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Is Cashew Nut Good For Diabetic Patient

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

Getty Images What to Eat to Beat Type 2 Diabetes What makes a food “super”? When it comes to type 2 diabetes, it’s not just about foods that pack lots of nutrients. For a diabetes-friendly diet, you also need foods that will help keep your blood sugar levels in check. “Look for items that contain healthy fats and are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, a certified diabetes educator at Burgess Health Center in Onawa, Iowa. It’s also crucial to eat a wide variety of foods to make sure you’re getting a healthy mix of phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. Add these 11 superfoods to your grocery cart to keep your diet diabetes-friendly. Continue reading >>

The Best Nuts And Seeds For Diabetes

The Best Nuts And Seeds For Diabetes

Almonds are rich in protein, vitamins and minerals; exactly why it is said to be a healthy nut. According to researchers from the American University of Medicine, munching a couple of almonds a day can help diabetics to reduce their level of cholesterol and makes the insulin active. This stabilises the blood sugar levels. Eating 6 almonds every day helps to keep diabetes under control. Image source: Getty Images Continue reading >>

16 Amazing Health Benefits Of Cashew Nuts (kaju)

16 Amazing Health Benefits Of Cashew Nuts (kaju)

Cashew, cashew nuts, cashew seeds, Kaju are different names for the same thing and is a widely consumed nut all over the world, and grows on the cashew tree.More precisely, cashew apple grows on cashew nuts, and cashew nuts grow on cashew tree. Cashew nuts are widely consumed all over the world in many ways.Eating cashew nuts is good for our health because of the number of compounds like antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, flavonoids, etc. present in them. In this article, we will know about the health benefits of cashews in detail, but first, let’s take a look at below mentioned nutrition chart of cashew nuts. Nutrition Chart of Cashew Nuts Health Benefits Of Cashew Nuts (1) Keep Our Cardiovascular System Healthy Eating cashew nuts is very beneficial for our heart and keep our cardiovascular system healthy because of the presence of a good number of healthy dietary fats in it. These fats are essential for our body as they help in the proper absorption of fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin A, D, E and K. Other than this, the inclusion of other fats like monounsaturated fats(MUFA) and polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) also make cashew nuts beneficial for our heart. Moderate consumption of cashew nuts helps in controlling cholesterol level as they reduce bad cholesterol level ( LDL cholesterol) and increase good cholesterol level (HDL cholesterol ). The presence of high level of LDL cholesterol can be a threat to our cardiovascular system and give rise to heart problems like heart attack, stroke, hardening of arteries (atherosclerosis ), etc. The best way to minimize the risk of these cardiovascular problems is to reduce bad cholesterol and increase good cholesterol level. Studies have demonstrated that cashew nuts and other foods that are rich in unsaturated fats are very usefu Continue reading >>

Role Of Cashew Nuts And Other Nuts In The Management Of Diabetes: A Clinical Review

Role Of Cashew Nuts And Other Nuts In The Management Of Diabetes: A Clinical Review

About Authors: Satyanand Tyagi*, Patel Chirag J1, Tarun Parashar2, Soniya2, Rishikesh Gupta3, Devesh Kaushik4 *President, Tyagi Pharmacy Association & Scientific Writer (Pharmacy), Chattarpur, New Delhi, India-110074. Prof. Satyanand Tyagi is a life time member of various pharmacy professional bodies like IPA, APTI and IPGA. He has published various research papers, review articles and short communications. He is member of Editorial Advisory Board for some reputed Pharmacy Journals. He is appointed as an Author for International Pharmaceutical Writers Association (IPWA). (Appointed as an author for the chapters of book on Pharmaceutical Chemistry). His academic work includes 62 Publications (52 Review Articles, 08 Research Articles and 02 short Communications of Pharmaceutical, Medicinal and Clinical Importance, published in standard and reputed National and International Pharmacy journals; Out of 62 publications, 11 are International Publications). His research topics of interest are neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes mellitus, cancer, rare genetic disorders, psycho-pharmacological agents as well as epilepsy. 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Maharishi Arvind Institute of Pharmacy, Mansarovar, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India-302020. 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Himalayan Institute of Pharmacy and Research, Rajawala, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India-302020. 3Institute of Pharmacy, Bundelkhand University, Jhansi, Uttar Pradesh, India-284128. 4Territory Business Manager, Diabetes Division, Abbott Healthcare Private Limited, Okhla, New Delhi, India- 110020. *sntyagi9 @yahoo.com, +91-9871111375/9582025220 ABSTRACT: Diabetes is usually a lifelong (chronic) disease in which there are high levels of sugar in the blood. Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describe Continue reading >>

