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Is Cabbage Ok For A Diabetic To Eat?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

If you have type 2 diabetes — the most common form of diabetes — eating a healthy, well-balanced diet is critical to controlling your weight, blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol. By enriching your diet and creating a meal plan tailored to your personal preferences and lifestyle, you'll be able to enjoy the foods you love while minimizing complications and reducing further risk. Although there isn’t any research that directly supports individual dietary choices in the fight against type 2 diabetes, it doesn’t hurt to maintain a balanced diet. More often than not, the average diet is lacking in these key nutrients: calcium magnesium fiber potassium vitamins A, C, D, and E vitamin B-12 for those on metformin Adding foods rich in these nutrients is often a great first step in diabetes management. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the following are considered to be diabetes superfoods: Fat-free milk and yogurt are both a good source of vitamin D, which promotes strong bones and teeth. Whole grains containing germ and bran are often rich in magnesium, chromium, and folate. Regardless of the type, berries are an excellent source of antioxidants and fiber. Citrus fruits, such as oranges, lemons, and limes, are high in vitamin C. Not only are beans high in fiber, they’re a solid source of potassium and magnesium. Omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce your risk of heart disease, so don’t shy away from salmon dishes. In addition to providing magnesium and fiber, nuts can help with hunger management. Some nuts and seeds also contain omega-3s. Tomatoes contain crucial nutrients such as vitamins C and E. Swap regular potatoes for sweet potatoes, which are chock-full of potassium and vitamin A. Dark green leafy vegetables like collards and kale a Continue reading >>

What Vegetables Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics?

What Vegetables Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics?

Vegetables are a healthy part of the diet of people who have type 2 diabetes. If you have this condition, you are encouraged to eat from the rainbow of vegetables, as colorful choices provide an array of nutrients, vitamins and minerals. Choose dark, leafy greens, deep purples, and bright red, orange and yellow vegetables for great health benefits. Vegetables are also usually excellent sources of fiber and antioxidants, plus they are low in calories. There are only a handful of vegetables that people with diabetes need to watch, and that’s because of their starch content. Video of the Day Green vegetables provide a lot of bang for the calorie buck. You are likely get a plentiful serving of vitamins A, C, E and K, along with calcium, potassium and magnesium. Green vegetables tend to be low-carb foods. The American Diabetes Association says healthy green vegetables for diabetics include asparagus, broccoli, green cabbage, Swiss chard, bok choy, spinach, Brussels sprouts, celery, chayote, artichoke, cucumber and kale, along with collard, mustard and turnip greens. This isn’t an exhaustive list by any stretch, however. Orange, Red and Yellow With so many choices, you never have to guess which vegetables are good for you because they all contain important nutrients. Look to carrots, baby corn, squash, tomatoes and radishes when you want to have fun with bright orange, red and yellow vegetables. Red tomatoes contain high concentrations of lycopene, a powerful antioxidant that MedlinePlus says helps to ward off cancers of the prostate, lung, bladder, ovaries, colon and pancreas. The American Diabetes Association recommends squash because it can be eaten year-round, as there are winter and summer varieties of squash. Squash contains a good helping of vitamins A and C, some Continue reading >>

Can Sugar Patients Eat Cabbage?

Can Sugar Patients Eat Cabbage?

Yes! Anyone can eat any fruit and veg! Medical industry (not same as medical science) has been feeding us with wrong information through ads, and we all started believing that fruits and veggies could be bad for few….that’s not true. I have seen many sugar/diabetes patients being cured permanently with just plant based diet so go and have it as mush as you can! :) Continue reading >>

