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Is Blood Sugar High After Exercise?

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Exercise is an important part of any diabetes treatment plan. To avoid potential problems, check your blood sugar before, during and after exercise. Diabetes and exercise go hand in hand, at least when it comes to managing your diabetes. Exercise can help you improve your blood sugar control, boost your overall fitness, and reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. But diabetes and exercise pose unique challenges, too. To exercise safely, it's crucial to track your blood sugar before, during and after physical activity. You'll learn how your body responds to exercise, which can help you prevent potentially dangerous blood sugar fluctuations. Before exercise: Check your blood sugar before your workout Before jumping into a fitness program, get your doctor's OK to exercise — especially if you've been inactive. Talk to your doctor about any activities you're contemplating, the best time to exercise and the potential impact of medications on your blood sugar as you become more active. For the best health benefits, experts recommend at least 150 minutes a week of moderately intense physical activities such as: Fast walking Lap swimming Bicycling If you're taking insulin or medications that can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), test your blood sugar 30 minutes before exercising. Consider these general guidelines relative to your blood sugar level — measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Lower than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Your blood sugar may be too low to exercise safely. Eat a small snack containing 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates, such as fruit juice, fruit, crackers or even glucose tablets before you begin your workout. 100 to 250 mg/dL (5.6 to 13.9 mmol/L). You're good to go. For most people, this is a safe pre-exercise Continue reading >>

Why Does My Sugar Go Up After Exercise?

Why Does My Sugar Go Up After Exercise?

Why Does My Sugar Go Up After Exercise? Answer: why does my sugar go up after exercise ? If an inadequate amount of insulin is present in the blood allowing the BG to rise to about 250 to 300 mg/dl, then exercise may cause a further rise in BG rather than the expected drop. Low insulin coupled with physical activity stimulates the secretion of several other hormones such as epinephrine, norepinephrine, cortisol, glucagon, and growth hormone. Collectively these hormones trigger the liver to release glucose into the blood, thereby increasing the BG rather than decreasing it. The hormones also increase the breakdown of fat but limit the uptake of fat by muscle cells. The liver converts some of the fats to strong acids called ketones. The ketones may build up in the blood producing a state called ketoacidosis. This event is far more likely to occur in people with type I diabetes. To prevent the problem the BG should be checked before exercise and if the level exceeds 250, then exercise should be delayed until it decreases well below 250. The urine should be checked for ketones and if they are present, exercise at this time will exacerbate the problem. A second cause why does my sugar go up after exercise ? is highly vigorous exercise. The more intense exercise is, the greater the secretion of glucose from the liver. During the strenuous session, stress hormones will be secreted in large quantities which will then stimulate the liver to release glucose. This is an interesting paradox: the more vigorous the exercise the more glucose released by the liver with a likely rise in BG rather than a fall. To make matters worse, the level of stress hormones in the blood may be elevated for several hours after intense exercise causing the liver to continue the outpouring of sugar. Thu Continue reading >>

Limiting Low And High Blood Sugars During And After Exercise

Limiting Low And High Blood Sugars During And After Exercise

Exercise can be amazing, empowering, and uplifting, but it can also sometimes be a frustrating experience. If you live with diabetes and your blood sugars just won’t cooperate when working out, you know what I’m talking about. Not cool! But can you imagine a world where you felt comfortable exercising, knowing that your exercise, food, and insulin choices lead to a limited risk of low or high blood sugar during and after your workout? I’ve been living with type 1 diabetes since 1997, and I believe that we can achieve that if we have the right tools and the right knowledge and information. In this post, I’ll share some of the methods I use myself and with my clients to achieve optimal blood sugar control during and after exercise. The Basics of Exercise and Blood Sugars Knowing the basics of how different types of exercise affect your blood sugars is the first step to successfully mastering blood sugars and exercise. If you have already started seeing patterns, and have a good idea about which types of exercise make your blood sugar drop and which make them soar, that’s great! That knowledge will set you up for success. But maybe you are new to it all or haven’t seen any patterns yet, and need some pointers on where to start and what to be aware of. That’s what I will try to provide in this post. In its most basic form, there are two types of exercise, aerobic and anaerobic. Aerobic exercise is characterized by a steady elevated heartbeat that you’ll see from jogging, dancing, flat terrain biking and walking. Most people will see a drop in their blood sugar when engaging in this kind of activity. Anaerobic exercise is characterized by bouts of intense movement that will have your heart rate fluctuating. Types of exercise that are labeled anaerobic are wei Continue reading >>

