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Is Cashew Nut Good For Diabetics

54 Grams Of Tree Nuts Per Day Can Drastically Improve Type 2 Diabetes Patients' Blood Sugar Levels

54 Grams Of Tree Nuts Per Day Can Drastically Improve Type 2 Diabetes Patients' Blood Sugar Levels

Adding nuts to our diet is already considered a good strategy for lowering the risk of heart disease by reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL), also known as “bad” cholesterol levels. A recent study conducted at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto suggests eating tree nuts such as almonds, cashews, and hazelnuts can improve the results of both HbA1c tests and fasting glucose tests for type 2 diabetes patients. "Tree nuts are another way people can maintain healthy blood sugar levels in the context of a healthy dietary pattern," Dr. John Sievenpiper, physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael's Hospital, said in a statement. Sievenpiper and his colleagues recruited 450 type 2 diabetes patients to participate in 12 clinical trials. People in North America generally consume less than one serving of tree nuts a day, equaling a quarter of a cup or 30 grams. Adding tree nuts such as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts, and pistachios to our diets could lead to further metabolic benefits. Study participants were asked to consume 54 grams of tree nuts per day. Overall, adding tree nuts to the diets of type 2 diabetes patients improved HbA1c test results, the measurement of blood sugar levels over a period of three months, and fasting glucose levels, which tests blood glucose levels after a patient hasn’t eaten or drank anything except water for eight hours. Even though tree nuts can be high in calories and fat, albeit healthy unsaturated fat, the study’s participants did not gain weight. The research team identified better results when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates instead of saturated fats. A similar study conducted at St. Michael Continue reading >>

The Exact Number Of Nuts You Should Eat Every Day

The Exact Number Of Nuts You Should Eat Every Day

You might have started incorporating a handful of nuts into your heart-healthy, brain-boosting diet, but a new study adds some compelling details about the nutritional star power of this all-time favorite snack. Dutch researchers followed 120,000 adults (ages 55 to 69) as part of a Netherlands Cohort Study and reviewed data to find that eating nuts seemed to offer protection from various major causes of death. Both men and women who ate at least 10 grams of nuts per day were less likely to die from cancer, diabetes, and heart disease—and the lowly peanut played just as important a role, says lead author Piet van den Brandt, PhD, an epidemiologist and professor at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Compared to non-nut eaters, people who ate at least 10 grams a day had a 23% lower chance of death from any cause. They were 17% less likely to die from heart disease, 21% less likely to die from cancer, 30% less likely to die from diabetes, and 47% less likely to die from neurodegenerative diseases, according to the study, which was published in the International Journal of Epidemiology. Eating more grams, however, didn't improve the percentages significantly. (Diabetes doesn't have to be your fate; Rodale's new book, The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes, shows you exactly what to eat and do to prevent the disease—and even reverse it.) "Peanuts and tree nuts are relatively rich in mono and polyunsaturated fats, protein, fiber, several B-vitamins, and antioxidants, which could explain part of the effect," van den Brandt says. But it's possible the nuts themselves aren't responsible for the entire effect. "Nut consumers in this population tended to be in better overall health, eat more fruits and vegetables, use dietary supplements more frequently, and have a higher educ Continue reading >>

Almonds Vs Cashew Nuts: Which Nut Should You Go With?

Almonds Vs Cashew Nuts: Which Nut Should You Go With?

We have always heard that including nuts in your diet is the best option to lead a healthy lifestyle. This is accepted scientifically as well. Also, a research states that eating 42.52 grams of nuts per day as part of a healthy diet may reduce your risk of heart disease. Almonds and cashews both contain heart-healthy unsaturated fats, but almonds have a better fat profile. Cashews provide more vitamin K and zinc, but almonds make a better choice for fibers, vitamin E and calcium. Both cashews and almonds have their own health benefits but still they are a lot different. Almonds- Good for your gut! Almonds are regarded good for your guts as Almonds contain the most fiber — about three grams per ounce — compared to other nuts, and are richest in vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant. A test-tube study (funded by the Almond Board of California) found that the nuts raised levels of good bacteria that bolster the body’s immune system. So, we can say that Almonds may even help you slip into those skinny jeans which you are unable to fit in after your college days! Almonds are high in magnesium, and experimental studies have suggested that dietary magnesium intake may reduce a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes. CALORIE COUNT: 23 NUTS equals 170 CALORIES Cashews: Booster for your brain On the other hand cashews are regarded as Brainpower Boosters. Cashews are particularly rich in iron and zinc. Iron helps deliver oxygen to all of your cells, which can prevent anaemia, and zinc is critical to immune health and healthy vision. Cashews are also a good source of magnesium which acts as memory booster. CALORIE COUNT: 23 NUTS equals 200 CALORIES Bowl of unsalted nuts So far, no nut is a hands-down winner. But there is always the non-competitive approach: mixed nuts. Uns Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Nuts