Nuts Good For Some With Diabetes

Nuts Good For Some With Diabetes

July 8, 2011 -- Eating about 2 ounces of nuts daily in place of carbohydrates may be beneficial to people with type 2 diabetes by lowering bad cholesterol levels and improving blood sugar control, a new study shows. “There are two important factors in caring for diabetes: blood sugar control and heart health,” study researcher Cyril W.C. Kendall, PhD, of the University of Toronto, says in a news release. The study involved 117 people with type 2 diabetes who were randomly assigned to one of three groups. One group’s members ate about 2 ounces of mixed nuts daily, another a healthy muffin, and the third half nuts and half muffin. Researchers say those whose diet included 2 ounces of nuts showed better results after three months in both blood sugar and LDL "bad" cholesterol levels than participants in the other two groups. The nuts consisted of a mixture of unsalted and mostly raw almonds, pistachios, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, peanuts, cashews, and macadamias. The muffin was concocted to be a healthy whole wheat product, sweetened with apple concentrate but with no sugar added. The muffins had similar protein content to the nuts from the addition of egg white and skim milk powder. Calories from monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) in the nuts were the same as the carbohydrate calories in the muffin, the researchers write. During the three-month study, participants were asked to maintain their oral diabetes medications. The main outcome researchers looked for was change in a marker of blood sugar control called HbA1c. Kendall described the results of the study as “a very exciting and promising finding about the treatment” of type 2 diabetes. The researchers write that the reduction in the HbA1c level was significantly more in those in the nuts-only group than pa Continue reading >>

Cashews Nutrition: Helps Prevent Cancer, Diabetes & More

Cashews Nutrition: Helps Prevent Cancer, Diabetes & More

Not only are cashews one of the best-tasting and most versatile nuts there is, but they also come loaded with health benefits. Cashews nutrition benefits include the ability to improve heart health, support healthy brain functioning, and improve digestion and nutrient absorption. Plus, they might even be able to help you lose weight. (1) Cashew consumption has increased in recent years in most Western countries, most likely because nuts in general are repeatedly ranked as some of the healthiest foods there are and an important addition to your diet in order to prevent a wide range of chronic diseases. One of the best things about cashews is that they taste great in both sweet and savory recipes, so consuming them along with other versatile nuts like almonds or walnuts is a breeze. Cashews Nutrition Facts Cashews, which are actually seeds as opposed to nuts, are light-colored and kidney-shaped nuts we often see in trail mixes. They’re actually the fruit of the tropical tree called Anacardium occidentale that produces the bitter-tasting cashew apple. Cashews have been used in traditional medicine systems for centuries to heal various ailments, including poor heart health and diabetes. They’re native to coastal Brazil and today are popular across the globe, especially in Asian cuisine. Due to their high nutrient density and supply of many vital minerals, cashews and other nuts are often recommended most often to improve heart health. Cashews are rich in unsaturated fatty acids and numerous other beneficial compounds, including plant-based protein; dietary fiber; minerals like copper, zinc and magnesium; plus antioxidants in the form of phytosterols and phenolic compounds. The composition of the cashew kernel is about 21 percent protein, 46 percent fat and 25 percent ca Continue reading >>

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Nuts! Can nuts help prevent diabetes? Can nuts help control diabetes? Are nuts a healthy snack or just another fad? Should you include nuts in your diet? The simple answer is yes—though, read on, because there are some caveats (aren’t there always…) to the simple “yes” answer. What are Nuts? Nuts are seeds in a hard shell and are the seeds of various trees. These nuts are commonly called tree nuts. Botanically, nuts are also those where the shell does not break apart to release the nuts—these shells have to get broken to free the nut. However, for the sake of this article, the more general use of nuts—those in hard shells that need to be broken (chestnuts and hazelnuts) and other nuts that technically are legumes (like the peanut) and seeds (eg. Pecans, Almonds) are included. Some of the more common nuts are:[1] Hazelnuts/Filberts Brazil nuts Almonds Cashews Chestnuts Peanuts Pine nuts Walnuts Macadamia nuts Pistachios Coconuts Acorns The USDA’s “Choose My Plate” program designed to help people make healthy eating choices included nuts in the Protein Foods Group, but nuts are high in a number of other nutrients as well, including fiber, the heart healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, healthy omega-3 fats, vitamins and minerals. Nuts are also high in anti-oxidants. One thing to note is that nuts are also high in calories. However, while noting that, it is also important to remember that while you DO want to watch your calories, you are getting an awful lot of healthy nutrition along with those calories and are NOT getting a lot of sugars, cholesterol or unhealthy fats (the sorts of unhealthy saturated fats that can clog up arteries). The way you can get the health benefits of nuts without paying a large “calorie price” is to use nuts a Continue reading >>