Why Some Types Of Exercise Can Make Your Blood Sugar Increase

Why Some Types Of Exercise Can Make Your Blood Sugar Increase

Have you ever wondered why your blood sugar falls during certain types of exercise whilst roaring to sky-high levels during and after other types of exercise? If you’re curious about the scientific explanation of the relationship between exercise and blood sugar, read on. I rarely come across scientific studies that explore how exercise affects blood sugar in people living with Type 1 diabetes, so when I recently got my hands on just such a research paper, I dug in with great interest (they specified Type 1 diabetes, but I would think that the results are applicable to anybody using insulin). Well actually, Google and I dug in. This research paper is heavy reading. You know those scientific papers where you feel like you need an advanced degree (plus a whole lot of Googling) just to understand the introduction? This is one of them. The paper is titled “Effect of intermittent high-intensity compared with continuous moderate exercise on glucose production and utilization in individuals with type 1 diabetes”, and is written by a team of scientists from Australia. It was published in the American Journal of Physiology – Endocrinology and Metabolism in 2007 (not exactly new research, but peer reviewed research nonetheless, which means it’s legit). Anyway, I thought that the subject was relevant and interesting enough to spend the time reading and understanding it. So, since I’ve done the heavy reading, let me share what I’ve learned with you. Exercise and blood sugar impact So why do some types of exercise make our blood sugar drop like crazy while others hardly have any impact? I know from my own experience that I really have to watch my blood sugars if I do steady state cardio, while an interval training session will have little impact or even make my blood s Continue reading >>

About High Blood Sugar After Exercise

About High Blood Sugar After Exercise

Exercise is a key component to managing diabetes. It helps you to shed extra pounds and lower your blood glucose level. Regular exercise will help you to avoid serious diabetic related complications. While exercise can make your blood sugar levels drop too low, it can also cause it to increase. Given this it is important to understand how your body responds to exercise by testing your blood glucose levels before, during and after exercise. This will help you learn how to eat and exercise at a level that works for you. Video of the Day When you exercise, your body needs to provide energy to your cells. This energy comes from glucose that is in your bloodstream and stored in your body. To use the glucose, you need enough insulin. The American Diabetes Association states that in the case of type 2 diabetes, insulin is not available because the body does not produce enough or you are unable to use it properly. This can lead to complications when exercising if you do not take the proper precautions. In most cases, the reason your blood sugar levels rise too high after exercise is because they were too high before you started,according to the John Hopkins Diabetes Center. This is especially true if your pre-exercise reading is more than 250mg/dL. The center suggests taking two readings before you exercise. One reading should be 30 minutes before activity and the other right before you start. John Hopkins recommends that “A safe pre-workout blood glucose level is between 100mg/dL and 250mg/dL.” You should not exercise if your general reading is 300mg/dL or higher, your fasting reading is over 250mg/dL or if your urine test is positive for keytones--a byproduct of fat metabolism. The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse states that if your level is just slightly high Continue reading >>

Exercise And Blood Glucose Levels

Exercise And Blood Glucose Levels

Exercise is good for you. It’s good for the heart, good for losing weight, makes you feel better (really — it releases endorphins that elevate mood), and it’s good for blood glucose — well, sort of. It is good for blood glucose, but it can be tricky at the same time. So today I’m going to talk about how to deal with blood sugar when you’re exercising so that you can minimize the negative effects and enjoy the positive. OK, let’s start with some basics. Aerobic exercise, or cardio, is what we call activity that requires “the pumping of oxygenated blood by the heart,” to be delivered to working muscles. A general rule of thumb is that aerobic exercise is achieved when our heart rate and breathing rate rise in a sustainable way (in order to maintain this pumping of oxygenated blood — the heart rate to circulate the blood, the breathing rate to increase the oxygen intake). Anaerobic exercise occurs when the activity is simply too much for the heart rate and breathing to keep up with, causing you to become out of breath, and it includes activities such as sprinting and weightlifting. Here, we’ll be talking about aerobic activities, such as swimming, running, or dancing. So, what happens with aerobic activity? First, it lowers blood glucose. Why? Because the muscles are working harder and they need energy. The glucose in our blood is energy for our cells. Insulin is the hormone that transfers the glucose from our blood to our cells. So when we Diabetians exercise, we often “go low.” This is because the glucose in our blood is quickly moved into our cells, but the insulin in our blood is still active. Unlike non-Diabetians, the insulin we’ve injected doesn’t go away once the glucose has been moved. It keeps moving glucose out of the blood (and out Continue reading >>

