least twice to ensure that they are fit to be consumed by a Gestational Diabetic. Most recipes have worked well in keeping her blood sugar levels controlled. So I have thought of treasuring these on Swasthis recipes index. If you desire to try this for your Gestational diabetic or diabetic loved ones and are skeptical about the suitability, you can get a dieticians view on it. Most brown rice recipes can be a Gestational diabetic friendly, but how many of us like to eat brown rice when it is cooked on stove top. Either it is undercooked or t Continue reading >>

Indian Diet Plan For Gestational Diabetes

Indian Diet Plan For Gestational Diabetes

I was at my OB/GYN’s office last week for my annual check up. This time I happened to take my little one along and my doctor and her medical assistant were so excited to see him grown up. Even my son was super excited and kept waving at them shouting “hi’ every now and then. She was seeing me after the weightloss and she assured that my healthy lifestyle might prevent me from diabetes in the future. She was curious to know what I did to get rid of 26 pounds. You can read about my weightloss journey here. I don’t think you could enjoy this drink during pregnancy. Read and save the recipe for post-pregancy weightloss journey. After the exam, we had a brief conversation about her new patients and that the practice is getting busy with new South Asian patients. That’s when we spoke about gestational diabetes (GD). She mentioned that despite the low body mass index (BMI), most women from India suffer from gestational diabetes. Yes I have seen that despite the low BMI, South Asians are more prone to diabetes and cardiovascular complications. She wanted to connect them with me and my blog as most patients are not ready to accept the fact that they have GD and need to be on a strict menu plan. I can totally understand the mind set of pregnant women. Even I was in the same state – unaccepting, depressed and lost. Even my mom was not “OK” with it. She kept confusing me that if you avoid idly/dosa and rice, your baby will be thin and not healthy. She would also say that she ate so much rice and lot of food during pregnancy and me eating such measured quantities was totally wrong as per her views. But the truth is that, whole grains, vegetables and nuts on a GD diet is going to make your child more healthy. I don’t blame the Indian mom as there is a lot of ignoran Continue reading >>

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Why do I have to watch what I eat? Eating well is a great way to stay healthy during pregnancy. If you have gestational diabetes, choosing the right food is especially important. You may be able to control gestational diabetes by eating well and exercising regularly. This means you won't need to take medication. Sugar (glucose) is one of your body's main sources of energy. Your body uses a hormone called insulin to control the amount of sugar in your blood and to turn it into fuel. But pregnancy hormones reduce the effect of insulin, so your body has to make more to be able to use any sugar in your blood. If you have gestational diabetes, your body isn't producing enough insulin. As a result, your blood sugar levels can get very high and that can lead to problems for your baby. It's possible to keep your blood sugar levels under control by changing what you eat and combining your new healthy diet with regular exercise. In fact, up to 90 per cent of women with gestational diabetes control it this way. How will I have to change my diet? If you were overweight before you got pregnant, your doctor will advise you to monitor your calorie intake. She will also suggest you to take at least 30 minutes' moderate exercise, such as walking or swimming, every day. You'll need to be careful that you don't have sharp rises and falls in your blood sugar levels. Your doctor would help you with this. She might work out a special diet for you. The special diet will guide you on: which foods you should and shouldn't eat how much you should be eating how often you should eat Although the idea of a special diet may sound daunting, it's not so hard once you get the hang of it. The principles of the diabetic diet are good ones for everyone to follow. Try to think Continue reading >>

