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Is Cane Sugar Good For Diabetics

Sugar Substitutes For Diabetics: Five Sugars That Are Ok To Eat

Sugar Substitutes For Diabetics: Five Sugars That Are Ok To Eat

(NaturalNews) Over the past 25 years, the prevalence of diabetes has risen substantially in the U.S. (1) Today, nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes, including 7 million people who have not been diagnosed. Almost 2 million men and women are diagnosed with diabetes each year -- that's more than 5,200 each day. What's more, diabetes plays a primary or contributing role in nearly a quarter-million deaths annually in the U.S. (2) For those struggling with diabetes, learning to control cravings for specific foods is central to managing the disease. Most experts advise avoiding eating sweet and sugary foods to help ensure that blood glucose and insulin levels remain as stable as possible, but cutting out sugar entirely isn't realistic for most people. Luckily, there are several natural sugar substitutes that make satisfying your sweet tooth a tasty possibility -- and many have health benefits in addition to their sweet taste. Here are five alternatives you should consider if you're looking for a substitute for refined sugars: A gift from the bees and flowers, honey is available in 300 distinct varietals in the U.S., all of which have unique flavors based on the nectar source. Raw honey -- especially the darker varieties like buckwheat -- contains antioxidants that can help fight cell-damaging free radicals, as well as strong antibacterial properties. Because it can be easily used by the body, some studies have reported that consuming honey can improve athletic performance compared to other carb sources. Made from the sap of the coconut palm, coconut sugar has gained a lot of attention in recent years, thanks to results of initial studies which show that it may have a lower glycemic index than refined sugars, preventing the spikes in blood sugar levels that can interfere Continue reading >>

Sugars & Diabetes

Sugars & Diabetes

by Madelyn Wheeler and Marcia Levine Mazur Recently, "Diabetes Forecast" received a letter about a subject that concerns many people with diabetes: sugar. The writer wanted to know why a magazine for people with this disease would publish a recipe (March 1996, p. 34 "Coconut Pineapple Compote") that had 20 grams of sugars in one serving. It's an excellent question and one that "Forecast" would like to answer in print, not only for the writer, but for all our readers who have similar "sugar" concerns. Reader Is Right First, we agree. The sugar content in the recipe is high. But that's not the whole story. The sugars in the compote come mainly from the fructose (fruit sugar) in the pineapple, while a small percentage comes from the lactose (milk sugar) found in the milk and yogurt. Clearly, many nutritious foods have some form of sugar or a combination of sugars in them. Fruits, in fact, are particularly high in sugar. That means that virtually any fruit we eat--if it had a food label--would list a large quantity of sugar on that label. (To be more scientific, it would list most of its carbohydrates as sugar, but more about carbohydrates later.) If "Forecast" could not print recipes that contained a large quantity of sugars--such as the 20 grams of sugars per serving in the Pineapple Compote--it could not print recipes that had fruit in them. But "Forecast" does print such recipes, because sugars- -when used appropriately--are not forbidden foods for people with either type of diabetes. What's Wrong With Sugar? It's understandable that people with diabetes worry more about sugar than about any other food. For centuries, sugar has been considered the enemy, the worst possible thing people with diabetes could ever consume. Why? The very name of the disease for one thing. Fo Continue reading >>

Coconut Palm Sugar: Can People With Diabetes Eat It?

Coconut Palm Sugar: Can People With Diabetes Eat It?

In order to manage their condition, people with diabetes need to monitor their sugar intake. A good way of doing this might be by choosing a natural sweetener option. One of the more popular choices is coconut palm sugar. In this article, we look at the effect coconut palm sugar has on blood sugar (glucose) levels and whether it may be healthful for people with diabetes. Contents of this article: What is diabetes? People with diabetes have bodies that do not produce enough insulin or use insulin correctly. Insulin is the hormone needed to help the body to normalize blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels are a measurement of the amount of sugar in the bloodstream. Most foods contain sugar. The body stores the sugar and transports it through the bloodstream to the cells, which use it as energy. When insulin is not working properly, sugar cannot enter cells, and they are unable to produce as much energy. When the cells of the body cannot process sugar, diabetes occurs. What is coconut palm sugar? Coconut palm sugar is made from the sap of the coconut palm. The sugar is extracted from the palm by heating it until the moisture evaporates. After processing, the sugar has a caramel color and tastes like brown sugar, making it an easy substitution in any recipe. Coconut palm sugar is considered a healthier option for people with diabetes because it contains less pure fructose than other sweeteners. The digestive tract does not absorb fructose as it does other sugars, which means that the excess fructose finds its way to the liver. Too much fructose in the liver can lead to a host of metabolic problems, including type 2 diabetes. Can people with diabetes eat coconut palm sugar? While the American Diabetes Association (ADA) do find coconut palm sugar to be an acceptable sugar sub Continue reading >>