Physical Activity & Blood Glucose

Physical Activity & Blood Glucose

SHARE RATE★★★★★ Because diabetes a disorder that affects the way your body processes glucose, when you engage in physical activity you need to be especially aware of changes in blood glucose levels as your body burns extra glucose for energy. This can help you avoid problems like low blood glucose (hypoglycemia). Being aware of changes in blood glucose during physical activity is especially important if you take certain diabetes medications that increase risk for hypoglycemia, including insulin or diabetes medications that cause insulin secretion (called secretagogues), including sulfonylureas (glimepiride) and glinides (repaglinide and nateglinide).1 Should I avoid physical activity if my blood glucose is very high In general, if your blood glucose is very high (250 mg/dL) and you take insulin, you should avoid vigorous physical activity. However, if your blood glucose is mildly elevated and you feel well, you may exercise safely. Remember, make sure to drink water so that you are adequately hydrated before, during, and after any physical activity. Dehydration can affect your blood glucose.2 How should I monitor blood glucose during exercise? Even if you do not use insulin or a diabetes medications called secretagogues that increase secretion of insulin (this includes sulfonylureas [glimepiride] or glinides [repaglinide and nateglinide]) to control your diabetes, you may still want to use a blood glucose monitor to find out how your exercise routine affects your blood glucose level. Physical activities of long duration and low intensity typically cause blood glucose to decrease, but not to a problematic level. Try monitoring before, during, and after training several times so that you understand and anticipate exercise-related changes in blood glucose. Althou Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Control — During And After Exercise

Blood Sugar Control — During And After Exercise

WRITTEN BY: Christel Oerum Medical disclaimer: No adjustments to care should be done without consulting your medical team. If you are new to exercise, haven’t exercised in a while and/or haven’t seen your medical team in the last 3 months, it is advised to do so before engaging in any kind of physical activities. Exercising with diabetes can be tricky because you never know exactly how your blood sugar will react. However, there are some general rules that apply to all of us and when you know those rules, it becomes easier to recognize patterns, find your personal “formula” for food and insulin, and exercise with fewer blood sugar headaches. In this article, I’ll walk you through three different types of exercise, and what you usually can expect from a blood sugar perspective. I also suggest strategies for managing your blood sugar during and after each type of exercise. Types of exercise Steady-state cardio Interval training Resistance training Blood sugar management during and after steady state cardio The general rule for steady-state cardio (where your heart rate stays moderately elevated for the duration of your workout) is that it will make your blood sugar decrease if you have any insulin on board (IOB). Some people don’t start to see the effect until 20 minutes into a workout, and some will only see the effect during specific types of workouts. What happens during steady-state cardio is that you increase the body’s use of blood glucose. So, if you have high levels of IOB during your cardio session, the muscles will take up more blood glucose and the risk of low blood sugar increases. This risk is not only increased during the cardio session, but also up to 48 hours after you’re done. Strategies for preventing low blood sugar during and after stea Continue reading >>

Does Blood Sugar Go Up By 20 Points After Fasted Exercise In People With Normal Glucose Regulation?

Does Blood Sugar Go Up By 20 Points After Fasted Exercise In People With Normal Glucose Regulation?

