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Is Carrot Good For Diabetes

Is Carrot Good For Diabetic Patients? Should Eat Or Not

Is Carrot Good For Diabetic Patients? Should Eat Or Not

Being a diabetic it is really complicated to manage it effectively for this you need to have a well-balanced and healthy diet. You are therefore also wary as to what should you eat and what you should not eat when you are diabetic because any access consumption may rise up your blood glucose level. Worst Foods For Diabetes Discover the Worst Foods for Diabetes and A Doctor's Secret Natural Solution. Newsmax Health In this article, we analyze the effect of eating carrots on the people who suffer from diabetes. So, come and join us to analyze can a diabetic patient eat carrot or not? Benefits of Eating Carrot for Diabetic Patients Following are some of the advantages which you get when you include carrots in your diabetic diet: Carrots are a high source of several antioxidants. These antioxidants play a great role in helping to prevent diabetes, particularly type 2. The antioxidants, along with vitamin A helps to protect the diabetes patients from various heart-related conditions. Carrots also play an important role in helping you lose weight. Losing weight, as you know, forms an important part of overall diabetes management. Although carrot is known to contain more sugar than some of the other vegetables, it is safe enough to be included in the diet. Carrots are also known to be a rich source of fiber. Fiber, as we know, play an important role in dealing with several complications which diabetes can cause. Besides, this vegetable is abundant in vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, potassium, manganese, as well as other vitamins and nutrients. Carotenoids present in the carrots expose you to lesser risks of contracting cardiovascular conditions. The soluble fiber which is present in abundance in carrots goes a long way in regulating the levels of bad cholesterol in the body. Alt Continue reading >>

Are Carrots Bad For You?

Are Carrots Bad For You?

The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. The question: I've been told I should avoid carrots because they're too high in sugar. Is that true? Aren't they nutritious? The answer: It is true that carrots have natural sugar, but not much more than many other vegetables. And you certainly don't need to avoid these low-calorie, nutritious root vegetables. One half-cup of chopped raw carrot sticks has three grams of sugar and only 26 calories. You might be surprised to learn that the same serving size of chopped raw broccoli has similar numbers at 6 g of sugar and 31 calories. Vegetables such as leafy greens, asparagus, cabbage, cauliflower and mushrooms provide 1 to 2 g of sugar per serving. What carrots are packed with, however, is beta-carotene, a phytochemical that gives them their bright orange colour. Beta-carotene is important for two reasons. First, your body converts some of it to retinol, an active form of vitamin A. A deficiency of vitamin A can cause symptoms including night blindness, dry eyes, dry skin, impaired bone growth and susceptibility to respiratory infections. (Night blindness is a condition in which vision is normal in daylight, but very weak or completely lost at night or in dim light.) Beta-carotene is also a powerful antioxidant, protecting cells from damage caused by harmful free radicals. Studies suggest that a diet high in beta-carotene from foods, not supplements can help lower the risk of heart disease and lung cancer. There isn't an official recommended dietary intake for beta-carotene, but experts contend that consuming three to six milligrams of beta-carotene daily will maintain blood levels of the phytochemical in the range that's associated with a lower risk of chronic di Continue reading >>

Carrot Juice And Diabetes: Know The Facts

Carrot Juice And Diabetes: Know The Facts

Juices. They come from fresh fruit and vegetables, so they're healthy, right? This is the common assumption. But…juicing isn't really all it's cracked up to be. Here we cover carrot juice and diabetes, the facts, myths, truths and research. By the time you finish reading this, you'll know the facts so you can make a more informed decision about consuming carrot juice in your diet. Nutrition facts We've written about carrots before over here. Here at Diabetes Meal Plans we encourage a lower carb diet and sometimes low carbers say “carrots aren’t low carb.” While they aren’t the lowest carb food, they do have lots of nutritional benefits and in our opinion it’s perfectly fine to eat carrots on a regular basis – whole carrots that is – carrot juice on the other hand. Well, keep on reading… Carrots contain many beneficial vitamins, minerals and compounds that support health. And, even though they are higher in carbs than other vegetables, they aren't so high that they are worth eliminating all together. Here's a great nutrition infographic from Dr. Axe. While the above nutrition looks promising, and is if you're eating whole carrots. This is NOT the case for carrot juice. Carrot and Carrot Juice Comparison Myths and Truths Did you pick up on a few differences in the above comparison? Take a look again and note the difference in calories, total carbs, dietary fiber, and sugar content. Calories: Even though the two measurements above are for 1 cup of carrots or carrot juice, the juice is almost double the calories. This is obviously because it requires more carrots in volume to make juice than it does to eat them raw. But this is something many people don't take into consideration. Total carbs: When you juice any fruit or vegetable it usually doubles the car Continue reading >>

