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Is Being Dizziness A Sign Of Gestational Diabetes?

Preterm Labor

Preterm Labor

Download PDF version of this article here Compiled by Sidelines High-Risk Pregnancy Support Most women only experience the normal discomforts that take place during pregnancy. However, sometimes there can be complications that need immediate medical attention. If you experience any of the symptoms listed below, contact your health care provider immediately, or go to the hospital or emergency room. Vaginal bleeding Vaginal discharge that is unusual Severe, persistent, frequent headaches Pain or burning upon urination, or decrease in urination Persistent nausea or vomiting Leakage of fluid from the vagina Sharp pelvic pain or severe cramping Frequent dizzy spells or fainting Visual disturbances such as blurred vision, white lights or flashes, dots in front of the eyes Sudden swelling in hands, feet, and face Falling or sustaining a blow to your abdomen Noticeable decrease or absence of fetal movement High fever with chills, over 100.4° Fahrenheit orally Contractions more often than four times an hour if you are less than 37 weeks Low back pain that comes and goes Any other problem that feels unusual A feeling that something is not right The bottom line: if you are worried, call your health care provider! Chances are, someone from your practice is awake and working in labor and delivery at any given moment. It's better to call and check than stay at home and worry alone. Almost all hospitals provide an all-call nurse that can speak with you on the phone and provide advice. If you feel that your questions are not being answered fully, never hesitate to get a second opinion or go the emergency room. Download PDF version of this article here By Sidelines High-Risk Pregnancy Support When it comes to protecting yourself and your baby from pregnancy complications, early detecti Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Management: Causes, Symptoms And Management

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Management: Causes, Symptoms And Management

Causes Women at Risk Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Diet Exercise Medication Prevention Gestational diabetes is a carbohydrate intolerance of variable severity that starts or is first recognized during pregnancy or the inability of the tissues to absorb glucose from the bloodstream during pregnancy due to a lack of the hormone insulin. The new guidelines are based on a study of more than 23,000 women in nine countries. Metzger and the international team concluded that: A fasting blood sugar level of 92 or higher, A one-hour level of 180 or higher on a glucose tolerance test, or A two-hour level of 153 or higher on a glucose tolerance test All posed serious risks to the mother and the infant. All of these levels had previously been considered to be in the safe, normal range, and a woman had to have two high levels before she would be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. (The study’s lead author Boyd Metzger, MD, the Tom D. Spies Professor of Metabolism and Nutrition at Feinberg and a physician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, and a group of 50 international experts spent about two years analyzing data from a 2008 study. ) Causes: Glucose is a form of sugar that is present in many foods, including sweets, potatoes, pasta, and breads. The body uses glucose to provide energy. It is stored in the liver, muscles, and fatty tissue. The pancreas produces a hormone (a chemical produced in one part of the body, which travels to another part of the body in order to exert its effect) called insulin. Insulin is required to allow glucose to enter the liver, muscles, and fatty tissues, thus reducing the amount of glucose in the blood. In diabetes, blood levels of glucose remain abnormally high. In many forms of diabetes, this is because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin. Continue reading >>

Blurry Vision During Pregnancy

Blurry Vision During Pregnancy

What is blurry vision during pregnancy? Now that you’re expecting, you might find your eyesight isn’t as sharp as it used to be. What could be causing my blurry vision during pregnancy? There are actually a lot of reasons you might not be seeing clearly. Hey, it could just be a product of pregnancy dizziness. “Pregnant women may complain of blurry vision when they go from reclining to standing up too quickly,” says Robert O. Atlas, MD, chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “What happens is, not a lot of blood is going to the brain, and their vision gets blurred, and they may find themselves dizzy as well.” Some pregnant women also have swelling during pregnancy, which can change your eyes enough to affect your vision — usually it’s temporary and just another pregnancy symptom. But know that some pregnancy health conditions, like preeclampsia, can cause retinal swelling too — that's why blurry vision is a complaint of some preeclampsia patients, says Atlas. Gestational diabetes may be a culprit since glucose can hang out in the lens and may cause differences in the cornea. Blurry visions can also be related to retinal detachments, which can sometimes be caused by hypertension disorders. When should I go to the doctor about my blurry vision during pregnancy? If you have blurry vision, definitely tell your doctor. If it’s persistent or if it’s a new onset, your OB may recommend that you see an ophthalmologist, but at the very least, you should have your blood pressure checked, and possibly your blood sugar too. If your blurry vision is accompanied by a headache, swelling, abdominal pain and rapid weight gain, you may have preeclampsia, in which case you should seek medical treatment ASAP. What shoul Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia: How Low Can You Go?

