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Is Bananas Good For Diabetics?

Diabetic Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? | Diabetic Connect

Diabetic Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? | Diabetic Connect

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? By Amy Reeder, Registered Dietitian and CDE No Comments Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a masters degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. Bananas are a healthy way to get nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. However, bananas sometimes tend to get a bad rap, even from doctors. In an internet search, you might frequently run into informational advertisements with bananas as part of the list of the five foods you should never eat. Never eat? That seems a little extreme, especially if you know your nutrition facts about this fruit. Bananas are fat free, sodium free, and cholesterol free. But it is important to understand that bananas are NOT carbohydrate free! And figuring the carbohydrate content of a banana can be tricky because the content varies with size. Use this chart when calculating the carb content of the bananas you eat (measure once and eyeball thereafter): From small to large bananas in that scale, you will get anywhere from two to four grams of fiber per serving, depending on the size. Obviously the larger the banana, the higher the fiber, potassium, and vitamin C content, but that also comes with higher carbohydrate content. Of the 30 grams of carbohydrate in a medium banana, 19 grams are sugar and the other 11 grams are starch, including three grams of fiber. A fully ripe banana has a glycemic index of 51this would be considered a low-glycemic index food, as the cutoff is 55. In addition, the ripeness of a banana changes its glycemic index. An under-ripe banana with visible green sections on the peel would have a glycemic index of approximately 42, while an over-ripe banana w Continue reading >>

Is Banana Beneficial For Diabetics

Is Banana Beneficial For Diabetics

Good news for the diabetic sweet tooth! The American Diabetes Association has announced that you can eat almost any fruit, even bananas. And the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends a daily consumption of between 1½ – 2 cups of fruit daily, while the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases cites bananas with other fruits that diabetics can safely add to their diets. It is recommended that the consumption of fruit be distributed at regular times during the day in order to prevent sudden elevation in levels of blood sugar. But don’t forget the carbohydrates in fruits, and be sure to count them when you’re planning your meal. Click here to find the best method to cure your diabetes naturally The Concern About Carbs Diabetics must be vigilant about the type and the amount of carbohydrates they consume. By utilizing the insulin hormone, your body breaks down carbs and converts them to glucose, providing energy and fueling cells. However, diabetics have problems with insulin, which may cause abnormally high glucose levels to flow through the bloodstream. Since almost all fruit contains a large number of carbohydrates, eating too many can dump an amount of glucose greater than the body can process. Even so, carbs are an invaluable nutrient that our bodies need to survive. The key is to manage them properly within the special dietary needs of a diabetic. The Beneficial Banana According to the USDA, bananas are America’s favorite fruit. This is good because they’re very beneficial as well. Bananas have a low calorie count but are high in vitamin C, vitamin B6, potassium, and fiber. The fiber helps keep you feeling full and satisfies your cravings, Vitamin C enhances the immune system, Vitamin B6 boosts your mood, and potassium helps contr Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

When a person has diabetes, they need to carefully consider the contents of each meal. This can be especially true for carbohydrate-containing food, which not only includes desserts and other sweet treats, but bread, pasta, and fresh fruits. One fruit that traditionally has been on the "avoid" list for those with diabetes is bananas. However, for the most part, bananas eaten in moderation can be safely enjoyed when a person has diabetes. Bananas grow on banana plants that can have anywhere from 50 to 150 bananas in each bunch of fruit. The individual bananas are sold in varying sizes, from small to extra-large, the size-grading being determined by their length. Nutritional breakdown Overall, bananas are low in saturated fat, sodium, and cholesterol. They also have a good mix of nutrients, including vitamin B6, potassium, and manganese. However, some doctors and dietitians may give bananas greater nutritional scrutiny when considering them for people with diabetes, because bananas are high in sugar relative to their calories. One medium banana has an estimated glycemic load of 11, according to Harvard Health Publishing on glycemic loads. Glycemic load is a measure of a food's impact on blood sugar. A glycemic load of fewer than 10 is considered low, while one above 20 is high. Can you eat bananas if you have diabetes? Examples of lower-sugar fruit options include apples, grapes, and pears. Fruits with higher sugar levels include papayas and pineapples. However, those with diabetes do not have to eliminate bananas from their diet, or any other fruit for that matter. Their other nutritional values in terms of vitamins and minerals can make them a healthy option for those with diabetes when consumed in moderation. The American Diabetes Association recommend incorporating fr Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

