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Is Being Dizziness A Sign Of Gestational Diabetes?

Fainting And Dizziness In Pregnancy (natural Remedies)

Fainting And Dizziness In Pregnancy (natural Remedies)

What causes dizziness and fainting in pregnancy? Dizziness and fainting is common in early pregnancy. It is usually caused by low blood sugar levels and high levels of pregnancy hormones in your body. Dizziness is often made worse if you have: During pregnancy, fluctuations in your blood pressure may make you feel dizzy or faint. The hormone progesterone makes your veins dilate, causing your blood pressure to drop. This may be worse if you sit or stand too quickly. As your pregnancy progresses, you will have more blood and fluid in your body to accommodate your developing baby. This can increase your blood pressure and cause headaches and dizziness. In later pregnancy, the weight of your baby can squeeze the blood vessels in your legs, pelvis and lower body when you lie on your back. This can also make you feel dizzy, as your blood pressure drops. Being too hot can add to these problems, and overheating is common because your growing baby pushes your normal temperature up by one degree C or 33.8 degree F. Occasional fainting and dizziness may be caused by diabetes, which you may have had before you became pregnant. Or you may have developed the condition during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). It's essential to maintain a stable blood sugar level if you have diabetes. On rare occasions fainting and dizziness may suggest more serious problems, such as an ectopic pregnancy or bleeding from the placenta. If you are worried about dizziness and fainting, contact your doctor. How can I stop myself from getting dizzy? Keep your blood sugar levels even by eating regularly - ideally, little and often. If you are prone to dizziness, keep a couple of savoury biscuits, a handful of almonds (badaam), or a banana (kela) in your bag. Try to avoid sweet, sugary foods that give you a q Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Possible Pregnancy Complications

Signs And Symptoms Of Possible Pregnancy Complications

Pregnancy is an exciting and scary time. With so many emotions and nerves, it’s tough to know whether that pain you feel or light spotting you see is normal or a sign of something more serious. And whether you’re a first-time mom-to-be or if you’ve already have children, every pregnancy is different. Pregnancy places a large strain on your body and sometimes complications can arise. Many are manageable, but it’s important to know the symptoms of common complications and when you should visit your doctor to ensure the health and well being of you and your baby. Common Pregnancy Complications Anemia – a condition of low red blood cells. It can make you feel tired, dizzy, or short of breath. Regularly eating foods high in iron is the best way to manage anemia. Severe nausea – nausea and vomiting early in pregnancy is common. In some cases it can be severe enough to cause dehydration, in which case you may need medication or IV fluids at a hospital. Usually, nausea gets better after the 20th week of pregnancy. Gestational diabetes – this is found in a routine screening test and can usually be controlled with diet during pregnancy. It’s important to follow a doctor’s recommendations if you get diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to preeclampsia or early delivery. The baby can also be larger than average, making delivery a challenge, or born with low blood sugar or jaundice. Vaginal spotting or bleeding – red or brown spotting or light bleeding happens in many pregnancies. If it persists, you have bleeding, cramping, or see fluid or tissue in your underwear, call your doctor right away. This may be a sign of something more serious. Possible Serious Pregnancy Complications Miscarriage – happens in about one in five pregnanc Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Or Low Blood Glucose

Hypoglycemia Or Low Blood Glucose

Hypoglycemia means that your blood glucose is low - generally below 60 to 80 mg/dL. Symptoms occur quickly and need to be treated as soon as possible. Causes Prevention Not enough food Eat all your meals and snacks on time. More physical activity than usual Eat extra food to match your increased activity. Too much diabetes medicine Take only the dose that has been prescribed. Symptoms You may have one or more of the following symptoms: sweating shaking feeling weak or tired feeling anxious or nervous racing heart feeling hungry having a mild headache tingling sensation around lips and tongue Treating hypoglycemia You are never harming yourself if you take glucose tablets or eat a simple sugar food because you suspect you have low blood glucose. If you are injecting insulin, always carry a simple sugar food with you. These include raisins, marshmallows, glucose tablets or a juice box. Test your blood glucose as soon as you feel symptoms. If your level is low, treat with 15 grams of carbohydrate. Examples include: 1/2 cup of fruit juice (you don't need to add sugar) 1/2 cup of regular pop 1 tablespoon of honey or sugar 2 tablespoons of raisins 3 large marshmallows 1 cup of skim milk 3 to 4 glucose tablets 15 grams of glucose gel After eating one of these foods, test your blood glucose every 10 to 15 minutes. If it is still low, eat another 15 grams of carbohydrate until your symptoms are gone or your blood glucose level is above 80. Follow-up treatment after hypoglycemia After you've experienced hypoglycemia, you may need more food. If your next meal or snack is less than one hour away, eat at your normal time. If your next meal or snack is one to two hours away, eat an extra snack that contains 15 grams of carbohydrate. If your next meal or snack is more than two hours a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar

Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar

Women who take insulin shots or take the medicine glyburide are at risk for low blood sugar levels. Most women with gestational diabetes do not have problems with low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). If your blood sugar (glucose) drops very low, make sure to get treated immediately so that neither you nor your baby is harmed. Low blood sugar occurs when the sugar level in the blood drops below what the body needs to function normally. Women who take insulin may get low blood sugar if they don't eat enough food, skip meals, exercise more than usual, or take too much insulin. These steps can help you avoid a life-threatening emergency from low blood sugar: Test your blood sugar often so that you don't have to guess when your blood sugar is low. Know the signs of low blood sugar, such as sweating, shakiness, hunger, blurred vision, and dizziness. The best treatment for low blood sugar is to eat quick-sugar foods. Liquids will raise your blood sugar faster than solid foods. Keep the list of quick-sugar foods in a convenient place. Wait 10 to 15 minutes after eating the quick-sugar food, and, if possible, check your blood sugar again. Keep some hard candy, raisins, or other sugary foods with you at all times. Eat some at the first sign of low blood sugar. Check your blood sugar before getting in a car, and don't drive if your blood sugar level is less than 70 mg/dL. Teach your friends and coworkers what to do if your blood sugar is very low. How to deal with low blood sugar emergencies Here are some ways you can prevent and manage low blood sugar emergencies. Be prepared Although most women with gestational diabetes do not have problems with low blood sugar, you should always be prepared for the possibility. Keep some quick-sugar foods with you at all times. If you are at home, y Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia: How Low Can You Go?

Hypoglycemia: How Low Can You Go?

If you have diabetes, you probably know the warning signs of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. "It's been described best as a little like the feeling you get when you're sliding on ice in a car: panic, rapid heart rate, [and] sort of a sense of doom," says John Buse, MD, PhD, professor of medicine, chief of the division of endocrinology, and executive associate dean for clinical research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine. You also probably know that hypoglycemia can come on suddenly and must be treated right away by eating sugar or carbohydrates. Other signs of hypoglycemia include dizziness, shakiness, difficulty paying attention, hunger, headaches, clumsy or jerky movements, and sudden moodiness like crying, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). But sometimes, people with low blood sugar don't get or even notice these warning symptoms. Instead, they develop a dangerous condition called hypoglycemic unawareness, which, in its worst form, can lead to unconsciousness, coma, or even death, though the latter is rare, Buse says. "Hypoglycemic unawareness is sort of a race," he says. "Will the patient figure out that they're hypoglycemic before they become incapacitated?" Hypoglycemic unawareness occurs most often in insulin-treated people with type 1 diabetes but also happens in those with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes, says Buse. It's more common in pregnant women and in those who have had diabetes for a long time, according to the ADA. In addition, "skipping or delaying a meal, increasing physical activity, or drinking alcohol can trigger an episode of low blood sugar," says Buse. "Even modest alcohol intake can bring it on." Often, the very medicines used to treat diabetes can cause hypoglycemia and in turn lead to hy Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition marked by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that are discovered during pregnancy. It is defined as carbohydrate intolerance. About two to 10 percent of all pregnant women in the U.S. are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Am I at risk for gestational diabetes? These factors increase your risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy: Being overweight before becoming pregnant (if you are 20% or more over your ideal body weight) Family history of diabetes (if your parents or siblings have diabetes) Being over age 25 Previously giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Previously giving birth to a stillborn baby Having gestational diabetes with an earlier pregnancy Being diagnosed with pre-diabetes Having polycystic ovary syndrome Being African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian-American, American Indian, or Pacific Islander American Keep in mind that half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no known risk factors. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by some hormonal changes that occur in all women during pregnancy. The placenta is the organ that connects the baby (by the umbilical cord) to the uterus and transfers nutrients from the mother to the baby. Increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta can prevent insulin—a hormone that controls blood sugar—from managing glucose properly. This condition is called "insulin resistance." As the placenta grows larger during pregnancy, it produces more hormones and increases this insulin resistance. Usually, the mother’s pancreas is able to produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the insulin resistance. If it cannot, sugar levels will rise, resulting in gestational dia Continue reading >>

Fainting And Dizziness (natural Remedies)

Fainting And Dizziness (natural Remedies)

