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Is Brussel Sprouts Good For A Diabetic?

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat? Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein. The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar. Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable. Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks. A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health. Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes. Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calories and 5 grams of fat, only 1.6 grams of which are saturated fat. Eggs are versatile and can be prepared in different ways to suit your tastes. You can make an already-healthy food even better by mixi Continue reading >>

Vegetables For Diabetics – What To Eat And Avoid

Vegetables For Diabetics – What To Eat And Avoid

Vegetables are a vital component of a healthy diet and this is particularly true for diabetics. Most fruits and vegetables are high in fiber and nutrient dense but low in calories making them ideal for diabetics who often need to watch their calorie intake. The general rule of thumb for diabetics is that root vegetables should be eaten in moderation (no more than 1 serving a day), while green and red vegetables are great choices and should be consumed in high amounts, preferably 3-5 servings a day. There are exceptions to this rule that we will discuss in more detail below. Root Vegetables & Tubers Root vegetables and tubers are relatively concentrated sources of sugars and starches and tend to contain only small amounts of fiber. This can be problematic for diabetics because they can produce a large glycemic response in situations when they are not combined with high fiber foods. The glycemic index of root vegetables and tubers range from moderate (40-60) to very high (80+). The lowest GI vegetables are yams, carrots and sweet potatoes with GI values of 38, 47 and 55 respectively. High GI root vegetables include potatoes (GI of 60-90), parsnip (97), rutabaga (71), and beets (65). If you like these vegetables, try and limit your intake to one serving (approx. 200g) a day. Cooking method also has a significant impact on the GI value of the vegetable. In general, boiling rather than baking or mashing a root vegetable will result in a lower GI. Boiled potatoes for example have a GI of around 70 compared to 80-90 for mashing or baking. Cooking root vegetables converts some of the starch into simple sugars which are more readily absorbed by the body, increasing their GI values. A raw carrot for example has a GI of just 15, while over-cooking a carrot until it turns to mush c Continue reading >>

Recipe Of The Week: Seasoned Brussels Sprouts

Recipe Of The Week: Seasoned Brussels Sprouts

Recipe of the Week: Seasoned Brussels sprouts This nourishing vegetable dish is spruced up with garlic and ginger and garnished with toasted almonds (the health benefits of which Amy Campbell explains in her blog entry this week ). Brussels sprouts are a cool season crop related to cabbages and other leafy greens; you should be able to find them fresh or frozen at your grocery store. (Note: If youre watching your sodium intake, you may want to cut down on the added salt in this dish or replace it with a salt-free spice mixture.) And remember that hundreds of additional recipes are always available in our recipes section! Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments to such blog posts (whether posted by us, our agents or bloggers, or by users) do not constitute medical advice or recommendation of any kind, and you should not rely on any information contained in such posts or comments to replace consultations with your qualified health care professionals to meet your individual needs. The opinions and other information contained in the blog posts and comments do not reflect the opinions or positions of the Site Proprietor. All comments are moderated and there may be a delay in the publication of your comment. Please be on-topic and appropriate. Do not disclose personal information. Be respectful of other posters. Only post information that is correct and true to your knowledge. When referencing information that is not based on personal experience, please provide links to your sources. All commenters are considered to be nonmedical professionals unless explicitly stated otherwise. Promotion of your own or someone else's business or competing site is not allowed: Sharing links to sites that are relevant to the topic at hand is permitted, bu Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet is one of the most important treatments in managing diabetes and kidney disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease as a result of diabetes, you’ll need to work with a dietitian to create an eating plan that’s right for you. This plan will help manage your blood glucose levels and reduce the amount of waste and fluid your kidneys process. Which nutrients do I need to regulate? Your dietitian will give you nutritional guidelines that tell you how much protein, fat and carbohydrate you can eat, as well as how much potassium, phosphorus and sodium you can have each day. Because your diet needs to be lower in these minerals, you’ll limit or avoid certain foods, while planning your meals. Portion control is also important. Talk to your dietitian regarding tips for accurately measuring a serving size. What may be measured as one serving on a regular diet may count as three servings on the kidney diet. Your doctor and dietitian will also recommend you eat meals and snacks of the same size and calorie/carbohydrate content at certain times of the day to keep your blood glucose at an even level. .It’s important to check blood glucose levels often and share the results with your doctor. What can I eat? Below is an example of food choices that are usually recommended on a typical renal diabetic diet. This list is based on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and high sugar content of foods included. Ask your dietitian if you can have any of these listed foods and make sure you know what the recommended serving size should be. Carbohydrate Foods Milk and nondairy Recommended Avoid Skim or fat-free milk, non-dairy creamer, plain yogurt, sugar-free yogurt, sugar-free pudding, sugar-free ice cream, sugar-free nondairy frozen desserts* *Portions of dairy products are o Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Brussel Sprouts?????

