diabetestalk.net

Is Cashew Nut Good For Diabetics

Share on facebook

15 Surprising Benefits Of Cashews

The health benefits of cashews include a healthy heart, strong nerve and muscle function, aid in the formation of red blood cells, and an improved bone and oral health. They also provide a relief from diabetes, anemia, and gallstones. By offering an antioxidant defense, they also encourage a better immune system. Health Benefits of Cashews What are Cashews? Cashews are super nuts belonging to the family of Anacardiaceae, which includes mangoes and pistachios. They are originally native to the coastal areas of north-eastern Brazil. They are kidney-shaped seeds and are widely cultivated in places that have tropical climates. Cashews are grown in countries like India, Sri Lanka, Kenya, and Tanzania. The nuts stick to the bottom of the fruit, known as a cashew apple, and have diverse uses, particularly in Brazil, Asia, and Africa. Cashews Nutrition Facts Cashews are very nutritious and are a powerhouse of proteins and essential minerals including copper, calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, potassium, and zinc. Sodium is also present in very small quantities. Cashews also contain vitamins such as vitamin C, vitamin B1 (thiamin), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B6 Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. behzadji

    Cashew Nut(Kajoo) is good for Diabetes(Sugar disease)

    Last edited by Waseem; 12-Nov-2010 at 06:20 PM. Reason: c dis 4 posting images http://www.siasat.pk/forum/showthread.php?37717-How-to-upload-an-image-on-Siasat.pk-Video-Tutorial

  2. Night_Hawk

    low Down Diabetes By Going Nuts By Erin Richards | April 21st 2009 01:30 PM
    Erin's Spin
    More Articles
    About Erin I am a current graduate student at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. I write for Neon Tommy, a digital news website, as a science...
    View Erin's Profile
    Erin Richards
    For those of us who are savvy on health food, what I’m about to tell you will come as no surprise, if not, hold onto your hats. If you have heard about “good fats” such as poly-unsaturated fats and omega fatty acids, found in fish and olive oil, then you know that researchers and nutrition professionals agree that these fats should replace the “bad fats” including trans fats and saturated fats found in junk food.
    The body does need some fats, and the “good fats” in olive oil and fish are much more easily broken down and utilized by the body instead of the saturated fats, which instead of being broken down, may be allocated to fat storage, and add inches to the waistline and pounds to your physique.
    Increasing your waistline does not just hinder your look in a swimsuit, but is commonly acknowledged as a detriment to your health. Overweight and obese individuals have an increased risk of developing some serious complications which include heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis and diabetes.
    Diabetes is a fast-growing pandemic in the US. High amounts of sugar and fatty foods in the typical American diet are one of the causes for the 800,000 new cases of diabetes diagnosed in patients 40-59 in the United States in 2007. Photo credit: National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse
    What you may not know is that that battling the bulge lowers your propensity to develop serious health consequences due to weight. For those suffering from diabetes, or at a high risk of developing diabetes, every tool is important to combat this growing threat.
    Another tool in this arsenal is surprisingly common: nuts. That’s right; you can munch your way to a lower glycemic index and control diabetes all while snacking on some peanuts.
    Tree nuts, like the ones shown here, are most commonly brazil nuts, walnuts, cashews and pecans. Incorporating these into your diet may help shed a few pounds and also prove to help manage onset and symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Photo credit: UC Davis Health System
    A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto produced findings that support that nuts may be a vital way to manage diabetes. Results show that nuts may improve blood lipid levels and blood sugar levels in individuals with non-insulin dependent diabetes (type 2 diabetes).
    The goal of this study was to determine if by added nuts to a diet could improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glycemic control was assessed by blood sugar levels (shown by HbA1c levels). Researchers also evaluated if these outcomes related to improvements in cardiovascular health.
    The study was conducted over a three month period and tested 117 participants currently being treated with oral hypoglycemic medications to treat their type 2 diabetes. The participants were randomized and split into three groups and given one of three diet options. The diets included a supplement with either a � cup of mixed nuts, mixed nuts and muffins or all muffins. The calorie content for each supplement was the same, around 450, but the mixed nuts have more unsaturated fats and fewer carbohydrates than the other two supplements with muffins.
    Study findings showed that the group given the supplement with all mixed nuts had a significantly reduced LDL (bad cholesterol) and total cholesterol levels compared to the full dose muffin group. Additionally, there was also a significant reduction in HbA1c levels in participants with full dose mixed nut supplement than the other two diets. This indicates a greater glycemic control and higher degree of effectively managing diabetes.
    "This is the largest study done to date looking at the effect of tree nuts (almonds, Brazils, cashews, hazelnuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, macadamias and walnuts) and peanuts on Type 2 diabetes,” says Cyril Kendall, Ph.D., of the University of Toronto. “If improvements in glycemic control can be achieved by dietary changes, this would make a substantial contribution to the treatment of those with Type 2 diabetes.” In 2003, the FDA qualified that eating 1.5 ounces of nuts may help reduce the risk of heart disease, if added to a low fat and cholesterol diet. However, patients with type 2 diabetes have a much higher risk of developing heart disease than non-diabetic individuals. It begs the question that since the two are somewhat related in consequence, could the prevention be similar as well? Initial results seem to support this idea. Perhaps skipping your morning bagel and reaching for the walnuts instead could be a small step to bolster your health.