Cabbage, A Natural Medicine For Cancer And Diabetes

Cabbage, A Natural Medicine For Cancer And Diabetes

The beautiful, lowly cabbage. It’s a close relative to several other leafy green veggies such as cauliflower and broccoli, and it has a lengthy history as both a vital food as well as medicine. The Ancient Greeks would often prescribe cabbage juice to treat mushroom poisoning or constipation. The Ancient Egyptians ate cabbage before meals to keep themselves from becoming overly intoxicated when drinking wine. Even the British brought cabbages to those in the trenches of World War 1, to use the leaves as bandages and heal treat trench foot. The humble cabbage has been used throughout history as a medicine due to its very dense concentration of nutrients. Cabbage has almost the same nutritional profile as broccoli, and is proven to treat many of the same health conditions its darker green cousin does. Sautéing cabbage is a great way to help it retain the most nutrients, however steaming and boiling is also acceptable. Eating them raw, such as in salads or on sandwiches, is perhaps the best way. However, it’s important to note that, regardless of how you choose to eat them, cabbages must be organic in nature. Cabbage heads are not protected by any sort of shell or skin, so they get completely exposed to herbicides, fungicides, and pesticides. Also, cabbages are famous for being susceptible to mineral deficiencies that come from poor soil. Organic farms have a tendency to have the healthiest soil, which will make for the most nutritious, not to mention, tasty cabbages. Cabbage is a very powerful veggie; so much so that ancient healers claimed it must have contained moon power because it grew in the moonlight. Modern science knows that its power comes from its high vitamin C and sulfur content. But no matter how you look at it, cabbage is a true super food that’s wort Continue reading >>

Spinach And Cabbage 'may Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes'

Spinach And Cabbage 'may Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes'

Spinach and cabbage 'may reduce risk of type 2 diabetes' Eating extra cabbage, broccoli and spinach may reduce the risk of developing type two diabetes, researchers have found. There are around two million people in Britain with type two diabetes and some do not know they have itPhoto: ALAMY A diet rich in leafy green vegetables was associated with a 14 per cent reduced risk of developing the condition, a study by a team at University of Leicester has found. There are around two million people in Britain with type two diabetes and some do not know they have it. A diet high in fruit and vegetables generally has been found to reduce the risk of cancer and heart disease but it had not been known whether there was a beneficial effect in diabetes. Patrice Carter, a research nutritionist at the University and lead author, wrote in the British Medical Journal online that a lack of fruit and vegetables is thought to account for 2.6m deaths worldwide in 2000. The team analysed six research studies involving more than 220,000 people. Heart safety of popular diabetes drug reviewed by regulators It was concluded that eating 1.15 servings of leafy green vegetables a day resulted in a 14 per cent reduced risk of type two diabetes when compared with people who ate less than half a serving per day. This was the equivalent of eating 122 grams of leafy green vegetables per day. However there was no significant link between overall consumption of fruit and vegetables and the condition although the trend suggested eating more portions was beneficial. Mr Carter wrote: "there are several possible mechanisms that could explain the benefit of consuming green leafy vegetables in the diet. "Our results support the evidence that foods rather than isolated components such as antioxidants are bene Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, in many ways your diet is your medicine. As diabetes educators, we help patients understand what food and beverage choices are best to avoid. When foods are high in carbohydrates, fat and sodium, they increase your risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight gain, heart disease and uncontrolled sugar . Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Sweetened drinks. These include regular pop/soda, fruit punches and iced teas. These are loaded with sugar and calories, and they usually have little or no nutritional value. Instead, try infusing plain water with different berries and fruits so you can enjoy the natural sweetness. “Designer” or specialty coffee drinks – including frappuccinos or cappuccinos. That “once a day special treat” can add up to lots of extra sugar, calories and saturated fat. Instead, go for straight java, either black, with artificial sweetener or a small splash of skim milk. Whole milk. It has too much fat, which can lead to weight gain. Switch to 2 percent, 1 percent – or even better: skim milk. Keep in mind that one cup of skim milk has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you don’t like milk or are lactose intolerant, you can drink almond milk, rice milk or soy milk instead—but remember to get the low sugar varieties. Hot dogs. These grilled little favorites are still high in saturated fat and sodium—yes, that even includes turkey dogs! Try to avoid them or eat them only occasionally. Packaged lunch meats. These are also high in saturated fat and sodium. Check your deli for low sodium meats—or better yet use sliced meat that you’ve roasted at home to make your sandwic Continue reading >>

