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Is Cheese Ok For Diabetics

Is Cheese Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Cheese Safe For People With Diabetes?

Compared with many other foods, cheese is high in fat and calories and may not be an obvious choice for someone with diabetes. Cheese and diabetes can, however, be a healthful combination. Cheese lovers can enjoy a wide variety of cheeses without elevating blood sugar, raising blood pressure, or gaining weight. For diabetes-friendly meals or snacks, people should choose healthful cheeses and serve them with foods that are rich in fiber and low in calories. Can people with diabetes eat cheese? People with diabetes can safely eat cheese as part of a balanced, healthful diet. Just as with other foods, moderation is the key. A diet mainly consisting of cheese is unhealthy for anyone. When selecting cheeses, people with diabetes need to consider a few things: Calories Cheese is very high in calories and fat. Though calorie content varies among cheese varieties, people with diabetes should avoid overindulging in cheese. Type 2 diabetes is linked with obesity, and losing just a few pounds can reduce the risk of diabetes. There are several steps that people with diabetes can take to help them eat cheese without gaining weight: stick to small servings choose lower-calorie cheeses use cheese as a source of flavor rather than as the main course Saturated fat Cheese is high in saturated fat compared with many other foods. In small quantities, saturated fat is harmless and can actually be beneficial to the body. But excessive intake of saturated fats is linked to weight gain, high cholesterol, gallbladder problems, and heart disease. The American Heart Association recommend a diet that contains no more than 5-6 percent saturated fat. That means that in a 2,000 calorie diet, no more than 120 calories or 13 grams (g) should come from saturated fats. Other experts advise no more than 1 Continue reading >>

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

NEW! Download our free grocery shopping companions: Free Foods – a guide to foods that won’t impact your blood sugar 15 Carbs Snack List – a mega-list of great snack ideas What’s the best snack for someone with diabetes? A snack with few carbs! (There are some exceptions. If you are planning on working out or have low blood sugar, than some carbohydrates may be beneficial.) Here are our top 23 favorite low-carb snacks in no particular order: Peanut butter Cheddar cheese String cheese Cottage cheese Broccoli with melted cheese Salad with free veggies and low-carb dressing Tomato and mozzarella salad Celery with peanut butter Fresh strawberries or blueberries with low-fat plain yogurt Veggies with hummus Cucumbers with olive-oil and rice vinegar Carrot sticks Snap peas with Caesar dressing Green beans cooked and cooled with lemon juice Nuts Sauteed Spinach Pickles Rotisserie chicken Deli meat Pepperoni and cheese Beef jerky Hard boiled eggs What are your favorites? You can get more snack ideas in our recipes forum, diabetes cookbook, and the Simply Cooking blog. Further reading on diabetes diet: Read more about low blood glucose/sugar (hypoglycemia), low-carb diet, snacks. Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Dairy And Diabetes

Dairy And Diabetes

All of us, whether we have diabetes or not, need some dairy products (or non-dairy alternatives like soya products) such as milk, cheese and yogurt every day. These all contain proteins and vitamins and are an important source of calcium, which help to keep your bones and teeth strong. Some dairy foods, however, can be high in fat and saturated fat, so choose lower-fat alternatives where you can. Adults and older children who consume too much fat may find they gain weight and too much saturated fat can cause your cholesterol levels to rise, which increases your risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Unfortunately, diabetes increases your risk of having CVD, so it pays to opt for the lower-fat options to help manage your risk. How much per day? Aim for 3 portions. What's a portion? One portion equals: 190ml (⅓ pint ) milk a small pot of yogurt 2 tbsp cottage cheese a matchbox-sized portion of cheese (30g) How to make healthy dairy choices Milk Switching to lower-fat milk, such as semi-skimmed milk (green top) from whole milk (blue top), which contains the most fat, is a good start. To make even more of a difference, try 1 per cent fat milk (orange top) or even better skimmed milk (red top). Lower-fat milks have all the goodness of whole milk, including calcium, all you lose is the fat. This table shows the savings you could make. The figures are for 100ml but bear in mind a pint is 568ml, which many of us consume each day on cereal and in cups of tea and coffee. It shows how the savings can really add up. Milk Kcal /100ml Fat /100ml Saturated fat /100ml Carbohydrate /100ml Of which sugars /100ml Salt /100ml Whole 64 3.6 2.3 4.7 4.7 0.1 Semi-skimmed 50 1.8 1.1 4.8 4.8 0.1 1% fat 43 1 0.7 4.9 4.9 0.1 Skimmed 35 0.1 < 0.1 5 5 0.1 To help you see if your favourite milk or c Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Cheese With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can I Eat Cheese With Type 2 Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, your body does not metabolize carbohydrates properly, and you have high blood sugar. A healthy diet is an important part of managing your blood sugar levels and preventing diabetes complications. In moderation, cheese can be a regular part of a sensible diet for individuals with this health condition. Video of the Day Following a healthy diet for individuals with diabetes includes consuming controlled amounts of carbohydrates throughout the day. You might have 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates at your meals, and 15 grams of carbohydrates at snacks. An ounce of mozzarella or cheddar each provides less than 1 gram of carbohydrates. For lunch, you could have a whole-grain wrap with cheese and a large apple. As a snack, you could have blue cheese with walnuts and a small piece of fruit. Diabetes, Cheese and Weight Obesity is a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes. If you have type-2 diabetes and are obese, losing weight can help. Cheese is a high-calorie food, so limit your portion sizes. An ounce of cheddar cheese contains 113 calories. Reduce your calorie consumption by selecting reduced-fat or fat-free cheese instead. An ounce of nonfat cheddar cheese contains 44 calories. To promote weight loss, eat your cheese with low-calorie foods. Have low-fat string cheese and grapes for a snack, or melt shredded nonfat cheddar cheese onto steamed broccoli for a side dish. Cheese and Sodium One main concern with cheese is its high sodium content. An ounce of cheddar cheese has 174 milligrams of sodium. Individuals with diabetes are already at risk for heart disease and kidney disease, and a high-sodium diet further increases the risk. Those with diabetes should have no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. An ounce of low-sodium cheddar cheese has only Continue reading >>

