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Is Canned Tuna Fish Good For Diabetics?

By The Plate: Tuna Salad Sandwich Meal

By The Plate: Tuna Salad Sandwich Meal

whole wheat English muffins, toasted, or 2 small whole wheat pita bread rounds In a medium bowl, flake the drained tuna gently until fluffy. In a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil, vinegar, mustard, garlic, salt, black pepper, and sugar. Pour over the tuna and gently mix. Add the celery, onion, capers, and basil and gently combine. Divide the tuna salad and serve with the English muffins. 1 cup steamed green beans sprinkled with 1 tsp. toasted, slivered almonds Continue reading >>

Diabetic Appetizer - Low Carb Tuna Cakes (step-by-step With Pictures)

Diabetic Appetizer - Low Carb Tuna Cakes (step-by-step With Pictures)

Diabetic Appetizer - Low Carb Tuna Cakes (Step-By-Step with Pictures) The star ingredient of this diabetic recipe has often been underestimated. Just because it is cheap and comes in a can doesn't mean it can't turn into something more refined. For the love of fish, give canned tuna a chance to prove its true potential! This tuna cake recipe might be a good way to do so. It is healthy and low in carbs, so diabetics and weight watchers can enjoy this appetizer guilt-free. For impatient chefs, there's no need to fuss. These tuna cakes can be prepared in just about 15 minutes. Tuna is a healthy choice of protein. The omega-3 fatty acids in tuna can improve your insulin sensitivity and strengthen your heart health. This tuna cake recipe doesn't require bread crumbs or flour. Instead, you'll be using ground whole-grain oats, a complex-carb food that gives you energy without jeopardizing your blood sugar. Oats are packed with magnesium, a mineral that acts as a co-factor for more than 300 enzymes, including those involved in the body's use of glucose and insulin secretion. Bell peppers are not only rich in fiber and cancer-preventing antioxidants, but also all the vitamins and minerals that help protect your vision. Since eye problems are a common diabetes complication, adding some bell peppers to your diet might be a good way to protect your eyesight. Diabetic Tuna Cakes - Ingredients (for about 4 - 6 tuna cakes) Finely chop garlic and green onions. Cut bell peppers into thin rings. Grind oats in a spice mill. Set aside. In a large bowl, combine tuna, ground oats, egg, dried parsley, garlic, green onions, Dijon mustard, salt and pepper. Mix together well with a fork. Heat vegetable oil in a skillet over medium heat. Use a big spoon to scoop up a portion of the tuna mixture. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Sardine Diet - Meals - Diabetes | Healthcentral