Vegetables For Diabetics – What To Eat And Avoid

Vegetables For Diabetics – What To Eat And Avoid

Vegetables are a vital component of a healthy diet and this is particularly true for diabetics. Most fruits and vegetables are high in fiber and nutrient dense but low in calories making them ideal for diabetics who often need to watch their calorie intake. The general rule of thumb for diabetics is that root vegetables should be eaten in moderation (no more than 1 serving a day), while green and red vegetables are great choices and should be consumed in high amounts, preferably 3-5 servings a day. There are exceptions to this rule that we will discuss in more detail below. Root Vegetables & Tubers Root vegetables and tubers are relatively concentrated sources of sugars and starches and tend to contain only small amounts of fiber. This can be problematic for diabetics because they can produce a large glycemic response in situations when they are not combined with high fiber foods. The glycemic index of root vegetables and tubers range from moderate (40-60) to very high (80+). The lowest GI vegetables are yams, carrots and sweet potatoes with GI values of 38, 47 and 55 respectively. High GI root vegetables include potatoes (GI of 60-90), parsnip (97), rutabaga (71), and beets (65). If you like these vegetables, try and limit your intake to one serving (approx. 200g) a day. Cooking method also has a significant impact on the GI value of the vegetable. In general, boiling rather than baking or mashing a root vegetable will result in a lower GI. Boiled potatoes for example have a GI of around 70 compared to 80-90 for mashing or baking. Cooking root vegetables converts some of the starch into simple sugars which are more readily absorbed by the body, increasing their GI values. A raw carrot for example has a GI of just 15, while over-cooking a carrot until it turns to mush c Continue reading >>

Best Vegetables For Diabetes

Best Vegetables For Diabetes

When I say to people, it's best to eat a low carb diet for diabetes – they often say “But, don't I need to eat carbs?” Sure, you do. A low carb diet is not a no carb diet. But something that most people don't realize is that vegetables are carbohydrates, too. In fact, they are the type of carbohydrates most of us need to eat more of. So, we've recently talked about starch and root vegetables and potatoes, now we're going to cover the best vegetables to eat as a diabetic. Why You Need To Eat More Vegetables I could give you a dozen reasons why you need to eat more vegetables because research shows they have unlimited health benefits – they really are incredible – but I'll give you just a few reasons right now. Low in carbs You'll see in just a minute in the food charts below, that vegetables are low in carbohydrates. This makes them the perfect source of carbs because they are not going to send your blood sugar soaring like bread, pasta, or rice. Lots of Nutrients Vegetables contain many protective ingredients such as antioxidants, flavonoids, vitamins, minerals, and fiber – these all help ward off disease, reduce diabetic complications and keep the cells and organs in your body healthier. Lower Blood Sugar, A1C & Cholesterol Research shows that increasing your vegetable intake helps lower blood sugar A1C and cholesterol. Promote Healthy Digestion Eating your vegetables helps promote a healthy bowel and keeps you regular! Eating more veggies is the easiest way to get your daily requirement of dietary fiber and will help reduce your risk of colon cancer and keep you super healthy – or help you get healthy again. Did you know that your gastrointestinal tract is one of the largest immune organs in your body? It hosts 70-80% of our immune system and a whole ran Continue reading >>