Surprising Advice For Diabetes Prevention: Eat Cheese

Surprising Advice For Diabetes Prevention: Eat Cheese

Surprising Advice for Diabetes Prevention: Eat Cheese Cheese lovers could be 12 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes, research finds. But that doesn't necessarily mean you can eat cheese with abandon. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2012 People with an elevated diabetes risk are often told to avoid high-fat foods, such as cheese, but a new study published in theAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutritionsuggests that a diet rich in cheese might actually prevent the disease from developing. The reason? Cheese's particular brand of fat and fermentation process, researchers in the Netherlands concluded. A study of more than 300,000 people across eight European countries indicated that total dairy consumption was not associated with diabetes risk. But cheese and other fermented dairy products, such as yogurt and thick, fermented milk were inversely associated with type 2 diabetes. Out of all the dairy products, cheese was found to lower risk the most. Researchers say that though results are promising, more research needs to be done to determine a link between fermented dairy and diabetes risk. Because numerous studies have found high-fat diets to be associated with diabetes risk and inflammation in the body, which is linked to a host of other chronic diseases, this research does not give you a free pass to go cheese-crazy. "Diabetes puts people at increased risk for heart disease, which is why it's important to watch your fat intake," says Dara Gurau, RD at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center in Toronto."Cheese and dairy products are higher in saturated fat, so it's best to choose lower fat varieties of these foods s Continue reading >>

The Cheese Trap: Fighting Diabetes With A Dairy-free Diet

The Cheese Trap: Fighting Diabetes With A Dairy-free Diet

The Cheese Trap: Fighting Diabetes with a Dairy-Free Diet Articles » The Cheese Trap: Fighting Diabetes with a Dairy-Free Diet The Cheese Trap: Fighting Diabetes with a Dairy-Free Diet Have you ever felt pulled to a certain food? Maybe it’s chocolate, potato chips, a hamburger, or a bowl of ice cream. For some people, it’s cheese. After 30 years of conducting clinical research studies and prescribing the same approach—a low-fat vegan diet—to participants eager to lose extra weight, lower blood pressure, improve cholesterol, alleviate headaches and joint pain, and feel great again, I always get pushback about the same food: cheese. Parting ways with this ultra-processed substance, which smells like the bacteria it is, seems harder than eliminating chicken, turkey, yogurt, fish, and milk, which collectively don’t have the same gravitational pull as cheddar, mozzarella, feta, and baked brie. Part of this habitual preference is neurological. As cheese digests it may release tiny molecules, casomorphins, that can bind to dopamine receptors in our brain. [1] [2] [3] This “feel good” chemical reaction looks similar to any other dopamine trigger, from alcohol and drug use to exercise or listening to music. The casomorphins in cheese may be what drives pizza, along with its hyperpalatable state, to the No. 1 spot on the Yale Food Addiction Scale. [1] While this neurological tangle isn’t as potent as alcohol, drugs, and tobacco, it’s still present and lingers in our minds. It’s also entrenched in our society. We consume 37 pounds of cheese, per person, each year. [5] This is nearly twice the amount of cheese we consumed, per person, in 1975. [6] The dairy industry’s marketing wizards do a good job: they sell their products, keep us coming back, and maintai Continue reading >>