Could Carrots Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Could Carrots Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Behind the headlines They say The Express reported in January 2013 that scientists found that carrots are packed with potent health-boosting antioxidants that seem to prevent Type 2 diabetes. We already know that eating a healthy, balanced diet and keeping to a healthy weight are key to reducing the risk of Type 2. However, the new findings shed light on the interaction between our genes and the content of the foods we eat and their impact on our risk of developing this condition. Researchers from Stanford University in California found that, in people with particular common genetic variations, high blood levels of beta carotene, which the body converts to a form of vitamin A, might lower the risk of Type 2 diabetes. They also found that high levels of gamma tocopherol (the major form of vitamin E in the diet, found in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds and wholegrains), might increase the risk of Type 2. The research, published in the journal Human Genetics, focused on the interactions that occur between the specific genetic variations found in different individuals and blood levels of key substances that have previously been linked to an increased risk of Type 2. On their own, none of the genetic factors showed an impressive impact on Type 2 risk. But when paired with the antioxidants, there were significant results. In people carrying a double dose of a specific variation (in the gene SLC30A4), which is known to increase the risk of Type 2, researchers found clear links between high blood levels of beta carotene and a reduced risk of Type 2. Whereas, the variations combined with high blood levels of gamma tocopherol were linked to an increased risk of the condition. These findings highlight the need for further studies to find out if beta carotene and gamma tocopherol are p Continue reading >>

Carrot Juice For Diabetics

Carrot Juice For Diabetics

The glycemic index, or GI, of a food indicates how quickly and how high a food will raise blood glucose levels. By following a diet rich in low GI foods, such as carrot juice, those with diabetes can work to better manage blood glucose levels. While carrot juice does contain sugar and carbohydrates, because it is a low GI food, it will not cause a rapid rise in blood glucose levels. A diet based on GI can be difficult to follow and, like all diets, may not work for everyone. Glycemic Index When you eat carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into sugars called glucose. The body uses glucose for energy. Different foods contain different types of carbohydrates, which can affect how quickly the food is broken down into glucose and used by the body. The GI measures how much a food raises your blood glucose level. Foods with a high GI are broken down faster and may raise your blood glucose levels more quickly than foods with a low GI. Foods with no carbohydrates, such as fats and meats, have no GI rating. High GI Foods Foods that have a high GI can cause blood sugar levels to spike very quickly after meals. You may even feel energized, but the feeling will not last long. When blood sugar levels are elevated, the body releases insulin to help bring blood glucose levels back down. Because of this, high GI foods may perk you up for a short period, but soon after, you will feel very sluggish and hungry. A GI over 60 is generally considered to be high. Foods with a high GI include sugars, syrups, sodas, white bread, cookies, cakes, potatoes, rice cereal, corn flakes, pineapple, pretzels and ice cream. Low GI Foods Foods with a low GI are used more slowly by the body. These foods are broken down into glucose, and the glucose is used by the body over a longer period. This results Continue reading >>