Hypoglycemia: How Low Can You Go?

If you have diabetes, you probably know the warning signs of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. "It's been described best as a little like the feeling you get when you're sliding on ice in a car: panic, rapid heart rate, [and] sort of a sense of doom," says John Buse, MD, PhD, professor of medicine, chief of the division of endocrinology, and executive associate dean for clinical research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine. You also probably know that hypoglycemia can come on suddenly and must be treated right away by eating sugar or carbohydrates. Other signs of hypoglycemia include dizziness, shakiness, difficulty paying attention, hunger, headaches, clumsy or jerky movements, and sudden moodiness like crying, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). But sometimes, people with low blood sugar don't get or even notice these warning symptoms. Instead, they develop a dangerous condition called hypoglycemic unawareness, which, in its worst form, can lead to unconsciousness, coma, or even death, though the latter is rare, Buse says. "Hypoglycemic unawareness is sort of a race," he says. "Will the patient figure out that they're hypoglycemic before they become incapacitated?" Hypoglycemic unawareness occurs most often in insulin-treated people with type 1 diabetes but also happens in those with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes, says Buse. It's more common in pregnant women and in those who have had diabetes for a long time, according to the ADA. In addition, "skipping or delaying a meal, increasing physical activity, or drinking alcohol can trigger an episode of low blood sugar," says Buse. "Even modest alcohol intake can bring it on." Often, the very medicines used to treat diabetes can cause hypoglycemia and in turn lead to hy Continue reading >>

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness is a symptom that is often applies to a variety of sensations including lightheadedness and vertigo. Vertigo is the sensation of spinning, while lightheadedness is typically described as near fainting, and weakness. Some of the conditions that may cause lightheadedness in a patient include low blood pressure, high blood pressure, dehydration, medications, postural or orthostatic hypotension, diabetes, endocrine disorders, hyperventilation, heart conditions, and vasovagal syncope. Vertigo is most often caused by a problem in the balance centers of the inner ear called the vestibular system and causes the sensation of the room spinning. It may be associated with vomiting. Symptoms often are made worse with position changes. Those with significant symptoms and vomiting may need intravenous medication and hospitalization. Vertigo is also the presenting symptom in patients with Meniere's Disease and acoustic neuroma, conditions that often require referral to an ENT specialist. Vertigo may also be a symptom of stroke. Most often, dizziness or lightheadedness is a temporary situation that resolves spontaneously without a specific diagnosis being made. Introduction to dizziness (feeling dizzy) Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms that will prompt a person to seek medical care. The term dizziness is sometimes difficult to understand since it means different things to different people. It is either the sensation of feeling lightheaded as if the individual is weak and will pass out, or it describes vertigo or the sensation of spinning, as if the affected person just got off a merry-go-round. Lightheadedness is often caused by a decrease in blood supply to the brain, while vertigo may be caused by disturbances of the inner ear and the balance centers of the brain. Continue reading >>