The Complete Food Planner For Diabetics Updated: Aug 4, 2017, 15:42 Ist

The Complete Food Planner For Diabetics Updated: Aug 4, 2017, 15:42 Ist

/articles/health/the-complete-food-planner-for-diabetics/diabetic-diet-chart-you-must-follow/photostory/59683533.cms The brightest thing about silent killer diabetes is that it can easily be managed by following a regulated lifestyle and following a healthy diet. According to celebrity nutritionist Sandhya Gugnani, This lifestyle disease can be contained by eating right and exercising regularly. Following is the diet chart that she recommends for diabetics to follow. Warm water with 1 tsp methi dana (soaked overnight), 5-6 almonds (soaked overnight with peel), weak tea + 2 multi grain (without sugar) ragi / oat biscuit / veg crackers Expert Tip: Eat a variety of foods e.g. whole grains, whole pulses, fruits, vegetables, dairy, nuts, seeds, non-veg (if taken) and cold pressed oils. 1 cup milk (low fat) / chach, poha / oats upma (all with vegs) / 2 egg whites with one yolk 2 pc of multi grain slices Expert tip: Restrict total carbohydrates intake and avoid simple sugars and refined carbohydrates like white flour or polished rice. 1 medium size fruit (apple/ pear/ plum / papaya/ jamun/ cherry (when in season),1 tsp mixed seeds (flax seeds/ chia/ pumpkin/ melon etc) Expert tip: Read labels carefully especially for foods sold as diabetic foods. They may appear healthy but might have hidden calories. Dal/ sprouts/ beans 1 bowl, vegetables 1 bowl, salad- 1bowl, curd (with vegs) 1 bowl, chapati- 2 (mix cereal & green leafy & other vegetables) / unpolished rice (brown or red) - 1 bowl Expert tip: Go for special smart foods: These include Oats, barley, coarse grains, millets, Bengal gram, soybeans, brightly colored vegetables, fruits, ginger, onion, green tea, flax seeds, fenugreek seeds, pumpkin seeds, watermelon seeds, cucumber seeds, amla, nuts, and sunflower seeds, wheat ger Continue reading >>

Basmati Rice As A Diabetic Food

Basmati Rice As A Diabetic Food

The prevalence of diabetes is on the rise and it now affects 7.8 percent of the U.S. population, as of 2007 according to the American Diabetes Association. In order to prevent long-term complications associated with uncontrolled diabetes, diabetics need to adapt their lifestyle, and sometimes rely on extra help from medications or insulin, to achieve good glycemic control, defined by blood sugar levels ranging between 70 and 130 mg/dL before meals and below 180 mg/dL two hours after eating. Video of the Day Carbohydrate is the key nutrient to control with diabetes as it is the one that influence blood sugar levels the most. After the digestion process, carbohydrates are converted into glucose, or sugar, molecules, which then make their way into the bloodstream elevating blood sugar levels at the same time. Because insulin is either present in insufficient quantities or is simply ineffective with diabetes, an excessive carbohydrate intake leads to blood glucose levels above target. For this reason, the American Diabetes Association recommends aiming for a carbohydrate intake ranging between 45 and 60 g at each meal. Basmati Rice Nutrition Facts Basmati rice belongs to the group of carbohydrate-containing foods that need to be limited with diabetes. As a general rule of thumb, all rices, whether brown or white, contains a similar amount of carbohydrates averaging about 15 g per 1/3-cup serving. More precisely, 3/4 cup cooked Basmati rice provides 150 calories, 0 g fat, 3 g protein, 35 g carbohydrate and 0 g fiber, while the same serving of cooked brown Basmati rice contains about 162 calories, 1.5 g fat, 3.8 g protein, 33.8 g carbohydrate and 3 g fiber. Basmati Rice Glycemic Index In addition to considering the amount of carbohydrate you include in your diabetic meal plan Continue reading >>

Top Diabetic Diet Tips For Indians

Top Diabetic Diet Tips For Indians

People suffering from diabetes have double the risk of getting a heart attack and developing mental health issues. But the good news is, most cases of type 2 diabetes can be reversed. Taking steps to control your diabetes does not mean to live in deprivation, it rather means eating in moderation and maintaining the right balance. Here we bring to you some diet tips which will not leave you hungry or deprived. Nutrition No matter whether you are a diabetic or not, the nutrition needed by your body is same as for any other normal person (without diabetes). So, you don't need to consume anything special, though you need to take care of the number of calories you intake. Your choice of food matters and most importantly the carbohydrates. Lose weight Fortunately, you have more control over your health than you think. By eating healthy, doing some physical activity and losing weight you can control your diabetes and even reverse it in some cases. By losing just 5 to 10 per cent of your weight, you can lower your blood sugar level, lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol. Also, losing weight and eating healthy will have a profound effect on your energy, mood and sense of well-being. So even if you already developed diabetes it's not too late to make positive changes. Diabetic diet for Indians The per day calorie intake should be between 1500 to 1800 calories. A diabetic diet should have at least three vegetables and two fruits each day. Avoid consuming dry fruits Dry fruits seem like a healthy snacking option but for diabetic people it's not really the case. The fructose in dry fruits may spike your sugar level. So, try having fresh fruits instead of dry fruits. Some home remedies to control diabetes Green tea: This tea is unfermented and hence has high polyphenol content, Continue reading >>

Can Eating Rice Affect My Diabetes?