Fruit And Diabetes

Fruit And Diabetes

Everyone should be eating more fruit and vegetables. You're probably aware of the five a day target, and this is equally important if you’re living with diabetes or if you’re not. You might think you think that the sugar content of fruit means that you can’t eat it. But, the sugar in fruit is natural, and is not this type of sugar we need to cut down on. This is different to the added sugar in drinks, chocolate, cakes and biscuits, as well as in fruit juices and honey. The amount of carbohydrate you eat has the biggest effect on your blood glucose levels and considering a portion of fruit contains about 15–20g carbs, a chocolate muffin has 55g carbs and a small bar of chocolate has 30g carbs it is better to reduce your intake of the chocolate, cakes and other snacks than the fruit itself to help manage your blood glucose levels. It is very unlikely that you need to reduce your fruit intake but you could keep a food diary to check how often and how much fruit you are eating. Some people find that it is easy to overdo the dried fruit, grapes and tropical fruits. If you consider a serving of dried fruit is a tablespoon and packs in 20.8g carbs, 20.8g total sugar and 82 calories you can see how easily this happens. An apple on the other hand, which takes a while to eat, contains only 11.8g carbs, 11.8g sugar and 47 calories. Be mindful of your serving sizes too – bananas in supermarkets now seem to be supersize with a large banana containing 27.8g carbs, 25.1g sugar and 114 calories. But, most people need to cut down on foods with added sugars rather than fruit – a large banana is still better for you than a a standard chocolate bar, which contains 27.9g carbohydrate, 27.8g sugars and a staggering 260 calories. Why do I need to be careful about fruit juices and Continue reading >>

Bananas For Diabetes: Good Or Bad?

Bananas For Diabetes: Good Or Bad?

Bananas for diabetes. Are you curious to know whether they are a good or bad fruit to include in your diet? Glad you asked. Because while eating bananas are commonly thought of as being a “healthy,” when you have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, there's a bit more to the story. Let's explore bananas together now. JUMP TO: Bananas as a common fruit | Nutrition facts | The downfalls of fructose | Green vs. ripe bananas | Glycemic index | Potassium sources comparison | Conclusion Bananas: a popular common fruit As we all know, bananas are a popular fruit, well known for their bright yellow peel and unique boomerang shape. People from all across the world consume bananas. And as suggested above, bananas are often considered a health food because they are relatively low in calories and rich in minerals like potassium, plus they’re an easy snack to grab on the go. Still, while they may provide various health benefits for the general population, the question still remains: are they really a healthy choice for people with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? To find out, let’s start by taking a peek at the nutrition facts. Banana Nutrition Facts For one medium-sized ripe banana: Calories: 105 Total carbohydrates: 26.9g Protein: 1.20g Fat: 0.39g Fiber: 3.1g With only about 1 gram of protein and less than a gram of fat, it’s pretty easy to see that the dominant macronutrient in a banana is… carbohydrates. The carbohydrate content of one medium banana is a whopping 26.9 grams (beware of the oncoming blood sugar spikes)! Foods with a higher carb count can sometimes be “balanced out” if they also contain a high amount of dietary fiber, which reduces the overall net carbs of a food (the available carbs for digestion). But unfortunately, bananas aren’t rich in fiber. Just Continue reading >>

Why Eating Banana Peels Can Be Good For Diabetics

Why Eating Banana Peels Can Be Good For Diabetics

We all know that bananas are good for diabetics. Not only is this succulent, sweet fruit rich in fiber, but it also has anti-diabetic properties that can help keep your blood sugar levels down. But did you know that its peel is just as beneficial as well? In fact, some Asian countries even incorporate banana peels into their diet! If you have high blood sugar levels, knowing the benefits of banana peels just might encourage you to start eating them as well. What’s in the banana peel? Banana peel makes up about 40% of the fruit’s total weight. Like its pulp, it contains numerous phytochemicals as well as phenolic compounds beneficial to diabetics. It also has antioxidant properties that can help combat chronic low-grade inflammation which worsens diabetes. Some of the compounds found in banana peels that help reduce blood sugar levels and maintain normal cholesterol levels include pectin, cellulose, as well as hemicellulose. The banana peel also contains lignin, another compound that reduces oxidative stress and helps prevent nephropathy. What can eating banana peels do for you? Chronic low-grade inflammation, as studies have proven, worsens diabetes and prevents the insulin-producing cells from recovering. It also contributes to the development of diabetes complications like heart disease and stroke. - Advertisement - Banana peels, as mentioned above, are a good source of antioxidants. The antioxidant compounds from banana peels help reduce cellular toxicity caused by chronic low-grade inflammation, giving the cells time to recover. In addition to controlling cellular toxicity though, banana peel’s antioxidant effects also reduce bad cholesterol levels and help prevent heart diseases. Moreover, the pectin from banana peels has hypoglycemic effects which can help c Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Know What to Avoid Diabetes requires daily maintenance, including monitoring your blood sugar, eating a healthy diet, exercising, and of course staying on top of any complications with your heart, eyes, and other organs. Controlling your weight is another key aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing some weight — even just 10 to 15 pounds — can help improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, reduce triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, and lower your blood pressure. A healthy diet for diabetes will help you manage your weight and lead you toward foods that have a positive effect on your glucose levels, while guiding you away from those foods that are likely to cause dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Learn which nine foods you should steer clear of if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

