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Is Boiled Eggs Good For A Diabetic?

People With Diabetes Can Eat Eggs

People With Diabetes Can Eat Eggs

Many people with diabetes are concerned about eating eggs because they believe they are too high in cholesterol. It was once believed that eating dietary cholesterol could increase cholesterol in the blood, but this logic is no longer thought to be true. In fact, studies have shown that dietary cholesterol, like the cholesterol found in eggs, is not linked to high levels of cholesterol in the blood. Dietary Cholesterol Not Linked to High Blood Cholesterol While it is not uncommon for a person with type 2 diabetes to have other conditions like high cholesterol, dietary cholesterol consumption itself has not been linked to elevated blood cholesterol levels. As for an overall relationship between egg consumption and type 2 diabetes, a June 2010 study published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition found no such relationship. Some experts recommend limiting eggs to no more than three yolks per week. This recommendation is mainly due to the saturated fat content found in the yolk rather than the cholesterol. It's the Added Saturated That Will Get You Excess intake of saturated fat (found in fried foods, process meats like sausage and bacon and sweets such as cookies, cake, and candy) can raise your blood cholesterol. And while two eggs have less saturated fat than a small hamburger, if you cook your eggs in butter, top them with full fat cheese or pair them with bacon or sausage, you are bound to eat too much saturated. In fact, some study results have shown a link between egg intake and high cholesterol or diabetes may be skewed based on the presence of other high-fat breakfast items like butter, bacon, and sausage. Eggs Can Be Part of a Balanced Meal Plan On their own, eggs are a moderately lean protein source that can help balance a meal plan made for someone with diabetes Continue reading >>

What Are Some Good Snacks For A Person That Is Diabetic And Has Low Sodium?

What Are Some Good Snacks For A Person That Is Diabetic And Has Low Sodium?

Diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, is associated with many health complications, including kidney diseases. If you are diabetic, you can decrease your risk of developing kidney disease by keeping your blood sugar and blood pressure under control. If your kidneys are already damaged by your diabetes, following a diet that helps you minimize further damage by keeping your blood sugar under control is key. Your doctor and dietitian will keep a close eye on your electrolytes, such as sodium, potassium and phosphorus, to advise you on how to adjust your diet accordingly. Most people with diabetes and kidney diseases have high levels of these electrolytes and need to consume less. Vegetables and Guacamole Non-starchy vegetables have a very low carbohydrate but high fiber content, which can help to fill you up without increasing your blood sugar levels. If you need a snack to sustain you between meals, prepare yourself a serving of raw vegetables, such as cucumber slices, carrot and celery sticks and cauliflower and broccoli florets. Instead of dipping your vegetables in commercial dipping sauces, which are often made with processed ingredients, use homemade guacamole. Simply mash an avocado and season it with pepper and lemon juice. If your blood sodium is high, don't add salt, and if your sodium is low, be more generous with the amount of salt you add. Fruits and Nut Butter Although fruits contain some carbohydrates, they also pack a lot of water, fiber and a variety of antioxidants. Don't have too much fruit at once, and limit yourself to the equivalent of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates to prevent your blood sugar levels from rising too high. For example, a small to medium apple provides 20 to 25 grams of carbohydrates, while the amount of carbohydrates in a banana usually Continue reading >>

20 Delicious Low-sugar Snacks

20 Delicious Low-sugar Snacks

Try these strategic snacks for losing weight and keeping blood sugar in check. Hard boiled Egg Whites Snacking on four hard-boiled egg whites will give you the boost you need to keep going in between meals. Because egg whites are pure, high-quality protein, they have minimal impact on your blood sugar. Plus, boiling eggs takes only a couple minutes, and they can be stored in the fridge, making them a great grab-and-go option during the week. Previous Next More Photos Part Skim String Cheese Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat? Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein. The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar. Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable. Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks. A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health. Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes. Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calories and 5 grams of fat, only 1.6 grams of which are saturated fat. Eggs are versatile and can be prepared in different ways to suit your tastes. You can make an already-healthy food even better by mixi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Egg Breakfast Recipes

Diabetic Egg Breakfast Recipes

Packed with protein, eggs are a great way to start your day. Try one of these diabetes-friendly egg recipes that are carb-smart and delicious. Packed with protein, eggs are a great way to start your day. Try one of these diabetes-friendly egg recipes that are carb-smart and delicious. Packed with protein, eggs are a great way to start your day. Try one of these diabetes-friendly egg recipes that are carb-smart and delicious. Packed with protein, eggs are a great way to start your day. Try one of these diabetes-friendly egg recipes that are carb-smart and delicious. Continue reading >>

Four Eggs A Week 'can Reduce Risk Of Diabetes'

Four Eggs A Week 'can Reduce Risk Of Diabetes'

