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Is Caesar Salad Good For Diabetics

How I Eat Out With Type 2

How I Eat Out With Type 2

Have one bite! my friend said, pushing a bowl of sugar-filled tiramisu in my direction. Dont you want to taste this? asked my other dinner companion, handing me a blueberry bread pudding draped in whipped cream. Eating out is not impossible when you have type 2 diabetes, but sometimesit can be challenging. Interestingly, it seems to me that what often makes it toughest is your companions, who can order anything they want, while you sit, trying to find the most acceptable appetizer or entre. In ordering shared desserts for the table, my mostly well-meaning friends werent exactly helping. But since I had prepared a strategy for attacking the meal before I stepped foot in the restaurant, I wasnt really bothered. One strategy, for example, is that once I know where Im headed for a meal, I immediately go online and check out the menu, to see what the restaurant is offering. If nothing looks acceptable, I examine what raw ingredients the cooks are using that can be made acceptable for a type 2 low carb diet. If I spot a separate Caesar salad and a grilled chicken dish on the menu, for example, all I have to do is ask the staff to nix the croutons, put the dressing on the side, drop the chicken on top, and Im good to go. It does take a little bit of nerve to ask for special orders (no risotto, please, but twice as much broccoli rabe), but in my experience restaurants have been glad to comply. At a time when food allergies and gluten-free diets proliferate, type 2 diabetes is simply another variation on a theme that tests a chefs ingenuity. Ive even recently read that some chefs see such special requests as a welcome challenge. Another possible strategy is to take a diabetes break. Some days and at some restaurants, its too hard to stick to your diet, and though you know you s Continue reading >>

Caesar Salad For Diabetics

Caesar Salad For Diabetics

Posted on March 19, 2014 | No Comments on Caesar Salad for Diabetics Caesar salad is a type of vegetable salad which is primarily made of romaine lettuce and croutons and is dressed with parmesan cheese, lemon juice, olive oil, boiled egg, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, and black pepper. Some people add wine of vinegar. In the Philippines, it is also commonly added with mayonnaise. The salad is usually prepared as a side dish and has become very popular because of it is healthy. The creation of Caesar salad is commonly attributed to a famous Italian chef and restaurant owner in the US, Caesar Cardini, from where the name of the salad was accordingly derived. There are different variations of the Caesar salad but its main ingredient lettuce is always there. For diabetics, the original ingredients for Caesar salad is just ok because it essentially fibrous and therefore safe. However the local Filipino Caesar salad which adds mayonnaise and skimmed milk can be altered to make it safer by using low fat mayonnaise and low fat milk. One serving of Caesars salad approximately has 55 Calories, 4 grams of fat, 6 mg of Cholesterol and 2 grams of Carbohydrate and 1 gram sugar. Based on this nutritional content, Caesars salad is a healthy choice for diabetics. However, it does not treat diabetes nor control blood sugar but at least helps in managing the disease. Continue reading >>

Caesar Dressing

Caesar Dressing

Can any one recommend a Caesar dressing i could buy or make prefer to buy but if have to make will do. Since finding out Friday i had type 2 i been trying to change all my foods so learning. I went to Coles and bought a fresh salad kit bag comes with lettuce some dressing looked like mayo caesar dressing 20ml small satchet of Croutons and some sliced cheese small amount, after mixing it all up i found it really tasty but thought the dressing is likely full of sugar so thought i buy my own , bought some cheddar and bought some priase fat free mayonnaise and some french Vinaigrette with olive oil in it mixed that all up and added some chicken and it tasted really nice but now reading here you guys are suggesting buy mayo with fat so will go to the shop later today and try pick the right one. All im really after is a Caesar dressing so thought maybe i just ask here and someone can put me onto the right one or right way. Also regarding these croutons are they Ok to add into a salad i usually just add 20g that's all. Continue reading >>