Go Nuts To Help Lower Your Blood Sugar

Go Nuts To Help Lower Your Blood Sugar

Open this photo in gallery: If you have Type 2 diabetes - i.e. your blood glucose (sugar) is higher than it should be - consider replacing some of the carbohydrates in your diet with a handful or two of nuts. According to a new study, eating about half a cup of nuts each day can help people with diabetes lower their blood glucose and cholesterol levels. These new findings add to mounting evidence that nuts confer important health benefits. Numerous studies have linked nuts with protection from heart attack, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes and even Alzheimer's disease. Despite nuts' high fat content, studies - including this one - haven't linked them with weight gain. Scientists suspect it's actually the fat content that makes them so healthy: Nuts contain mainly unsaturated fat - polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats - and only small amounts of cholesterol-raising saturated fat. They also deliver plant protein, some fibre and phytochemicals, which may also play a role. The current study, published in the August issue of Diabetes Care, was led by David Jenkins, director of the Risk Factor Modification Centre at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Researchers told 117 people with type 2 diabetes to replace some of the usual carbohydrates in their diet with nuts, a healthy muffin or a combination of the two. One group was given roughly 2.5 ounces (475 calories worth) of unsalted mixed nuts, a second group received a low-sugar, whole-wheat muffin, and remaining participants followed a half nut/half muffin regimen. The unsalted nut mixture included raw almonds, pistachios, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, peanuts, cashews and macadamias. The muffin had a similar protein content to the nuts from the addition of egg whites and skim-milk powder. After three months, Continue reading >>

Nuts And Diabetes

Nuts And Diabetes

Tweet Nuts provide a number of benefits for people with diabetes. Studies suggest that nuts may even decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes. A study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that "nut consumption was associated with a decreased prevalence of selected risk factors for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.[138] This page explores the various benefits of nuts for people with type 2 diabetes. Do different nuts have different health benefits for people with diabetes? Yes. Some nuts have benefits that others don't. Almonds contain a lot of nutrients, particularly vitamin E Walnuts contain healthy omega-3 fatty acids Cashews offers lots of magnesium Almonds, peanuts, and pistachios all reduce 'bad' cholesterol Almost all nuts offer something good for people with diabetes. Salted nuts, however, should be avoided. Excessive salt consumption is consistently linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Nuts and cholesterol One of the most prominent characteristics of nuts for people with diabetes is their effect on cholesterol levels. Avoiding high cholesterol levels is essential for people with diabetes, because exposure to high blood glucose levels increases the risk of the arteries narrowing. Almonds, peanuts, and pistachios all reduce "bad" cholesterol very effectively. "Bad" cholesterol refers to small, dense particles of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), too much of which can clog the arteries. Almonds, walnuts, pistachios, pecans, and hazelnuts reduce "bad" cholesterol by increasing levels of high-density-lipoprotein (HDL), or 'good' cholesterol. HDL clears out 'bad' cholesterol, thus reducing the risk of heart disease. Nuts and the glycemic index (GI) The glycemic index measures the speed at which your body Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Eat Cashew Nuts During Pregnancy?

Is It Safe To Eat Cashew Nuts During Pregnancy?

Doesn’t your mouth start watering when you think of the rich, tasty and succulent flavored cashew nuts? Well, cashew nuts are tasty no doubt and these are also loaded with lots of nutrients as well. The highly nutritive nuts can be safely consumed in pregnancy provided you follow the safety related considerations. So, before you chew on the nuts, you must get the facts right to know if they are absolutely safe for you and your baby. Nutritional Benefits Of Eating Cashew Nuts During Pregnancy: Cashew nuts are popularly known as “natural vitamin pills” that make them ideal to be consumed during pregnancy. An ounce of cashew contains 4.3 gm of protein, 9 gm of carbohydrate and 13 gm of healthy fat. Let’s take a closer look into the nutritional benefits of cashew nuts in pregnancy: Cashews contain all the vitamins you need for development of your fetus during pregnancy. Cashews are rich in anti-bacterial properties that help fight against infections. These are low in fat content and offer tocopherols, phytosterols and sqaulene that bring overall benefit to you in pregnancy. Cashew nuts are rich sources of energy that helps you keep going through those somewhat difficult pregnancy months. You can fight against diarrhea and constipation with the high fiber content that cashews have. Cashew nuts are rich in iron. This ensures you do not get anemic at this stage. A single serving contains 1.7 mg iron, whereas you need 27 mg of iron each day in pregnancy. Cashew nuts are rich in K vitamin. This ensures you do not bleed excessively in pregnancy. At this stage you need about 90 mcg of vitamin K, while an ounce of cashew contains around 9.8 mcg. These nuts are rich sources of magnesium that protects you from muscle spasms, high blood pressure, tension, soreness, migraines, Continue reading >>