Four eggs a week 'can reduce risk of diabetes' Research finds that eggs reduce blood sugar levels Cracked it: eggs are healthier todayPhoto: Alamy Eating four eggs a week can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by more than a third, according to a new study. Scientists found that egg consumption was associated with a lower risk of the disease as well as with lower blood sugar levels. The research, led by University of Eastern Finland, examined the eating habits of 2,332 men aged between 42 and 60. It found that those who ate four eggs per week had a 37 per cent lower risk than men who only ate one egg per week. The association persisted even when factors such as physical activity, body mass index, smoking and consumption of fruits and vegetables were taken into account. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition , said that eggs contained many nutrients that could effect glucose metabolism and low-grade inflammation. However, consumption of more than four eggs did not bring any significant additional benefits. And researchers warned that those who already have type 2 diabetes should not increase their egg intake, as they appeared to increase heart disease in those who had already been diagnosed with the condition. The scientists studied the eating and lifestyle habits of those who took part in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study between 1984 and 1989. Two decades later, 432 men had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Separate research has found that eating full-fat dairy products also slashed the risk of type 2 diabetes . Researchers at Lund University in Sweden found that those who ate high fat dairy products had a 23 per cent lower risk of developing the disease. Dr Ulrika Ericson said: "When we investigated the consumption of Continue reading >>

Egg-rich Diet Not Harmful In Type 2 Diabetes

Egg-rich Diet Not Harmful In Type 2 Diabetes

Oct. 9, 2014 -- Eggs don't have a bad effect on cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. Researchers also found that eating an egg-rich diet for 3 months was linked to better appetite control, and may also provide a greater sense of feeling full. The findings suggest that eating two eggs per day, 6 days a week can be a safe part of a healthy diet for people with type 2, according to Nicholas Fuller, PhD, from the Boden Institute Clinical Trials Unit, University of Sydney, Australia. Fuller presented his findings at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes 2014 Meeting last month. He said the study was motivated by the negative perception widely held toward eggs in the diets of people with type 2 diabetes. Studies have also suggested that, although eating high amounts of eggs is not linked to heart problems in people without diabetes, it may be tied to heart problems in people with type 2, he said. National guidelines on eating eggs and total cholesterol limits are inconclusive, though, and guidelines vary between different countries, he said. For example, in Australia, the National Heart Foundation recommends a maximum of six eggs per week as part of a diet low in saturated fats for healthy people and in those with type 2 diabetes. But in the U.S., guidelines recommend cholesterol be limited to less than 300 milligrams per day for healthy people -- and one egg has about 200 milligrams of cholesterol. Those guidelines also suggest that people with type 2 stick to less than four eggs per week. There's a lack of research into the effects of eating high amounts of eggs in people with type 2 diabetes, Fuller said. The study led by Fuller explored health outcomes in people on a high-egg diet who had either prediabetes or type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Eggs?

Can Diabetics Eat Eggs?

Your nutrition plan is one of the most important and potentially effective treatment tools to manage your diabetes. The objectives of your diabetes diet are controlling your blood sugar and reducing the risk of diabetes-related complications. Eggs may be a concern because they contain large amounts of cholesterol and saturated fats, nutrients that may contribute to your cardiovascular risk. When eaten in moderation, as part of a heart-healthy nutrition plan, you can include eggs as part of your diabetes diet unless your doctor recommends otherwise. Video of the Day Having diabetes increases your risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, characterized by cholesterol-laden deposits in the walls your arteries that obstruct blood flow. Abnormal blood fat levels further contribute to your risk of developing atherosclerosis. Your diabetes health care team will monitor your blood fat levels, including triglycerides and good and bad cholesterol. A heart-healthy diet is recommended for all diabetics to help reduce your risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Eggs are a nutritious food, packed with high-quality protein, vitamins and minerals. The nutritional drawback of including eggs in your diabetes diet, however, is the fat content. A large egg contains approximately 210 mg of cholesterol and 1.6 g of saturated fats; a small egg contains 155 mg of cholesterol and 1.2 g of saturated fats. The good news is that all of the fat in eggs is in the yolk, which means it is easy to separate out. Incorporating Eggs into Your Diet The best option in terms of limiting your fat intake is to use egg whites instead of whole eggs. Egg whites work well for omelets or scrambled eggs. You can also boil whole eggs and remove the yolk after cooking. If you occasionally wa Continue reading >>

