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Is Avocado Oil Good For Diabetics

Is Avocado Good For Diabetics?

Is Avocado Good For Diabetics?

Over the years many people have come to fear avocados. I think this largely comes from the weight loss/ low fat industry pushing us not to eat fat because the common thinking is that we'll end up getting fat. Now I hear no end of people saying they avoid avocado, or left questioning is avocado good for diabetics? Well I hope this info helps to clear that up for you because avocado is one of the very best and healthiest foods we can all eat, diabetic or not. So let's dig in. So Is Avocado Good For Diabetics? As you most likely know, as a diabetic the macronutrient you most have to be concerned about is carbohydrates. But as dietitian Aglaee Jacob points out: “Avocado contains very small amounts of available carbohydrates and are not problematic for diabetes control, even if you eat a whole, large avocado”. What she means by available carbohydrates is that fiber does not affect blood sugar levels, only starch and sugar does. So when you subtract the amount of fiber in a food you are left with the net carbs, which is the net effect of that carbohydrate food. Sometimes it seems like a food has quite a bit of carbohydrate but once you minus the fiber you're left with very low ‘available carbohydrate content', just like the avocado in this instance. Avocado Is High In Monounsaturated Fat The fat found in avocado is 71% monounsaturated fat, 13% polyunsaturated, and 16% saturated fat. Monounsaturated fats provide diabetics with valuable health benefits: Eating a diet rich in monounsaturated fat from avocados helps to lower cholesterol and has a beneficial influence on glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes Even after 7 days of eating a high avocado diet, total cholesterol level has been shown to decrease by 17% in hypercholesterolemia patients, 22% decrease in LD Continue reading >>

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

As a person with diabetes, I love avocados. That beautiful, alligator-skinned, green-egg shaped thing. Sorry, it doesn’t come with ham. (Oh come on, that was funny!) So, why do I love avocados, and why are they so good for people with diabetes? First of all, it’s low-carb and high in fat, and the fat is all good for you (because it’s mostly a healthy fat). The avocado is also yummy, like butter, except instead of killing you, it’s saving you. I know, I know, big claims, but why? Here are some of the nutritional wonders of the average California avocado: about 320 calories 17 grams carbs 13 grams of fiber 30 grams of fat –> 4 grams of saturated fat (the least healthy kind) –> 20 grams monounsaturated fat (the most healthy kind) –> 4 grams of polyunsaturated fat (a pretty healthy kind) Numerous vitamins and minerals, including the ever so important electrolytes potassium and magnesium. In fact, an avocado usually has 3 times more potassium than a banana does. Now let’s break that down. 320 calories. That’s pretty high, right? So what! With everything you get in this wonder fruit, it’s worth it. Yes, it’s a fruit, not a vegetable. The avocado is also known as an “alligator pear.” 17 grams of carbs and 13 grams of fiber. As people with diabetes, you know that’s a really odd ratio, and it seems that you may not even need to take any insulin when you eat one of these things, because we always substract the fiber from the carbohydrates to calculate our insulin needs. Personally, I don’t need any insulin for an avocado, and that’s part of why I love them. 30 grams of fat. That’s high too, right? So what! The simple myth of “eating fat makes you fat” simply isn’t accurate. Fat doesn’t make you fat. You get 20 grams of monounsaturated fat Continue reading >>

Review: Calpure Extra Virgin Avocado Oil

Review: Calpure Extra Virgin Avocado Oil

Curious why youre seeing oils like avocado oil as being touted asbetterthan olive oil? The company states avocado oil, which is pressed from the soft flesh surrounding the avocado pit, is healthier than olive oil because olive oil (and most other oils) turn into a trans fat when cooked above 400 degrees. Avocado oil, on the hand,has a 520 degree smoke pointthe highest of any cooking oil. Just as with olive oils, the extra virgin avocado oil is best used for dressings and where no high heating takes place whereas the non extra virgin oil can be used for grilling, sauting, roasting, frying and bakingdishes. CalPure was foundedby the Rutledges- -who describe themselves as avid home cooks and California vegetable farmers. CalPure shares the benefits of their oils: 10g of monounsaturated fats per serving and high in cholesterol-lowering beta sitosterolideal for the Mediterranean and DASH diets Great addition to a heart-healthy diet: no trans-fats, preservatives or cholesterol The main fatty acid in avocado oil is oleic acid, known for its anti-inflammatory benefits Cold-pressed and naturally refined with no absolutely no additives I was sent the organic extra virgin avocado oil . Ive so far used it in place of extra virgin olive oil in a few recipes like, potato salad, green salad, on lightly cooked eggs and even as a sandwich drizzle. I was surprised by the bright green color of the oil, which the companys website states has to do with the way they make their oil, Cold-pressing using a simple centrifuge allows the oil retains all its flavor, aroma, and natural antioxidants. By cold-pressing grocery store quality fruit, we are able to produce our flavorful, emerald green oil. So due to that process, the oil contains Vitamin E and is rich in flavor quality. I am picky anddon Continue reading >>