Does blood sugar go up by 20 points after fasted exercise in people with normal glucose regulation? I finished up about half an hour ago doing some bike sprints and weight lifting fasted. my blood sugar has gone up about 20 points so far. do normoglycemic people have this reaction? what causes blood sugar to go up after exercise when you have nothing in your stomach? PS I control blood sugar through diet and exercise alone. the highest my A1c has been that i know of is 5.9 My personal experience is that anaerobic exercise like sprints or weight lifting raise my blood sugar. The explanation I have seen is that this sort of exercise releases cortisol and adrenaline and that causes a rise in blood sugar. Before I started insulin I would routinely see my blood sugar soar over 100 mg/dl during workouts. After I started insulin I would take some insulin before working out in order to maintain normal blood sugars. I actually found this effect could be used to systematically keep my blood sugar stable. Aerobic exercise tends to drop my blood sugar. I could put together mixed routines of aerobic and anaerobic exercise to keep things stable. You can do this with mixtures of interval training or by splitting up your lifting with cardio sessions. Yes , the body notices that the body is using more energy but is programmed to think that the pancreas is still producing the required amount of insulin so the body gets too much energy out of storage so the bgl goes up. Type 1s who are long term sufferers the body also attacks the alpha cells on the islets of langerhanes which produces glucagon to raise the bgl by instructing the liver to release glucose to raise the bgl , hence the risk of a type 1s bgl plunging. I will swap your type 2 for type 1 if you prefer! Yes , the body notices t Continue reading >>

What Happens To Blood Sugar Levels During Exercise?

What Happens To Blood Sugar Levels During Exercise?

Muscles hold enough energy stores for a short burst of activity. After that, they depend on increased blood supply to deliver oxygen, blood sugar and other nutrients to manufacture more energy. Your body burns the sugar in your blood, and then calls for your liver to supply stored glucose to keep up with energy demands. This causes fluctuations in your blood sugar when you exercise. Video of the Day As you warm up, your muscles start to call for nutrients to manufacture energy. Glucose carried in your blood and delivered to the muscles is an energy supply, as are free fatty acids, a type of lipid carried in blood that provide energy when glucose is low. Using energy during exercise helps balance high blood sugar and provide fuel at the same time. As blood flow to your muscles increases, the energy supplies increase as well. Your muscle cells send signals to start burning glucose, and more of it is delivered to the cells. This lowers your blood sugar levels. Sugars from the foods you eat are stored in your liver and in other tissues in a form called glycogen. When your body requires more sugar than is available in your blood, it starts to convert stored sugars to a usable form, releasing them into the blood. Blood sugar levels in your blood increase as muscles and oter tissues call for release of energy into your bloodstream. When glycogen provides fuel for your muscles, your blood sugar fluctuates up and down as it's used. Elevated Blood Sugar If your blood sugar is high when you begin to exercise, it can climb higher. This is because your body does not recognize the glucose in your blood, and calls for your liver to break down more glycogen. If your blood sugar is high before exercise, you should wait until it is within normal range before you exercise, according to Jo Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

back to Overview Markus, one of our great German-language authors, wrote about struggling with high blood sugar after exercise. I know it's a common problem, and one I've struggled with personally, so I want to make sure you get to see it, too. From Markus Berndt: It’s one of the first recommendations you get after being diagnosed with diabetes. “Get active, do more exercise, it’s good for you!” And since we’ve been a child we’ve heard that exercise is healthy. If we do it consistently we’re rewarded, literally, with an awesome beach body. Adding exercise into our day is also good for our diabetes. We’re taught that exercise lowers blood sugar, right? But can the opposite also be true? Can you have high blood sugar after exercise? Up close We now know that physical activity usually lowers blood sugar because it reduces how much insulin is needed to move sugar into the cells. While, in the past, most experts advised frequent training intervals at moderate intensity, but recent studies have shown that even short, intense workouts are very effective. For example, a 15-minute intense weight training lowered blood sugar even more than what’s seen in some endurance training. So activity lowers blood sugar – but not always! Personally, I experienced this very early on and was extremely irritated! I just learned that exercise lowers blood sugar, but an intense 45-minute run consistently resulted in higher blood sugars than when I started! What in the world? At first, I was confused and felt like I didn’t understand the world anymore. Then it was more of a “would you look at this?” kind of thing. And finally, I was determined to figure out what was happening. I knew there had to be an explanation. Why does exercise sometimes raise blood sugar? Exercise Continue reading >>