Healthy Eggs For People With Diabetes

Healthy Eggs For People With Diabetes

Eggs can be one of the healthiest foods for people with diabetes to eat. But some people still doubt that fact. And the way many of us prepare them aren’t healthy. One large fresh, whole, raw egg has just 72 calories. It has a bit more than 6 grams of protein, a bit less than 5 grams of fat, and less than one-third of a gram of carbohydrate, according to the USDA’s National Nutrient Database. No wonder that those of us who follow the low-carb lifestyle usually eat eggs. Eggs have complete protein with an optimal balance of the nine essential amino acids. The fats are largely monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. The carbohydrates don’t include any sucrose or fructose. Yet some people are still concerned about the amount of cholesterol in eggs. A large one has 186 mg. The standard diet that our doctors have been recommending for decades is to consume no more than 300 mg of cholesterol a day. However, some of the most advanced medical minds know that the cholesterol we eat has little effect on our blood levels of cholesterol, high levels of which supposedly lead to heart disease. Actually, more than 20 years ago The New England Journal of Medicine reported that an 88-year-old man regularly ate 25 eggs a day and had a normal cholesterol level. Then, the influential Framingham Heart Study found "no relationship between egg intake and coronary heart disease." Our bodies need cholesterol to synthesize bile acids, which are necessary to digest fat. But our bodies keep losing some of these bile acids. "To make up for this, the liver synthesizes approximately 1,500 to 2,000 mg of new cholesterol a day," according to The Great Cholesterol Myth by Jonny Bowden and Stephen Sinatra, M.D, which I reviewed at "Cholesterol Myths" here. As Drs. Bowden and Sinatra write, "Clearly, t Continue reading >>

Egg Ingestion In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: Effects On Glycemic Control, Anthropometry, And Diet Quality—a Randomized, Controlled, Crossover Trial

Egg Ingestion In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: Effects On Glycemic Control, Anthropometry, And Diet Quality—a Randomized, Controlled, Crossover Trial

Go to: Discussion Our data suggest that short-term daily inclusion of eggs in the habitual diet of adults with type 2 diabetes was associated with improved anthropometric measures and had no effect on glycemic control and blood pressure. The exclusion of eggs from the habitual diet increased insulin resistance. The inclusion of eggs in the habitual diet did not improve overall diet quality. In our study, the inclusion of eggs in the habitual diet, as compared with egg exclusion, non-significantly reduced glycemic hemoglobin and had no effects on insulin resistance. The exclusion of eggs from the habitual diet increased insulin resistance. In a previous study by Pearce et al with type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance individuals,23 daily consumption of eggs for 12 weeks as compared with lean animal protein improved glycemic control and cholesterol levels. In another study by Ratliff et al24 with apparently healthy men, daily consumption of eggs for breakfast for 1 week, as compared with bagels, reduced plasma glucose, insulin, energy intake, and suppressed ghrelin response. Eggs have a relatively low glycemic index and therefore do not affect blood glucose levels. In addition, eggs are a satiating food and hence can reduce caloric intake, which may consequently help to improve glycemic control. While the detectable difference observed in glycemic control in our study is clinically meaningful, the lack of statistical significance on the effects on glycemic control with the inclusion of eggs in the habitual diet could be due to small sample size, inadequate amount of eggs consumed, and/or inadequate intervention length. We demonstrated that daily inclusion of eggs in the habitual diet for 12 weeks reduced body weight, waist circumference, visceral fat rating, and Continue reading >>

Can Dogs Eat Eggs? Raw, Boiled Or Scrambled?

Can Dogs Eat Eggs? Raw, Boiled Or Scrambled?

Can Dogs Eat Eggs? Raw, Boiled or Scrambled? A healthy diet includes eggs as its main component but how about eating eggs in the company of your dog. Can dogs eat eggs just like we do? Eggs contain nutrients and most of which are found in egg yolk. Protein is present in both the white and in egg yolk. In this article I will discuss the importance of eggs for dogs and also the interesting ways of serving eggs to your four legged friend which will make him stronger and sharper than other pets. Eggs are very beneficial to dogs. They are a rich source of protein and calcium. It will strength your dogs coat and buildup his muscles. If you want strong teeth and bones for your dog then it is a good idea to crush the eggshells which need to be sprinkled on his meals. If you are worried about salmonella poisoning then you should boil these eggshells. Once they are dried then they are ready to be crushed. After reading these amazing health benefits if you have not been giving eggs to your dog I am sure from now onwards you will consider eggs for him. Eggs have a permanent place in our breakfast but can dogs eat eggs for breakfast? Yes as eggs contain vitamin A and Vitamin D. they are loaded with iron, calcium, phosphorus, thiamine and riboflavin. Eggs should be a part of your dogs raw food diet and it is very beneficial to dogs. Protein is found in egg white and yolk. If your dog has poor health he must get benefit from this high protein diet. Calcium and phosphorus in eggs makes your dogs bones strong. Eggs can be given in many forms to dogs and you have to note that which form your dog likes the most. For your dogs good health it is very important that you give me eggs to eat. Recommended article : What Happens If My Dog Eats Raw Egg? When we talk about the egg yolk then a com Continue reading >>