  3. -> Continue reading
read more close
Share on facebook

Health Benefits Of Cashew Nuts

Delicious and crunchy, cashew nuts are a popular snack as well as a healthy source of food. These kidney shaped nuts are formed in the cashew tree (Anacardium occidentale), which is a native to the coastal regions of northeastern Brazil. However, nowadays they are grown in many tropical countries like India, Southeast Asia and Africa. Cashew nuts are actually seeds of the cashew apple and are found attached to the bottom of the fruit. The outer shell of the nut is inedible and has to be removed. The shell contains phenolic resin which is an allergenic and skin irritant. Processing of cashew nuts The cashew tree bears its fruits called cashew apples. Cashew nut grows as an extension of these fruits. The nuts can be found hanging from the underside of the cashew apples. The cashew apples come in different colors like yellow, orange and red. They are edible, tasty and used in the manufacture of juice, wine, jellies and jams. The processing of cashew nuts is rather complex and intensive. The nuts that fall down are collected every day. Once you have collected the nuts, they are removed from the cashew apples. They are then cleaned to remove all impurities. The nuts are then roasted whi Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. behzadji

    Cashew Nut(Kajoo) is good for Diabetes(Sugar disease)

    Last edited by Waseem; 12-Nov-2010 at 06:20 PM. Reason: c dis 4 posting images http://www.siasat.pk/forum/showthread.php?37717-How-to-upload-an-image-on-Siasat.pk-Video-Tutorial

  2. Night_Hawk

    low Down Diabetes By Going Nuts By Erin Richards | April 21st 2009 01:30 PM
    Erin's Spin
    More Articles
    About Erin I am a current graduate student at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. I write for Neon Tommy, a digital news website, as a science...
    View Erin's Profile
    Erin Richards
    For those of us who are savvy on health food, what I’m about to tell you will come as no surprise, if not, hold onto your hats. If you have heard about “good fats” such as poly-unsaturated fats and omega fatty acids, found in fish and olive oil, then you know that researchers and nutrition professionals agree that these fats should replace the “bad fats” including trans fats and saturated fats found in junk food.
    The body does need some fats, and the “good fats” in olive oil and fish are much more easily broken down and utilized by the body instead of the saturated fats, which instead of being broken down, may be allocated to fat storage, and add inches to the waistline and pounds to your physique.
    Increasing your waistline does not just hinder your look in a swimsuit, but is commonly acknowledged as a detriment to your health. Overweight and obese individuals have an increased risk of developing some serious complications which include heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis and diabetes.
    Diabetes is a fast-growing pandemic in the US. High amounts of sugar and fatty foods in the typical American diet are one of the causes for the 800,000 new cases of diabetes diagnosed in patients 40-59 in the United States in 2007. Photo credit: National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse
    What you may not know is that that battling the bulge lowers your propensity to develop serious health consequences due to weight. For those suffering from diabetes, or at a high risk of developing diabetes, every tool is important to combat this growing threat.
    Another tool in this arsenal is surprisingly common: nuts. That’s right; you can munch your way to a lower glycemic index and control diabetes all while snacking on some peanuts.
    Tree nuts, like the ones shown here, are most commonly brazil nuts, walnuts, cashews and pecans. Incorporating these into your diet may help shed a few pounds and also prove to help manage onset and symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Photo credit: UC Davis Health System
    A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto produced findings that support that nuts may be a vital way to manage diabetes. Results show that nuts may improve blood lipid levels and blood sugar levels in individuals with non-insulin dependent diabetes (type 2 diabetes).
    The goal of this study was to determine if by added nuts to a diet could improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glycemic control was assessed by blood sugar levels (shown by HbA1c levels). Researchers also evaluated if these outcomes related to improvements in cardiovascular health.
    The study was conducted over a three month period and tested 117 participants currently being treated with oral hypoglycemic medications to treat their type 2 diabetes. The participants were randomized and split into three groups and given one of three diet options. The diets included a supplement with either a � cup of mixed nuts, mixed nuts and muffins or all muffins. The calorie content for each supplement was the same, around 450, but the mixed nuts have more unsaturated fats and fewer carbohydrates than the other two supplements with muffins.
    Study findings showed that the group given the supplement with all mixed nuts had a significantly reduced LDL (bad cholesterol) and total cholesterol levels compared to the full dose muffin group. Additionally, there was also a significant reduction in HbA1c levels in participants with full dose mixed nut supplement than the other two diets. This indicates a greater glycemic control and higher degree of effectively managing diabetes.
    "This is the largest study done to date looking at the effect of tree nuts (almonds, Brazils, cashews, hazelnuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, macadamias and walnuts) and peanuts on Type 2 diabetes,” says Cyril Kendall, Ph.D., of the University of Toronto. “If improvements in glycemic control can be achieved by dietary changes, this would make a substantial contribution to the treatment of those with Type 2 diabetes.” In 2003, the FDA qualified that eating 1.5 ounces of nuts may help reduce the risk of heart disease, if added to a low fat and cholesterol diet. However, patients with type 2 diabetes have a much higher risk of developing heart disease than non-diabetic individuals. It begs the question that since the two are somewhat related in consequence, could the prevention be similar as well? Initial results seem to support this idea. Perhaps skipping your morning bagel and reaching for the walnuts instead could be a small step to bolster your health.