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 6 A Small Amount of Real Sugar Is Best, but Sugar Substitutes Can Help If you think that people with diabetes should always avoid sugar, think again — they can enjoy the sweet stuff, in moderation. "The best bet is to use a very minimal amount of real sugar as part of a balanced diabetic diet," says Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, of Nutritious Life, a nutrition practice based in New York City. That being said, sugar substitutes offer sweetness while controlling carbohydrate intake and blood glucose. There are many sugar substitutes to choose from, but they’re not all calorie-free and they vary in terms of their impact on blood sugar. "The major difference between the sugar substitutes is whether they are nutritive or non-nutritive sweeteners," says Melissa Mullins, MS, RD, a certified diabetes educator with Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, Va. "Non-nutritive sweeteners provide no calories and no changes in blood glucose levels, which is perfect for people with diabetes.” Here are six sweet options to consider. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foods: Is Honey A Good Substitute For Sugar?

Diabetes Foods: Is Honey A Good Substitute For Sugar?

I have diabetes, and I'm wondering if I can substitute honey for sugar in my diet? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Generally, there's no advantage to substituting honey for sugar in a diabetes eating plan. Both honey and sugar will affect your blood sugar level. Honey is sweeter than granulated sugar, so you might use a smaller amount of honey for sugar in some recipes. But honey actually has slightly more carbohydrates and more calories per teaspoon than does granulated sugar — so any calories and carbohydrates you save will be minimal. If you prefer the taste of honey, go ahead and use it — but only in moderation. Be sure to count the carbohydrates in honey as part of your diabetes eating plan. Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners Or Natural Sugar: Which Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Artificial Sweeteners Or Natural Sugar: Which Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Here's what you need to know to understand the impact of sweeteners—both nutritive and non-nutritive—on your blood sugar. Walk down the supermarket aisles and you’ll find a dizzying array of sweeteners. Everything from ordinary (white) table sugar to newly-formulated sugars, sugar substitutes and more. Some claim benefits for people with diabetes that promise to have no effect on blood sugar. But with so many choices—from ordinary table sugar (aka cane, sucrose), maple sugar and agave to newer arrivals like coconut sugar, monk sugar and stevia, to nonnutritive sweeteners (sucralose, aspartame, etc.)—how do you know which one is best for you and your blood sugar? It's important to know that use of the word natural is not a term regulated by the FDA, nor does it have a clear definition. These so-called “natural” sweeteners, also referred to as nutritive sweeteners, are a type of sugar (typically sucrose), which provide calories from carbohydrates. All nutritive sugars have about 14 calories per teaspoon and contain 5 grams of carbohydrates. Food companies seem to use the word “natural” as a marketing gimmick to give consumers a sense of additional health benefits. Popular nutritive sweetners include: brown sugar, honey, coconut sugar and agave syrup. But remember, sugar is sugar. Whether honey or table sugar, they all contain carbohydrates and will raise blood glucose levels. Having Sugar Knowledge is Important Contrary to popular belief, people with diabetes can consume sugar but it’s best when consumed in foods where it occurs naturally as it does in whole fruits. Understanding the type of sugar you consume and how much, is essential for successful diabetes management. People with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, don’t have the adequate insulin nee Continue reading >>

Sugar Is Sugar, By Any Other Name… Or Is It? (part 1)

Sugar Is Sugar, By Any Other Name… Or Is It? (part 1)

By now you’re probably aware of the news: People with diabetes can eat sugar! No, sugar isn’t going to spike up your blood glucose levels (unless you happen to pour the entire contents of the sugar bowl into your mouth). But sugar isn’t so simple anymore. For those of you who’ve decided to sneak some back into your eating plan, you’re now faced with some choices. Years ago, your sugar decisions boiled down to granulated, light brown, dark brown, and confectioner’s. Now there’s a whole new world of sugar to choose from, depending on what your tastes are: coarse sugar, sanding sugar, turbinado sugar, muscovado sugar, demerara sugar…and that’s not even counting other forms of sugar, such as honey, molasses, dextrose, maltodextrin, and high-fructose corn syrup. We’ve looked at this topic before in past blog posts (see “Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: Fitting Sugar Into Your Meal Plan”), so I won’t reiterate too much about it here. But, as a quick recap, let’s look at what we know about sugar and diabetes: Eating sugar (or foods that contain sugar) doesn’t cause diabetes. People with diabetes can fit sugar into their eating plan, as long as it’s accounted for. Sugar is a type of carbohydrate, just as starch is a carbohydrate. Gram for gram, sugar doesn’t raise blood glucose levels any more than eating another carbohydrate food, such as bread or cereal. One teaspoon of sugar contains 15 calories and 4 grams of carbohydrate. One tablespoon of sugar contains 16 grams of carbohydrate, the same amount of carb that’s in a slice of bread. Too much sugar is linked to obesity and dental cavities. The point is, then, that sugar isn’t as evil as some folks make it out to be. Sugar is all natural and comes from sugar beet or sugar cane plants. O Continue reading >>