Can Diabetics Eat Nuts

Diabetes management requires a significant adjustment not only on lifestyle but also in a diet. This includes forfeiting even some of your favorite dishes. The good news is that diabetics can still consume nuts without worrying too much about their health. Nuts consumption can help even in reducing the risk of ailments that are often associated with diabetes. Often time’s diabetics wonder whether it’s safe to consume nuts or not. Most of them end up questioning different scenarios as to whether to consume or not to consume nuts. The answer to their questions is that they should not worry about consumption of nuts. Diabetics can comfortably consume nuts because of the great nutritional value they harbor. Nuts Nuts are generally defined as seeds or fruits in a hard inedible shell. They are also the seeds of various trees and commonly known as tree nuts. The more general use of nuts has been included in this article i.e. those in hard shells (e.g. chestnut) and others that are technically legumes (e.g. peanut) and seeds (e.g. pecans). Some of the most common nuts are as listed below. Almonds Peanuts Pine nuts Walnuts Coconuts Acorns Chestnuts Cashew nuts Filberts/Hazelnuts Macadamia nuts Brazil nuts Pistachios According to a report published in “Choose My Plate” by the USDA program; nuts were included to a diet as proteins. However, nuts are contains a lot of other nutrients such as anti-oxidants, unsaturated fats, vitamins and most importantly fiber. It’s important to note that despite the numerous healthy nutrients nuts contain, they have high calories. Nuts contain very high nutritional value and don’t have unhealthy fats that can block arteries. The calories are just a minor setback in nuts consumption without major side effects to your health. To avoid con Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Eat Cashew Nuts During Pregnancy?

Is It Safe To Eat Cashew Nuts During Pregnancy?

Doesn’t your mouth start watering when you think of the rich, tasty and succulent flavored cashew nuts? Well, cashew nuts are tasty no doubt and these are also loaded with lots of nutrients as well. The highly nutritive nuts can be safely consumed in pregnancy provided you follow the safety related considerations. So, before you chew on the nuts, you must get the facts right to know if they are absolutely safe for you and your baby. Nutritional Benefits Of Eating Cashew Nuts During Pregnancy: Cashew nuts are popularly known as “natural vitamin pills” that make them ideal to be consumed during pregnancy. An ounce of cashew contains 4.3 gm of protein, 9 gm of carbohydrate and 13 gm of healthy fat. Let’s take a closer look into the nutritional benefits of cashew nuts in pregnancy: Cashews contain all the vitamins you need for development of your fetus during pregnancy. Cashews are rich in anti-bacterial properties that help fight against infections. These are low in fat content and offer tocopherols, phytosterols and sqaulene that bring overall benefit to you in pregnancy. Cashew nuts are rich sources of energy that helps you keep going through those somewhat difficult pregnancy months. You can fight against diarrhea and constipation with the high fiber content that cashews have. Cashew nuts are rich in iron. This ensures you do not get anemic at this stage. A single serving contains 1.7 mg iron, whereas you need 27 mg of iron each day in pregnancy. Cashew nuts are rich in K vitamin. This ensures you do not bleed excessively in pregnancy. At this stage you need about 90 mcg of vitamin K, while an ounce of cashew contains around 9.8 mcg. These nuts are rich sources of magnesium that protects you from muscle spasms, high blood pressure, tension, soreness, migraines, Continue reading >>

Is Popcorn A Healthy Snack?

Is Popcorn A Healthy Snack?