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Are late-night snacks a no-no for people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes, late-night snacks aren't necessarily off-limits — but it's important to make wise choices. Late-night snacks add extra calories, which can lead to weight gain. And if you snack after your evening meal — especially if the foods contain carbohydrates — you may wake up the next morning with a high blood sugar level. If you're hungry after dinner, choose a "free" food, such as: One sugar-free frozen cream pop Five baby carrots One cup of light popcorn A small handful of goldfish-style crackers A can of diet soda Or swap the snack for a piece of gum or small hard candy. These "free" foods have few, if any, carbohydrates and calories, so they won't contribute to weight gain or increased blood sugar. If you take insulin or other diabetes medications and feel that you must snack before bedtime to prevent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during the night, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend adjusting the dose of your medications to prevent the need for a late-night snack. Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

The Benefits And Risks Of Cheese For People With Diabetes

The Benefits And Risks Of Cheese For People With Diabetes

Can people with diabetes eat cheese? The answer in many cases is yes. This delicious, calcium-rich food contains many nutritional properties that make it a healthy part of a balanced diet. Of course, there are some precautions to keep in mind. Read on to find out what people with diabetes need to know about eating cheese. Cheese can help maintain healthy glucose levels People with diabetes must consider the glycemic content of various foods. This is based on how quickly the body is able to digest the carbohydrates in those foods. The glycemic index (GI) is a 100-point scale that rates foods based on how rapidly they cause blood sugar to rise. Foods are given a higher value the more rapid the rise in blood sugar. Most cheeses contain little to no carbohydrates and thus rate very low on the GI scale. Some cheeses, however, have more than others. For example, cheddar cheese contains just 0.4 grams of carbohydrates per 1 ounce, while Swiss cheese contains 1.5 grams of carbohydrates per 1 ounce. So it’s important to check the nutritional label on various cheeses. Cheese is protein-rich Cheese is generally high in protein, which is great to help balance out the blood sugar spikes that occur when eating carbohydrates alone. When eaten together, they take longer to burn off. Protein also helps people feel full longer, thus reducing cravings for other unhealthy foods. The amount of protein varies depending on the type of cheese. For example, 1 ounce of parmesan contains 10 grams of protein, while cheddar contains 7 grams of protein. Cottage cheese has less than 3 grams per 1 ounce. Cheese may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes At least one study has shown that cheese may lower a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. The 2012 study found th Continue reading >>

How Cheese Affects Glucose In A Diabetes Diet

How Cheese Affects Glucose In A Diabetes Diet

The higher the glycemic index of the food, the higher you can expect your blood sugar to rise after eating it. Cheese has a very low glycemic index and has minimal impact on blood sugar values in a person with diabetes. It is a great option for a snack and pairs well with carbohydrate-containing foods to blunt their ability to raise blood sugar. Choose low-fat varieties for a healthy option in your diet. Video of the Day Not all foods affect blood sugar in the same way. The glycemic index, or GI, was developed as a method to evaluate how much and how quickly a food will raise blood sugar after consumption. In general, the more refined the food and the higher the carbohydrate content is, the higher the GI will be. Low-GI foods have a ranking of 55 or below, moderate-GI foods have a ranking of 56 through 75 and high-GI foods have a ranking of 76 through 100 and are often refined carbohydrates. Cheese and Diabetes Dairy products generally have a low GI and fit well in a diabetic diet. Cheese is similar to foods in the protein group that contain predominantly fat and protein, and it has a lower GI than yogurt or milk. For example, one slice of American cheese has only 1 gram of carbohydrate, causing a very minimal impact on blood sugar. For a healthy snack that has a low GI, registered dietitian Joy Bauer suggests eating part-skim string cheese, which has 80 calories and no grams of carbohydrate. To keep calories and saturated fat low, choose a low-fat version of your favorite cheese. Combining foods will alter the GI. Pair low-GI foods with high-GI foods to create a meal that more moderately affects your blood sugar. Foods with higher proportions of protein and fat will often have minimal impact on blood sugar. For example, adding a low-GI food such as cheese to a slice of Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: Healthy Diabetes Diet Foods | Prevention

Diabetes Prevention: Healthy Diabetes Diet Foods | Prevention

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet , and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber(plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calciumabout 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fatthe kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin Da potent diabetes-quelling combinationthan in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both nutrients. You can get these nu Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

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