Everyday Chicken Caesar Salad

Everyday Chicken Caesar Salad

Chicken Caesar Salad is undoubtedly one of the most popular (if not the most popular) entre salad featured on restaurant menus. But what most people dont realize is that most recipes for Chicken Caesar Salads contain more fat and calories than a loaded Big Mac-thats a big problem, especially if you are watching out for your health. Heres an easy way to create a delicious and healthful restaurant-quality Chicken Caesar right at home. To enjoy it as a side salad, simply leave out the chicken. 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper, or to taste 3 cups shredded cooked skinless chicken breast To make the dressing, in a food processor combine the lemon juice, yogurt, mustard, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, and anchovy paste and pulse briefly. With the processor running, slowly add in the olive oil until the dressing is creamy and smooth. Add the Parmesan and pepper and pulse briefly. For the salad, in a large bowl combine the lettuce, chicken, and croutons. Pour the dressing on top, and toss together to combine. *Even if you think you dont like anchovies, youll find that a touch of the paste really makes the dressing taste authentic, with no fishy taste. Food Exchanges: 4 Lean Meat, 1 Vegetable, 1 Fat, 1/2 Starch Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical adv Continue reading >>

Free Diabetic Recipe: Caesar Salad

Free Diabetic Recipe: Caesar Salad

Caesar salads are a staple item at your typical fancy restaurant. But why let them have all the fun? As this recipe shows, you can enjoy the wonderful flavor of a traditional Caesar salad at home, right down to the anchovies. Calories: 290.2Fat: 24.8 g,Cholesterol: 61.5 mg,Sodium: 300.9 mg,Carbohydrate: 11.9 g,Sugar: 2.7 g, Fiber: 3.9 g, Protein: 7.7 g Remove the tough outer leaves of the lettuce head. Wash the tender leaves, spin dry, and put in a plastic bag. Put in the fridge to crisp. Preheat your oven to 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Cut the baguette into thick slices. Mash the anchovy fillets and the garlic with the butter and spread out over the bread slices. Put on a baking tray and bake until the pieces become pale, gold, and crisp. Put the lemon juice, olive oil, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper, and parmesan cheese into a jar or small bowl. Shake or whisk until all ingredients are combined. Coddle the egg by lowering it into a small saucepan of simmering water. Let simmer for 1 minute, and left out with a slotted spoon. Arrange the crisp lettuce leaves in a bowl. Add the croutons. Add the dressing and break in the coddled egg, and then turn the salad gently until the dressing evenly coats the lettuce leaves. Serve immediately. You can sprinkle a few capers into the salad if you wish to up the dishs briny component. FOR RECIPES LIKE THIS, CLICK HERE TO GET OUR FREE DIABETIC COOKBOOK. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Shot Up When Eating Salad :(

Blood Sugar Shot Up When Eating Salad :(

D.D. Family T2 for a few years-diet, exercise, Metformin So I eat at Applebee's a few times a month (it's one of the few sit-down restaurants in our mall - I go to the mall with my MIL every Saturday). I used to eat their chicken Caesar salad, but I was kind of sick of it. I do generally eat low-carb but also trying to eat low-fat and low-calorie. So I tried the low-fat Asian chicken salad, which was really good. I should have checked out the carbs first. My blood sugar jumped and I only had half of it. Turns out that the whole salad has 121 grams of carbs! Yikes! Must be a really sweet dressing. It does have mini wonton strips, too. I had no idea, though. The site I went to, to check the carbs, says that their fried chicken has fewer carbs!! It sucks when you try to eat healthy and it still doesn't work, you know? LOL! D.D. Family T2 - late Jan, 2009 Avandamet 500 mg twice daily Many low fat foods I have found are loaded with carbs. I guess the people that make them add sugars, etc to compromise for the low fat taste. That does stink but thanks for telling us so we all know to keep away from it. That is one of the bad things about eating out. You try and you try and then get sideswiped. I think there are a lot of hidden carbs in salad dressing. So if you don't know for sure avoid it. I also think those little strips are pretty high carb. How did you find the carb count. Was it online. It is probably good to investigate before you eat. Get the dressing on the side - I usually ask for Oil & Vinegar and apply it myself. Sorry about that suprise - 121g of carbs is quite a salad! So I eat at Applebee's a few times a month (it's one of the few sit-down restaurants in our mall - I go to the mall with my MIL every Saturday). I used to eat their chicken Caesar salad, but I was Continue reading >>