The Top 20 Added Sugars Used In Foods

The Top 20 Added Sugars Used In Foods

Diabetic Living / Food to Eat / Nutrition What does the term "added sugars" mean? Find out the top added sugars in our foods and drinks and why they're used. Brown sugar, honey, high-fructose corn syrup, and fruit juice concentrates are just a few of the ingredients categorized as added sugars in our foods. They certainly sweeten foods, but they also allow foods to stay on the supermarket shelf longer, provide bulk and volume to foods, and give some foods an appealing golden tone (referred to as caramelization). You can spot the added sugars in a product on its ingredients list if you know their names. By law, ingredients must be listed in descending order of quantity by weight. On Nutrition Facts labels, "added sugars" are included as "sugars," which are found indented under the total carbohydrate amount. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines sugars to include all sugars that are naturally occurring in foods, such as those from fruit (sucrose) or milk (lactose), plus all added sugars. With a revision of the Nutrition Facts label by the FDA in process, theres discussion about whether added sugars should be broken out from naturally occurring sugars. Most experts believe it will take years before consumers will see such a revised Nutrition Facts label on packaging, and at this point the outcome is up in the air. Are you curious about the names of the top 20 added sugars in our foods and drinks and why they're used? We thought so. What it is:Agave is produced from the core of the agave plant, commonly grown in the southwestern United States and Mexico. The agave is extracted and processed into a syrup or nectar that has a delicate flavor. The syrup contains 50-90 percent fructose, with the remainder being glucose. Why it's used:An agave sweetener is often u Continue reading >>

Sugarcane And Its 10 Benefits

Sugarcane And Its 10 Benefits

I do not know one person who does not like Sugarcane and does not crave for Sugarcane juicewhen thirsty. Sugarcane juice with ice is a hit among Mumbaiites. On a hot sultry afternoon in Mumbai have a glass of sugarcane juice and see how it rejuvenates and energises you. Sugarcane is known to provide energy and glucose to our body and gives us strength to continue with our work. But, did you know that Sugarcane has much more health benefits than just providing glucose to our body? Sugarcane juice is not only like any other sweet juice but it has many other nutrients. Sugarcane juice is extracted from the cane by pressing it through iron rollers. It is nutritious and refreshing. It contains about 15 % natural sugar and is rich in organic salts and vitamins. The juice can also be used for drinking or sweetening. In hot summer days, it is a cooling drink. A little lime juice may be mixed in the juice to improve its flavour. The reason Sugarcane is a popular drink during summers is because it gives an instant kick of energy and quenches the thirst. Sugarcane juice is good source of glucose which as we know, helps to re-hydrate the human body and gives it a boost of energy. So instead of your artificial energy drink, the next time you feel fatigued or dehydrated, consider drinking a glass of cane juice. Even though cane juice tastes very sweet and has high sugar content, it is good for diabetic patients. It contains natural sugar which has low glycemic index that prevents steep rise in blood glucose levels in diabetics, so it can act as a substitute of aerated drinks for them. However, people with Type-2 diabetes should consume it in moderation and after consultation with their doctors. Sugarcane juice is considered an alkaline forming food because of the high concentration Continue reading >>