Glycemic Index And Glycemic Load

Glycemic Index And Glycemic Load

What’s this thing called the glycemic index? Is it a meal-planning method? Does it work? The glycemic index is a hot topic these days, it seems. But it’s a controversial topic, too. This week, I thought I’d try and shed some light on the glycemic index and hopefully clear up any misconceptions you may have. The glycemic index (GI) has actually been around for about 20 years. Researchers at the University of Toronto came up with this tool back in the 1980’s. GI is really a ranking system of carbohydrate foods based on how they affect blood glucose levels. Carbohydrate foods are assigned a number between 0 and 100 based on that effect. Foods that have a GI of more than 70 are considered to be “high,” foods with a GI between 55 and 70 are “moderate,” and foods with a GI below 55 are “low.” Why do foods have different GIs? Much of the reason has to do with how quickly the food breaks down during digestion, and therefore, how quickly blood glucose levels go up after eating. Let’s take a look at some foods and see how they’re classified: Low-GI Foods Oranges Whole-wheat spaghetti All Bran Peanuts M&Ms peanut candies Moderate-GI Foods Pineapple White rice Multi-Bran Chex Popcorn Life Savers High-GI Foods Watermelon Instant mashed potatoes Cornflakes Pretzels Jelly beans You may be surprised to see that M&Ms have a low GI, while watermelon has a high GI. Does this mean that you should be eating M&Ms and not watermelon? Of course not. This is one of the flaws of the GI. The point is not to completely avoid high-GI foods and only eat low GI foods. Not only is that not practical, but it would mean forgoing many healthy foods that contain important nutrients. Also, many factors can affect the GI of a food, including the following: The variety, the ripeness, Continue reading >>

Can A Type-2 Diabetic Patient Eat Carrots?

Can A Type-2 Diabetic Patient Eat Carrots?

Diabetics саn hаvе carrots preferably аѕ a snack оr adding it tо salads аnd pasta dishes. Cooking carrots caramelizes thе sugar in thе carrots аnd increases thе glycemic index. Cooking оr roasting iѕ nоt a good idea but уоu саn steam thеm if eating thеm raw iѕ nоt аlwауѕ palatable. Carrots ѕhоuld bе controlled thе wау diabetics control thеir intake оf potatoes. People frequently drink carrot juice. Carrot juice iѕ nоt a vеrу good option fоr diabetics. Anу fruit оf vegetable juice, еѕресiаllу оf vegetables likе carrots, gеtѕ converted tо glucose vеrу quickly аnd саn саuѕе a spike in thе blood sugar. If уоu аrе gоing tо increase уоur carrot intake, уоu ѕhоuld check with уоur health professional оr doctor juѕt tо bе оn thе safe side. A moderate amount оf carrot consumption wоuld nоt hurt you, еvеn if уоu аrе a diabetic. My husband was diagnosed with diabetes 2 about 3 months ago. We immediately began using a food plan, and within 2 weeks his numbers went from the frightening 440, down to 100 !!! We added a brisk 1 mi. walk, and eliminated sugar, white flour and white rice, and upped our raw fresh veggies, nuts, and seeds. We switched to coconut, avocado, Hemp and Rice Bran oils, and minimized even their use. He is the picture of excellent health today at the age of 41. His energy is back up to normal, and his skin color is beautiful! We are SO thankful Sheryl Wann from Toronto, on her site Control Your Blood Sugar Level told us about a book to cure diabetes! And THANKS to Sheryl Wann again!!! Continue reading >>

How The Humble Carrot May Beat Diabetes

How The Humble Carrot May Beat Diabetes

Scientists have found the humble veg is packed with potent health-boosting antioxidants which appear to prevent the disease. It is already well known that eating a healthy diet and keeping a healthy weight are key to keeping your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes low. But now research has revealed the actual foods we eat can influence whether or not people will get the condition. Scientists have found the humble veg is packed with potent health-boosting antioxidants which appear to prevent the disease. Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine in California have found that for people with a genetic predisposition to diabetes, beta carotene, which the body converts to a close cousin of vitamin A, may lower the risk for Type 2 diabetes. And they found that gamma tocopherol, the major form of vitamin E in the diet which is found in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds and wholegrains, may increase risk for the disease. The scientists discovered interactions are occurring between gene variants previously linked to increased risk for diabetes and blood levels of substances linked to risk. They found that, in people carrying a double dose of one specific gene variant which makes them more susceptible to the condition, there was a major link between beta carotene blood levels with the Type 2 diabetes risk, along with a high positive association of gamma tocopherol with risk for the disease. None of the genetic factors studied in isolation showed a particularly impressive impact on Type 2 diabetes risk. But when they were paired off one by one with the antioxidants, there were significant results. They found that, for those carrying two copies of the variant in the gene SLC30A4, higher beta-carotene vitamin levels were linked with lower blood glucose levels, according to th Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Carrots?