Can Eating Rice Affect My Diabetes?

Having diabetes requires you to be vigilant about your diet and exercise habits. You have to watch what you eat every day to ensure that your blood sugar doesn’t rise to an unhealthy level. Monitoring the carbohydrate count and glycemic index (GI) score of the foods you eat can make controlling your diabetes easier. The GI ranks food based on how they can affect your blood sugar. If you aren’t tracking your diet, diabetes can cause more serious health problems. This includes cardiovascular disease, kidney damage, or foot infections. Rice is rich in carbohydrates and can have a high GI score. If you have diabetes, you may think that you need to skip it at the dinner, but this isn’t always the case. You can still eat rice if you have diabetes. You should avoid eating it in large portions or too frequently, though. Many types of rice exist, and some types are healthier than others. There are risks to having too much rice in your diet. A study in the British Medical Journal found that people who eat high levels of white rice may have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This means that if you have prediabetes, you should be especially conscientious about your rice intake. If you’ve already been diagnosed with diabetes, it’s generally safe for you to enjoy rice in moderation. Make sure you’re aware of the carbohydrate count and GI score for the type of rice you wish to eat. You should aim to eat between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Some varieties of rice have a lower GI score than others. The Create Your Plate method used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture is a good way to ensure your meals are portioned well. Your dinner plate should have 25 percent protein, 25 percent grains and starchy foods, and 50 percent non-starchy vegetables. Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Diet plays an important role in staying healthy, especially for people with diabetes. Many people wonder whether high-carbohydrate foods such as rice are healthy to eat. This article will explain how to count carbohydrates, how to incorporate rice into the diet, and what the healthy alternatives to rice are. Diabetes basics Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases where the body does not adequately produce insulin, use insulin properly, or both. Insulin plays a crucial role in allowing blood sugar to enter the cells and be used for energy. There are two main types: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes have abnormally high levels of blood sugar. This can damage many organs in the body if left untreated. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommend the following steps to manage diabetes: making healthy choices in eating engaging in regular physical activity or exercise taking medications, if required A nutritious diet is important in keeping blood sugar levels at a healthy level. The healthy range is 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter mg/dL before meals or below 180 mg/dL after meals, according to the American Diabetes Association. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin. Various insulin delivery systems and protocols are used to manage blood sugar levels both between and at meal times. People with type 2 diabetes often manage their condition with diet and exercise, and with medications as needed to keep their blood sugar levels within the target range. These medications vary in how they work. People with diabetes will have different treatment plans, and they will respond to food, exercise, and medication differently. It is important that people consult with a doctor to get personalized recommendations on target blood suga Continue reading >>

Best Food Suitable For A Diabetic Type 2 Person

Best Food Suitable For A Diabetic Type 2 Person

Food plans for diabetics vary, depending on allowed individual sugar and carbohydrate content. In general, however, all persons with diabetes should eat, or avoid, the same foods. Avoid Foods Containing Sugar and Most Artificial Sweeteners This includes so-called “sugar-free” foods enhanced with artificial sweeteners. The Most Sugary Foods to Avoid Sweets and Chocolates, Including “Sugar-Free” Types These are not good foods for the diabetic, as they contain sugar and artificial sweeteners. Diabetics may eat Continental dark chocolate, with 70% or more cocoa solids, once a week. Foods Containing Significant Proportions of Ingredients Ending in -ose or -ol These ingredients are usually sugars. One notable exception is cellulose, which is a form of dietary fiber. Grains and Foods Made from Grain Products These include corn, rice, pasta, breads, cakes, tarts, breakfast cereals, and biscuits. Starchy vegetables Particularly avoid parsnips and potatoes. Limit carrots, beans (except runner beans), peas, and other starches. Be careful with packets of mixed vegetables. Limit Certain Dairy Products Limit milk to small quantities. Also limit cottage cheese, and sweetened or low-fat yogurts. Limit Commercially Packaged Foods These processed foods include frozen dinners, especially those marked “lean” or “light”, and snack foods or fast foods. Fruit Juices Choose fresh fruit instead, because it is lower in carbohydrates. For the fruit juice flavor, add a touch of fruit juice to water. Healthy Food for Diabetics This list of diabetic foods contains the best foods for diabetics to eat. All foods listed here are especially for Diabetes Type 2. All Meat Just when you were wondering, “What food can diabetics eat?” you find meat to be tasty answer. Bacon, pork, lamb, b Continue reading >>