Dizziness During Pregnancy: Causes

Dizziness During Pregnancy: Causes

Dizziness during pregnancy is disturbing as well as something that worries many pregnant women. Yet, it is quite normal particularly during the first 12 weeks. Severe dizziness may also indicate a medical problem in some cases. What do you need to know about feeling faint and dizzy while you are expecting a baby? Dizzy? Relax (probably) When you get pregnant, your hormones go crazy. As your body gears up and prepares to make the transition from tiny zygote to full-term baby, your blood volume increases by 50 percent and your blood vessels widen. This is why so many women suffer from low blood pressure. It's a shame that high blood pressure gets all the pregnancy press, because although hypotension is not dangerous, it can certainly cause you to feel really bad. Beside low blood pressure, you may also be suffering from low blood sugar levels. A third cause of feeling dizzy and faint in pregnancy is iron-deficiency anemia. This is something you'll be checked for over the course of your prenatal appointments. You may still like to increase your intake of iron-rich foods, like leafy greens and meat if you eat it. As your pregnancy progresses, the pressure of your uterus may put your blood vessels under a great deal of pressure, and this too can cause dizziness during pregnancy. A change in position often offers instant relief. Dizziness is the most common during the first trimester of pregnancy, but it can also happen during your second and third trimesters. As you can see from the number of possible causes we've just listed, there usually is no need to worry. Still, it is important to listen to your body and to take any symptoms you experience seriously. I remember standing in a grocery store queue with my little daughter during the first trimester of my second pregnancy, Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition marked by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that are discovered during pregnancy. It is defined as carbohydrate intolerance. About two to 10 percent of all pregnant women in the U.S. are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Am I at risk for gestational diabetes? These factors increase your risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy: Being overweight before becoming pregnant (if you are 20% or more over your ideal body weight) Family history of diabetes (if your parents or siblings have diabetes) Being over age 25 Previously giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Previously giving birth to a stillborn baby Having gestational diabetes with an earlier pregnancy Being diagnosed with pre-diabetes Having polycystic ovary syndrome Being African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian-American, American Indian, or Pacific Islander American Keep in mind that half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no known risk factors. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by some hormonal changes that occur in all women during pregnancy. The placenta is the organ that connects the baby (by the umbilical cord) to the uterus and transfers nutrients from the mother to the baby. Increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta can prevent insulin—a hormone that controls blood sugar—from managing glucose properly. This condition is called "insulin resistance." As the placenta grows larger during pregnancy, it produces more hormones and increases this insulin resistance. Usually, the mother’s pancreas is able to produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the insulin resistance. If it cannot, sugar levels will rise, resulting in gestational dia Continue reading >>

Dizziness While Pregnant

Dizziness While Pregnant

Introduction Dizzy spells are a common symptom of pregnancy and often occur in the first trimester, but may continue until the third trimester. In fact, along with morning sickness and sore breasts, dizziness is often one of the first early signs of pregnancy. Generally, dizzy or shaky spells do not indicate a serious condition and are unharmful to mothers or babies. Dizziness comes in various form's, but the most common symptom is a feeling of moving or spinning while standing still. Sometimes this is accompanied by loss of balance and nausea without vomiting, similar to vertigo. An 'attack' can last for a few minutes, or up to several hours. What Causes Dizziness During Pregnancy? Hormone Changes Those pesky hormones again! Throughout pregnancy, high levels of progesterone cause blood vessels to relax. This has the effect of allowing extra blood to flow through the veins (in fact an increase of up to 50 percent), towards the developing embryo. At the same time, it slows the return of blood to the mother. Result? Reduced blood flow leads to reduced blood pressure, a common cause of temporary faintness. Blood Sugar A woman's metabolism changes during pregnancy and dizziness may be a direct consequence of fluctuating blood sugar levels. Women with types 1 or 2 diabetes are more susceptible than others. For those who are not diabetic, there is a 4 to 8 percent of risk of developing gestational diabetes, a condition where blood sugar levels are too high. This condition requires close medical attention, but fortunately in most cases, it disappears after birth. For more about caring for your baby in the formative months, see our prenatal care guide. Uterus Pressure By the second trimester, the expanding uterus can put pressure on surrounding blood vessels, causing dizziness. Continue reading >>