Banana Good Or Bad | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Banana Good Or Bad | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have an age old habit of having 1-2 bananas in breakfast. Now that I have been diagnosed with Type-2, is it advisable to continue with this habit? I have banana has lots of carbs and is not good but many people say it is healthy to eat banana even as a diabetic. I have an age old habit of having 1-2 bananas in breakfast. Now that I have been diagnosed with Type-2, is it advisable to continue with this habit? I have banana has lots of carbs and is not good but many people say it is healthy to eat banana even as a diabetic. Our ears must of been burning as I'm interested in knowing if I can continue to eat Bananas, as I enjoy Toasted Wholemeal Bread with a Banana on it, as an alternative to porridge on some mornings. So after seeing the add advising us not to eat bananas, I became concerned and decided to ask why there not recomended, but you beat me to it, so I hope we get a response soon. Just googled that banana has 92% carb- one medium banana has 27g carb so i guess having 2 in the morning will leave little budget for carb for the rest of the day..and god knows what will happen to the blood sugar level with such a high dump of carb So I guess there is more to it than I am getting, i will have to get rid of bananas VinnyJames Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member Some will say that bananas are the devils work but I love them. I wouldn't eat them every day but I have one occasionally and usually just before I hit the gym so I can work off the carbs that way. I think most of us would consider bananas a no-no. The best way to find out for sure is to test before and after eating them to see how you personally are with them. But as you say, 2 nanas i Continue reading >>

15 Facts About Banana For Diabetes (#you Must Know)

15 Facts About Banana For Diabetes (#you Must Know)

Diabetes patients should concern about the amount intake of carbohydrate as well as the kind of it. The insulin hormone divides carbohydrate and change it into glucose that gives you energy to work. Diabetes patients have problem with their insulin. Besides, their glucose level in their body is higher. Almost all of fruits are rich of carbohydrate. It makes diabetes patients face difficulties in dealing with their glucose level. Yet, carbohydrate is important nutrition for us. Sponsors Link One of the fruits that diabetes patients should be aware of is banana. Banana is the source of fiber, potassium, and vitamin C. Those three nutrition are important for diabetes patients. However, we should know that banana contains carbohydrate. Thus, diabetes patients should smartly manage the portion of banana that can be consumed. Moreover, the size of banana is various. It makes the carbohydrate counting difficult. The 5 size estimation of bananas and the content of their carbohydrate: Extra small banana (6 inches long or less) contains 18.5 grams of carbohydrate Small banana (about 6-6 7/8 inches long) contains 23 grams of carbohydrate Medium banana (7-7 7/8 inches long) contains 27 grams of carbohydrate Large banana (8-8 7/8 inches long) contains 31 grams of carbohydrate Extra large banana (9 inches or longer) contains 35 grams of carbohydrate. 15 Connection between Diabetes and Banana: 1. Ripe Banana. Ideally, diabetes patients should not consume banana, especially the ripe one. Based on a study, people who eat ripe banana have high response to glycemic. It means the level of their blood sugar is drastically increasing. As a result, they demand more insulin. 2. Half Ripe Banana. People who eat half ripe banana show low glycemic response. The experts say that 90% of carbohydrat Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas

Even diabetics should eat at least two servings of fruit per day, and bananas are one healthful way of filling that requirement. One extra-small banana contains 8 percent of the daily value for potassium, a mineral that can help you control your blood pressure. It also provides you with 2 grams of fiber and 12 percent of the daily value for vitamin C. As long as you're careful to eat them with meals, and account for their carbohydrate content in your daily meal plan, they can remain a part of your diet. Carbohydrate Counting The recommended serving size for bananas for diabetics is one extra-small banana, which is a banana that is no more than 6 inches long. A banana of this size contains 19 grams of carbohydrates, which is about a third of the 45 grams to 60 grams of carbohydrates most diabetics can consume in each meal. Glycemic Index Foods that are low on the glycemic index cause less of a rise in blood sugar levels than foods that are higher on the glycemic index. A banana that is a bit green is lower on the glycemic index than a riper banana. If you eat a banana, which is a medium glycemic index food, eat it along with foods that are low on the glycemic index or with foods that contain little or no carbohydrate, as this will help keep your blood sugar from spiking. Foods low on the glycemic index include nuts, non-starchy vegetables and beans. Meat, fish, poultry, cheese and eggs are examples of foods that contain very little carbohydrate. Fruits that have a lower glycemic index include raw apples, cherries and grapefruit, and those that have a higher glycemic index include dried dates and watermelon. Create Your Plate The American Diabetes Association's Create Your Plate method allows you to control your blood sugar without worrying about counting carbohydrates. Y Continue reading >>

Green Bananas: A Diabetes-friendly Snack

Green Bananas: A Diabetes-friendly Snack

(Content Updated 3/23/2017) By Joy Stephenson-Laws and the pH health care professionals Bananas are one of the most popular fruits around. In fact, they seem to be America’s favorite fruit, according to the USDA. The average American eats 27 pounds of bananas a year, and it’s no wonder! They’re high in potassium, dietary fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins B6 and C. But what you may not know about bananas is that you don’t have to wait for them to turn yellow to enjoy them. In fact, there may be benefits of eating them green that you don’t get when they’re ripe. Both green and yellow bananas have their own perks, but people who have diabetes should lean toward the green ones. What are the benefits of green bananas for a person with diabetes? You may have noticed that bananas get sweeter as they ripen. This is because the bananas’ chemical composition changes through the ripening process, turning from starch to sugar. This means the green, unripe bananas have much less sugar than the fully ripe bananas. Additionally, recent research shows resistant starch, found in green bananas, may improve insulin sensitivity. Resistant starch is a type of starch that “resists” digestion, thereby acting like fiber and making you feel full longer. However, when it is cooked, most of the starch in a green banana becomes highly digestible and is no longer “resistant.” Resistant starch has also shown promise for being a natural weight loss tool. However, if you’re like the average American, you probably don’t get nearly enough resistant starch in your diet. A typical Western diet contains highly digestible starches that have a high glycemic index. Foods like potatoes, rice, pasta, cereals and breads are low in resistant starch. Cooked legumes, peas and green bananas Continue reading >>

Should You Eat Bananas If You’re Diabetic?

Should You Eat Bananas If You’re Diabetic?

Diabetics have to be careful about what they eat, and too many carbs or high glycemic index foods are usually a no-no. On the other hand, fresh fruit and vegetables are supposed to have a beneficial effect on the condition. So where does that leave you when it comes to fruit like the humble banana? When you have Type-2 diabetes, your body can’t produce adequate insulin, causing glucose to get pulled out of the blood for storage in cells. As a result, your sugar levels go through dips and spikes. This means your diet has a vital role to play in helping regulate the sugar levels. Very high glycemic foods can exaggerate the spikes and the sudden dips after the sugar is burnt through quickly. What’s In A Banana? Bananas are a rich source of dietary fiber as well as vitamin C, vitamin B6, and potassium, making them a great healthy snack or ingredient in a meal. While the B6 keeps you in a good mood, vitamin C does wonders for your immune system, potassium helps regulate blood pressure, and the fiber keeps you feeling satiated for longer. One study even indicated that native banana starch (24 g per day) could be beneficial for increasing insulin sensitivity and may help lower body weight in obese Type-2 diabetics.1 It is no wonder then that they are also one of the most popular fresh fruits in the United States.2 What diabetics need to keep in mind though, is that bananas also contain carbohydrates and this must be factored in when planning your meals for the day. Diabetics Can Have Bananas Too The American Diabetes Association encourages the consumption of fruit by diabetics and says eating bananas as part of a healthy diet is absolutely okay.3 In fact, one study showed that a banana is actually among the best whole fruit (along with blueberries and grapefruit) you can h Continue reading >>

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