What causes dizziness and fainting in pregnancy? Fluctuations in your blood pressure may make you feel dizzy or faint. The hormone progesterone makes your veins widen from early pregnancy, causing your blood pressure to drop. This may be worse if you sit or stand too quickly. In later pregnancy, the weight of your baby can squeeze the blood vessels in your legs, pelvis and lower body, especially when you lie on your back. This can also make you feel dizzy and woolly-headed, as your blood pressure drops. Being too hot can add to these problems. Feeling warmer is normal when you're pregnant. It's caused by hormonal changes and more blood going to your skin's surface. Be careful not to overheat when exercising, as exercising during pregnancy pushes up your body temperature more than normal. Other reasons for feeling faint include: You're feeling breathless, which is a common side-effect of pregnancy. You are low in iron and have anaemia. You have morning sickness and are being sick a lot. With so many reasons to feel dizzy and faint during pregnancy, it's hardly surprising that it's very common, affecting most mums-to-be. When should I be worried about fainting and dizziness? Occasional fainting and dizziness may be caused by diabetes, which you may have had before you became pregnant. Or you may have developed diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). Your midwife should assess how likely you are to develop gestational diabetes as part of your routine antenatal care. If you have diabetes you may feel faint if your blood sugar has dipped because you haven't eaten for a while. Very rarely, fainting and dizziness may suggest more serious problems, such as bleeding from the placenta. If you are worried about feeling faint, talk to your midwife or doctor. How can I sto Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

Understanding The Risks And Early Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Understanding The Risks And Early Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes can be particularly hard on pregnant women. It can affect both the mother and her unborn child. Known as gestational diabetes, this condition is now more common than ever. In the United States, it is estimated to affect up to 1 in every 10 pregnancies. The rate is said to be similar in Australia, with new cases of gestational diabetes rising a whopping 21% between 2000 and 2010. Fortunately with early diagnosis and treatment, any negative health effects on mother and child can be significantly minimised. In this article, HealthEngine looks at the health risks and early warning signs of gestational diabetes. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is the term given to expecting mothers diagnosed with pre-diabetes (otherwise known as Glucose Intolerance) during their pregnancy. The risk of glucose intolerance – and therefore gestational diabetes – is greatly increased during pregnancy because the efficiency of insulin (the hormone required to remove sugar from our bloodstream) naturally declines during this period. Less efficient insulin means sugar can become 'stuck' in our bloodstream, which leads to many health issues. For this reason, added sugar is basically hazardous to health during and immediately after pregnancy. What are the health risks of gestational diabetes? Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes does not mean you had diabetes before falling pregnant, or that you will have diabetes after pregnancy. But it does mean you need to be extra mindful of the foods you eat to ensure both you and your baby remain healthy. The risks of poorly managed gestational diabetes are serious: The developing foetus is prone to excessive growth and large birth weight, which is not ideal for either mother or child. Children born to mothers with poorly ma Continue reading >>

Preeclampsia And Gestational Diabetes

Preeclampsia And Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes and preeclampsia are both conditions that only occur during or just after pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is caused by an inability to use sugar properly during pregnancy, and may result in giving birth to a large baby. One of the potential complications of gestational diabetes is the development of preeclampsia. This condition, which may also be called toxemia of pregnancy or pregnancy-induced hypertension, occurs in about 10 to 30 percent of women with gestational diabetes. What Is Preeclampsia? Preeclampsia is defined as the presence of protein in your urine and high blood pressure occurring after the 20th week of your pregnancy. The condition affects about 5 to 8 percent of all pregnancies. In the United States, preeclampsia rarely causes the death of a mother or infant, but worldwide pregnancy-induced high blood pressure still causes 76,000 maternal deaths and 500,000 infant deaths every year. The cause of preeclampsia remains a mystery. We do know that you are at higher risk if you have gestational diabetes, a family history of preeclampsia, are overweight, or if you had high blood pressure or kidney disease before your pregnancy. Preeclampsia is more common during your first pregnancy, if you are carrying twins, and if you are over age 40 or a teenage mother. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Preeclampsia? The signs and symptoms of preeclampsia are caused by the sudden increase in your blood pressure, retention of fluids in your body, and kidney damage that allows proteins to pass into your urine. High blood pressure. You may have high blood pressure during your pregnancy without swelling or protein in your urine, so high blood pressure alone doesn't mean you have preeclampsia. Your doctor may suspect preeclampsia if you have a sudden increa Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Q. What is gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. It is different from having known diabetes before pregnancy and then getting pregnant. Gestational diabetes is generally diagnosed in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, and usually goes away after the baby is born. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for the mother and baby, but treatment and regular check-ups mean most women have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Q. Am I at risk of gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes affects between 10 and 15 per cent of pregnancies in Australia. Women of certain ethnic backgrounds — Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, Indian, Asian, Middle Eastern, African, Maori and Pacific Islander — are more at risk of developing gestational diabetes than women of Anglo-Celtic backgrounds. Other factors can also increase your risk, including: being overweight; having a family history of diabetes; having had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy; being 40 years or older; having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); taking medicines that can affect blood sugar levels (such as corticosteroids and antipsychotic medicines); and previously having a very large baby (more than 4.5 kg). Q. How would I know if I had gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes does not usually give rise to symptoms. For this reason it is important to be tested during pregnancy, usually between 24 and 28 weeks. Women with risk factors for diabetes may be offered testing earlier than this – sometimes at the first antenatal visit, which is often at around 10 weeks. Women who do develop symptoms may experience: extreme tiredness; being thirsty all the time; symptoms of recurrent infections (such as thrush); and needi Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Pregnancy Dizziness