Can Diabetics Eat Carrots?

Managing blood sugars as a diabetic is a lot more complicated than just avoiding sweets. Many seemingly-healthy foods can cause a rapid rise in blood glucose, and carrots are often listed among that number. In truth carrots are a healthy option for diabetics despite their naturally sweet flavor, and they can be eaten regularly as part of your balanced diet. Many diabetics and health conscious non-diabetics use a tool called the Glycemic Index, or GI, to help manage their blood sugar levels. The GI compares how much a fixed quantity of a given food raises blood sugars, comparing it against the same quantity of pure glucose. As the reference point, pure glucose is assigned a GI of 100. The higher the GI of a specific food, the more it boosts your blood sugar, so the lower the number the better. Carrots currently are assessed at a GI of 41 by the Glycemic Index Institute, which is a moderate level, but earlier and less-stringent testing resulted in a higher figure. This made intuitive sense, given that carrots taste naturally sweet, so people with diabetes have often been warned to limit their consumption of carrots because of that flawed early test. They're Part of a Healthy Diet There's more to a food than its impact on your blood sugars though, and by any reasonable standard carrots are a superbly healthy mealtime option. A half-cup of cooked carrots supplies over two grams of dietary fiber – nine percent of your daily value – in its six grams of carbs, with just 27 calories. You'll also get more than double your daily value of vitamin A, and 13 percent of your day's vitamin K. That one-cup portion of raw carrot provides three grams of fiber, or 14 percent of your daily value, against 12 grams of total carbs and 50 calories. You'll also get more than four times your Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Evil Carrot

Diabetes And The Evil Carrot

Poor little guy. The moment someone gets high blood sugars they turn their back on him as if he is soley to blame. It's an unusual phenomenon. People come to me for diabetes counseling and often tell me they have been avoiding carrots because they will raise their blood sugar. Well there are lots of things that will raise your blood sugars: bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, cereals, grains, fruits, dairy and sweets. Yet carrots tend to get eliminated before most things time and time again. Let's look at it in numbers: 1 cup of chopped carrot has about 12 grams of carbohydrate (the nutrient in our food that our body breaks down into sugar). Of those 12 grams of carbs, 4g are fibre (fibre is something the body can't turn into sugar) and 6g are sugar. The rest would be starches. An average slice of whole wheat bread has about 12g of carbohydrate. Of those 2 grams are fibre and 2 grams are sugar. The rest would be starches. As I said above, fibre is the one type of carbohydrate we don't break down into sugar. So if we subtract the fibre from both, that would leave 8g of carbohydrates in the cup of carrots and the slice of bread has 10g of carbs. So carrots do not contain tons of sugar. They may contain more than some vegetables but not so much that they cannot be included in your diet. They are a good source of fibre, vitamin A and quite frankly, they are tasty. You don't need to restrict them just because of high blood sugars. If you eat balanced reasonable portions, they can be just as much a part of a healthy diet as everything else. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Carrots?

Can Diabetics Eat Carrots?