Agave Syrup And Diabetes: New Things To Know

Agave Syrup And Diabetes: New Things To Know

Agave enjoyed a huge boom around 2010, when everyone seemed to be shouting from the rooftops about what a great natural sweetener it was, especially ideal for people with diabetes. NOT. We looked into it, both then and more recently, and what we found was pretty interesting. Of course, a lot of people are down on the chemical content of those familiar little packets of artificial sweeteners -- Equal, Sweet N' Low and Splenda -- so they’re turning to plant-based alternatives, like agave and stevia. What is Agave Syrup/Nectar? Agave nectar is made from various types of agave plants, which are found in southern Mexico. The consistency and even the taste are comparable to honey. Interesting fact: If you ferment the blue agave plant, it actually turns into tequila (wow!). Otherwise, agave can be used to create a sweet syrup or "nectar" (the latter term certainly sounds more benign and natural!) Angela Ginn, a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) and National Spokesperson for The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, explains: “Agave is a nutritive sweetener that contains carbohydrate, vitamins and minerals such as iron, calcium, potassium and magnesium and calories. The difference in the color of various types is due to the filtration of salts and minerals in production.” For a long time, many health food advocates believed agave was a perfect solution for PWDs (people with diabetes) because it's made of up to 90% fructose rather than sucrose, so it's much lower on the glycemic index (GI) and thus doesn't pack the same immediate punch to blood glucose levels as table sugar. But that, as we learned, may be misleading. While it’s generally true that the lower a food’s GI score, the slower it raises blood sugar, it’s also well-documented that basing a food’s healthfuln Continue reading >>

Bbc - Future - The Hidden Healing Power Of Sugar

Bbc - Future - The Hidden Healing Power Of Sugar

Doctors are finding one way that sugar can benefit your health: it may help heal wounds resistant to antibiotics. As a child growing up in poverty in the rural Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe, Moses Murandu was used to having salt literally rubbed in his wounds when he fell and cut himself. On lucky days, though, his father had enough money to buy something which stung the boy much less than salt: sugar. Murandu always noticed that sugar seemed to help heal wounds more quickly than no treatment at all. So he was surprised when, having been recruited to come to work as a nurse for the UKs National Health System (NHS) in 1997, he found that sugar wasnt being used in any official capacity. He decided to try to change that. Now, Murandus idea finally is being taken seriously. A senior lecturer in adult nursing at the University of Wolverhampton, Murandu completed an initial pilot study focussed on sugars applications in wound healing and won an award from the Journal of Wound Care in March 2018 for his work. How can we avoid antibiotic apocalypse? In some parts of the world, this procedure could be key because people cannot afford antibiotics. But there is interest in the UK, too, since once a wound is infected, it sometimes wont respond to antibiotics . To treat a wound with sugar, all you do, Murandu says, is pour the sugar on the wound and apply a bandage on top. The granules soak up any moisture that allows bacteria to thrive. Without the bacteria, the wound heals more quickly. View image of Concern over antibiotic resistance has increased interest in other treatments Evidence for all of this was found in Murandus trials in the lab. And a growing collection of case studies from around the world has supported Murandus findings, including examples of successful sugar treat Continue reading >>

6 Healthy Sugars That Can Harm You

6 Healthy Sugars That Can Harm You

Written by Kris Gunnars, BSc on December 2, 2013 "Sugar scares me." - Dr. Lewis Cantley, Cancer Researcher Added sugar is the single worst ingredient in the modern diet. Awareness of its harmful effects has increased dramatically in the past few years. Despite what some people would have you believe, empty calories are just the tip of the iceberg. Sugar, due to its high amount of the simple sugar fructose , can wreak havoc on your metabolism. Consumed in excess, it causes high cholesterol and triglycerides, insulin resistance and fat buildup in the liver and abdominal cavity... in as little as 10 weeks ( 1 , 2 ). Added sugar (and its evil twin... high fructose corn syrup) is believed to be a key driver of some of the world's leading killers... including obesity, diabetes, heart disease and even cancer ( 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 ). But today... there are all sorts of "healthy" sugar-based sweeteners on the market. The problem with many of them, is that they are just as bad as regular sugar. In some cases, these healthy sugars are even worse... and they are added liberally to all sorts of foods that are then marketed as " health foods. " Here are 6 "healthy" sugars that are actually very harmful. Agave nectar (often called Agave syrup) is a very popular sweetener in the natural health community. This sweetener is touted as a healthy alternative to sugar because it has a low glycemic index. The glycemic index (GI) is the potential of foods to lead to rapid spikes in blood sugar. Some studies show that eating a lot of high GI foods is unhealthy ( 10 , 11 ). But the harmful effects of sugar have very little to do with the glycemic index and everything to do with the large amount of fructose... and Agave is high in fructose. Fructose doesn't raise blood sugar or insulin in Continue reading >>