Brussel Sprouts?????

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have been diligent for the last month regarding a food diary & what does & doesn't cause me to spike. Now I think this is bizarre and am hoping for an explaination or feedback. Brussel Sprouts cause me to go higher than any other veg. As a matter of fact I had them 2 days in a row & my morning numbers were higher than they have been since I was diagnosed (6.0 & 6.1). Looking back at my food diary I noticed this earlier on in the month but didn't clue in. The rest of the food I ate during these 2 days don't cause me to go high or spike. This then caused me to have a mini breakdown (ie - I try & try - so whats the point) As a result I pigged out to a major degree last night and woke up at 5.7 - I just don't get it. Thanks for letting me vent - mini breakdown & all Brussel Sprouts affect me that way too--and they are one of my favourites. Hang in there though. I will tell you that after a couple of years of low carbing and controlling my blood sugar I can tolerate more things now. Also I know my body rythms now and know that late afternoon and early evening is when these kind of things affect me less--especially if I am active. I can enjoy brussel sprouts now in small quantities only. I wouldn't have them two days in a row either. Why not put them on the "not now" list and try them again at a later time. When you try again, I would advise trying a small quantity at first and testing a lot around the sprouts. I do not know why these little yummy gems have such a powerful effect on BG for me and would love to hear from someone who has a theory about that. One more example of something that I tho Continue reading >>

8 Low-carb Veggies For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Low-carb Veggies For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 Best Low-Carb Veggies for a Diabetes-Friendly Diet When you have type 2 diabetes, eating low-carb vegetables is a smart way to fill up without filling out your waistline — or spiking your blood sugar levels. Non-starchy or low-carbohydrate veggies are loaded with vitamins, minerals, and fiber while still being low in calories. It’s always smart to eat a rainbow-colored diet, but the following veggies are among the best. Continue reading >>

Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Bacon

Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Bacon

Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon 2 slices bacon, crisp-cooked, drained, and crumbled 2 teaspoons finely shredded lemon peel (optional) Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Cut large Brussels sprouts into lengthwise quarters or cut small sprouts in half. In a large bowl toss together sprouts, 1 tablespoon of the vinegar, and the oil until sprouts are lightly coated. Sprinkle with pepper and salt; toss to coat. Place Brussels sprouts in a single layer on a baking sheet. Roast for 20 to 30 minutes or until sprouts become brown and tender, turning sprouts every 10 minutes. Transfer Brussels sprouts to a large bowl. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon vinegar and sprinkle with bacon. If desired, garnish with lemon peel. Tip: To bake pork bacon, place slices side by side on a rack in a foil-lined shallow baking pan with sides. Bake for 18 to 21 minutes or until bacon is crisp-cooked Drain well on paper towels. PER SERVING: 108 cal., 5 g total fat (1 g sat. fat), 4 mg chol., 195 mg sodium, 12 g carb. (4 g fiber, 4 g sugars), 5 g pro. Continue reading >>

Brussels Sprouts And Type 2 Diabetes

Brussels Sprouts And Type 2 Diabetes

Brussels sprouts are very low in calories touting only 56 calories per cup cooked low glycemic index food (exact value unmeasured) Brussels sprouts contain many phytochemicals, including being one of the highest sources of glucosinolates Brussels sprouts are very high in vitamin K providing 243% DV A serving of Brussels sprouts provides 129% DV for vitamin C Brussels sprouts provide many B vitamins and 4 grams fiber Brussels sprouts contain a small amount of omega-3 fatty acids (not very common in vegetables) Glucosinolates in particular (and phytochemicals generally) have been shown to have cancer protective attributes Vitamin K is essential for blood clotting, bone structure and heart function Vitamin C is an antioxidant and builds collagen to form healthy skin tissue Fiber is essential for healthy bowel movement, providing satiety and keep Omega-3 Fatty Acids help fight inflammation and support brain health Research on Brussels Sprouts Specific to T2 Diabetes anti-diabetic effect in that they decreased the hyperglycemic effect when fed to rabbits. Additionally, research studying foods in the same plant family/species have found an improvement of diabetic neuropathy in rats. Another study found similar effects on glucose as well as a decrease in lipids. Brussels sprouts as a component of a Mediterranean diet has been shown to help reduce risk of blindness through curbing glaucoma and cataracts in African type 2 diabetics. Sulfur components in Brussels sprouts play a Cruciferous vegetables, including Brussels sprouts, seem to benefit and cultivate liver health and aid in strengthening the bodys natural detoxification system. Cruciferous vegetables contain sulfur, which have an anti-inflammatory effect. This can effectively counter much of the thiocyanates, which inhib Continue reading >>

What Is A Brussels Sprouts Recipe For People With Diabetes?