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

The Exact Number Of Nuts You Should Eat Every Day

The Exact Number Of Nuts You Should Eat Every Day

You might have started incorporating a handful of nuts into your heart-healthy, brain-boosting diet, but a new study adds some compelling details about the nutritional star power of this all-time favorite snack. Dutch researchers followed 120,000 adults (ages 55 to 69) as part of a Netherlands Cohort Study and reviewed data to find that eating nuts seemed to offer protection from various major causes of death. Both men and women who ate at least 10 grams of nuts per day were less likely to die from cancer, diabetes, and heart disease—and the lowly peanut played just as important a role, says lead author Piet van den Brandt, PhD, an epidemiologist and professor at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Compared to non-nut eaters, people who ate at least 10 grams a day had a 23% lower chance of death from any cause. They were 17% less likely to die from heart disease, 21% less likely to die from cancer, 30% less likely to die from diabetes, and 47% less likely to die from neurodegenerative diseases, according to the study, which was published in the International Journal of Epidemiology. Eating more grams, however, didn't improve the percentages significantly. (Diabetes doesn't have to be your fate; Rodale's new book, The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes, shows you exactly what to eat and do to prevent the disease—and even reverse it.) "Peanuts and tree nuts are relatively rich in mono and polyunsaturated fats, protein, fiber, several B-vitamins, and antioxidants, which could explain part of the effect," van den Brandt says. But it's possible the nuts themselves aren't responsible for the entire effect. "Nut consumers in this population tended to be in better overall health, eat more fruits and vegetables, use dietary supplements more frequently, and have a higher educ Continue reading >>

54 Grams Of Tree Nuts Per Day Can Drastically Improve Type 2 Diabetes Patients' Blood Sugar Levels

54 Grams Of Tree Nuts Per Day Can Drastically Improve Type 2 Diabetes Patients' Blood Sugar Levels

Adding nuts to our diet is already considered a good strategy for lowering the risk of heart disease by reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL), also known as “bad” cholesterol levels. A recent study conducted at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto suggests eating tree nuts such as almonds, cashews, and hazelnuts can improve the results of both HbA1c tests and fasting glucose tests for type 2 diabetes patients. "Tree nuts are another way people can maintain healthy blood sugar levels in the context of a healthy dietary pattern," Dr. John Sievenpiper, physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael's Hospital, said in a statement. Sievenpiper and his colleagues recruited 450 type 2 diabetes patients to participate in 12 clinical trials. People in North America generally consume less than one serving of tree nuts a day, equaling a quarter of a cup or 30 grams. Adding tree nuts such as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts, and pistachios to our diets could lead to further metabolic benefits. Study participants were asked to consume 54 grams of tree nuts per day. Overall, adding tree nuts to the diets of type 2 diabetes patients improved HbA1c test results, the measurement of blood sugar levels over a period of three months, and fasting glucose levels, which tests blood glucose levels after a patient hasn’t eaten or drank anything except water for eight hours. Even though tree nuts can be high in calories and fat, albeit healthy unsaturated fat, the study’s participants did not gain weight. The research team identified better results when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates instead of saturated fats. A similar study conducted at St. Michael Continue reading >>

Cashews Help Treat Diabetes

Cashews Help Treat Diabetes

School of Montreal researchers recommend us one good way cashew extract may treat type two diabetes. New research published inside the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research suggests cashew seed extract may play an important role in preventing and treating diabetic issues. The cashew is a tree in the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. The plant is native to northeastern Brazil. Scientists at the School of Montreal and the School of Yaoundé in Cameroon studied how cashew products affected the responses of rat liver cells to insulin. In Canada, over 3 million Canadians have diabetes and this number is expected to reach 3.7 million by 2020, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association. In U.S.A, according to the American Diabetes Association, from the 2007 National Diabetes Fact Sheet, there are total 23.6 million children and adults in the United States - 7.8% of the population - have diabetes. 1.6 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older each year. Scientists viewed cashew tree leaves, bark, seeds and apples. They found that the cashew seed extract increased the absorption of blood sugar by the cells. Extracts of other plant parts had no such effect, indicating that cashew seed extract likely contains active compounds, that can have potential anti-diabetic properties. In most people who have diabetes, a disorder called insulin resistance prevents the body from processing the hormone, which regulates energy and the processing of sugars in the body. Deficiency of insulin can lead to heart or kidney diseases over time. The cashew nut is a popular snack, and its rich flavor means it's often eaten without treatment, lightly salted or sugared. Cashews are a staple in vegan diets. They are utilized as a base in sauces and gravie Continue reading >>

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