Diabetes: The Sardine Diet - Meals - Diabetes | Healthcentral

A diet limited to sardines might sound somewhat too restrictive. It is. Even the most ardent health food fanatics dont go that far. As much as I love the health benefits and taste of sardines, I almost never eat more than two cans of sardines a day. Even Keri Glassman, who wrote The Sardine Diet, is using hyperbole to make her points. Her points are that sardines are not only delicious but also have unique properties that help us lose weight and improve our health. Food doesnt come any better than that. Keri is president of A Nutritious Life , a nutrition counseling and consulting practice in New York City. Her practice focuses on weight loss/maintenance, pediatric nutrition, lifestyle/wellness/beauty, pre/post natal nutrition, cardiovascular health, and sports performance. A registered nurse and Certified Dietitian Nutritionist, Keri is the Nutrition Contributor to the CBS Early Show as well as a tri-athlete. In 2006 Downtown Bookworks published The Sardine Diet: Lose Weight, Fight Disease, and Stay Healthy for Life. I just obtained one of the last available copies of this 128-page paperback (unless you are willing to pay $195 for a used copy) and have studied it carefully. I also interviewed Keri by phone at her New York practice. Calling it The Sardine Diet is a great attention getter. Punningly, she admits in the book that it is really a fishy name for a high-fiber, reduced calorie diet thats high in omega-3 fatty acids. The sardine diet involves eating a wide variety of foods. Sardines simply make it easy to follow, even on a hectic schedule. Thats because sardines are the best combination of healthy and convenience food. Keri notes that they are so popular for desktop lunches because all you need to do it flip open the lid. For me they are my favorite trail food. Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Peanut butter may help people to manage diabetes, a condition that affects blood sugar levels. How exactly does this popular snack help to control the condition? A diet high in magnesium is thought to offer protective benefits against the development of diabetes. Peanuts are a good source of magnesium. Natural peanut butter and peanuts are also low glycemic index (GI) foods. This means that they have a lower effect on blood sugar levels. This article explores research into the impact of peanut butter on diabetes, to help people with diabetes decide whether eating it could improve their condition. It also considers any risks involved and looks at other healthful snacks for people with diabetes. How GI affects blood sugar GI is a 100-point scale applied to foods. This scale measures how blood sugar and insulin spike after eating specific food types. Foods that are digested slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. Peanuts have a GI score of just 14, making them one of the lowest GI foods. Foods high in GI cause blood sugar and insulin to spike severely after eating them. This is followed by a crash in blood sugar that can result in hunger, cravings, and tiredness. These cycles of spiking and crashing blood sugar and insulin levels are not good for the body. They can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Research into peanut butter and blood sugar By contrast, low-GI foods can help people to better control their blood sugar levels. For example, a 2012 study looked into eating peanut butter or peanuts at breakfast. This helped obese women who were at risk of developing type 2 diabetes to control their blood sugar throughout the day. In the study, the beneficial effects of the peanuts were observed. They were looked at hours later, Continue reading >>

Canned Tuna Fish For Diabetics Recipes

Canned Tuna Fish For Diabetics Recipes

Member Recipes for Canned Tuna Fish For Diabetics Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Tuna Fish Patties Calories A unique way to enjoy canned tuna. Submitted by: RHIENN CALORIES: 311.4 | FAT: 7.7g | PROTEIN: 45.1g | CARBS: 13.2g | FIBER: 1.1g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Tuna Burgers Calories This can be made with any ground meat, even with canned tunaSubmitted by: FLOWERDALEJEWEL CALORIES: 518.3 | FAT: 17.8g | PROTEIN: 29.3g | CARBS: 61.7g | FIBER: 9.2g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Spinach and Beef Bake Calories Give your tuna salad a lift with this recipe.Submitted by: DAVENPLK CALORIES: 157.4 | FAT: 7.7g | PROTEIN: 12.7g | CARBS: 12g | FIBER: 1.8g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Tuna Salad Calories Need to add Protein to your diet?Submitted by: SAZZYGIRL CALORIES: 81.3 | FAT: 0.9g | PROTEIN: 12.5g | CARBS: 5.1g | FIBER: 0.8g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Tuna Patties (Protein) Calories Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Grilled Tuna Steaks Calories This recipe came from the fish market at my local grocery, and is the best marinade I have found for tuna. Everybody loves it.Submitted by: JJENNEY CALORIES: 363.3 | FAT: 15.6g | PROTEIN: 51.1g | CARBS: 2.6g | FIBER: 0.1g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Awesome Grilled Lime Tuna Steak Calories Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Cucumber Canoes with Tuna Calories High in healthy fats, vitamins and nutrients, low in carbs and high in protein! Is not a good option for low fat diets!Submitted by: GYPSYWARRIOR CALORIES: 444.1 | FAT: 22.5g | PROTEIN: 41.6g | CARBS: 20.8g | FIBER: 3.9g Healthy, delicious, and easy!Submitted by: METERMAID CALORIES: 186.4 | FAT: 2.5g | PROTEIN: 34.4g | CARBS: 4.7g | FIBER: 0g Full Continue reading >>