  3. -> Continue reading
read more close
Share on facebook

Cashew Extract To Treat Diabetes

(www.diabeticcookbooks.org) College of Montreal experts suggest one great way cashew extract may treat diabetic issues. A new study published in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research suggests cashew seed extract may play an important role in preventing and treating type 2 diabetes. The cashew is a tree in the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. The plant is indigenous to northeastern Brazil. Scientists at the School of Montreal and the University of Yaoundé in Cameroon researched how cashew products affected the responses of rat liver cells to insulin. In Canada, more than three million Canadians have diabetes and this number is expected to reach 3.7 million by 2020, based on the Canadian Diabetes Association. In U.S.A, according to the American Diabetes Association, from the 2007 National Diabetes Fact Sheet, there are total 23.6 million children and adults in the United States - 7.8% of the population - have diabetes. 1.6 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older each year. Scientists viewed cashew tree leaves, bark, seeds and apples. They found that the cashew seed extract increased the absorption of blood sugar by the cells. Ex Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. behzadji

    Cashew Nut(Kajoo) is good for Diabetes(Sugar disease)

    Last edited by Waseem; 12-Nov-2010 at 06:20 PM. Reason: c dis 4 posting images http://www.siasat.pk/forum/showthread.php?37717-How-to-upload-an-image-on-Siasat.pk-Video-Tutorial

  2. Night_Hawk

    low Down Diabetes By Going Nuts By Erin Richards | April 21st 2009 01:30 PM
    Erin's Spin
    More Articles
    About Erin I am a current graduate student at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. I write for Neon Tommy, a digital news website, as a science...
    View Erin's Profile
    Erin Richards
    For those of us who are savvy on health food, what I’m about to tell you will come as no surprise, if not, hold onto your hats. If you have heard about “good fats” such as poly-unsaturated fats and omega fatty acids, found in fish and olive oil, then you know that researchers and nutrition professionals agree that these fats should replace the “bad fats” including trans fats and saturated fats found in junk food.
    The body does need some fats, and the “good fats” in olive oil and fish are much more easily broken down and utilized by the body instead of the saturated fats, which instead of being broken down, may be allocated to fat storage, and add inches to the waistline and pounds to your physique.
    Increasing your waistline does not just hinder your look in a swimsuit, but is commonly acknowledged as a detriment to your health. Overweight and obese individuals have an increased risk of developing some serious complications which include heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis and diabetes.
    Diabetes is a fast-growing pandemic in the US. High amounts of sugar and fatty foods in the typical American diet are one of the causes for the 800,000 new cases of diabetes diagnosed in patients 40-59 in the United States in 2007. Photo credit: National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse
    What you may not know is that that battling the bulge lowers your propensity to develop serious health consequences due to weight. For those suffering from diabetes, or at a high risk of developing diabetes, every tool is important to combat this growing threat.
    Another tool in this arsenal is surprisingly common: nuts. That’s right; you can munch your way to a lower glycemic index and control diabetes all while snacking on some peanuts.
    Tree nuts, like the ones shown here, are most commonly brazil nuts, walnuts, cashews and pecans. Incorporating these into your diet may help shed a few pounds and also prove to help manage onset and symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Photo credit: UC Davis Health System
    A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto produced findings that support that nuts may be a vital way to manage diabetes. Results show that nuts may improve blood lipid levels and blood sugar levels in individuals with non-insulin dependent diabetes (type 2 diabetes).
    The goal of this study was to determine if by added nuts to a diet could improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glycemic control was assessed by blood sugar levels (shown by HbA1c levels). Researchers also evaluated if these outcomes related to improvements in cardiovascular health.
    The study was conducted over a three month period and tested 117 participants currently being treated with oral hypoglycemic medications to treat their type 2 diabetes. The participants were randomized and split into three groups and given one of three diet options. The diets included a supplement with either a � cup of mixed nuts, mixed nuts and muffins or all muffins. The calorie content for each supplement was the same, around 450, but the mixed nuts have more unsaturated fats and fewer carbohydrates than the other two supplements with muffins.
    Study findings showed that the group given the supplement with all mixed nuts had a significantly reduced LDL (bad cholesterol) and total cholesterol levels compared to the full dose muffin group. Additionally, there was also a significant reduction in HbA1c levels in participants with full dose mixed nut supplement than the other two diets. This indicates a greater glycemic control and higher degree of effectively managing diabetes.
    "This is the largest study done to date looking at the effect of tree nuts (almonds, Brazils, cashews, hazelnuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, macadamias and walnuts) and peanuts on Type 2 diabetes,” says Cyril Kendall, Ph.D., of the University of Toronto. “If improvements in glycemic control can be achieved by dietary changes, this would make a substantial contribution to the treatment of those with Type 2 diabetes.” In 2003, the FDA qualified that eating 1.5 ounces of nuts may help reduce the risk of heart disease, if added to a low fat and cholesterol diet. However, patients with type 2 diabetes have a much higher risk of developing heart disease than non-diabetic individuals. It begs the question that since the two are somewhat related in consequence, could the prevention be similar as well? Initial results seem to support this idea. Perhaps skipping your morning bagel and reaching for the walnuts instead could be a small step to bolster your health.