Toss A Healthier Salad

Toss A Healthier Salad

May is not only National Egg Month , its also National Salad Month. With summer right around the corner, the chances are pretty good that youll soon be crunching on salads, if you havent been doing so already. Salads seem to go hand-in-hand with any healthy eating plan, but they can be a double-edged sword, too. Going overboard with certain ingredients can quickly turn a salad into a calorie- and fat-laden disaster. Learn how to make your salads healthy, tasty, and filling with the tips below. Before we dig in to tips for healthy salads, you might be interested to know that: Christopher Columbus introduced lettuce to America. We Americans love our salads: we eat about 30 pounds of lettuce every year! Some salads have as many calories as a Double Cheeseburger. Caesar salad was created in Tijuana, Mexico, by restaurant owner Caesar Cardini. Now that youve learned some salad trivia, its time to start making salads that are better for your waistline and your blood sugars. Build your base. There are many varieties of greens to choose from when making a salad. And the good news is that they all provide nutritional value even iceberg lettuce! How to choose? Go for the darker greens. For example, kale is packed with vitamins A, C, and K, along with phytonutrients that fight cancer and heart disease. Other good choices: mesclun greens, baby spinach, Swiss chard, romaine lettuce, and red or green leaf lettuce. For some zest, throw in watercress or arugula. Add more veggies. Sure, lettuce is fine, but thats just the beginning. Really pack a nutritional punch by adding a variety of vegetables. The more variety, the better. Add tomatoes, different color peppers, cucumbers, radishes, mushrooms, red onions, and carrots, for example. If youre at the salad bar, skip any veggies that ar Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

It's not always easy to follow your diabetes meal plan day after day, but these delicious recipes may help. Appetizer recipes Beverage recipes Bread recipes Breakfast recipes Dessert recipes Main dish recipes Salad recipes Sandwich recipes Sauce and dressing recipes Side dish recipes Soup recipes Vegetable recipes Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Skillet | Caesar Salad With Shrimp

The Diabetic Skillet | Caesar Salad With Shrimp

This is a quick and simple version that is lower in calories and fat. We like using low fat creamy caesar dressing made by Ken's Steakhouse brand, but you can use any favorite. 1/3 cup salad dressing, creamy Caesar, low fat, such as Ken's Steakhous, low fat Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Pat shrimp dry with paper towels and place shrimp in skillet in a single layer. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes on each side until opaque, careful not to over cook. Remove shrimp and place in a bowl. Place all ingredients in a large salad bowl and toss before serving. Per Serving About: 270 calories, 10 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat, 145 mg cholesterol, 24 g protein, 17 g carbohydrates, 1 g dietary fiber, 590 mg sodium, Exchanges: 1 starch, .5 vegetable, 2.5 lean meat, 1.5 fat, Carb Choices: 1 2010 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED THE SIMPLE SKILLET, LLC. POWERED BY ARTICULATE SOLUTIONS INC. The information on this site is intended solely for general educational purposes, and it is not intended to be a substitute for professional dietary and/or medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or before making changes to your diet, exercise or medical programs/routines. Reliance on any information provided on this site is solely at your own risk. Continue reading >>