Study: Does Eating White Rice Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes?

Study: Does Eating White Rice Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes?

When it comes to your risk of diabetes, a new study by Harvard researchers suggests that eating less white rice could make a difference. Each additional daily serving of white rice, a staple of Asian diets, may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 10%, according to the study, which analyzed the results of four previous studies involving 352,384 participants from four countries: China, Japan, U.S. and Australia. Those who ate the highest amounts of white rice had a 27% higher risk of diabetes than those who ate the least, and the risk was most pronounced in Asian people. The studies followed people for anywhere from 4 to 22 years, tracking their food intake. All the participants were diabetes-free at the beginning of the study. MORE: Five Ways to Avoid Diabetes — Without Medications Why white rice may impact diabetes risk isn’t clear, but it may have to do with the food’s high score on the glycemic index (GI) — a measurement of how foods affect blood sugar levels — meaning that it can cause spikes in blood sugar. High GI ranking foods have previously been associated with increased risk of diabetes. “White rice also lacks nutrients like fiber and magnesium,” says study author Qi Sun, a professor of medicine at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. “People with high white rice consumption lack these beneficial nutrients and Asian populations consume a lot of white rice. If you consume brown rice instead, you will get these nutrients. There are alternatives.” But before you swear off white rice for good, the study authors and other nutrition experts caution that it’s not the only culprit in diabetes risk. Rather, a general decrease in physical activity and increase in food consumption may be responsible for the rise in obesity and insulin res Continue reading >>

Healthy Recipe For Diabetics: Low Carbohydrate Cauliflower Rice Biryani

Healthy Recipe For Diabetics: Low Carbohydrate Cauliflower Rice Biryani

/ Healthy recipe for diabetics: Low carbohydrate cauliflower rice biryani Healthy recipe for diabetics: Low carbohydrate cauliflower rice biryani A healthy, tasty, quick and low-calorie recipe of cauliflower everyone must try! Bhavyajyoti Chilukoti | Published: November 22, 2016 4:57 pm You might be well aware of the trials and tribulations a person with diabetes goes through while picking the foods. However, Ms Lalitha Subramanyam, Chief Nutritionist at Grow Fit says that a diabetic diet need not be complicated. The nutritional needs of a person with diabetes are the same as any other individual however the former has to exercise a little care while choosing the carbohydrates. Selecting whole grain carbohydrates instead of starchy carbohydrates is the key as they are high in fibre and digested slowly, keeping blood sugar levels in control . And this is why cauliflower, which is loaded with nutrients, low in calories, low in carbohydrates and high in fibre is known to be a diabetic friendly vegetable. Heres a quick, simple and low carbohydrate recipe of cauliflower biryani minus rice for diabetics. 3 tablespoons of oil (use olive oil for best results) 1 medium onion (sliced and not cut into pieces) 2 tablespoons of fresh coriander leaves for garnish 1. Remove the stalks from the cauliflower and separate the florals in a bowl. Now, wash it and cut the florals of cauliflower into large pieces and shred until you get the texture of coarse couscous. You can even coarsely grind it in a grinder. 2. In the meantime, heat olive oil in a pan and add cinnamon, green cardamoms and cloves. After a minute, add thinly sliced onions and allow it to cook for about 7 to 10 minutes or until the onions turn translucent. 3. Add grated cauliflower (cauliflower rice) in the pan. Mix all the Continue reading >>

More in diabetes