Dry Mouth During Early Pregnancy

Dry Mouth During Early Pregnancy

If there’s one word that can sum up early pregnancy symptoms, it’s “hangover”. Seriously, think about it: the blinding headaches? The roiling stomach? The queasy bowel? Dizzy spells? Nausea? Mouth lined with flannel peeled off the bottom of the cat box? It’s all there, so yes – dry mouth is definitely associated with pregnancy. That doesn’t mean because you have a dry mouth, it means you’re pregnant – it means IF you’re pregnant, that’s why your mouth is dry. Why do we get flannel-mouth in early pregnancy, anyway? It’s simple: your body is busily gearing up for “gestation” mode. This means your metabolism has jacked up – you’re running through fluids at an accelerated pace and that increases the demand on your kidneys and bladder which requires more coming in the top end to replenish. It needs to expand blood volume by half again – that needs fluid. Later on in pregnancy, you’ll experience that precious, precious feeling of your uterus slouching down all over your bladder – this is when you desperately crab-walk to the bathroom only to discover it’s two drips and a drop because your bladder has been compressed to the size of a lentil. And why must there be the foul metallic taste, like you’ve been licking a tin can all night? That’s a hormone thing – it messes up your taste receptors and also explains why you just can’t eat certain foods that may have been favorites up to now. Seafood, eggs, meat, and chicken are all common aversions and when you look at them, you can see why: they are extremely common causes of food poisoning. Some researchers theorize that food aversion is the body’s way of limiting exposure to food-borne pathogens. Respect the dry mouth, however: it does serve a purpose. Simple “blech” dry mouth i Continue reading >>

What Is Gestational Diabetes Insipidus?

What Is Gestational Diabetes Insipidus?

Gestational diabetes insipidus is a rare condition that affects women during pregnancy, usually in the third trimester. It is not the same as, or related to, gestational diabetes. A key symptom is being very thirsty, so you drink far more liquid. This in turn leads to more frequent trips to the toilet. Other symptoms include nausea, dizziness, and weakness. What causes gestational diabetes insipidus? In rare cases during pregnancy, the placenta can make an enzyme that interferes with the antidiuretic hormone (ADH), which is also known as vasopressin. It’s a hormone that controls how much water you retain. The lack of the hormone causes extreme thirst and frequent urination. Gestational diabetes insipidus can also lead to lack of control when you pee and to bedwetting. The cause isn’t always known, but in some cases, the condition runs in the family. How is gestational diabetes insipidus diagnosed? A doctor will diagnose the condition based on a woman's symptoms, urine tests, and blood tests, and scans may also be arranged. How is gestational diabetes insipidus treated? Treatment may not always be recommended, but close monitoring may be preferred. A woman may be advised to increase her fluid intake to help avoid dehydration. One medication option is desmopressin - a synthetic form of ADH (vasopressin) - to help control urine production and help the body to absorb and manage water from the kidneys. When should I seek medical advice? As with any medical concerns during pregnancy, seek medical advice from your midwife or GP if you think you have symptoms of gestational diabetes insipidus. Many cases of the condition get better on their own some weeks after giving birth, but having the condition in one pregnancy makes it more likely to reappear in another one. Continue reading >>