Unhealthy Food Choices For People With Diabetes

Unhealthy Food Choices For People With Diabetes

While it'stechnicallytrue that"all foods can fit" in a healthy diabetesdiet , there are some foods that are just easier (and healthier) to avoid. This mostly comes down to portion control. A dish with a concentrated amount of sugar or fat might work in your diet if you're having just a bite or two. But especially if you're eating out, what's the point of tempting yourself with a big portion of something that only "fits" in small amounts? Here are five foods to avoid when you're eating out or buying prepared foods: I'm a big fan of sandwiches, especially for people with diabetes. Lean proteins and vegetables on slices of whole grain bread make for a quick and balanced diabetes-friendly meal. But be careful about tuna, chicken and egg salad sandwiches, especially if you're eating out. Most commercially prepared salad sandwich fillers use plenty of full-fat mayonnaise. This pushes the calorie and fat levels sky-high. If you're cooking at home, use just enough reduced-fat or fat-free mayonnaise to hold everything together. If you're eating out, it's probably better to skip the salad sandwiches. You can put the words "taco" and "salad" in the same sentence, but it doesn't make it healthy. Healthy salad meals start with about a two-cup base of leafy greens (the darker the green the better) and are topped with lean proteins, non-starchy vegetables, possibly legumes and a light dressing. Southwestern salads, on the other hand, are often calorie bombs thanks to full-fat cheese, fried meats, heavy dressings and fried salad toppers. There are healthy ones out there, but this category of "salads" should be a red-flag. Smoothies may sound synonymous with health food, but most times they're not. Many retail establishments use smoothie mixes that contain too much added sugar, especia Continue reading >>

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

1 / 10 Fish Is an Excellent Choice for Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes experts recommend eating fish for cardiovascular health, but if your only experience with fish has been the fried variety or fish sticks, you might be wondering how and why to include fish in your strategy for eating well with diabetes. “It’s a great protein choice, a source of healthy fat, and it contains important vitamins and minerals,” says Cassandra Rico, MPH, RD, associate director of nutrition and medical affairs for the American Diabetes Association. And the best part of all is that "you don’t have to do a whole lot to seafood to make it taste good," she says. "You can add just a few herbs and bake it in the oven. It’s a lot easier to prepare than I think people perceive.” So get to know your local seafood purveyor and make seafood part of your type 2 diabetes diet. Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

People Tuna Fish Ok???

People Tuna Fish Ok???

Cutter is doing great. He is still very stubborn about eating any canned wet cat foods. Tried lots of suggested foods and tricks from sight with very little luck.I gave him some people tuna fish which I mix with chia gel for added hydration and he luvs it.Cutter used to be a 20 pound cat now he is down to pretty close to normal cat weight 13.2 and holding right around there. What is worrying me now is if it is ok for him to be on a tuna diet. He does eat a new Fancy Feast It is called 'mornings' and it contains souffle w/white meat chicken garden veggies and egg.however I do not think this meets the high protien low carb that this sight suggests. But I think that mixing the two will kind of balance it all out as tuna has 0 carbs. I did try searching for this answer in prev posts but could not find an answer to the original ? Is canned people tuna ok for cats to eat regularly. Once again I thank all who contribute ,you are wonderful people doing wonderful things for people and the pets they luv. You might want to set aside the high carb Fancy Feast "Mornings" style canned food for your hypo kit. Have you tried crumbling Halo LIv-a-Little freeze dried chicken treats on top of the wet food? That is one way I got Wink to switch from the dry food to the wet food. Also, you need to use the cats' natural hunger drive to help make the switch. If you free feed and the cat is always full, he'll never try anything -new. I stopped free feeding Wink like they were doing at the cat shelter. I also left Wink and his canned food alone in a separate room for 45-60 minutes. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Now some of the diabetes diet information presented below may be slightly different to what you are used to seeing. That’s because there are quite a few flaws in the common diet prescription for type 2 diabetes. In our work with clients we’ve discovered that a ‘real food’ approach to eating has helped control type 2 diabetes the most. That’s because there is more to managing diabetes than just counting cabrs! So we’ve put together this type 2 diabetes diet food list that will give you a great place to start. FREE DOWNLOAD Like a Take Home Copy Of This List? Includes Snack Ideas and Food Tips! Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List PROTEINS Every meal should contain a source of protein for energy production and to fuel the creation of new cells. Below is a list of good protein sources to choose from. Protein also helps to satisfy the appetite, keeping you fuller longer. Lean Meats Lean beef; veal, flank steak, extra lean mince, sirloin steak, chuck steak, lamb. Pork Lean cuts of pork; pork chops or loin. Poultry Chicken, turkey, duck, quail, goose. Fish Tuna, salmon, cod, trout, bass, flatfish, whitehead, mackerel, herring, eel, haddock, red snapper, trout, drum, walleye, sardines and so forth. Seafood Crab, lobster, prawns, shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, crayfish. Game Meats Venison, wild boar, kangaroo, deer, pheasant, moose, wild turkey, alligator, emu, ostrich, elk, bison, turtle. Many people don’t eat these types of meats but you can eat them if you like them. Organ Meats Beef, pork, lamb, chicken livers. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken tongues, hearts, brains. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken marrow, kidneys. Many people don’t eat these types of meats either but you can eat them if you like them, and they are very good sources of vitamins and minera Continue reading >>