Many people enjoy snacking in-between meals. Snacks can keep blood sugar levels steady and keep you satisfied until your main meals of the day. Finding snacks that are healthy can be a problem, especially when you’re trying to lose weight. It can also pose a problem when searching for snacks that are filling and delicious. During your quest for the perfect snack, you might have wondering whether or not popcorn is a good choice. Here is an overview of this possibility and whether or not popcorn is a healthy snack: High fibre, normal carb diet If you are following a diet that consists of an average amount of carbs and high fibre, then is popcorn a healthy snack? Popcorn can be healthy, but it will depend on how it’s prepared. Is plain popcorn a healthy snack? Yes, on a high fibre, normal carb diet, it is. However, many people dislike the taste of plain popcorn, as it can be too bland for many peoples’ tastes. There are numerous healthy toppings that can be put on popcorn to improve the taste immensely. As long as you don’t slather on a large amount , you can even use a small amount of butter to give it flavor. Here are some additional toppings that you might choose for your popcorn, to keep it healthy yet tasty: Garlic powder & oil (olive or coconut oils are healthiest) Sea salt and low fat powdered cheese Cinnamon and healthy oil Cayenne pepper, sea salt and butter, and many more Diabetic diet If you happen to be on a diabetic diet, then popcorn can be made to be healthy. Regardless of the toppings that you might opt for, moderation is the key to safely enjoying popcorn while on a diabetic diet. Portion control is important, because overeating any food can cause the loss of blood sugar control. There are many other healthy snacks for diabetics that you might want Continue reading >>

Dates For Diabetes – Is It Safe?

Dates For Diabetes – Is It Safe?

Diabetes usually means a big “NO” to sugar intake. But how far is this true? Most studies show that it is not. Diabetes is the fastest growing disease in the recent times. Although diabetics are not required to abstain from sugar entirely, they are advised to limit its intake. So, what do you do when you need to satisfy your sweet tooth? Eat dates, of course! Dates are small and sweet fruits and have a surprisingly low glycemic index. Studies have been done to determine the effects of consuming dates on blood sugar levels. They concluded that eating dates does not cause a spike in the blood glucose levels. In fact, they are extremely healthy – packed with an array of vital nutrients. Let’s read more on why dates are one of the h ealthiest snack options for you. Table Of Contents 1. Dates – An Overview Dates are one of the most commonly eaten foods in the Middle East. Their amazing nutritional qualities and health benefits are well known to people across the globe. The date palm is called “The Tree of Life” because of the long shelf life and rich nutritional profile of its fruits (1). Apart from containing a high amount of fructose, they also contain an opulence of fiber and nutrients like vitamins A, K, and B-complex, iron, calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. The presence of these nutrients in dates helps prevent constipation, heart diseases, intestinal problems, anemia, and diarrhea, among other conditions (2). All well. But what about diabetes? What’s the connection between dates and diabetes? [ Read: Health Benefits Of Dates ] 2. Dates For Diabetes – What Does Science Say? Numerous studies have been done to determine the GI of dates and their effect on people with diabetes. A study done in 2011, published in the Nutrition Journal, was c Continue reading >>

Peanuts For Diabetes

Peanuts For Diabetes

Peanuts in diabetes are good only if eaten at the correct time and while keeping portion control in mind. Since peanuts are not nuts and are legumes they tend to be high in carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are quickly metabolized into glucose which gets released into the blood stream. This makes peanuts a high-glycemic food on the glycemic index. A glycemic index is basically an index that was created to categorize food based on how quickly the body digests it and converts it into glucose. Glucose in diabetics needs to be controlled. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 Therefore, there is the emphasis on foods that are not quickly converted into glucose. High-glycemic foods are usually refined foods, sugar and most carbohydrates. Vegetables and fruits are generally low glycemic foods. This does not hold true for some fruits and vegetables or even beans which tend to be high on carbohydrates. Often while talking about healthy food for diabetics, nuts are included. This list usually does not include peanuts and cashews, both of which make for a high count on carbohydrates. If you are deciding to include peanuts, as a diabetic, in your diet, you should include it like a garnish. A garnish over salads, curries, soups or even over cereal or oatmeal. Nut butter is also very popular. Peanut butter, though extremely popular, also contains some sugar. So if you would like to eat some peanut butter, it would help if you could make it at home and control the ingredients that go into it. Nut butters also tend to be high in fat but are not high in cholesterol, which regular pasteurized butter tends to be. Therefore, nut butter makes a great substitute but again, only in moderation and limited intake. Since diabet Continue reading >>