There Are Many Reasons Why You Could Be Feeling Dizzy While Pregnant

There Are Many Reasons Why You Could Be Feeling Dizzy While Pregnant

It's not uncommon to experience episodes of dizziness and fainting while pregnant, especially in your first and second trimesters. While there are many different reasons, if you are dizzy while pregnant you may have stood up too quickly or stood for a long period of time. What Causes Fainting While Pregnant? In the first 16 to 20 weeks of your pregnancy, your diastolic blood pressure can often drop, making you dizzy. This number is your bottom number (the “100” in “70 over 100,” for example) and the lower it is, the more likely you will experience fainting while pregnant. Pregnancy changes your body and one of those changes is the fact that you produce more blood and your blood vessels become more elastic. A combination of these two things means blood can pool more often in your legs and feet, obviously further away from your brain. This is why you are dizzy while pregnant, too. If you have lower iron levels than normal this can cause not only weakness but dizziness. This correlation is because a lack of iron means a lack of oxygen since that's the storage process. If you are in your third trimester, you may become dizzy when you lay on your back. The sheer weight of your growing belly, and the baby, put too much pressure on the vena cava, one of the largest blood vessels in your body. What to Do If You Are Dizzy While Pregnant Don't stand for too long. If your job requires you to stand for long periods, take breaks and have a seat whenever possible. Take your time when going from lying down to sitting up or from sitting down to standing up. Fainting while pregnant is dangerous so avoid situations that would cause you to be dizzy. If you are dizzy and pregnant, think fast. Sit down and place your head between your knees. You can also lay on your side and take de Continue reading >>

15 Scary Signs In The Third Trimester

15 Scary Signs In The Third Trimester

By the third trimester you might be feeling like you finally have the hang of this whole "being pregnant" thing. Plenty of the worst risks and symptoms you and your baby experience are already over, while that longed for due-date is approaching faster than ever. However, the third trimester might also bring with it some heightened stress. You're certainly uncomfortable as you waddle around on your swollen feet. Especially if you've been having a tough pregnancy you may begin to wish the baby would just pop out already! At the same time, worries about how the labor will go and how healthy your baby is are as pressing as ever. This mix of elation and worry can be hard to navigate. You do need to know about some specific symptoms that plague mothers in their third trimester, and there are some new warning signs to watch out for. As your pregnancy makes way towards the finish line new conditions like pre-term labour, deep vein thrombosis, and placental abruption may start to feature in your worries more than the early-pregnancy thoughts of birth defects and miscarriage. Healthy knowledge of the risks is important, but try not to work yourself up over potential risks if you're not experiencing the symptoms. Check through this list we've provided on the symptoms you should seek medical attention about, but remember to call your doctor or midwife and let them soothe you over any symptoms you're just not sure about. Trust your intuition if you feel that something's not right and don't let anyone shame you for seeking medical advice over something they feel is "minor". It's always better to know for sure what's going on, when its your life and your baby's that could be affected! 15Baby Stops Moving Lulls in movement are normal of course, as your baby is old enough to be sleeping Continue reading >>

Preeclampsia And Gestational Diabetes

Preeclampsia And Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes and preeclampsia are both conditions that only occur during or just after pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is caused by an inability to use sugar properly during pregnancy, and may result in giving birth to a large baby. One of the potential complications of gestational diabetes is the development of preeclampsia. This condition, which may also be called toxemia of pregnancy or pregnancy-induced hypertension, occurs in about 10 to 30 percent of women with gestational diabetes. What Is Preeclampsia? Preeclampsia is defined as the presence of protein in your urine and high blood pressure occurring after the 20th week of your pregnancy. The condition affects about 5 to 8 percent of all pregnancies. In the United States, preeclampsia rarely causes the death of a mother or infant, but worldwide pregnancy-induced high blood pressure still causes 76,000 maternal deaths and 500,000 infant deaths every year. The cause of preeclampsia remains a mystery. We do know that you are at higher risk if you have gestational diabetes, a family history of preeclampsia, are overweight, or if you had high blood pressure or kidney disease before your pregnancy. Preeclampsia is more common during your first pregnancy, if you are carrying twins, and if you are over age 40 or a teenage mother. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Preeclampsia? The signs and symptoms of preeclampsia are caused by the sudden increase in your blood pressure, retention of fluids in your body, and kidney damage that allows proteins to pass into your urine. High blood pressure. You may have high blood pressure during your pregnancy without swelling or protein in your urine, so high blood pressure alone doesn't mean you have preeclampsia. Your doctor may suspect preeclampsia if you have a sudden increa Continue reading >>

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