What Is A Brussels Sprouts Recipe For People With Diabetes?

What is a Brussels sprouts recipe for people with diabetes? Youll want to eat your Brussels sprouts when they're paired with hazelnuts and a hint of cardamom. Nutrient-rich Brussels sprouts are high in antioxidant vitamins C and K and are a good source of dietary fiber -- so they're an excellent choice for people with diabetes. 1 lb fresh Brussels sprouts, washed, stems and loose leaves trimmed 1. Cut Brussels sprouts in half lengthwise. 2. In large saucepan, add water and salt. Bring to boil. Add sprouts. When water returns to boil, remove to colander to drain. 3. In large skillet, heat 1 teaspoon oil over medium high. Place half of sprouts, cut side down, in pan. Cook 5 minutes until golden brown. Remove to serving dish. 4. Return skillet to heat. Add 1 teaspoon oil. Place remaining sprouts, cut side down, in pan. Cook 5 minutes until golden brown. Remove to serving dish. 5. Toss with 1 teaspoon olive oil, nuts, and cardamom. Serve. Almonds or walnuts can be substituted for hazelnuts. Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the bodys inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes ... is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health Continue reading >>

Which Fruits And Vegetables Can Diabetics Eat?

Which Fruits And Vegetables Can Diabetics Eat?

Diabetics can eat almost every kind of fruit or vegetable. Fruits and vegetables are loaded with the nutrients that keep your body running smoothly. But they are also high in carbohydrates, which raise blood sugar levels, something diabetics need to be careful about. Some fruits and vegetables offer more nutrition than others, even when they have the same number of carbohydrates per equal portion. Many diabetics have other conditions that limit the kinds of fruits and vegetables they can eat. Video of the Day If you have diabetes you have to keep a close eye on the amount of carbohydrates you eat. The American Diabetes Association gives a range — 45 to 60 grams per meal — of carbohydrates you should include in your diet. This broad range can varies from person to person, depending on their metabolism and level of activity. Fruits and vegetables are made up primarily of simple and complex carbohydrates. Though carbohydrates are essential fuel for your body, eating too many carbohydrates can lead to weight gain and high blood glucose levels over your target range. Fruits contain many vitamins and minerals necessary for good brain and body health. Fruits are simple carbohydrates, however, and too many or the wrong kind can quickly raise your blood sugar and also lead to weight gain. Eating the same amount of pineapple and apples can have very different effects. Apples are low on the glycemic index, making your blood glucose rise more slowly. Pineapple is a high-glycemic fruit, causing your blood sugar to increase rapidly. Green leafy vegetables are especially healthy for you, whether you are diabetic or not. Spinach, kale and parsley are packed with the vitamins and minerals your body needs while being relatively low in carbohydrates. Red, yellow and orange vegetables Continue reading >>

Healthy Vegetables For High Blood Sugar

Healthy Vegetables For High Blood Sugar

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 79 million American adults have prediabetes. By making healthy dietary choices, you can prevent developing diabetes or effectively manage the condition. Simply adding vegetables to your diet isn’t good enough; some plants are better for managing your blood sugar levels than others. Whether you are at a restaurant or in a supermarket, learning to make the best choices for your health can help you take control of your blood sugar levels. The glycemic index, or GI, helps determine how carbohydrates in food raise blood sugar levels. Foods with a high GI raise your blood sugar level more than foods with a low or medium GI. Foods with minimal or no carbs, such as meat, eggs and cheese, do not have a GI. According to the American Diabetes Association, you can balance the effects of high-GI foods with low-GI foods. Therefore, add low GI vegetables to your meals. The glycemic load takes into account the serving size, as well as how much the food raises your blood glucose. Carrots, parsnips and green peas all have a GL rating of 4 or less per serving. High-Fiber Vegetables According to MayoClinic.com, insoluble fiber helps prevent Type 2 diabetes and soluble fiber can help slow sugar absorption in the blood, which helps improve blood sugar control. High-fiber vegetables include potatoes -- with the skin -- Brussels sprouts, spinach, chickpeas and lima beans. MayoClinic.com recommends that men aged 50 and younger should consume 38 grams of fiber daily, while women of the same age range should aim for 25 grams. Men who are aged 51 and older should have 30 grams of fiber daily, and women should consume 21 grams. Vegetables To Avoid Vegetables naturally have little or no fats and sugar, but certain commercial Continue reading >>