Avocado Oil | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Avocado Oil | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community While grocery shopping today, as always I was looking for things that might be better for me as a diabetic. I came across avocado oil. It was really quite expensive I have to say, but I bought some to try. Has anyone else tried it, and what did you make of it? I made some home made lamb burgers tonight for dinner, and I fried them in the avocado oil and they came out really nice. So far I am impressed, but still curious about others experience with it. Good question and I wonder if it's neutral tasting enough to make a homemade Mayo without having to use a grain oil? that would be good indeed! :thumbup: Good question and I wonder if it's neutral tasting enough to make a homemade Mayo without having to use a grain oil? that would be good indeed! :thumbup: Ahhh good thinking Paul. It could be worth a try. Its lovely on dry skin, I actually use it in my homemade skincare products. But it is very good in salad dressing and its nice and green. Its lovely on dry skin, I actually use it in my homemade skincare products. But it is very good in salad dressing and its nice and green. I use virgin cold pressed coconut oil on my skin and in my frying pan. I love how all these things have a duel purpose. I have to say while avocado oil is quite pricey, I do think it will be my oil of choice from now on. It's really nice, plus it can be used as a salad dressing etc, the same as olive oil, but to me just 'feels' healthier for me. Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

The humble avocado, shunned for years during the fat-free diet craze of the 1990s, may have finally hit its stride. No longer just for guacamole, this nutritious fruit is popping up as a healthy addition to various diet plans. But can people with diabetes eat this food? It turns out that avocados are not only safe for people with diabetes, but they may be downright beneficial. Research shows that avocados offer many ways to help people manage their diabetes and improve their overall well-being. Contents of this article: Diet and diabetes A healthy diet is critical for people with diabetes. The foods that they eat each day can have a considerable impact on how they feel and how well their diabetes is controlled. In general, people with diabetes should eat foods that help control blood sugar levels and that offer health benefits such lowering blood pressure and cholesterol. This is one of the best ways to keep diabetes under control, avoid complications, and lead the healthiest life possible. Avocados are an excellent choice for people with diabetes because they offer all these benefits - and possibly more. How do avocados affect blood sugar levels? Blood sugar control is critical for people who have diabetes. A physician or dietitian may advise patients to choose foods that are lower in carbohydrates and sugar. They may also recommend foods that help control blood sugar spikes. An avocado meets both of these requirements. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, an average medium avocado has around 17 grams of carbohydrates. For comparison, an apple has 25 grams of carbohydrates and a banana has 27. A 1-ounce serving, or about one-fifth of an avocado, contains only 3 grams of carbohydrates and less than 1 gram of sugar. With so few carbohydrates, people Continue reading >>

Avocado Oil: The Healthiest New Oil - Dr. Axe

Avocado Oil: The Healthiest New Oil - Dr. Axe

Current: Why Avocado Oil Got Rx Status in France Dr. Axe on Facebook2513 Dr. Axe on Twitter68 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest1145 Share on Email Print Article Thanks to the delicious dip known as guacamole , most likely you are familiar with the beloved avocado. But have you ever tried avocado oil or did you even know it existed? I previously ranked the benefit-rich avocado as one of the top five healthiest foods so its not surprising that I would also rank avocado oil has one of the top five healthiest oils on the planet! Studies have found avocado oil benefits to include the prevention of the development of diabetes, high cholesterol, high triglyceride levels, and obesity. ( 1 ) Avocado oil has even received prescription drug status in France because of its proven ability to counter the negative effects of arthritis! ( 2 ) This is just one of the many reasons to start stocking this oil alongside coconut oil in your cupboard, for both cooking as well as raw foods. Why Avocado Oil Is Superior to Most Other Oils Avocado oil is produced from the fruit (avocado) of the avocado tree. Avocado oil is pressed from the fleshy pulp surrounding the avocado pit, making it one of the few edible oils not derived from seed. This pulp produces anoil full of healthy fats , includingoleic acid and essential fatty acids. Oils like flaxseed oil and pumpkin seed oil are very nutrient dense, but they cannot be used for cooking. The awesome thing about avocado oil is that its not only a superfood oil that can used in uncooked items like salads and dips, but its also highly recommended for cooking. When using any oil for cooking, it is very important to consider the smoke point (the temperature at which the oil starts to be visibly smoking i Continue reading >>