Diabetics Develop Higher Blood Sugar During Exercise

Diabetics Develop Higher Blood Sugar During Exercise

insulin after intense exercise rather than less, contrary to conventional wisdom. A new study, published in the November issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, shows that insulin-dependent diabetics, known as type 1 diabetics, are likely to see an increase in their blood sugar, not a decrease, after an intense bout of physical exertion. It is healthy for blood sugar to rise during exercise because the muscles need the excess fuel to compensate for the increased demand placed upon them. But in most people the body will adjust after exercising and bring the blood sugar levels back to normal. That is not the case for a type 1 diabetic, because their bodies will not circulate enough insulin, which is required to convert the sugar in the blood. "Anyone who is competitive, who is doing a sprint, playing hockey, [playing] basketball ... is at significant risk of developing high sugar as a consequence of their exercise," study investigator Errol Marliss, MD, tells WebMD. Marliss is professor of medicine and director of the McGill Nutrition and Food Science Center at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal. "There's a big difference in the blood [sugar] response depending on the intensity of exercise," Marliss says. "The classic teaching about [exercise by a diabetic] who is insulin-treated is, 'Look out, because your blood sugar is going to go down; you may have to either take extra carbohydrate or less insulin.' [But] a lot of very athletic, type 1 diabetic people have been telling their doctors for years, 'Look, Doc, I'm getting [too much blood sugar] when I exercise,'" Marliss says, "and that is a predictable consequence of higher intensities of exercise." "Intense exercise makes you put out anti-insulin hormones," says Stanley Feld, MD, chairman of t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Sports And Exercise: The Ultimate Challenge In Blood Sugar Control

Sports And Exercise: The Ultimate Challenge In Blood Sugar Control

by gary scheiner, MS, CDE Sometimes, it amazes me how smart the pancreas really is. It always seems to know what to do to keep blood sugars in range, even under the most challenging circumstances. Having an argument with your partner? It churns out some extra insulin to offset the “fight or flight” response (make that flight only, if you’re smart). Upset stomach keeping you from eating the way you normally eat? Insulin secretion drops off a bit. Can’t resist the aroma of a fresh bagel (something that, in my opinion, was forged by the Diabetes Devil himself)? Pancreas cranks out just enough to cover it. Participation in sports and exercise presents a special challenge. That’s because physical activity can affect blood sugar in multiple ways. With increased activity, muscle cells become much more sensitive to insulin. This enhanced insulin sensitivity may continue for many hours after the exercise is over, depending on the extent of the activity. The more intense and prolonged the activity, the longer and greater the enhancement in insulin sensitivity. With enhanced insulin sensitivity, insulin exerts a greater force than usual. A unit that usually covers 10 grams of carbohydrate might cover 15 or 20. A unit that normally lowers the blood sugar by 50 mg/dl might lower it by 75. Some forms of physical activity, most notably high-intensity/short duration exercises and competitive sports, can produce a sharp rise in blood sugar levels followed by a delayed drop. This is due primarily to the stress hormone production or “adrenaline rush” that accompanies these kinds of activities. Let’s take a look at these two different situations in greater detail. aerobic activities Most daily activities and aerobic exercises (activities performed at a challenging but sub-m Continue reading >>

Why Do Blood Glucose Levels Sometimes Go Up After Physical Activity?

Why Do Blood Glucose Levels Sometimes Go Up After Physical Activity?

When you exercise your muscles need more glucose to supply energy. In response, your liver increases the amount of glucose it releases into your bloodstream. Remember, however, that the glucose needs insulin in order to be used by your muscles. So if you do not have enough insulin available, your blood glucose levels can actually increase right after exercise. Basically, stimulated by the demand from your exercising muscles, your body is pouring glucose into your bloodstream. If you do not have enough insulin available to "unlock the door" to your muscles, the glucose cannot get into your muscles to provide needed energy. The end result is that glucose backs-up in your bloodstream, causing higher blood glucose readings. Here are some tips to safely exercise: Consult your doctor before starting an exercise program. If you are over the age of 35 you may need a stress test. Pick an exercise that you enjoy. Check your blood sugar before and after exercise. Do not exercise if your blood sugar is over 250 mg/dl and you have ketones. If your blood sugar is over 250 but no ketones are present, follow these guidelines: Type 1: If blood sugars are 300 or more, test within 5-10 minutes of begining exercise. If your blood sugar is dropping, you may continue. If it is not dropping, stop exercising. Type 2: Do Not exercise if blood sugars are 400 or more Plan exercise to prevent low blood sugar reactions. Exercise 1 to 1 ½ hours after eating. Always carry a carbohydrate snack (juice, glucose tablets, etc.) with you. Drink plenty of fluids. Wear shoes and equipment that fit well. Find more information about physical activity and diabetes in Staying Healthy with Diabetes – Physical Activity & Fitness available from the Joslin Online Store. Continue reading >>

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