Vegetables: Super Foods That Help Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Vegetables: Super Foods That Help Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Author Sidebar: When I was diabetic, I used to hate vegetables. When my mother made me eat vegetables after I got out of the hospital, I was surprised (and happy) how much my blood glucose level dropped! My doctors were also surprised, but my endocrinologist felt that I should stop eating green vegetables. He felt that the Vitamin K content in the vegetables would reduce the effectiveness of the blood thinner medication (Coumadin) that I was taking because of my blood clot issue. Luckily for me, I feared my mother more than the endocrinologist :-) so I decided to keep eating vegetables despite the blood clot threat. After 3.5 months, I was able to stop taking insulin shots. A month later, my doctor took me off the Coumadin.So, now I love love love vegetables. :-) Most vegetables are actually super foods. Why? Because studies have shown that the nutrients within most vegetables (and some fruits) can help prevent and reverse the damage to blood vessels and body tissues caused by Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and other similar diseases. Consequently, if you are trying to prevent the onset of disease or if you are fighting a specific disease, you should consume whole vegetables with each and every meal, and (some) whole fruits as part of a daily snack or dessert. There are several ways to classify vegetables. Generally, vegetables are classified according to their botanical families or what part of the plant is eaten (such as the root, stalk, or leaves). Leafy Vegetables - This vegetable group includes salad greens, spinach, collards, kale, radicchio, and watercress. Leafy vegetables may grow in tight loose heads or individually on stems. A few leafy greens, such as turnip greens and beet greens, are actually the tops of root vegetables. Salad greens, such as lettuce, are Continue reading >>

Best Vegetables For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Vegetables For Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes often feel left out at big family meals and at restaurants, but it should not mean having to avoid delicious food. In fact, no food item is strictly forbidden for people with type 2 diabetes. Healthy eating for people with diabetes is all about moderation and balance. The best vegetables for type 2 diabetes are low on the glycemic index (GI) scale, rich in fiber, or high in blood pressure-lowering nitrates. Why choose vegetables? When considering foods to avoid, many people with diabetes might think about sugary or high-carbohydrate foods, such as cinnamon rolls or bread. Certain vegetables, though, can also cause blood glucose problems. The GI refers to how quickly foods cause blood sugar levels to rise. Foods high on the GI, such as most potatoes, rapidly release glucose, potentially triggering blood glucose spikes. They can also cause weight gain when eaten in excess. Low to moderate GI vegetables, such as carrots, offer better blood glucose control, and a lower risk of weight gain. Nitrates are chemicals that naturally occur in some vegetables. They are also used as preservatives in some foods. Eating nitrate-rich foods, not foods processed with added nitrates, can lower blood pressure, and improve overall circulatory health. This means that nitrate-rich foods, such as beets, are among the best vegetables for people with type 2 diabetes who have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This is still true despite their high level of carbohydrates. The key to good food management, in this instance, is to reduce carbohydrate consumption elsewhere, such as by eliminating bread or sugary snacks. Fiber and protein are both very important in a healthful diabetes diet. Protein is vital for good health, and can help people feel fuller for longer, Continue reading >>

10 Ways Brussels Sprouts Benefit Your Health

10 Ways Brussels Sprouts Benefit Your Health

10 Ways Brussels Sprouts Benefit Your Health Written by Rachael Link, MS, RD on September 8, 2017 Brussels sprouts are a member of the Brassicaceae family of vegetables and closely related to kale, cauliflower and mustard greens. These cruciferous vegetables resemble mini cabbages and are typically cut, cleaned and cooked to make a nutritious side dish or main course. Brussels sprouts boast high levels of many nutrients and have been linked to several health benefits. This article examines 10 ways Brussels sprouts may benefit your health. Brussels sprouts are low in calories but high in fiber, vitamins and minerals. Here are some of the major nutrients in a half cup (78 grams) of cooked Brussels sprouts ( 1 ): Brussels sprouts are especially rich in vitamin K, which is necessary for blood clotting and bone health ( 2 ). Theyre also high in vitamin C, an antioxidant that helps promote iron absorption and is involved in tissue repair and immune function ( 3 ). Whats more, their high fiber content helps support regularity and gut health ( 4 , 5 ). In addition to the nutrients above, Brussels sprouts contain small amounts of vitamin B6, potassium, iron, thiamine, magnesium and phosphorus ( 1 ). Summary: Brussels sprouts are low in calories but high in many nutrients, especially fiber, vitamin K and vitamin C. Brussels sprouts have many health benefits, but their impressive antioxidant content stands out. Antioxidants are compounds that reduce oxidative stress in your cells and help lower your risk of chronic disease. One study found that when participants ate about 2 cups (300 grams) of Brussels sprouts daily, damage to their cells from oxidative stress decreased by 28% ( 6 ). Brussels sprouts are especially high in kaempferol, an antioxidant that has been studied extensiv Continue reading >>

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