How To Deal With Pregnancy Dizziness

Dizziness in maternity is quite regular. Barely would you find a female that has not experienced this sign during her term. A sudden surge in the pregnancy hormonal agents expands the capillary that results in an increased blood flow to the establishing unborn child. The regular blood flow in your body obtains hampered to some level causing a sudden decrease in the blood stress causing dizziness. You feel a reeling sensation in your head as if you will drop down subconscious. Severe dizziness can make you faint. According to the American Pregnancy Organization, this projects in anemic females as well as those dealing with varicose capillaries. Low blood glucose levels caused because of raised metabolism during pregnancy can also result in dizziness. This signs and symptom could also be felt in the 2nd and also third trimesters of maternity. Dizziness during pregnancy is not a serious problem. In instance of ectopic pregnancy, wooziness is usually come with by palpitation, blurred vision, bleeding as well as abdominal pain which calls for prompt clinical attention. Tips To Deal With Maternity Dizziness Dealing with pregnancy related dizziness is not difficult. You should adhere to some steps carefully to tackle this problem. Slow Down Your Movements You may feel dizziness as quickly as you obtain off from your bed early in the morning. This is among the usual symptoms of “morning health issues” in maternity. Stand up gradually from your bed. Your body undergoes some cardio changes throughout maternity that impacts the regular blood flow. Relax and also provide time to your body to adjust to the various transforming stances instead of hurrying. Eat Frequently Your body metabolic rate boosts throughout maternity and also you should provide a steady gas to cope up with Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diagnosed in a pregnant woman with no history of any kind of diabetes in her life. Like the general form, the gestational type is characterized by abnormally high blood glucose levels [1]. High glucose levels in the blood can be dangerous both for the mother and child. Gestational diabetes is usually diagnosed later in pregnancy; so, if you have diabetes in the first trimester that often means you have had it before getting pregnant [2]. Gestational Diabetes Classification Gestational diabetes mellitus or GDM (common) [3] Gestational diabetes insipidus or GDI (rare) [4] What causes diabetes during pregnancy? Researches are still being carried out to find the exact factors triggering high blood glucose levels in pregnancy. But, the hormonal and other changes occurring in your body are known to be responsible for the problem. Certain genetic factors have also been recognized to play a role in some cases [5]. Pathophysiology of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus The body changes during pregnancy make your body somewhat resistant to insulin [6]. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas to help your body use glucose for producing energy. The reduced functioning of insulin during pregnancy causes glucose build up in the blood, leading to diabetes. Gestational diabetes is more likely to occur late in the second trimester or during the third trimester as the pregnancy hormone levels gradually becomes higher with the advancement of your pregnancy [7]. What are the risk factors for gestational diabetes? Being overweight before conceiving Being over 25 years of age [7] History of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Family history of type 2 diabetes Carrying twins A tendency to have high blood glucose levels, but not hi Continue reading >>

Handling Dizziness During Pregnancy

Handling Dizziness During Pregnancy

Dizziness while pregnant refers to the circumstance when you feel unsteady or disoriented. Usually the pregnant females feel like they are going to pale or loss as well as you have to be truly careful because in a few of the cases they truly do. The root causes of maternity dizziness At the early phases, the lightheadedness could be brought on by the truth that your body isn’t really able to generate sufficient blood to fill up the circulatory system that is growing at a rapid speed. On the other hand the bright side is that your body is getting ready for the nourishing of the baby. In case you experience pregnancy lightheadedness throughout the 2nd trimester, it may be triggered by that your stomach is frequently growing as well as it is putting pressure on the surrounding capillary, so much less blood reaches your mind and also this could make your head spin. Some other reasons of dizziness during pregnancy include a decrease of the blood glucose level or you could additionally obtain dehydrated. Another factor may be that you are too warm or that you are using limited clothing. Keep in mind that your body has the ability to create a great deal of heat, so you don’t require a whole lot of clothes. Information regarding maternity dizziness It is normal to really feel lightheaded throughout your pregnancy however in case the lightheadedness lasts for a longer amount of time or you really pale, this is something that you ought to allow your doctor know about. Bear in mind that although it is normal to feel this means, you shouldn’t just neglect the feeling. If you experience lightheadedness throughout maternity, you should not be driving, handling dangerous things and you must likewise prevent functioning out. If the dizziness becomes worse, you need to rest down t Continue reading >>

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