Foods You Think Are Healthy But Aren T | Diabetic Connect

Foods You Think Are Healthy But Aren T | Diabetic Connect

No food is all or nothing even sugar can be okay to eat in small quantities. However, there are some common dishes many of us think are wholesome, but arent good for you in their typical serving sizes and with the typical ingredients. Here are 10 dishes many think are healthy but arent and how to modify them for better health. With the combination of croutons, heavy dressing, and loads of Parmesan cheese, even a small Caesar salad can deliver a whopping 470 calories with 40 grams of fat and more sodium than a bag of potato chips. Dont let the healthy label salad fool you. For a healthier option, get rid of those croutons, put less cheese on it and go for a lighter salad dressing. The unfortunate thing about taco salads is youre likely to add on a plethora of toppings from sour cream to Mexican blend shredded cheese to piles of guacamole that just arent good for you. Some sources say that a whole fast food taco salad can have 906 calories and 49 grams of fat. Consider foregoing the added cheese, taco sauce, crispy taco shell and guacamole and make a modified taco salad with the meat, beans and lettuce. A Cobb salad may be a lunch favorite, but our bodies certainly could do without it. Many Cobb salads come with supersized portions of bacon, hard-boiled eggs and blue cheese, not to mention dressing on top. The finished product is heaping amounts of fatty meats and cheeses and little lettuce and vegetables. You may want to omit the blue cheese and bacon and instead add more vegetables like peppers and cucumbers. You may think that fresh smoothies you get on your way to work may be jam-packed with nutrients. However, many of the most popular smoothies are filled with sherbet, ice cream, and fruit concentrates all high-sugar products with little to no nutritional value. Mak Continue reading >>

Chicken Caesar Salad Lunch Wraps

Chicken Caesar Salad Lunch Wraps

If you are tired of the same boring sandwich for lunch, try this restaurant-style wrap. It's packed full of flavor, low in carbs, and also gives you a serving of veggies. Use cooked rotisserie chicken from your grocery store for a time-saver. 3 tablespoons light Caesar salad dressing 3 tablespoons freshly shredded Parmesan cheese In a medium bowl, mix together all the ingredients except for the tortillas. Coat the salad evenly with the dressing Spread 1 heaping cup of the chicken salad mixture onto the tortilla. Fold the left and right sides of the wrap in until they touch and roll from the bottom to make a wrap. MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: You can substitute gluten-free wraps and confirm the salad dressing is gluten-free to make this recipe gluten-free. Find 15 great tips that you can use this fall to keep healthy eating on the menu. Come home to a hot meal without actually having to do any cooking. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's moderately active. I am very active every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk more than 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's very active. This number estimates how many calories you should eat per day to keep your body weight where it is now. If you want to lose weight, you may need fewer calories. You should talk with you Continue reading >>

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes A health-care professional for more than 10 years, Rica Lewis has obtained numerous certifications in the industry. In 2006 she began channeling her knowledge into health-related articles for print and online publications. Her work has appeared in "Metroparent Magazine," "Anew Heart Healthcare Magazine" and community newspapers. Lewis earned a diploma from LongRidge Writers Institute. Special meal planning for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes affects pregnant women whose blood sugar levels are elevated during pregnancy. Women who do not have diabetes outside of pregnancy can get gestational diabetes. Expecting mothers are typically tested as a routine part of medical care. The disease is thought to be caused by the placentas hormones blocking the action of the mothers insulin, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The goal of treatment is to keep blood glucose levels normal. Special meal planning in addition to blood glucose monitoring and insulin injections are all aspects of treatment. When planning meals, the ADA recommends women with gestational diabetes limit fat intake to 30 percent or less of daily calories. A healthy breakfast for women with gestational diabetes might begin with whole grain toast with sugar-free jelly, a teaspoon of butter or margarine, one egg and a side of fresh fruit. Lunch could include a leafy green salad with a variety of vegetables, topped with a vinegar and oil dressing or a light variety with low sugar. Lean meats like turkey or chicken are also great salad toppers and can provide a substantial source of protein. Soups can also be great lunch meals and can incorporate a host of vegetables. Packaged foods should be limited, as they are often higher in calories, carboh Continue reading >>

