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Is Cashew Nut Good For Diabetics

The Best Nuts For Diabetes

The Best Nuts For Diabetes

It's no surprise that nuts are heart-healthy but it's also possible that they are beneficial foods for individuals with diabetes. Research suggests that that consuming tree nuts, in conjunction with other dietary changes, can improve blood sugar levels in individuals with non-insulin dependent, or type 2, diabetes and also improve blood cholesterol levels in these individuals. If you have diabetes, be careful of nuts with added sugar in any form, such as honey or chocolate, since these components are high in simple carbohydrate. Mixed Nuts and Diabetes Several research studies have examined the potential benefits of consuming a mixture of different nuts for individuals with diabetes. In one study, published in "Diabetes Care" in 2011, researches found that subjects with type 2 diabetes had increased energy after consuming 2 ounces of mixed nuts daily, compared to a control group. These individuals also had changes that indicated their blood sugar was lower during the study and their levels of "bad," LDL-cholesterol also dropped. The researchers concluded that nuts are a good replacement for carbohydrate foods that can improve glycemic control and blood cholesterol. Almonds decrease post-meal blood sugar surges, according to a research study published in the "Journal of Nutrition" in 2006. Researchers fed 15 healthy subjects five meals comparable in carbohydrate, fat and protein content; three test meals that consisted of almonds, bread, boiled rice and instant mashed potatoes; and two control meals. Blood samples, taken pre-meal and four hours after each meal, showed that almonds lowered the rise in blood sugar and insulin levels four hours after eating. Additional research, published in "Metabolism" in 2007, showed that eating almonds with a high glycemic index food re Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Almonds: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Almonds: What You Need To Know

Almonds may be bite-sized, but these nuts pack a big nutritional punch. They’re an excellent source of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin E and manganese. They’re also a good source of: In fact, “almonds are actually one of the highest protein sources among tree nuts,” said Peggy O’Shea-Kochenbach, MBA, RDN, LDN, a dietitian and consultant in Boston. Almonds, while nutritionally beneficial for most people, are especially good for people with diabetes. “Research has shown that almonds may reduce the rise in glucose (blood sugar) and insulin levels after meals,” said O’Shea-Kochenbach. In a 2011 study, researchers found that the consumption of 2 ounces of almonds was associated with lower levels of fasting insulin and fasting glucose. This amount consists of about 45 almonds. The key in this study is that the participants reduced their caloric intake by enough to accommodate the addition of the almonds so that no extra calories were consumed. A 2010 study found that eating almonds may help increase insulin sensitivity in people with prediabetes. Almonds and magnesium Almonds are high in magnesium. Experimental studies have suggested that dietary magnesium intake may reduce a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In a 2012 study, researchers found that long-term high blood sugar levels may cause a loss of magnesium via urine. Because of this, people with diabetes may be at a greater risk for magnesium deficiency. Learn more about mineral deficiencies. Almonds and your heart Almonds may reduce your risk of heart disease. This is important for people with diabetes. According to the World Heart Federation, people with diabetes are at a higher risk of heart disease. “Almonds are high in monounsaturated fat,” said O’Shea-Kochenbach, Continue reading >>

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Managing diabetes requires a number of lifestyle changes, including becoming more active and making changes in your diet. Often that means saying goodbye to foods you enjoy, but nuts aren't one you need to worry about. Not only can diabetics eat nuts, but they may actually help minimize the impact of some other health issues that often come along with diabetes. Depending on your condition and circumstances, there are several techniques you might use to manage your meals and their impact on your blood sugars and overall health. The American Diabetes Association favors counting the grams of carbs in your diet, while some people with diabetes monitor the glycemic index, or GI, of the foods they eat. If you're trying to lose weight, you might also be on a calorie-restricted plan. Nuts can play a role in your diet, whichever of these strategies you follow: Carb Counting: Most nuts have a low impact on your carb count. An ounce of walnuts contains only 4 grams of carbohydrates, almonds and peanuts have 6 grams, and cashews have 9 grams. Glycemic Index: The Glycemic Index, or GI, measures how quickly a food raises your blood sugar, and the lower the number the better, with any GI below 55 considered "low." Most nuts are very low: The GI of peanuts is 13, for example, and even cashews – relatively high in carbs, for a nut – have a GI of 22. * Calorie Counting: Nuts are more problematic in a weight-loss scenario, because they're high in calories. An ounce of walnuts contains 185 calories, for example, and almonds contain 170. However, their combination of protein, healthy fats and fiber make them a filling and healthful snack, and may help you stay away from less-virtuous foods. Nuts and Health Benefits "First, do no harm" is a fundamental principle in medicine, but nuts go Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Eat Cashew Nuts During Pregnancy?