Myth: I Can't Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes

Myth: I Can't Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes

Save for later Although we know fruits and vegetables are good for us people with diabetes are often told they can’t eat fruit because they are too sweet or contain sugar. All fruits contain natural sugar, but also contain a good mix of vitamins, minerals and fibre. Why are fruit and vegetables so good for us? Eating fruits and vegetables lowers the risk of developing many health conditions including high blood pressure, heart diseases, strokes, obesity and certain cancers. It’s even more important for people with diabetes to eat more fruits and vegetables as most of these conditions are more likely to affect them. Fruits and vegetables have a good mix of soluble and insoluble fibre which is good for your bowels and general health – so it makes sense to eat more of them Should people with diabetes cut back on fruit because of sugar content? Managing diabetes has to do with managing your blood glucose, blood fats, blood pressure and your weight, and fruits and vegetables can play a positive role in all these. The concern has been that because fruits contain sugar, it makes your blood glucose go up. In fact, most fruits have low to medium glycaemic index, so they do not lead to a sharp rise in your blood glucose levels compared to other carbohydrate containing foods like white or wholemeal bread. Portion size is very important when considering the biggest effects on your blood glucose levels so let’s look at this in more detail. A portion of fruit contains about 15-20g carbohydrate on average, which is similar to a slice of bread. To put things in perspective, just a can of cola contains 35g carb and a medium slice of chocolate cake contains 35g of carbs as well. So, if you are looking to reduce your carb intake, with the aim to manage blood glucose levels, the ad Continue reading >>

Cabbage And Type 2 Diabetes

Cabbage And Type 2 Diabetes

Cabbage is a cruciferous vegetable (along with broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and others). There are 3 different types of cabbage: red, green and savoy (and of course the Chinese varieties). Here we're putting cabbage in the spotlight, including nutrition and health facts, cooking and kitchen tips, and recipes. Cabbage Nutrition Facts Cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin K, C, and B6, and a very good source of manganese, fiber, potassium, vitamin B1, folate and copper. It has unique antioxidant properties including anthocyanins, which are anti-inflammatory. It provides a rich supply of glucosinolates, phytonutrients which are effective in detoxification. All types of cabbage are beneficial and contain different glucosinolates so it is wise to consume a variety from each type available. Cabbage (1 cup shredded raw, 70 g) Nutrition Facts Calories: 18 | Total Fat: 0.07 g | Sat Fat: 0.024 g | Poly: 0.012 g | Mono: 0.012 g | Total Carbs: 4.06 g | Fiber: 1.8 g | Net Carbs: 2.26 g | Protein: 0.90 g Minerals Calcium: 28 mg | Iron: 0.33 mg | Magnesium: 9 mg | Phosphorus: 18 mg | Potassium: 119 mg | Zinc: 0.13 mg Vitamins Vitamin C: 25.6 mg | Thiamin: 0.043 mg | Riboflavin: 0.028 mg | Niacin: 0.164 mg | Vit B6: 0.087 mg | Folate: 30 ug | Vit B12: 0 mg | Vit A: 69 IU | Vit E: 0.10 mg | Vit D: 0 IU | Vit K: 53.2 ug Cabbage (1/2 cup shredded cooked, boiled, drained, no salt, 75 g) Nutrition Facts Calories: 0 | Total Fat: 0.04 g | Sat Fat: 0 g | Poly: 0.017 g | Mono: 0.014 g | Total Carbs: 4.13 g | Fiber: 1.4 g | Net Carbs: 2.73 g | Protein: 0.95 g Minerals Calcium: 36 mg | Iron: 0.13 mg | Magnesium: 11 mg | Phosphorus: 25 mg | Potassium: 147 mg | Zinc: 0.15 mg Vitamins Vitamin C: 28.1 mg | Thiamin: 0.046 mg | Riboflavin: 0.028 mg | Niacin: 0.186 mg | Vit B6: 0.084 mg | Continue reading >>

8 Low-carb Veggies For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Low-carb Veggies For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 Best Low-Carb Veggies for a Diabetes-Friendly Diet When you have type 2 diabetes, eating low-carb vegetables is a smart way to fill up without filling out your waistline — or spiking your blood sugar levels. Non-starchy or low-carbohydrate veggies are loaded with vitamins, minerals, and fiber while still being low in calories. It’s always smart to eat a rainbow-colored diet, but the following veggies are among the best. Continue reading >>