Almonds, Walnuts, Cashews: Get To Know Your Nuts

Almonds, Walnuts, Cashews: Get To Know Your Nuts

What nuts to eat and when They’re packed with health-boosting nutrients but which nuts, and how many, are right for you? Rosie King finds out Almonds BENEFITS: Naturally high in calcium and a source of vitamin E, protein and healthy fats. GOOD FOR: Anyone who avoids dairy, who should try having a handful daily. Almond milk doesn’t offer the same calcium boost, accredited practising dietitian Lisa Yates says. “It’s usually only 5 per cent almonds, so the only way it will be high in calcium is if it’s added,” she says. “Check the packaging.” Almonds have also been shown to help reduce blood glucose levels, making them good for type 2 diabetics. SERVING SIZE: 20 nuts Brazil Nuts BENEFITS: A great source of protein and selenium, an important antioxidant for protecting cells from damage. GOOD FOR: Snacking on before or after a workout. Studies show selenium has a positive effect on older people with mild cognitive impairment, a possible precursor to Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. SERVING SIZE: 10 nuts Cashews BENEFITS: High in plant iron and protein, and a good source of healthy fats. GOOD FOR: Vegetarians and vegans. “We’re not as good at absorbing plant iron as we are at absorbing the iron in meat,” Yates says. “If you mix a source of plant iron with a source of vitamin C, the vitamin C will help this process.” Try adding cashews to a stir-fry with capsicum and broccoli or enjoy a handful with a glass of fresh orange juice. SERVING SIZE: 15 nuts Walnuts BENEFITS: A rich source of the omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid, which is known to impact heart health and is linked to improved brain and memory function. GOOD FOR: Anyone concerned about their heart and brain health. “Improvements have been seen in people eating two serves per day, Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Are you trying to prevent diabetes, lower your blood sugar levels, or just looking to understand the condition? Learn more about diabetes and check out this list of healthy snacks handpicked by our Health Nut and Registered Dietitian. Successfully managing diabetes is all about balancing blood sugar levels and maintaining or achieving a healthy weight. What is Diabetes? Diabetes (often referred to in the medical community as diabetes mellitus) is caused by the body's inability to produce any or enough insulin. Insulin is the hormone the converts sugar, a.k.a glucose, to energy. Without adequate levels of insulin, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead of being delivered to cells to use as energy. This glucose build-up leads to high blood sugar, which triggers the signs and symptoms of diabetes. What is the Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as juvenile diabetes) is characterized by a complete lack of insulin. This type of diabetes only accounts for about 5% of people who have diabetes, and is typically diagnosed in children and young adults. In Type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys pancreatic cells that are required to produce insulin. Blood sugar levels rise without insulin to convert glucose to energy. Type 2 diabetes (also referred to as adult-onset diabetes) is the most common form of diabetes. Affecting 95% of people with diabetes, type 2 is usually detected in adulthood, although children can also develop it. In Type 2 diabetes, the body does not effectively use insulin, a condition known as insulin resistance. Initially, the pancreas responds by making more insulin to compensate, but over time, it produces less and less. This results in insulin deficiency because the body can't make enough insulin to keep bl Continue reading >>

Cashews Help Treat Diabetes

Cashews Help Treat Diabetes

School of Montreal researchers recommend us one good way cashew extract may treat type two diabetes. New research published inside the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research suggests cashew seed extract may play an important role in preventing and treating diabetic issues. The cashew is a tree in the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. The plant is native to northeastern Brazil. Scientists at the School of Montreal and the School of Yaoundé in Cameroon studied how cashew products affected the responses of rat liver cells to insulin. In Canada, over 3 million Canadians have diabetes and this number is expected to reach 3.7 million by 2020, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association. In U.S.A, according to the American Diabetes Association, from the 2007 National Diabetes Fact Sheet, there are total 23.6 million children and adults in the United States - 7.8% of the population - have diabetes. 1.6 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older each year. Scientists viewed cashew tree leaves, bark, seeds and apples. They found that the cashew seed extract increased the absorption of blood sugar by the cells. Extracts of other plant parts had no such effect, indicating that cashew seed extract likely contains active compounds, that can have potential anti-diabetic properties. In most people who have diabetes, a disorder called insulin resistance prevents the body from processing the hormone, which regulates energy and the processing of sugars in the body. Deficiency of insulin can lead to heart or kidney diseases over time. The cashew nut is a popular snack, and its rich flavor means it's often eaten without treatment, lightly salted or sugared. Cashews are a staple in vegan diets. They are utilized as a base in sauces and gravie Continue reading >>