Is It Safe To Eat Cashew Nuts During Pregnancy?

Doesn’t your mouth start watering when you think of the rich, tasty and succulent flavored cashew nuts? Well, cashew nuts are tasty no doubt and these are also loaded with lots of nutrients as well. The highly nutritive nuts can be safely consumed in pregnancy provided you follow the safety related considerations. So, before you chew on the nuts, you must get the facts right to know if they are absolutely safe for you and your baby. Nutritional Benefits Of Eating Cashew Nuts During Pregnancy: Cashew nuts are popularly known as “natural vitamin pills” that make them ideal to be consumed during pregnancy. An ounce of cashew contains 4.3 gm of protein, 9 gm of carbohydrate and 13 gm of healthy fat. Let’s take a closer look into the nutritional benefits of cashew nuts in pregnancy: Cashews contain all the vitamins you need for development of your fetus during pregnancy. Cashews are rich in anti-bacterial properties that help fight against infections. These are low in fat content and offer tocopherols, phytosterols and sqaulene that bring overall benefit to you in pregnancy. Cashew nuts are rich sources of energy that helps you keep going through those somewhat difficult pregnancy months. You can fight against diarrhea and constipation with the high fiber content that cashews have. Cashew nuts are rich in iron. This ensures you do not get anemic at this stage. A single serving contains 1.7 mg iron, whereas you need 27 mg of iron each day in pregnancy. Cashew nuts are rich in K vitamin. This ensures you do not bleed excessively in pregnancy. At this stage you need about 90 mcg of vitamin K, while an ounce of cashew contains around 9.8 mcg. These nuts are rich sources of magnesium that protects you from muscle spasms, high blood pressure, tension, soreness, migraines, Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia After Fruits, Cashew Nuts And Even Yogurt? (metformin, Blood, Plan) - Diabetes -symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention, Treatment - City-data Forum

Reactive Hypoglycemia After Fruits, Cashew Nuts And Even Yogurt? (metformin, Blood, Plan) - Diabetes -symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention, Treatment - City-data Forum

Reactive hypoglycemia after fruits, cashew nuts and even yogurt? (Metformin, blood, plan) Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account , you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads. View detailed profile ( Advanced ) or search I don't really know what's wrong with me. Sure I did some crash dieting in the past and became borderline anorexic but now when I try to eat to gain weight it seems the list with the food I have to exclude has become larger and larger. My tests don't show any diabetes, but I have overactive thyroid and I seem to have the tingling in extremes, eye problems, and my pancreas produces excessive insulin after I eat glucose/carbs. I no longer can tolerate apples, bananas, tangerines or any sweet fruits, only berries, but not blueberries. No baked goods and breads anymore. Even artificial sweeteners like maltitol in the Atkins bars will make me hypoglycemic. So all grains and potatoes are out, crab-heavy stuff are limited, but I thought yogurt was supposed to not lead to hypoglycemia after eating? The other day I munched on too much cashew nuts and now I know they're also carb-heavy and will avoid them. However since that day, I'm on a BS roller coaster where even full-fat yogurt seems to make me nauseous after eating, like it causes too much insulin spikes. I really have no one to turn, studying abroad and the doctors always ignore me. And it doesn't help that, while I am losing weight (maybe due to an again overactive thyroid, I was on 12.5 mcg of Levo + 5g of Carbimazole, and when I tried to increase the Levo to 25 mcg I got hot flashes and panic attacks which tells m Continue reading >>