Good Nutrition

Good Nutrition

Good nutrition is essential for a healthy body. Eating well-balanced meals and snacks will help you feel your best. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, a healthful diet is one that: focuses on fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat milk includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs and nuts is low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt and added sugars In general, you should: Eat smaller portion sizes. Make half of your grains whole. Make half of your plate vegetables and fruits. Drink fat-free or low-fat milk. Eat lean proteins. How to plan your meals and snacks When you are planning your meals and snacks, try to think about what your plate should look like. Food group Use more often (each portion below equals one serving) Use less often Grains group (Make half your grains whole.) 1 slice bread or tortilla 1/2 bagel, English muffin, pita 4 to 6 crackers 1/2 cup unsweetened cooked cereal, bulgur 1/3 cup cooked rice, pasta 3/4 cup dry unsweetened cereal croissants, sweet rolls, doughnuts, muffins, Danish pastry, biscuits, high-fat crackers, regular tortilla chips, fried tortillas granola-type cereals Vegetable group (Vary your veggies.) 1 cup raw vegetables 1/2 cup cooked vegetables or vegetable juice vegetables with butter or margarine, cream or cheese sauces Fruit group (Focus on fruits.) 1 small fresh fruit 1/2 cup canned fruit in light syrup or its own juices 1/3 to 1/2 cup fruit juice fruits in pastry (like pies), coconut high in sugar: dried fruit, juices or drinks sweetened with sugar, fruit canned in syrup, large amounts of fruit juice Diary group (Get your calcium-rich foods.) 1 cup milk: fat-free or 1 percent 1 cup low-fat or fat-free yogurt, sweetened with artificial sweetener 2 percent or whole milk yogurt w Continue reading >>

Tuna For A Diabetic | Livestrong.com

Tuna For A Diabetic | Livestrong.com

Tuna in a bowl with tomatoes, olives and fresh herbs.Photo Credit: Barbara Dudziska/iStock/Getty Images Tina M. St. John runs a health communications and consulting firm. She is also an author and editor, and was formerly a senior medical officer with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. St. John holds an M.D. from Emory University School of Medicine. Good nutrition is essential for everyone, but it is particularly important if you are living with diabetes. In addition to managing your carbohydrate intake, your nutrition plan needs to be heart-healthy because of the increased risk of cardiovascular disease that accompanies diabetes. Tuna is an excellent, low-calorie food choice for your diabetes diet, providing you with protein, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D and other important micronutrients. You don't have to worry about a spike in your blood sugar level when you eat tuna because it contains little to no carbohydrates. A 3 oz. serving of baked or broiled fresh tuna contains approximately 0.3 g of carbohydrates. A similar serving of canned tuna does not contain any measurable carbohydrates. You may struggle with an elevated blood cholesterol level, as many diabetics do. Tuna is a heart-healthy choice because it is naturally low in cholesterol and saturated fat. A 3-oz. serving of canned tuna contains approximately 15 mg to 25 mg of cholesterol. Water-packed tuna contains 0.2 g of saturated fat and oil-packed tuna contains 1.3 g. Fresh baked or broiled tuna contains 45 g of cholesterol and 0.7 g of saturated fat. If you make tuna salad, remember that regular mayonnaise contains nearly 400 calories and 45 g of fat per quarter cup. Consider using mayonnaise made from tofu, which contains roughly half the fat and calories of regular mayonnaise. Omega-3 fa Continue reading >>