Avocado And Diabetes Prevention And Treatment

Avocado And Diabetes Prevention And Treatment

Diabetes is a massive health problem with approximately 19 million Americans diagnosed with the disease. There are also believed to be a further 7 million people who are undiagnosed sufferers, according to the National Institute of Diabetes. That’s over 8% of the US population affected by a disease that is the leading cause of kidney failure, new cases of blindness in adults and non-trauma lower limb amputations. Diabetes is also a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke and now the seventh highest cause of death in the United States. The primary symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes include significantly increased thirst and hunger and the need to urinate more often. Vision problems, a dry mouth, rapid weight loss and leg pain can also be symptoms. If you exhibit any of these, please see a healthcare professional to have a simple check. Around half a million people in America lose their lives through diabetes each year. Millions more have to deal with the debilitating effects of the disease every day. Even worse, if the current upward trend of newly diagnosed cases continues, it has been predicted that more than half of all American adults will develop diabetes or prediabetes by 2020. This alone would likely collapse our health system, yet conventional medicine does not seem to be making significant inroads into beating the disease. Perhaps this is because it is not some new wonder drug that is needed, but rather a serious change in many of our lifestyles, particularly in the type of foods we eat. If you are already living with the condition, you would be worth reading these 5 important tips for diabetics to help reduce the damage of this debilitating disease. How the Monounsaturated Fats in Avocados Benefit Diabetes The American Diabetes Association Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Is Avocado Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Diabetes, as we know, is a complicated disease and in order to effectively manage the chronic illness, one has to take a lot of measures with respect to the diet and lifestyle. One of the much-loved fruit all across the world is Avocado. Most of the diabetic patients therefore often ask the question Is Avocado Good or Bad for Diabetics? In this article, we shall deep dive and try to analyze the relationship between Avocado and diabetes in detail. Let us first understand some of the facts related with Avocados. The fruit is a rich source of antioxidants and minerals such as potassium, vitamin E as well as Vitamin C. The fruit is known to be rich in a number of vitamin B such as riboflavin, pyridoxine, niacin, amongst others. They contain high amount of fats but the same is in the form of monosaturated fats, something that is considered good for diabetes An average medium sized Avocado has around 17 grams of carbohydrates Relationship Between Avocado and the Blood Sugar Level As per the United States Department of Agriculture, an average size of the fruit contains around 17 grams of carbohydrates. Hence, Avocado is a fruit which you can include in your diet without worrying about the increase in the levels of blood glucose. In fact, studies have shown that when you combine this fruit with other foods as part of your diet, any increase in the level of blood glucose is said to decline and stabilize. Other Benefits of Eating Avocado for People Suffering From Diabetes Eating and including Avocado has several health benefits apart from the advantage of stabilizing the level of blood glucose in the body. Some of the other benefits of the fruit include the following: The fruit is a rich source of fiber. Fiber is important as it helps in the smooth digestion of food in the body. Continue reading >>

Healthy Cooking Oils | Diabetic Connect

Healthy Cooking Oils | Diabetic Connect

I just read an article on Everyday Health and it was on healthy cooking oils. I was a bit unhappy with it, and found it a little out of touch. I have done a lot of research on oils and of course there are always two (or more) camps on things. But I was surprised at some of the oils they said were good and one they said was bad. Here is the article: And here are their recommendations, but I will say I do not agree 100% Start your cooking oil selection with plant-based oils like: Next choose from a variety of seed- and nut-based oils, many of which make tasty bases for salad dressings and marinades, including: Some oils contain higher levels of saturated fat, which is considered the "bad" or unhealthy fat because it can clog arteries and lead to high cholesterol levels and increased risk of heart disease. Avoid these oil varieties, some of which are so high in saturated fat that they have more of it than some meat sources: What do you guys think? What oils do you cook with and why? It certainly shows the old style wrong thinking. I think a number of us that use the oils that they have said that are bad and have improved our cholesterol LDL's proves their error. I can't understand why they would choose some of the worst oils over the naturally healthy oils to place in the diet. This is like the oil and grain carb diets that have led to increased disease and diabetes. The only thing I can come up with is they made that highly refined stuff and now they have to build a customer base to buy it. That thinking has caused much of America's health decline beginning at the same time those products hit our store shelves. What I can't understand is, Why would the medical field endorse it and push it ? Are they to building their customer base ? There seems to be more questions going Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Avocado Avocado is high in monounsaturated fats, which are generally considered among the healthiest of fats. Researchers have found that a diet high in monounsaturated fats and low in low–quality carbs may improve insulin sensitivity. Monounsaturated fats also improve heart health — an especially important benefit for diabetics, who are at an increased risk for heart disease and stroke. Add a few thin slices of avocado to your sandwiches in place of mayonnaise, or mash a ripe avocado with cilantro, lime juice, and diced tomato for a delicious guacamole dip. Now that you know which foods can help control blood sugars, find out which ones can lead to terrible diabetes complications. Continue reading >>