Trying To Lower Blood Sugar Levels? Raisins May Help

Trying To Lower Blood Sugar Levels? Raisins May Help

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. Here, Dr. Suzanne Nelson explains how raisins can still be enjoyed by diabetics because they are a low glycemic index food—they don’t cause sharp spikes to blood glucose. RAISINS AND DIABETES Recently, while answering consumer-related health questions at a Sun-Maid exhibit booth, I was approached by a middle-aged woman. She said “I’m so disappointed, I love Sun-Maid raisins but I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and can’t eat them anymore because they’re high in sugar.” I quickly responded, ” I’ve got great news for you! Let me explain.” The reality is that including raisins in your diet is completely acceptable even when you’re trying to control your blood sugar levels. The key is to balance your intake of carbohydrates with fat and protein to prevent major blood glucose fluctuations. If you’re following a carbohydrate exchange meal plan to help control your diabetes, 2 tablespoons of raisins count as a single carbohydrate exchange, or approximately 15 grams of carbohydrates. You can use one serving of raisins in place of any other carbohydrate source in a given meal, such as a 15-gram serving of grains, starch or dairy. Note: Always check food labels – unlike Sun-Maid, some manufacturers add sugar to raisins. Another important tool for diabetics to use is the glycemic index, which is a measure of how your blood sugar may respond to different foods. Certain types of foods have a low glycemic index, meaning that they do not cause sharp spikes in blood glucose levels. Raisins help contribute to blood glucose control because they have a relatively low glycemic index compared to other food and they also contain fiber and antioxidants. THE PROOF IS IN THE RAISIN PUDDING Researchers studied 4 Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Almonds

Diabetes And Almonds

It has been well-documented that in addition to being a delicious snack, almonds are also full of nutrients that have an overall positive effect on one's general health. Over the past several years, research has been conducted that has demonstrated a palpable connection between almond consumption and decreased symptoms specifically for diabetics. Risk factors for diabetes: Weight Being overweight is a significant risk factor for diabetes, since more fat tissue means more insulin resistance. A High Density Lipoproten (HDL) level under 35 A high level of triglycerides in the body’s blood Hypertension, or high blood pressure Metabolic syndrome Almonds and Diabetes Given the specific nutrients that almonds contain, research has suggested that adding almonds to a well-balanced diet can act as both a preventative measure and part of a comprehensive treatment for your diabetes. Weight Although they are calorically dense, almonds can effectively facilitate weight control Due to the high caloric value of almonds, satiation is achieved more quickly According to several studies, the majority of people who add almonds to their diet naturally balance their calorie consumption by ingesting less calories from other foods Almonds may aid in inhibiting the absorption of fat and carbohydrates in the body HDL levels Integrating almonds into a well-balanced diet can raise HDL levels while reducing LDL levels Metabolic syndrome Diets rich in magnesium can decrease your susceptibility to metabolic syndrome, a group of disorders that increase your risk for diabetes A 95 gram serving of almonds contains 64% of the daily recommended requirement of magnesium Hypertension Almonds are a rich source of magnesium Magnesium is associated with a decrease in hypertension In addition: Integrating almo Continue reading >>

Are There Almond Milk Benefits For Diabetics?

Are There Almond Milk Benefits For Diabetics?

People with diabetes always have to watch their diets and make sure that their carb and sugar intake is as low as possible. There are many things that they always have to avoid on their diets and this is the main reason why they need to be very picky with everything that they eat and drink. In this article we are going to give you some of the benefits of almond milk for people with diabetes. Before we get started with almond milk, it has already been proven that eating almonds can have very good effects on your health as a diabetic. If you have 8 to 10 almonds before any meal your blood glucose could lower as much as 30%. This is just one of the benefits that diabetics can get from almonds. The longer you incorporate almonds and almond milk into your diet, the better your overall health will be and your body will be strong enough to fit diabetes more efficiently. The simple act of replacing regular milk with almond milk will lower your blood sugar levels quite a bit and this is the main goal of a person who has diabetes. It will also lower your bad cholesterol significantly. Just make sure that you always read the label and the nutritional facts of the product to ensure that the milk is pure and there are no added sugars and flavors. Drinking almond milk is only recommended to diabetics when the milk is completely pure, otherwise it could be dangerous for your health and that is why it’s important that you always read the box if you are not drinking homemade pure almond milk. Almond milk also improves your skin health and makes it look younger thanks to the improvement in elasticity. You can easily make almond milk and store it in your refrigerator for daily consumption. The good thing is that it won’t go to waste if you decide to keep it at room temperature too. Th Continue reading >>

Is Popcorn A Healthy Snack?

Is Popcorn A Healthy Snack?