Tangy Tuna Salad Recipe For Diabetics

Tangy Tuna Salad Recipe For Diabetics

Preparation time: 20 minutes. Chilling time: 1 hour. 1 can (6 ounces) tuna in water, drained well Place tuna in a medium bowl and flake with a fork. Add remaining ingredients and stir well to combine. Cover and refrigerate at least 1 hour to allow flavors to blend. Yield: 1 1/4 cups. Serving size: 1/4 cup. Calories: 65 calories, Carbohydrates: 4 g, Protein: 10 g, Fat: 1 g, Saturated Fat: <1 g, Sodium: 494 mg, Fiber: <1 g Exchanges per serving: 1 1/2 very lean meat. This recipe was developed by Tami Ross, a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

7 Best Fish Varieties For Diabetics - Myvita Wellness

7 Best Fish Varieties For Diabetics - Myvita Wellness

Choose your fish wisely to ward off diabetes Good nutrition is essential for everyone, but it is particularly important if you are living with diabetes. The deadliest complication of diabetes is heart disease. Diabetes experts recommend eating fish for cardiovascular health.Eating fish just once a week can reduce your risk by 40 per cent, according to a Harvard School of Public Health study. The fatty acids in fish reduce insulin resistance and inflammation in the body a major contributor to coronary disease. But remember to choose your fish wisely, as some varieties are much better for managing or warding off diabetes than others. Here are 7 of the best fish varieties for diabetics. Salmon is at the top of our list because it is high in omega-3, the healthy fats that can reduce the inflammation in your blood cells as well as help your cholesterol. The Omega-3 fatty acids in salmon are connected with a whole slew of other health benefits as well. These benefits include heart, brain, and eye health. Salmon is also great for managing blood glucose levels and improving your bodys ability to respond to insulin. As with most fish, you have a number of healthy options for cooking salmon, including poaching, broiling, and baking. Herring is an excellent choice for diabetics for many reasons. First and foremost, it is one of the best food sources of vitamin D. There seems to be more to vitamin D than strong teeth and bones. Its now thought that vitamin D deficiency might be a factor in many diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and diabetes. Additionally, Herring is loaded with EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). These fatty acids help prevent heart disease and keep the brain functioning properly. They are also effective in reducing inflammation in the b Continue reading >>

Six Fish Facts To Know Now

Six Fish Facts To Know Now

We’ve been hearing for a long time now that fish and other types of seafood are good for us. Current recommendations tell us to aim to eat “two fish meals a week.” But fish has some fishy aspects to it, like mercury. And what about all that cholesterol in shellfish? Do fish sticks count towards your two weekly fish meals? Let’s find out the facts about fish. Fish fact #1: Frozen fish can be just as good as fresh fish. Frozen fish has often been frozen on the boat right after being caught. The flash-freezing process that’s used keeps the fish at temperatures lower than your home freezer. Some “fresh” fish, on the other hand, is fish that was previously frozen or fish that’s been sitting around for a few days. When choosing frozen fish, look for either vacuum-sealed fish or fish with a thick coating of ice on it. Fish fact #2: Freshwater fish is just as good for you as saltwater fish. When we think of fish, what often comes to mind are omega-3 fatty acids, which are present in fish oils. Fish that are high in omega-3s include salmon, herring, and tuna, which are saltwater fish. But freshwater fish from cold water contain these healthful fats, too. Fish like trout contain decent amounts. Omega-3 fatty acids are thought to help lower blood pressure, lower blood triglyceride levels, reduce inflammation in the body, and possibly even help alleviate depression. Fish fact #3: Shellfish is higher in cholesterol than fish, but it’s low in saturated fat. If you live on the east coast, you know how popular clams (“steamers,” “littlenecks”) are in the summertime. But, if your blood cholesterol is on the high side, you might be worried that clams (along with shrimp, lobster, and other shellfish) are too high in cholesterol for you to eat. Relax. OK, shellfis Continue reading >>

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