6 Best Cooking Oils For People With Diabetes

6 Best Cooking Oils For People With Diabetes

There’s a lot of confusion when it comes to the type of cooking oil that you should use for daily use and especially if you are suffering from a lifestyle disease like heart trouble or diabetes where your diet plays a major role in managing the ailment. There are so many varieties and blends available in the supermarket that it is natural to feel overwhelmed. Here’s a way out. Wellness Expert Dr. Shikha Sharma tells us, “To ensure optimal fat quality the use of a combination of vegetable oils is important. You could juggle between butter, ghee, olive oil, mustard oil, soyabean, sesame or even groundnut oil for different meals. Depend more on unrefined (Kachi Ghani) or cold pressed oils versus refined oils.” When it comes to diabetes, it is very important to keep a check on your diet as your blood sugar levels are directly affected by what you eat. It helps to know that, in this case, a particular cooking oil may be better off than the other. Here are the healthiest cooking oils for diabetics as suggested by Dr. Sunali Sharma, Dietician & Nutritionist, Amandeep Hospitals. 1. Canola Oil: Canola oil is a plant-based oil derived from the rapeseed plant. It is rich in alpha-linolenic acid which is a type of omega-3 fatty acid that you will also find in walnuts. It also contains healthy monounsaturated fatty acids found in avocados and olives. “A study conducted by Dr. David Jenkins from the University of Toronto showed that canola oil helps in lowering blood sugar levels and bad cholesterol in people with type 2 diabetes.” Canola oil is a plant-based oil derived from the rapeseed plant​. Photo Credit: Istock 2. Olive Oil: Olive oil is a heart-friendly oil that is good for diabetics too. It contains an antioxidant called tyrosol that can act as a therapeutic age Continue reading >>

Avocado And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And More

Avocado And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And More

Avocados are growing in popularity. The creamy green fruit is packed with vitamins, nutrients, and heart-healthy fats . While they are high in fat, its the good kind of fat that benefits people with type 2 diabetes . If you have type 2 diabetes, adding avocado to your diet may help you lose weight, lower cholesterol, and increase insulin sensitivity. Read on to learn more about the benefits of avocados for people with diabetes. Benefits of avocadofor people with type 2 diabetes Avocados are low in carbohydrates, which means they have little effect on blood sugar levels. A recent study published in Nutrition Journal evaluated the effects of adding half an avocado to the standard lunch of healthy, overweight people. They discovered that avocados do not significantly impact blood sugar levels. Part of what makes avocados a good choice for people with diabetes is that, although they are low in carbs, they are high in fiber. Many other high-fiber foods may still spike blood sugar levels. One half of a small avocado, which is the standard amount people eat, contains about 5.9 grams of carbohydrate and 4.6 grams of fiber. According to the National Academies , the minimum recommended daily fiber intake for adults is: A 2012 review published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine looked at the results of 15 studies involving fiber supplements (around 40 grams of fiber) for people with type 2 diabetes. They found that fiber supplements for type 2 diabetes can reduce fasting blood sugar levels and A1c levels . You dont need to take supplements to achieve these results. Instead, try eating a high-fiber diet. You can easily increase your fiber intake by eating more low-carb fruits, vegetables and plants, like avocados, leafy greens, berries, chia seeds, and nuts. H Continue reading >>

How Much Avocado Can A Diabetic Eat?

How Much Avocado Can A Diabetic Eat?