All It Takes Is One Boiled Egg To Control Sugar In The Blood

All It Takes Is One Boiled Egg To Control Sugar In The Blood

Yes, it’s that simple! In this article we’re going to show you a simple trick, which will help you control your blood sugar levels! And you just need one boiled egg! Many experts around the world say that this homemade remedy is extremely effective and beneficial for controlling and reducing your blood sugar levels. It reduces the blood sugar levels very quickly. This recipe can decrease blood sugar very quickly and it requires commitment and attendance. Diabetes – it’s a very common health problem, which affects many people around the world. It happens when your pancreas stops producing insulin or when your body is not able to properly use the insulin which is present in the body. These are the common symptoms of diabetes: urinating more often than usual, especially at night, feeling very thirsty, rapid weight loss, itching around the penis or vagina, cuts or wounds that heal very slowly, blurred vision, fatigue, etc. The experts say that the worst thing about this disease is that it can cause many different health problems such as: poor vision, weakness, blindness, nerve damage, kidney failure, heart disease, erectile dysfunction (in men) etc. Note: while you are using this remedy, you need to be careful what food you are consuming and to remove the source that increased your blood sugar levels. And, as we said – this homemade recipe is very simple and easy to make. You just need two easy available ingredients. You need a boiled egg and vinegar. Regulate Your Blood Sugar Levels with This Natural Egg-Vinegar Remedy – RECIPE: Here’s what you need to do – boil an egg in the evening and after you peel it make a few holes in it using a fork. Put the egg in a bowl and pour vinegar over it. Leave it overnight. In the morning, pour away the vinegar and you nee Continue reading >>

All It Takes Is One Boiled Egg To Control Sugar Levels In The Blood

All It Takes Is One Boiled Egg To Control Sugar Levels In The Blood

Every time you eat, your blood sugar levels go up. This is especially true for individuals who have type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance. Having to learn how to control your blood sugar levels within a healthy range is by no means an easy task. It can take months for a newly diagnosed patient to learn what to eat and what to avoid. And during this period of time, someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to experience high blood sugar levels, which is detrimental to their overall health. Too much sugar in the blood for long periods of time can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems. (1) How To Control Blood Sugar Levels For the majority of healthy individuals, normal blood sugar levels are as follows: Between 4.0 to 6.0 mmol/L (72 to 108 mg/dL) when fasting. Up to 7.8 mmol/L (140 mg/dL) 2 hours after eating. (2) For people with insulin resistance, their blood sugar levels remain high long after having finished their meal. Fortunately, there are many foods you can eat that can help you control blood sugar levels naturally. As you’ll learn eventually, relying on expensive diabetes drugs in the long-run can have negative side effects on your body. Below is a powerful remedy that combines three simple ingredients to prevent your blood sugar levels from going rampant. For this recipe all you will need is apple cider vinegar, water, and a boiled egg. See also: Reversing diabetes Type-2 Instructions: Boil an egg in the afternoon, and peel it. Pierce the egg a 2-3 times using a toothpick. Put the egg in a mason jar and pour just enough vinegar over it so that it is completely covered. Close the jar and let it soak overnight in your refrigerator. The next morning, drink a glass of warm water and eat your egg. Repeat th Continue reading >>

Cancer, Diabetes And Heart Disease Diet: Is This The Healthiest Way To Eat Your Eggs?

Cancer, Diabetes And Heart Disease Diet: Is This The Healthiest Way To Eat Your Eggs?

Heart disease, cancer and diabetes risk could be cut by losing weight Risk reduced by avoiding inflammatory foods Eggs are the most nutritious foods you can eat Poached and hard boiled eggs had the fewest calories Heart disease, cancer and diabetes risk could be reduced by maintaining a healthy weight and reducing inflammation - and eating enough eggs in your diet could be the key. Despite being vilified in past decades as a cholesterol and salmonella risk, they are now a go-to brunch option thanks to their range of health benefits. Rob Hobson, Healthspan’s head of nutrition and author of The Detox Kitchen Bible, pointed out that eggs are one of the most nutritious foods you can eat. “As well as being rich in protein, they are one of the only foods to contain vitamin D, and are a source of nearly every vitamin and mineral you need,” he explained. “Additionally, eggs contain the antioxidants choline and beta carotene which both reduce damage caused by free radicals and help to lower inflammation in the body.” If you are watching your weight, poaching and hard boiling are going to contain fewer calories and fat compared to scrambled or fried From poached to hard boiled and scrambled to fried, what form are eggs best consumed in? “They are great served any which way,” explained Hobson. “But if you are watching your weight, poaching and hard boiling are going to contain fewer calories and fat compared to scrambled or fried which are often cooked using oils, butter and cream.” Jeraldine Curran, The Food Nutritionist (thefoodnutritionist.co.uk), also suggested consuming eggs as a frittata. “That way you can cook it thoroughly on a low heat,” she explained. “A low heat is particularly important with scrambled eggs which, if cooked at a high temperature, Continue reading >>

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