The combination of carrots and diabetes is worrying for some people, given how sweet these vegetables taste, but there are some benefits to eating carrots as a diabetic patient. What are Carrots? To begin with, carrots are root vegetables of varying colors that are typically tapered in shape. Scientifically known as Daucus carota subs. sativus, these vegetables have a high level of fiber, antioxidants, and various other nutrients, carrots are some of the most popular vegetables in the global diet. Available all year round and extremely versatile in different styles of cooking, these are simple and healthy choices, even for diabetics, in moderation! Can Diabetics Eat Carrots? Can diabetics eat carrots that are packed with antioxidants & vitamin C? It is an interesting challenge, as eating too many carrots may cause a blood sugar spike. Boasting a Glycemic Index rating of just over 40, carrots are considered “moderate” in terms of the effect they have on blood sugar. If you are crafting your diabetic diet, it is okay to eat certain foods that are in the moderate range, although you will want to eat them with some self-control. In the past, carrots’ sweet taste convinced researchers that their impact was much greater on blood sugar, but that has been proven untrue. That being said, carrots offer quite a few benefits besides its rather “average” GI score. The high level of dietary fiber found in carrots is very important for people struggling with diabetes, as fiber can help to regulate the release of insulin and glucose into the blood. Furthermore, carrots are packed with other important nutrients and antioxidants, including high levels of potassium, beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin K, and anthocyanins. Carrots present a case of the “pros” outweighing the Continue reading >>

Carrots And Diabetes

Carrots And Diabetes

It's often recommended that type 2 diabetics avoid starchy foods like rice, bread, pasta, and potatoes. But some foods like carrots, pumpkin, and beets are considered starches too, so are they safe for someone with type 2 diabetes to eat or not? Well, let's dig in and explore carrots in detail. Today, we're going to cover carrots and diabetes, including: Carrot nutrition facts Research on carrots Health benefits of carrots Carrots in the kitchen – selection, storage, uses, cooking Carrot recipes Here at Diabetes Meal Plans we encourage a lower carb diet and sometimes low carbers say “carrots aren't low carb.” While they aren't the lowest carb food, they do have lots of nutritional benefits and in our opinion it's perfectly fine to eat carrots on a regular basis. Right now, let's explore some of the facts and benefits of good old carrots. Carrot Nutrition Facts Carrots have a low glycemic index of 41 Carrots are high in fiber and low in carbs – 2.3 g fiber, 6.41 total carbs, and 4.11 net carbs Carrots are low in calories at just 27 calories per medium carrot Carrots have loads of valuable vitamins and minerals, carotenoids, antioxidants and polyphenols Nutrition Facts Calories: 25 | Total Fat: 0.15 g | Sat Fat: 0.023 g | Poly: 0.071 g | Mono: 0.009 g | Total Carbs: 5.84 g | Fiber: 1.7 g | Net Carbs: 4.14 g | Protein: 0.57 g Minerals Calcium: 20 mg | Iron: 0.18 mg | Magnesium: 7 mg | Phosphorus: 21 mg | Potassium: 195 mg | Zinc: 0.15 mg Vitamins Vitamin C: 3.6 mg | Thiamin: 0.040 mg | Riboflavin: 0.035 mg | Niacin: 0.600 mg | Vit B6: 0.084 mg | Folate: 12 ug | Vit B12: 0 mg | Vit A: 10191 IU | Vit E: 0.40 mg | Vit D: 0 IU | Vit K: 8.1 ug CARROTS (1.33 medium cooked, boiled, drained, no salt, 61 g) Nutrition Facts Calories: 21 | Total Fat: 0.11 g | Sat Fat: 0.018 g Continue reading >>

List Of The Right Vegetables For Diabetes

List Of The Right Vegetables For Diabetes

Vegetables add bright colors, flavors and textures to your diet. They are rich in vitamins, minerals, water, dietary fiber, phytochemicals and antioxidants and contribute to a healthy diet. Vegetables are generally low in calories and carbohydrates, making them an excellent option for diabetics. Vegetables fall into two groups: starchy and non-starchy. Starchy vegetables are higher in carbohydrates and raise blood glucose levels more easily. Non-starchy vegetables are the best choice for a diabetic meal plan. Video of the Day Rich in calcium, vitamins A, B, C and K, magnesium, iron, protein, potassium and dietary fiber, dark leafy greens are perfect for a diabetic diet. Leafy greens include spinach, kale, broccoli, asparagus, Brussels sprouts, arugula, mustard or collard greens, romaine lettuce and chard. Each of these vegetables contains approximately 5 g of carbohydrates per serving, with a serving equal to 1 cup raw or a ½ cup cooked vegetables. Eating a mixed green salad before or with your meal is a good way to incorporate leafy greens into your diabetic meal plan. Tomatoes contain lycopene, a potent antioxidant known to help fight disease. Tomatoes are also rich in potassium, phosphorus, calcium, vitamin A, C and K, folate and dietary fiber. A ½ cup serving of tomatoes is equivalent to 4 g of carbohydrates. Eat them raw, pureed, stewed, juiced or in a sauce; all tomato-based products are low in carbohydrates. When purchasing tomato-based products, be sure to choose "no sugar added" or "low sodium" varieties. Bell peppers are available in a rainbow of colors, including yellow, red, orange, green and purple. Containing only 3 g of carbohydrates per ½ cup serving, peppers are sweet, juicy and bursting with flavor. Bell peppers are packed with vitamin A and C, pota Continue reading >>