  3. -> Continue reading
read more close

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Is Cashew Nut Good For Diabetes

    Cashews contain more carbohydrates than other nuts. As a result, they can affect your blood glucose, but their impact is minimal. If you’re healthy, the calories in cashews -- 157 per 1-ounce serving -- have more potential to affect your weight than spike your blood sugar. But if you’re diabetic, or you have any questions about your blood glucose, talk to your health care provider before making changes to your diet. Blood Glucose and Your Hea ...

    diabetes Apr 27, 2018
  • Is Cashew Nut Good For Diabetics

    (www.diabeticcookbooks.org) College of Montreal experts suggest one great way cashew extract may treat diabetic issues. A new study published in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research suggests cashew seed extract may play an important role in preventing and treating type 2 diabetes. The cashew is a tree in the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. The plant is indigenous to northeastern Brazil. Scientists at the School of Montreal and ...

    diabetes Apr 19, 2018
  • Is Honey Nut Cheerios Good For Diabetics

    Aglaee Jacob is a registered dietitian. She has experience working with people who have diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity issues. Jacob obtained a bachelor of science and a master of science, both in nutrition, from Laval University in Quebec City, Canada. Each cup of Cheerios contains 21 grams of carbohydrates.Photo Credit: RonOrmanJr/iStock/Getty Images Cheerios is one of the many popular breakfast cereals regularly co ...

    diabetes Apr 27, 2018
  • Is Cashew Nut Good For Diabetic Patient

    It is a well-known fact that dry fruits and nuts have considerable health benefits and are often recommended to people for maintaining a healthy life. However, when you are a diabetes patient, you have to be extremely careful of what you eat and what you do not. In this article, we shall discuss the effects of eating the otherwise healthy nuts for a diabetes patient. So, come and join in for the article “Are Dry Fruits Good or Bad For Diabetic ...

    diabetes Feb 25, 2018
  • Is Cashew Nuts Good For Diabetics

    Nuts! Can nuts help prevent diabetes? Can nuts help control diabetes? Are nuts a healthy snack or just another fad? Should you include nuts in your diet? The simple answer is yes—though, read on, because there are some caveats (aren’t there always…) to the simple “yes” answer. What are Nuts? Nuts are seeds in a hard shell and are the seeds of various trees. These nuts are commonly called tree nuts. Botanically, nuts are also those where ...

    diabetes May 2, 2018
  • Are Cashew Nuts Good For Diabetics

    Managing diabetes requires a number of lifestyle changes, including becoming more active and making changes in your diet. Often that means saying goodbye to foods you enjoy, but nuts aren't one you need to worry about. Not only can diabetics eat nuts, but they may actually help minimize the impact of some other health issues that often come along with diabetes. Depending on your condition and circumstances, there are several techniques you might ...

    diabetes Mar 1, 2018

Popular Articles

More in diabetes