Nuts And Health

Nuts And Health

Nuts are a healthy plant food because they are high in healthy fats, protein and fibre, yet they’re often the source of confusion for those wanting to manage their weight. Lisa Yates, Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian and Program Manager of Nuts for Life answers some of your common questions about nuts below. What are nuts? According to the Australian Dietary Guidelines, nuts and seeds are: A nut is a simple dry fruit with one or two seeds in which the ovary wall becomes very hard (stony or woody) at maturity, and where the seed remains attached or fused with the ovary wall....Examples include almonds, pecans, walnuts, brazil nuts, cashew nuts, chestnuts, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, pine nuts and pistachio nuts. The term ‘nut’ is applied to many seeds that are not botanically true nuts. These may include cape seed, caraway, chia, flaxseed, linseed, passionfruit, poppy seed, pepita or pumpkin seed, sesame seed and sunflower seed. Although the peanut is technically a legume, the nutritional composition of the peanut is close to that of tree nuts, and there is research showcasing peanuts health benefits. What nutrients do nuts provide? Like other plant foods, nuts provide a range of nutrients, including large quantities of healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (49–74% total fat), and moderate amounts of protein (9–20%) (except chestnuts which are low fat). Nuts are also a good source of dietary fibre and provide a wide range of essential nutrients, including several B group vitamins (including folate), vitamin E, minerals such as calcium, iron, zinc, potassium and magnesium, antioxidant minerals (selenium, manganese and copper), plus other phytochemicals such as antioxidant compounds (flavonoids and resveratrol) and plant sterols. The 2013 Austra Continue reading >>

Tree Nuts For The Stop Prediabetes Diet

Tree Nuts For The Stop Prediabetes Diet

Regularly including nuts in your diet lowers body weight and waistline. Reduces the risk factors for type 2 diabetes and helps stop prediabetes metabolic syndrome. I have posted about the benefits of nuts as part of the diabetes diet. In another more recently published study in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition (Dec. 2011)*, researchers compared risk factors for heart disease, type 2 diabetes and prediabetes metabolic syndrome in people who ate nuts to people who did not eat nuts. They found that compared to people who did not eat nuts, people who ate nuts such as almonds, cashews and pistachios had a: lower body weight, lower body mass index (BMI) lower waist circumference They also had a lower risk of developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes and prediabetes metabolic syndrome. The study used data from 13,292 men and women participating in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). Nut eaters were defined as those who ate more than one quarter of an ounce of nuts per day. In addition, eating nuts was also linked to a lower prevalence of four risk factors for prediabetes metabolic syndrome suggesting that nuts help to stop prediabetes. Regular Nutrientology readers know these risk factors well: abdominal obesity high blood pressure high blood sugar levels low “good cholesterol” HDL levels I thought it was helpful that the researchers also specifically differentiated between “nuts” and “tree nuts.” This helps to reduce the thinking of peanuts as nuts. As the smart readers of Nutrientology know, peanuts are actually legumes (a type of bean) and peanuts grow in the ground, not in trees. Another common misconception involving nuts is the fear of their fat content. Yes, nuts do contain fats, and you should not sit do Continue reading >>

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

If you have diabetes, beware of peanuts, peanut butter, and peanut oil. Some people think that because most tree nuts, like almonds, are so healthy, that peanuts should also be good for us. But peanuts aren’t nuts at all. They are a legume, and unlike most nuts we can’t eat them raw because they are sometimes covered with a dangerous fungus. Actually, we can’t eat them at all if we want to avoid some of the side effects that we can get from them. Some of these side effects can be quite serious. I can think of only nine reasons why we have to avoid peanuts or anything made from them. Maybe you can think of more, but these eight might be enough to give anyone pause: 1. Peanuts have a lot of carbohydrates, which raise our blood sugar level. Take a look at the US Department of Agriculture’s [National Nutrient Database](which is the gold standard of nutrient facts. "One tablespoon of natural, unsweetened peanut butter contains 3 grams of carbohydrate and will raise my blood sugar 15 mg/dl," writes Dr. Richard K. Bernstein in the 2011 edition of his book Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. "Imagine the effect on blood sugar of downing 10 tablespoons!" 2. Peanuts are the source of one of the most common food allergies. "They have the potential to provoke acute allergic reactions (e.g., hives or anaphylaxis) that can be dangerous in the susceptible, even fatal in rare instances," writes Dr. William Davis in his 2011 book, Wheat Belly. Many schools will no longer let children bring peanut butter products to school. 3. Peanuts "contain lectins and other anti-nutrients that can adversely affect your health, particularly if you are suffering from an autoimmune disorder," writes Loren Cordain in his 2002 book, The Paleo Diet. These lectins "are known to increase intestinal Continue reading >>

The Best Nuts And Seeds For Diabetes

The Best Nuts And Seeds For Diabetes

Almonds are rich in protein, vitamins and minerals; exactly why it is said to be a healthy nut. According to researchers from the American University of Medicine, munching a couple of almonds a day can help diabetics to reduce their level of cholesterol and makes the insulin active. This stabilises the blood sugar levels. Eating 6 almonds every day helps to keep diabetes under control. Image source: Getty Images Continue reading >>

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