Is Carrot Good For Diabetic Patient ?

Is Carrot Good For Diabetic Patient ?

Carrots are one of many source of beta-carotene, which is the main ingredient is forming vitamin A in the body, because it implies reached up to 7,000 micrograms. Carrot energy levels are relatively low so it’s good for people who are in low-calorie diet. Chemical constituents in the form of carrot’s root contains alkaloids, essential oils, limonena, pyrrolidine. While the seeds contain Tiglath acid, azaron, and bisabol. That is why carrots touted as vegetables are good for diabetic patients. But is that true? Sponsors Link Diabetes mellitus is a disease of blood sugar metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency of the insulin hormone, causing blood sugar levels with all its consequences. Blood sugar levels are normal when checking at fasting or before meals is 80-100 mg/dl. As for checking at 2 hours after a meal should ideally 80-140 mg/dl. So, someone said to suffer from diabetes if the fasting blood sugar of 126 mg/dl and blood sugar levels two hours after eating above 200 mg/dl. Are carrots good for diabetics? 1. Carrots are high in calcium: to normalize the pancreas to produce insulin 100 grams carrots contains 157mg of calcium or 16% of daily value if the daily requirement is 2000 calories. The amount of calcium in carrots is higher when compared to milk which is it only 125mg on 100grams. Recent research suggests that vitamin D is critical for the islet cells in the pancreas to secrete insulin properly. Vitamin D can be obtained from sunlight. But not everyone was able to meet the needs of vitamin D in DV. Research has shown that individuals with the lowest levels of vitamin D in their blood, having problems in handling sugar and have a greater risk of developing diabetes. To process the absorption of Vitamin D from a variety of sources, including sunlight an Continue reading >>

Best Vegetables For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Vegetables For Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes often feel left out at big family meals and at restaurants, but it should not mean having to avoid delicious food. In fact, no food item is strictly forbidden for people with type 2 diabetes. Healthy eating for people with diabetes is all about moderation and balance. The best vegetables for type 2 diabetes are low on the glycemic index (GI) scale, rich in fiber, or high in blood pressure-lowering nitrates. Why choose vegetables? When considering foods to avoid, many people with diabetes might think about sugary or high-carbohydrate foods, such as cinnamon rolls or bread. Certain vegetables, though, can also cause blood glucose problems. The GI refers to how quickly foods cause blood sugar levels to rise. Foods high on the GI, such as most potatoes, rapidly release glucose, potentially triggering blood glucose spikes. They can also cause weight gain when eaten in excess. Low to moderate GI vegetables, such as carrots, offer better blood glucose control, and a lower risk of weight gain. Nitrates are chemicals that naturally occur in some vegetables. They are also used as preservatives in some foods. Eating nitrate-rich foods, not foods processed with added nitrates, can lower blood pressure, and improve overall circulatory health. This means that nitrate-rich foods, such as beets, are among the best vegetables for people with type 2 diabetes who have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This is still true despite their high level of carbohydrates. The key to good food management, in this instance, is to reduce carbohydrate consumption elsewhere, such as by eliminating bread or sugary snacks. Fiber and protein are both very important in a healthful diabetes diet. Protein is vital for good health, and can help people feel fuller for longer, Continue reading >>

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