Many people enjoy snacking in-between meals. Snacks can keep blood sugar levels steady and keep you satisfied until your main meals of the day. Finding snacks that are healthy can be a problem, especially when you’re trying to lose weight. It can also pose a problem when searching for snacks that are filling and delicious. During your quest for the perfect snack, you might have wondering whether or not popcorn is a good choice. Here is an overview of this possibility and whether or not popcorn is a healthy snack: High fibre, normal carb diet If you are following a diet that consists of an average amount of carbs and high fibre, then is popcorn a healthy snack? Popcorn can be healthy, but it will depend on how it’s prepared. Is plain popcorn a healthy snack? Yes, on a high fibre, normal carb diet, it is. However, many people dislike the taste of plain popcorn, as it can be too bland for many peoples’ tastes. There are numerous healthy toppings that can be put on popcorn to improve the taste immensely. As long as you don’t slather on a large amount , you can even use a small amount of butter to give it flavor. Here are some additional toppings that you might choose for your popcorn, to keep it healthy yet tasty: Garlic powder & oil (olive or coconut oils are healthiest) Sea salt and low fat powdered cheese Cinnamon and healthy oil Cayenne pepper, sea salt and butter, and many more Diabetic diet If you happen to be on a diabetic diet, then popcorn can be made to be healthy. Regardless of the toppings that you might opt for, moderation is the key to safely enjoying popcorn while on a diabetic diet. Portion control is important, because overeating any food can cause the loss of blood sugar control. There are many other healthy snacks for diabetics that you might want Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Nuts?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Nuts?

The moment anyone gets diagnosed with diabetes, the first and foremost step involves knowing about what foods they should eat and what they shouldn’t. While foods that are rich in sugar and fats are a strict no-no, some fruits and nuts are known to be beneficial for diabetics– especially nuts. Found to contain healthy fats and plant proteins that play a key role in prevention of a wide range of health complications in diabetics, nuts are great for a diabetic’s health. Dry fruits like almonds (badam), cashew nuts (kaju), walnuts and pistas are low in glycemic index (GI) value and therefore, help in maintaining your blood sugar levels within normal range. Many studies have also proved that intake of dry fruits on a regular basis lowers your risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. [1, 2] This is because nuts are loaded with many nutrients namely monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), high dietary fibre, phytonutrients, vitamins and minerals. Eating dry fruits not only makes you feel satiated for long hours but also lowers your total calorie intake. Type2 diabetics showed an improvement in their glycemic control and serum lipid profile on daily consumption of two ounces of dry fruits (as a replacement of carbohydrates). [3] Dry fruits not only result in positive health effects on people suffering from diabetes but also prevent various health complications in diabetics. Tip: You can eat mixed dry fruits to attain maximum health benefits. Avoid consuming salted nuts and dry fruits like raisins (kishmish) and dates (khajur). Image Source: Getty Images You may also like to read: For more on diabetes, check out our diabetes section and Diabetes page. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for all the latest updates! For daily free health Continue reading >>

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

Nuts And Diabetes | Charlesworth Nuts

Nuts And Diabetes | Charlesworth Nuts

INTRODUCTION Tree nuts such as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts are packed full of beneficial nutrients for people with diabetes. Eating nuts regularly may even help prevent the onset of diabetes later in life! If you have diabetes, individualised advice from an Accredited Practising Dietitian is recommended. WHY ARE NUTS SO GOOD FOR YOU? Nuts are high in so many different vitamins, minerals and nutrients: 1. Healthy fats People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing heart disease later in life. This risk can be reduced by replacing unhealthy saturated fats in the diet with healthy polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, such as those found in nuts. Some people with diabetes also benefit from replacing some of the carbohydrate rich foods in their diet with foods rich in monounsaturated fats. Nuts have also been shown to improve the cholesterol and triglyceride levels of those with diabetes. Nuts high in monounsaturated fat include macadamias, cashews, almonds, pistachios, and pecans. Nuts high in polyunsaturated fat include walnuts, hazelnuts, pine nuts and Brazil nuts. One type of polyunsaturated fat that is particularly beneficial for the heart is omega-3 – nuts high in omega-3 include walnuts and pecans. 2. Low Glycemic Index Cashews, chestnuts and pecans have a low glycaemic index (GI), which means the carbohydrate they contain is broken down slowly by the body. This results in a slow, steady rise in blood glucose levels, which is beneficial for people with diabetes. While the GI of other nuts has not been tested, all nuts, with the exception of chestnuts, are low in carbohydrate and high in protein. This means they are likely to have a low GI but further research is required t Continue reading >>

Need To Lower Your Blood Pressure? Eating A Handful Of These Could Have An Amazing Effect

Need To Lower Your Blood Pressure? Eating A Handful Of These Could Have An Amazing Effect