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

If breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day, lunch can often be the most hurried. A recent survey found that 62 percent of Americans rush through lunch at their desks, and even when we manage to leave the office, fast-food restaurants and food courts often prevail over more healthy options. But they don't have to be your only option — and, in fact, they shouldn't be your first choice if you have type 2 diabetes. In general, try to pack your own lunch whenever possible — the health benefits, not to mention the cost-savings, can be enormous. Short on prep time? Put these quick and nutritious lunch ideas on your menu to fill you up and keep your blood sugar in check. 1. Salads Salad should be in regular rotation for lunch. You can create a different salad every day of the week by varying your toppings. Try grilled chicken, shrimp, or fish, but avoid heaping on a lot of fattening ingredients, such as bacon bits and heavy cheeses. Salads with lots of raw vegetables are best, including carrots, cucumbers, radishes, celery, and spinach. Sprinkle nuts or seeds on top, add a few dried cranberries, and garnish with some avocado chunks to give it zip. Choose a salad dressing made with vinegar and olive oil to avoid added sugars found in fat-free and low-fat versions, and limit the serving to one tablespoon for a side salad and two tablespoons for an entrée-sized salad. 2. Sandwiches As with salads, there are many ways to spice up a sandwich. Start with whole-grain bread or a whole-wheat tortilla. Pick a lean meat, such as turkey, ham, or grilled chicken; layer on your choice of veggies; add mustard, low-fat mayonnaise, or hummus to the mix — and you have a filling and tasty lunch. Stay away from greasy chips, French fries, and other fattening sides. Instead choose fr Continue reading >>

Healthy... Or Not? Yogurt And Salad - Diabetes Self-management

Healthy... Or Not? Yogurt And Salad - Diabetes Self-management

Grocery shopping can be a daunting task for anyone, even dietitians. Keeping up with label reading and trying to decipher the ingredients list practically requires a PhD. (OK, perhaps thats an exaggeration, but it can often be confusing.) Whats frustrating for me is the sneaky, stealthy way that some (not all) food manufacturers package and advertise their foods to make them seem healthy and good for you. I sometimes have to pause when Im shopping to figure out if the product is really too good to be true. I can imagine how confusing it can be for people who are honestly trying to make better food choices without spending hours in the supermarket. So this week, Im highlighting a few of those health foods that maybe are thinly disguised. I should point out that the definition of healthy is somewhat subjective. For example, you may decide that a healthy food is one that is low in calories or low in carbohydrate. Others may define healthy as being free of artificial sweeteners or food colorings. Im a big fan of yogurt. Its a great source of calcium, protein, and good-for-you bacteria called probiotics. The downside of some yogurts is that they can be filled with sugar. Many people dont care for the tangy taste of plain yogurt, so food companies doctor up their yogurt by adding fruitalong with high fructose corn syrup. And to get kids to eat their yogurt, the companies have added even more sugar in the form of those little crunchy-things (such as cookies) to stir in, essentially making a highly nutritious food not much better than a sugary dessert. Lets take Dannon Fruit on the Bottom Raspberry yogurt: A 6-ounce cup contains 150 calories, 1.5 grams of fat, and 1 gram of saturated fat. Not too bad in terms of heart health (low-saturated-fat foods have no more than 1 gram pe Continue reading >>

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

How to keep your blood sugar in check when dining out. By the dLife Editors Going out to eat is fraught with challenges for people who need to watch their blood sugar. There’s the giant portion size issue, the unknown ingredients, and the “special-occasion effect.” That’s the way we tell ourselves it’s ok to make unhealthy choices on special occasions. Our idea of what constitutes a special occasion is pretty subjective. Here are some tips on making d-friendly choices in restaurants, by type of cuisine. What to Order at Italian Restaurants Italian restaurants can be full of high-carbohydrate foods like bread, pasta, pizza, risotto, and gnocci. Many of these combine refined carbs with processed meats like sausage and pepperoni, and batters or breading (think eggplant Parmesan or fried mozzarella). Things you can do: Ask your server to skip the bread basket for your table. If you’re going to splurge and have pasta, ask for it as a side dish and don’t eat more than the size of your fist. That’s one cup of pasta, or about 45 grams of carbohydrate. Order unbreaded chicken or veal baked with sauces like piccata, marsala, puttanesca, francese, or cacciatore. Other good choices include: Caesar salad with grilled or baked fish, escarole and beans, and minestrone soup. What to Order at Mexican Restaurants Mexican food can be full of carbohydrates with large portions of rice, beans, and tortillas. Things you can do: At the very least, limit portion sizes. Ask to have half your plate wrapped to go before you even start eating. Skip the rice; ask for black beans or salad in its place. If you love chips and salsa, take a handful and then ask for the basket to be removed from the table. Order soft chicken or fish tacos and eat the fillings with a fork, skipping the tor Continue reading >>

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