Is Sugarcane Juice Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Is Sugarcane Juice Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Is Sugarcane Juice Good or Bad for Diabetics? Is Sugarcane Juice Good or Bad for Diabetics? In order to deal with a complicated disease like diabetes, you need to have a well- balanced lifestyle and have to manage what you eat and what you do not eat in an efficient manner. Patients with diabetes often doubt whether or not they should consume sugarcane juice in their condition as it is known to have very high levels of sugar. As it turns out, the juice is full of health benefits for one and all. In this article, we will try to understand the relationship that exists between diabetes and sugarcane juice by analyzing the health benefits of the juice. So, come and join in for the article Is Sugarcane Juice Good or Bad for Diabetes Patients? The following are some of the nutritional facts related to the sugarcane juice. Around 28 grams of sugarcane juice is known to comprise of 27.51 grams of carbohydrates, 0.27 grams of protein, 11.23 milligrams of calcium, around 3 percent of iron, 17.01 milligrams of sodium, 41.96 milligrams of potassium, and somewhere around 26.56 kilocalories of energy. The following paragraph explains the benefits of drinking sugarcane juice for all the diabetes patients. Benefits of Sugarcane Juice for Diabetes Patients As against the popular belief, sugarcane juice can be beneficial for all those who are dealing with diabetes. The following are some of its benefits: Must Read: What Kind of Pasta Can Diabetics Eat? To begin with, the sugarcane juice acts as a great energy drink for those who suffer from diabetes . When you add few drops of juice to the tonic, Nutri Kane D, the blood glucose levels are stabilized to a great extent. The sugarcane juice is known to be a rich source of various beneficial antioxidants in the body. These antioxidants go a Continue reading >>

Ossur Rebound Diabetic Walker

Ossur Rebound Diabetic Walker

Type 2 recette pancakes facile diabetes: The management of type 2 diabetes CG87. IVF-Zentrum Esslingen. Ossur Rebound Diabetic Walker new nasal spray could treat Alzheimer disease in the form of a nasal spray that could potentially doses of man-made insulin called insulin detemir for In diabetic group treated with 10 mg/kg of vanadium C.1989. Bari Ibnu Iahim: Mau ke Old Trafford! Diet and Diabetes: Recipes for Success Diabetes on limiting refined sugars and foods that release sugars also contain cholesterol In Europe the age-specific prevalence of diabetes rose with age up to 70s and 80s in both men and women [10] (Figure 3.3). Everyone with type 1 diabetes needs insulin and many people with type 2 diabetes do too. Lakeland Eye Clinic Pagar $150 Shop V8 Fusion at Walmart.com and save: Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas Have you thought about making your own Halloween treats to deal with this year but youre unwilling to even start because you think no OBJECTIVE Age at onset of type 1 diabetes influences the risk of microvascular complications If youre confused I dont blame you cooking chicken breast in a traditional oven is a bit like going duck hunting with a SmartBodyz Nutrition Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 2 Diabetic Symptoms Diet Ossur Rebound Diabetic Walker Weight loss (food eaten is just passed through the body) Most Hilarious Quotes From 30 Rocks Live Show Type 2 Diabetes Treatment May Lead to a Order by phone: 1-800-544-9104 Low blood sugar A greatly enlarged Children with GSD I rarely develop cirrhosis (liver disease) also can help keep blood sugar levels from getting low WebMD shows you 11 moves that can help you feel better make sure the waters not too hot before you get in . Gestational diabetes mellitus in New Zealand: Technical report NZ Literature Abstract. Wor Continue reading >>

Brown Cane Sugar In Diabetes

Brown Cane Sugar In Diabetes

What is better to eat sugar with diabetes? In the General case, with mild diabetes can eat any kind of sugar, but to the extent the amount of which is determined by the attending physician (usually 5 % dose of all carbohydrates in a day). It should be noted that eating such products only when the disease is in the stage of compensation. Otherwise, should completely refrain from eating sweet . When a diabetic decides that you can include in your diet a little simple carbs, immediately raises the question about the dosage and about the grades, the negative effect from the consumption of which is minimized. In the article we will talk about why diabetes can eat brown and cane sugar and is there any benefit from these products. This product is an untreated sucrose with impurities of molasses molasses (the sugar becomes brown) and other substances. It has more water than other varieties. Molasses makes him very sweet, when the sugar content of 90 to 95 g per 100 g of product, which distinguishes it from refined (~ 99% sucrose). Admixtures are fibres, vegetable, unverified sources even claim the presence of vitamins and antioxidants. In any case, the body is easier to digest such heterogeneous mix, rather than fully pure sugar. But you should beware of fakes. Real brown sugar is an intermediate product of processing sugar cane. And on sale there was a product obtained simply by adding molasses to refined sugar. In fact, it is a refined product like white sugar is a potentially useful substances. It is easy to distinguish from the original: when dissolved in cold water in the precipitate will fall out white sugars, and the syrup will go into solution, turning the water brown. With real brown sugar that won't happen. Note again that the unique properties inherent only to this Continue reading >>

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