If you have diabetes, you know that food plays a big role in controlling your blood sugar levels. Carbohydrate--containing foods, which include sugar, sweets, sugary drinks, grains, starchy vegetables, fruits and some dairy, are converted to sugar during the digestion process and therefore contribute to raising your blood sugar levels after eating. A high--carb intake will result in high blood sugar levels. Video of the Day The nutrition facts for avocado depend on its size. For example, a whole California avocado provides about 227 calories, 11.8 grams of carbohydrates and 9.2 grams of fiber, while a Florida avocado is larger and contains 365 calories, 23.8 grams of carbohydrates and 17.0 grams of fiber. With diabetes, carbohydrates elevate your blood sugar levels, but only the starch and sugar part of the total carbohydrates, not the fiber. Available Carbohydrate and Diabetes To better estimate the effect of avocado on your blood sugar levels, you can calculate their available carbohydrate content by subtracting fiber from the total carbs. In the case of a California avocado, you get 2.6 grams of available carbohydrates, while a Florida avocado contains 6.8 grams of available carbohydates because of its larger size. Usually, diabetics are recommended to limit their carb intake to 45 grams to 60 grams per meal. Avocado contains very small amounts of available carbohydrates and are not problematic for diabetes control, even if you eat a whole, large avocado. Although avocado itself is not likely to hinder your glycemic control, it is often served with high-carb foods such as tortillas, nacho chips and taco shells. If your meal includes foods that have a high carbohydrate content, your blood sugar is likely to rise, so count your carbs to ensure you do not eat more carbo Continue reading >>

Cooking Oils

Cooking Oils

Fat plays many important roles in a healthful diet. It provides energy and essential fatty acids, which are necessary for good health. It helps to maintain healthy skin and to regulate cholesterol metabolism, and it contributes to substances in the body called prostaglandins, which regulate other body processes. Dietary fat aids in the absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, and it helps to satisfy the appetite by making you feel full after eating. Despite all the important functions of fat, there is clear evidence that a diet that is too high in fat can contribute to many health problems, including some types of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. High intakes of saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol increase the risk of unhealthy blood fat levels. In general, a healthy amount of fat in the diet ranges between 20% and 35% of total calories. Consuming more than 35% of total calories as fat can lead to a high intake of saturated fat and can also make it difficult to keep calorie intake at a desirable level. Types of dietary fat Being selective about the types of fat you eat is important for your heart health. Saturated fat and trans fat raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad”) cholesterol levels in the blood, which raises the risk of developing heart disease. Trans fat additionally decreases high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good”) cholesterol levels. The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) latest nutrition recommendations advise getting less than 7% of calories from saturated fat and minimizing intake of trans fat. For a person who consumes 1500 calories per day, 7% of calories from saturated fat is less than 12 grams of saturated fat per day. (When converting grams of fat into calories, remember that each gram of fat conta Continue reading >>

Are Avocados Good For Diabetics?-essential Health Benefits Of Avocados

Are Avocados Good For Diabetics?-essential Health Benefits Of Avocados

Avocados and diabetes What is the connection between avocados and diabetes? Well, there’s a lot of connections but let’s start by asking are avocados good for diabetics? The answer is not only a profound yes, but a yes meaning that it is also very beneficial for anyone who eats them. What is avocado and where does it come from? It is a tree that originates in Mexico and Central America and derives from the flowering pant family known as Lauracea. The avocado fruit is the fatty fruit of the tree. It is rich in monosaturated fats and higher in fats than most other fruits compared. Avocados are also plentiful in vitamins C and E, antioxidants, and vitamin B with niacin and riboflavin. An avocado of medium size has about 16-18 grams of carbs. This is excellent because diabetics can only have their blood glucose raised by carbohydrates but only from the sugar and starch in the total amount of carbohydrates, not the fiber. Nutritional facts of avocados Avocados consist of 8% carbs (which is mostly fiber),2% protein, 15% fat, and 72% water. One half of this very beneficial fruit is 86 grams, containing approximately 109 calories. Fat- Most fruits do not contain an abundant amount of monounsaturated fatty acids but avocados do. What makes avocados unique is that they do contain fatty acid known as oleic acid. The reason for oleic acid being unique is that it is linked to having positive effects on cancer and decreasing inflammation. Carbohydrates- Again, half an avocado is 68 grams and only contains .5 grams of sugar in the forms of glucose, fructose, and galactose. Because of this low sugar content, they have a very low glycemic index number relating to the fact that they should not increase your blood glucose levels much at all. Minerals and vitamins in avocados Carotenoi Continue reading >>

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