Got Pre-diabetes? Here’s Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Got Pre-diabetes? Here’s Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Diabetes Prevention Programs Studies around the world, including Finland, China and the US have shown diabetes prevention programs prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes. When people eat more healthily, drop their body weight by 5-10% and walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, they lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by about 58% over two years. We recently gave 101 men with pre-diabetes a self-directed diabetes prevention program over six months. We found they were able to reduce their portion size of potato and meat and improve their variety of health foods. They were able to reduce the proportion of energy coming from junk food by 7.6% more than the group who didn’t change their diet and got a four-point increase in their scores from the Healthy Eating Quiz. These improved eating patterns were associated with an average weight loss of 5.5kg and better blood sugar regulation. This is great news for the 318 million adults around the world, including two million Australians, who have pre-diabetes. The original diabetes prevention studies started in the 1980s. Back then the advice was to reduce your total kilojoule intake by eating less fat, especially from take-away, processed and fried foods and to eat more foods rich in carbohydrate, such as vegetables, fruit and wholegrains. That advice worked because the world did not have the huge numbers of ultra-processed foods and drinks, many of whic Continue reading >>

5 Fermented Foods To Control Weight And Blood Sugar In Diabetes

5 Fermented Foods To Control Weight And Blood Sugar In Diabetes

1 / 6 Go With Your Gut: Why Fermented Foods Can Be Good for Diabetes The pursuit of a healthy gut is a popular goal right now, and you may hear many people touting the benefits of fermented foods, like sauerkraut, miso, or kombucha. In these foods, bacteria ferment sugars or carbohydrates, delivering a unique flavor to that food — and perhaps health benefits for people with diabetes, too. It all has to do with the gut microbiome, the environment of bacteria that live in your gut, which potentially affects your immune system, your weight, and your risk for certain chronic diseases, according to a review published in January 2016 in the journal Current Opinion in Gastroenterology. Meanwhile, other studies, like those explored in a review published in January 2015 in the journal Diabetes Care, have found that changes in the gut microbiome may play a particular role in individuals’ risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Maintaining this collection of natural bacteria can help us stay healthy and potentially increase our longevity, research suggests, whereas other factors, such as not finishing a prescribed round of antibiotics, possessing certain dietary habits, and having impaired bowel function, can have an impact on this balance. The idea has inspired dozens of books on achieving and maintaining a healthy gut — with the majority of them offering dietary advice to help people lose unwanted weight. And at the center of it all? Fermented foods. Not only can these eats help promote gastrointestinal (GI) health and wellness — and potentially even your mood, some research suggests — but they’re also often rich with fiber, a component of food that can promote feelings of fullness, thereby promoting a healthy weight, and help stabilize blood sugar if you have type 2 d Continue reading >>

Can Cabbage Help Control Diabetes?

Can Cabbage Help Control Diabetes?

For a regular person cabbage might not be a top favourite. And there are valid reasons – it’s smelly, it’s unappealing and if not cooked right, can be very tasteless too. But if you are a diabetic or suffering from metabolic syndrome, then cabbage is that one vegetable that should be on your grocery list without fail. Yes, cabbage can do wonders to treat diabetes naturally, and probably get you off medications too (if you are lucky). Did you know okra or ladies finger can also help fight diabetes naturally? It helps to lose weight: Cabbage is low in calories and high in fibre content, so it becomes an ideal vegetable to choose for diabetics. It is also low on glycemic index with a rank of 10 (anything below 55 is considered low). GI is an indicator of how fast the carbohydrates will raise the blood glucose levels in your blood. A food item with a high GI means it will raise the levels quickly as compared to food with low GI. So bring cabbage to your table as often as you can. Here is a sample diet plan for diabetes to control blood sugar levels. Controls blood sugar: Cabbage also has a lot of antioxidant and antihyperglycemic properties that make it a medicine for diabetes. In a study done on rats in 2008, cabbage extracts fed to them for 60 days lowered blood sugar levels and also helped to control fluctuations and keep the readings in the safe range. Here are 10 home remedies for diabetes that really work. Improves kidney functions: Since cabbage can help keep blood sugar level in control, it also helps to maintain the kidney functions. When a diabetic has extremely high blood sugar levels (over 600 mg/dl), the kidneys try to get rid of the extra blood sugar by eliminating it through urine. This leads to excessive loss of body fluids, resulting in dehydration. D Continue reading >>

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