The nuts contain high levels of magnesium and potassium - which are essential elements in the human body. Magnesium helps keep heart rhythm steady, is vital for healthy bones and teeth, muscle function, the nervous system and keeps bowels healthy. The substance can also control blood sugar to combat insulin resistance which can lead to type 2 diabetes. But experts have since revealed there is a link between the amount of magnesium people eat and their blood pressure. Researchers at Indiana University have previously found people receiving an average of 368mg day for an average of three months had overall reductions in systolic blood pressure of 2mm of mercury (mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure of 1.78 mm Hg. The study found taking 300mg/a day for just one month was enough to reduce blood pressure and increase blood flow. Cassandra Barns, nutritionist, spoke to Express.co.uk about the findings. She said: “Cashew nuts are a fantastic source of magnesium. “Magnesium may help to keep blood pressure in balance, potentially by helping to relax the blood vessel walls and allow them to dilate.” The NHS recommends men should have 300mg of magnesium a day - while women only need 270mg. A handful of cashew nuts - or 100g - contain 292mg of magnesium. High blood pressure can cause damage the arteries, which carry blood away from the heart, by damaging the cells of their lining. This can cause a hardening of the arteries called arteriosclerosis which can block blood flow to the heart, kidneys and brain. Hypotension can also lead to aneurysms, which can rupture and cause life-threatening internal bleeding. It can also lead to coronary artery disease and increase the risk of kidney damage and TIAs - or ministrokes. Thu, August 18, 2016 Here are 16 of the best superfoods foods Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Should Diabetics Eat Nuts?

Problem Foods: Should Diabetics Eat Nuts?

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. All nuts can be part of a healthy diet. Nuts are made up of protein, vitamins, minerals, fiber, phytochemicals, and fat—the healthy kind of fat. Approximately 50 to 80 percent of a nut is fat, and most of it is healthy monounsaturated and/or polyunsaturated fat. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends the healthy adult population should get 20 to 35 percent of their food intake from dietary fat, with increased consumption of polyunsaturated fats and limited intake of saturated fats and trans fats. Regular consumption of nuts and seeds that contain polyunsaturated fats, in particular, can provide health benefits that foods containing saturated and trans fats can’t. The quality of the fat in your diet is just as important as the quantity of fat in your diet. Because nuts are high in fat, they are also high in calories. You can eat nuts (and seeds) to replace servings of meat and poultry, and/or consume nuts in small portions. A good serving size would be equal to a single layer on a square sticky note. Several studies have reported the benefits of walnuts and a variety of other nuts in the diet in relation to cardiac health. Nuts appear to lower lipid levels, decrease inflammation, and decrease blood pressure in those with elevated cholesterol. All of these results translate into a healthier heart. Examples of nuts that are a good source of polyunsaturated fats are walnuts, dried pine nuts, cashews, almonds, pecans, macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, hazelnuts, pistachios, and peanuts (peanuts are technically not a nut, but a member of the legume family) Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Walnuts For Diabetes

Health Benefits Of Walnuts For Diabetes

It's been suggested that walnuts are a heart healthy addition to any diet, including a diet for type 2 diabetes. And that's exactly what we're going to explore today. Known for their unique wrinkly brain-like appearance, walnuts have a wide range of health benefits from boosting brain health to preventing heart disease to weight loss. Let’s take a closer look at what they can do for us: What are Walnuts? Walnuts are tree nuts that originated from India. Now walnuts are grown all over the globe, the largest growers being China and the US. The two main types are: English Walnuts and Black Walnuts. The nutritional value does not vary significantly between the two. If you've ever come across them whole, you'll know that walnuts have very hard shells that need to be cracked to access the nut. That's why we commonly buy them already cracked – it's easier! Walnut Nutrition Facts Walnuts are made up of around 15% protein and 65% fat. Their fat content is heart-healthy fat. For instance, a one ounce serve (28g, around a quarter cup) of walnuts contains around 16 grams of fat. This is made up of 11 grams polyunsaturated, 5 grams monounsaturated, and just a small amount of saturated fat, 1 gram. Though polyunsaturated fats are lumped into the same category, there are actually two types – omega 6 and omega 3. A quarter of a cup of walnuts contain more than 100% of the recommended daily intake for omega 3, a fat that is well known for it's anti-inflammatory powers. Walnuts are very low in carbs (14%), with a one ounce serve coming in at just 2.7 grams total carbs. And they are high in fiber (1.9 g/oz) so they will have very little effect on your blood sugar levels. Walnuts also contain plant sterols, antioxidants, and many vitamins and minerals. Because fat is higher in calori Continue reading >>

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